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The Memphis appeal. (Memphis, Tenn.) 1886-1890, March 10, 1886, Image 1

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MEMPHIS . APPEAL
ESTABLISHED 1840.
MEMTIIIS, TENN., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 10, 1SSG.
VOL. XL VI NO.
59.
TILE
IEW ORLEAOTARDI GRAS
AH TBS EMPC&OR AIRE
LI US HAKI1PU HIS
Triumphant Entry loto Borne After
the Defeat of Zeiobia and Ilia
Conquest of Palm r.
T1MTEU8 ILLUSTRATES THE
PLANETS AXD THEIR PBCPLE.
The Balls at 5ihtatCarnWl Palace,
Washington Artillery Hall
and UeOpera-HiBje.
faraciAL To tri ArraiL.l
Sew OIWkanh, March 9. Glorious
Maitii Grae, "Shrove Tuesday," wound
up the Carnival to-ay, with all its
merriment and madness. Nowhere.
Have in a Southern clime like this or
Italy,' could thousands of people he
found to tlu-ow aside decorum and dig-
oitv, as was done to-day, put on masks
jwd dominoes and with tnein all the
antics of youth, and dunce and rnper
like-so many madmen. There is some
thing in the air that brings out this
epiru, for to-day the most staid and
dilate of Western merchants and
hankers threw themselves into the
festivities of the carnival, and frisked
around as merrily as the street gamins.
1 o day as yesterday, but in lur great
er numbers, the crowd poured forth
.from all the side streets into cannl.and
before 11 o clock that great thorough
fure, its galleries, its banquettes and
even the roadway was crowded with a
muss of people.
The morning, as hitherto, was tie
voted alnumt wholly to the promise
-cuousand unattached maskers. Tveu
tv years age Mardi Gras was cele
brated altogether in this way and
. maskers of this kind were far more
numerous t han they are to day, and
the carnival far more like that of
Kome or Veniee, with more license
and adventure. Themaskers inarched
or drove around town in parties of ten
or twenty, with bags of nnnr and wn-
Jetti at their sides, wherewith they
pelted every one they met. The city
was shoe eu one day by several mur
ders committed by masked men, and
an effort was made to regulate and or
ganize the celebration. The result
was the masked procession which now
constitutes one of the features of the
carnival, and which are nowhere else
to be seen in all their grandeur and
magnificence. There is somewhat
of a disposition to return to
those old aays where there was less
grandeur ana display, but more gen
uine carnival fan, aria this was con
spicuously shown to-day by the pres
ence of unusual numbers of unat
tached maskers, who kept the crowd
laughing all the morning with their
antics, and gambols, jokes and funny
sayings. Processions of Indians, frogs,
troubadours, monkeys and minstrels
were passing continually up and down
Canal street, whilo feminine maskers,
ia airy costumes, and some even in
masculine attire, but feebly disguised,
ttoemed to draw forth the admiration,
especially of Uie-mmer manors.
The crowd good-naturedly jostled
each other and laughed at everything
that struck its fancy. Every now and
then two opposing crowds would meet
each other at a corner, creating a sort
of dead-lock where one could not
move forward or backward, and giving
a splendid opportunity for those light
fingered gentry, the pickpockets, who
fcave never plied their trade more suc
cessfully than this carnival.
From daylight until after noon, al
though the weather during the morn
ina was cloudy and threatening rain.
.thereby delaying the carnival proces
sion, the fnu kept up, the scene ever
changing and shifting, but always
bright and beautiful. The blowing of
innumerable horns and trumpets an
nounced the coming of Rex, the mask
ers fell into the various divisions to
which they were assigned, and, with a
glare of light reflected lrom the gilded
i 1 tii.. i - i .
cnariou) unu uie armor oi uio Kiiignis,
the procession filed into Canal street.
The bocuf gras, or fatted ox, as usual,
led the procession an animal of pure
white, free from any flecks or blem
ishes, prepared for the sacrifice, with
- gilded hoofs and horns, and with its
neck garlanded by flowers and rib
bons. A nnmber of butchers stood
around, armed with axes and dressed
n the costumes of the mediieval ages.
REX AS AUKKMU8 ENTERING ROME.
The tantara of trumpets announced
the approach of Rex. Squads of
knights in lioman armor rode before
dhe procession and announced that
the King of the Carnival would appear
this year as Anrelius, Kmperor of
Kome, returning in triumph to the
"Eternal City" after the cdnquest of
Palmyra and his capture of the famous
Zenobia, Empress of the East. The
procession depicted a Roman triumph
in i all its details, just as it marched
through the streets of Rome some six
teen' centuries ago, with its thousands
of . captives, its spoils treasures and
mysteries.
The first five vans consisted entirely
of treasures brought from the East and
captured by the Roman army. One of
-'them was loaded with golden statues
-of oriental fashion, figures of Chaldean
. .human faced lions, shields, vases, hel
mets of the most precious metals, piled
ttdl-mell npon each other in the form
ti a.pyraniid, the whole surmounted
by a,colo8sal gold statue of the Phoe
nician god, Baal. Another chariot
brought the treasures torn from Judea,
vises and candlesticks of gold, rich
velvets and other woven goods. Bare
armed negro sUves, clad ia the prince
lieat raiment, carried immense-salver
filial with plates of gold and , r iles of
precious stonea. Files of turbaned
slave bore Tasea on their heads con
taming the richtw found in the treas
ury of Palmyra. Arabs followed lead
ing camels, also .similarly laden with
the trophies of the conauest of fivria.
All alongthis line,marchingon either
niue oi uie treasure .cnanots, were tno
Roman eenlurions, and the standard
bearerp, the ktter holding aloft the
Roman eagles.
Another division consisted oi the
.ambassadors come from various orien
tal countries, from China, India and
cythia, seeking the alliance of the
victorious Anrelius and .offering him
presents to propitiate ins food will.
Then followed the troops of slaves,
captered in this war, beautiful oda
lisques and slave girls, scantily but
nob'y elad, and fanned by immense
fans of ostrich feathers operated by
negTO attendants. Behind these came
the great Zenobia, fam?d cquaJly for
her beauty and her wisdom.her hands
bound together by chains of gold.
The high cliariot she occupied was
drawn by four white horses, richly
caparisoned. A company of soldiers
acted as a body guard and escort and
surrounded the chariot.
Amid Ute noise oi a hundred trum
pets, with bis warrions and his soldiers
around him, c-ame I5ie mighty Aure
lius, whose name w borne to-day by
the Orleans of ths new and old world.
The car that earned him was by long
odd' i tie lagliesv in me procession,
Intricate pillars and columns of Woo
and gold, Htukted with precious gems,
intertwined inemseives, rising one
upon another. Perched on the very
summit of this, fifty feet in the air,
was Aurelius, wearing the purple
toga of a Roman Emperor and sur
rounded bv the Konian eaulea.
Proteus rode behind him in military
attire in a chariot which was an exact
reproduction of tho war chariot of the
Romans its sides two sphinxes, its
front a blazing sun.
The next float showed a group of
Roman ladies watching Aurehus's tri
umph. At each comer ol the Roman
Atrium, represented here, were mar
ble statues holding in their bands
wreaths for the victorious Aurelius.
On a dais in the center of the room,
support-d by four immense golden
lions, were the ladies. Garlands of
flowers stretched through the room.
where the floor was covered with boil
quets. The Genius of Peace rested in chari
ot of shells supported ly the wings of
a dove and surrounded by birds of
paramse ana outers oi Deautilul hue
and plumage, attached to the chariot
by strings of roses.
Other historical scenes followed
marking important epochs in the his
tory of the world. The persecution of
the Christians in the Colosseum at
Kome, the the tableau depicting two
young Christian girls arrayed in white
arid pursued by Uons,oneof them felled
to the ground by tho beast and is in
the very act of being-devoured by it;
Constantino professing the Christian
faith the sceno a church of ancient
Byzantine architecture, its cupola of
gold, suppo ted by pi larsof porphyry;
Anna ui me gales oi itavenna demand
ing the ransom of the town. His llun-
nish warriors surround him, clad in
skins. Upon a carpet placed at the
feet of "the scourge of God" the Ro
mans are piling gold ornaments, vases
and other riches as tho ransom of the
city; Pepin crowned King of France;
Abdurrahman in his Moorish palace ;
Peter the Hermit preaching the cru
sades Peter, with cross in hand, ad
dressing from a mon:istery an audi
ence of knights -in full armor, who,
with their swords lifted high in the
air, promise to redeem the Holy Land
from the infidel.
Baibarossa was seen kneeling at the
foot of the Pope, seeking his forgive
ness and restoration.
Timour, the Tartar, was represented
amusing himself with the imprisoned
Bajazet, confined in a cage before
him. The scene showed a tent spread
on a bleak and desolate moor. Around
the tent were scattered innumerable
skulls, trophies of his victories, while
from its front dangled bloody scalps
and horse-tails.
Columbus at the Court of Ferdinand
and Is:ilella, after his return from
America.
And finally Luther at the :Piet of
AVorms, defending himself .before tho
bishops, prelates, princes and the other
German potentates w hich .composed
that body. t
All the tableaux were excellent
Among the more striking were ' the
massacre of Christians on the Colos
seum, Constantino professing tho
Christian 'faith, the palace of Ab
durrahman and Luther at the Diet of
Worms.
The Order of the Jfoon and the
comic societies made up the remain
der of the procession, With ludicrous
burlesques of popular songs and inci
dents. At 6 o clock Rex had traversed
the principal streets of the city and
reached Canal again, where his forces
were marshaled and dismissed.
AT Mcmr.
f or several Hours Uinal street was
quite deserted ; but at 7 o'clock the
crowd bejan to assemble there again
and it was then more crowded and
more brilliant than at any time during
the carnival. All the stores und clubs
were most brilliantly illuminated, an
that thoroughfare was made as bnirli
as day by the glare of electric and cat
cm in lights.
Th crowd waited an hour or more
for the coming of the night procession
for rrotous still preserves mystery
and secrecy, and no one knows whence
or where he springs. Ear out Cana
street a bright light is seen illuminat
ing the iieavens. it grew brighter and
stronger every minute, and tho crew
of Protons, whose members constitute
one of the leading social organizations
oi uie t'lty, came nuo signi.
I'rot'UB, the uod of Change an
Transformation, a sea god, led the par
ade. He was seated on a throne of
coral and crowned with the same sea
product. His robe also spoke of the
sea, being of silvered hue without and
sea green within.
PROTEUS MilSHALKD BIS ARMY IS
IlOHTEKN DIVISIONS,
illustrative of his suppose trip through
the heavens to each of the planets
and other celestial bodies to discover
their nature and bywhat sort of poo-
pie they are inhabited. The subject
was one well suited to a display of
this kind. Jt gave rein to taney, at
the same time that It was not entirely
fancy. The subject had been carefully
studied from an astronomical point of
view, and the latest works on astrou
omy consulted, the result being some
wonderful yet faithful juctures of life
in the other planets.
The first tableau was ithe Sun, the
source of all heat and life. The atmos
phere was of liquid goW ; its surface
showed immense iiames leaping high
in the air, but, despite it uninviting
nature, it was not entirely. uninliamt-
ed, for, in the very midst of these
flames, engaged in their elephantine
sports, were innumerable i beasts of
gi tran tie size, in shape like earthly
salamanders.
The planet Mercury was second,
The tableau showed a land at dense
vegetation, the plants and trees of
curious mushroom growth. The heat
of this planet is intense, and as a con
sequence, the inhabitants are black,
of a low order of civilization, and with
out permanent habitations. J lie plwiet
was shown, in all respects, to be in
tnuch the same condition as our
world millions of years ago, and its
future was a reproduction of the earta
in the eocene ago.
lbe inhabitants of Venus were rep
resented as of setni-vegetuble growth,
springing from exquisitely shaped
shells, hanging from trees, which
shells opened at the dawn of day, dis
playing within their clasp a pair of
perfect beings.
1 he next float was a chef-d'oeuvre
and would have delighted the most
learned astronomer, it was such a
splendid piece of luna scenery, just as
the telescope shows us the moon to
be, with its barren, dead volcanoes, its
high, sharp cliffs, its general desola
tion and deserted BDDearance. Ihe
inhabitants represented the last effort j
of a planet at producing life snowy
white of hue, but without intelligence
and almost lifeless.
The vegetation of Mars was of the
most brilliant character; tho flowers
and plants painted by nature in ex
quisite nd fascinating hues. 1 he in
habitant were represented twinged
and far superior to those of this earth,
flitting from point to point or sailing
upon the silver water of the planets in
boats composed wholly of flowers.
Juno was all metallic, a planet of
almost solid metal. Plants and flowers
bloomed on it, but even they were
metallic in their character, with me
tallic luster, while the inhabitants
were bronw seemingly generated by
the action of Hie twin upon the metal.
Vesta was given up entirely to
maids, a sort of Amazonian kingdom,
tho maids growing on the leaves of
immense plants.
Harmonia was music everywhere.
The very land was laden with it; the
vegetation nothing more nor less than
a growth of harps, lutes and musical
instruments.
In Flora, on the other hand, the in
habitants were represented as living
on flowers; in fact, flower beings
themselves, produced by them and a
ait of them.
In his tour of the heavens, Proteus
was next shown on a visit to a comet,
which he explored to discover its hab
itability. He found people even there,
but such strange people, composed ap-
Iiarently simply of flashes of lightning
ound together by some magnetic in
fluence electric bodies, without pow
ers of speech.
The Asteroid Iris showed a race of
butterfly beings anil even the vegeta
tion w as of butterfly growth.
In Ceres the fruits were animated
with life. The orange, pear and straw
berry were himti promenading around
arm-in-arm. J he orange legless and
rolling his round, unwieldly boilv
along. Avery queer figure was the
banana with his long, thin legs.
The Asteroid Aniphetryto was cov
ered with a marvelous and beautiful
growth of shells, rivaled by tt.e rain
bow lu their hue, tho nature living
within these shells like so many
hermit crabs.
The greatest of all tho planet, Ju
piter, was enveloped in dense and
neavy clouds through which tho
planets four moons were shining.
Jupiter was represented, as the astron
omers declare it to be, in a semi-
gaseous condition, its inhabitants, bat'
like people, who come out of their
eaves only night, remaining hidden
during the day.
Saturn s rings were shown to bo a
host of small meteoric bodies circulat
ing around the body of the planet and
adding to the light given by its eight
moons, the vegetation was of the
cactus order, and the inhabitants not
much unlike the cactus, sometimes
walking erect, again crawling like
beasts upon the ground.
LHe in the next planet, Uranus, wa?
also of a low order, the inhabitants
being beasts rather than men, con
stantly waging war on each other.
Neptune, the most distant planet,
was a broad ocean, bordored by huge
nrotuherant racks, unon which rested
the inhabitants, half boosts, half men
i. .... . . . t ...
rew if anv tableaux in New Orleans
have been better or more tasty than
the Proteus parade to-day in the
bight of their ..brilliant ornamenta
tion, rich colors and fantastic scenes.
The procession reached the 1-rench
Opera-llouse about 10 o'clock, where,
in the presence of an audience of 8000
persons, a tableau was given, repre
senting the universe. After that the
guests defended to the floor of the
theater, which had been boarded over
and converted into a ball-room for the
occasion, and where dancing was kept
up an nignt.
The whole city to-night is given up
to balls. There are more than twenty
in operation, and their number is lim
ited only by tho availablo ball-rooms
in the city. The two great ones are
those of Rex at Carnival Palace or
Washington Artillery Hall, with from
15,000 to 18,000 persons present. This
large building, some 300 feet in length,
was handsomely decorated. It had
been laid off into threo large rooms,
up and down stairs, two of which
were given up to dancing and the
other reserved as tho throne-room for
the King of the Carnival. Here sat
the King and Queen in state, sur
rounded by their guards ami maids of
honor. The Queen was Miss Iena
Jackson of this city; the maids of
honor, Misses Sneed of Memphis,
Broadwood, liraughn, Poche, Lom
bard, Ogden and Marks. Tho party
wore the royal colors, two being at
tired in robes of gold, two in
purple, two in green anil two
in white. After the reception, in
which thousands of persons partici-
Sated, the royal party visited the
ancing hall and opened.tho ball with
a quadrille. Dancing Uk'H became
general.
CHATTAJiOOUi, TLJiM.
A Pitched Battle In the Dark With
Burglar.
ISHCIAL TO THS AFFIAL.I
Cuattanoooa, Tenn., March 0. A
very sensational and highly exciting
battle in the dark occurred late last
night at Dayton, Tenn., forty miles
above here. It was learned that a
gang of professional burglars had ar
ranged a plan to rob a leading jewelry
house and the Cincinnati Southern
depot and postoflice. The officers
were lying in wait, and when the
burglars got within the building they
were ordered to surrender. They
showed fight and a regular battle en
suet'. Aboutforty shots wereexchanged
and the building completely riddled,
but no aim could be taken in the
pitclir darkness. Finally the thieves
retrea'x'd, ran to the river and were
soon lest. Tlie country is up in arms
and on the sear- n.
llorrthlo Doable Harder.
PlTTSR'jRO, Pa March 9. A horri
ble, double murder and a robbery were
committed yesterday at the farm
house of John T. Everhart, near Lick-
ingvillc, in the northern part of Clarion
county. A boy in ihe family return
ing from school foand Mrs. Everhart
lying on the floor with her throat fut
from ear to ear, and her mother, Mrs.
Gillfillen, in the spring-house, also
with her throat c"t and life extinct.
The house had been can sacked and
$300 taken.
' The Flerlda :baalaoe,a.
Iirscui to THt trriAL.I
Db FnNiAK Sihiiwis, Fla., March 0.
The Florida Chautauqua Assembly
will remain in se sioii until the 1st of
April. To-dai' measures were adopted
to render popular the k-rture platform
in the South and to enable the masses
to have lectures on popular subjects.
Have thoroughly tried Tonealine.
and it does all that is claimed for it.
P. M. BKAUAa, U.D., KU, Tti.
S0LTHER IMSTRIES.
THE
SUBJECT
LEU'S
OF ( 01 SWITZ.
REPORT.
Experts Eniplo)cd to Furnish Data
On. Mhreler'a Reception
Southern Patent.
tartcuiTOTac irnu I
Washington, March t'. The Com
mittee on Ways and Means decided to
report adversely the bill of Mr. Gates
to prohibit aliens from acquiring title
to or owning a greater yiterest .in huuls
than a leasehold for Jive years any
w here within the United States
SENATOR JOSKS OK ARKANSAS
introduced yesterday a bill providing
for the management and control of the
Arkansas hot springs, which directs
the Secretary of tho Interior to pay the
value of the bath houses and fixtures
to their owners, and place them under
the control of the superintendent of
the reservation.
(OI.. kwitzLkh,
Chief of the Bureau of Statistics,
has formulated the plans of the
work for his report on the internal
commerce of tho I'nited States. The
subject of the present report will lie
the commercial, industrial, transporta
tion and other interests of the South
ern States, in laying out the work for
it, it has been foiiinrnecessary to em
ploy an expert in each of the States
named to furnish the required data.
The following gentlemen have been
appointed in Alabama, Mississippi,
lAjiiisiana and lennessee:
Alabama-Col. J. W. Duhose of
Birmingham, a journalist of ability
and at one time editorof the Southern
Mining and Maniifurturvifl Journal. 11
is a gentleman of lanre experience and
especially enlightened on matters per
taming to the commercial and indiis
trial interests of Alabama.
Mississippi William T. Wynn ol
Coll'eeville. Mr. Wynn has been
highly commended for this work, and
will doubtless see to It that the mi
portant interests of Mississippi will not
suiter by his appointment,
Louisiana Henry G. Hester, seci eta-
ry of the NewOrleans Cotton Exchange
Mr. Hester is a writer of aeknow!-
edged ability, and is, thoroughly fa
miliar with the cotton interests of the
South. In addition t his report on
the State, he wili prepare a monograph
on tho subject of cotton. His report
will bo of especial value in connec
tion with his work.
Tennessee Ira P.
ville, a contributor
American of that city
Jones of Nash-
to the .Weekly
Mr, Jones has
made a close study o
the industrial
movements of the Stat
. He is a gen
tleman of intelligence and a very clear
and accunitu writer.
GEN. WIIKRLEB'S BBCKPTIOR.
Representative and Mrs. Wheeler,
and the Misses Wheeler, threw open
their large house on Highland i'laee
last evening for the entertainment of
their friends, lhree thousand invi
tations had been issu 1, and all seem.
ingly had been accepted. In the early
part of the evening the crush was al
most impassable and a constant stream
of people moved from one house of
entertainment to the other all through
the evening. The first floor of the
house contains a broad hall and stair
case, with reception rooms and parlors
on cither side, and at the back is a
long picture gallery, or music room,
w here dancing was engaged in when
the crush of people melted away suffi
ciently. A sumptuous supcr of ter
rapin and oysters was served, and for
those who wanted it an excellent
quality of claret punch.
TIIK rol.LOWINO BILIl
of interest to the South, were intro
duced yesterday:
By Mr. l'eet: To pay George W.
Mitchell of Benton county, Arkansas,
i 3000 for property faken in the late
civil war.
By Mr. Glass: A bill for the relief
of Almus Gardner of Gardner count y,
Tennessee; also for the relief of J. A.
Wilson, j roy, Tenn.
By Mr. Neal: A bill for the relief of
El za K. Weir, of McMinn county,
Tennessee.
By Mr. J. M. Tavlor: For the relief
of the estate of B. B. Bunch; also for
the legal representative of H. Trova
chor, deceased, of Henry county, Ten
nessee; also for the relief of .Margaret
C. Gray, Henderson county, Tennes
see. I'ATKXTS ISSUKI).
James W. Cole, Nashville, oil-stone
holder; John H. l'arrish, Saunders-
ville, Tenn., feed cutter; J. W.Phelps,
Humboldt, machine for manufactur
ing barrels; Archie Thompson, Chat
tanooga, balanced slide valve ; William
B. Turuian, Waldrau, Ark., permuta
tion padlock; John A. I'cgg. Jones
town, Miss., sample box or package.
RKI-ltKKKNTATIVK MART N OF ALABAMA
yas summoned to Kentucky yester
day by a telegram
announcing the
death of his mother.
GEN. CHANT S Fl'NERAL EXI'KNSKS.
The Sen to Committee on Appro
priations will report an amemliiient to
the general deficiency bill, providing
iO.OOO for the payment of the funeral
expenses of the late Gen. Grant.
Dlncaulx the tarlir.
Washington, March 9.-Beforo the
I louse Committee on Wavsanil Means
to-day, Mr. E. A. Hitchcock of St.
Iiiis, on behalf of the Crystal Plate
Gloss Company, submitted an argu
ment in opposition to that portion of
the Morrison bill which proposes a
reduction of the tariff duty on plate
glass. The manufacturers of plate
glass, he said, did not ask tor any in
crease of duty, but maintained ti at a
reduction of the import duty which
had so long existed would bean injury
alike to the government of the United
States, to the American industry and
all American consumers, and a
benefit to foreign manufacturers
alone. In case of Uie reduction
a branch of American industry, al
ready established, with satisfactory
prostata of success, would be de
stroyed; and such reduction would
amount to nothing short of bad faith
with its own citixens. The exisW
enceif American factories bad dur
ing tko past eight years reduced the
fost of plate glass from $1 00 a foot to
5 cents. J. R. Donnelly of New York,
representing New York firms en
gaged in beveling plate glass, aked
that aspecilie rateof duty.varyingfrom
1 j to 3 cents, according to the size of
the glass, be imposed upon each run
ning inch of beveling.
Salvation On, the greatest cure on
earth for pain, has made a most bril
liant debut. All druggists and dealers
in medicine sell it at 2o cents a bottle.
Ladles' Phaetons,
Doctors' Phaeton?,
Barouches,
Top Bungles,
Open Buggies,
Speeding Buggies,
Spring Wagons,
Farm Wagons,
Road Carts, Etc., Etc., Etc.
nelDgdeHlroiiN of ('lofting Oat thU branch of onr lnlnciK, confuting of Vehicles fall
tyles himI qiinlltlcM, we will oiler ihrm for the ftext wo 1)h al l'lltsi COST, CoMvaifr
ltoad Carta earti. Call early aud make your hcIccIIoii.
WOODRUFF-OLIVER CARRIAGE AND HARDWARE COMPANY.
. BFTHrLI. 4k CI.SPP, AMltBM.
TO -BAT
ioo
JACKETS AM) COATS,
Intendod for Oar Opening, bat
a day too late, will be shown
and sold. Suitable, Seasonable,
and at Great Bargains.
ALSO,
AN INVOICE
OP-
PARIS HATS
Jutd Recelred and Will Be Shown
To-l)aj.
EXCLUSIVE DESIUSS
IN WOOLEN AND SILK
SPRING
Dross Materials
. ABBIVISG DAILY.
Election for Magistrate
01 tb Fifth DUtrlot Uki plioe
To-Day (WeineMlaj) March 10lb.
H. BTJTTENBERQ
IS A CANPIDATK.
VOTE FOIt HIM!
Pii-nt. Parotid. Third and Kiih'h Wards
nd Bit Spring, cmftlin'e th f Inn di.lrint.
Sheriff's Sale.
BY content of tba nartic., I will, on
WXIamflMT. Marrti lOtk, at 10
o'clock a.m., at No. 41rS Mn Mroet, tell
tolheblih.it bidder, for oub, the entire
tuck of John Delpb A C., eoniiitinn ef
Matlreie, Fixture., eto Mere V, ltMlt.
n v. iinaun, on.nn.
BT. B. Mi.i.t. . H.
Notice to Brick makers.
SIALKD prnpnrali will be recelred at
Bolivar, ilardenmn eoaaty, Te o., un
til the 22(1 of MAKa.11, 1800, at Uo'cUek in.,
for the making of
9,000,000 I 8,000 OOO HAND-MADE
Hkli la,
to be nied In the ereeti- n of the Wait Ten
neuee 11- ipiUI for Inaane. All brick are to
he made and burn d on ho'pital r nndt
ne -r UollTar. D amilrmc lo Aa-tin Miller,
bolivar, lenn., bidd. rl o n procure aiieaifl
oatiom and all nee airv Inf rmu'lnn.
AU TIN MILLKIl,
Chairman of Butldiner ouiiuil-oe,
Bolivar, Tenn.
J. L. FROST,
Cor. Second and Monroe HU.,
CF-A-IIjODFwIi
Would call attention of hli frlenda
and patrona to hi
NEW SIMU.NO NrOCK,
Comprint the ohHcit and lateat de
atcna of Kureicn (o di in the market.
Having taken n-ecl.l care in their .elec
tion, I am pleaeed toaar to my auatameri
and puilio who fvor me with a eall, to
abow them inn o. goode onlrfounj in
leading houaea.
r Holders of MUcUlppI Mo. 1
Leyee Bondi, Act 1871, who desire
to collect game, will do well to ad
dreu at once,
W. If. H.URKF. Tirkaon.MhMi.
EGGS FOR, HATCUiNU.
FR"M ehoioe ard. of While Leehorn,
Houaana end Ht f a . a. ti per 13. Mj
atock are Iratlaaa, and guaranteed to be aa
rei reaented. I .kip in I ht baakata and in
jure aafe arrival.
WM. WI8B, Forreiit City, Ark.
DfL It. E. "TULLINGTON,
MTKOMW lE.VriT,
ft!7 Main Mrpl, Mrmiihln, 1'onn.
NOTICE.
WM. If. BIBia ia not ia onr emplov,
and if not aath.rit.d to collect any
money on ear aecoant.
HEMI
III If! ill till;!
sun
GOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 1878,
BAKER'S
El
Wurmiitttl ultMolutiy pure
CooiM.mit.i til. h thorxron of
Oil bun Im-oti Tvinov.il. It luif thrtt
ti.iustht .fmif tiiCH'o:im1H
Willi Hluri'h, Arrownu lorBiiur,
mid h lhonluri- fur tnuriM-eonoin-If
al, ttiHg h ! than one cft a
tup. It In ilvlliili'iin, iiimrlnMiu',
ritivutNt'iiliiKa runtly dlffcttUMt,
iiml Difuikmlfty tulupli'd for ln'l
IUm am wt'll UN fur nrti Nt hoult li,
Sold by ilroocrt Ttrywhrir.
BAKERft CO., narcbester, Mass.
DK. K L LASIii;
I'iiTelclnit, Snrgron and Arenticlirr,
RKSIOKVPR AND OFFIOR,
313 aiiiii rr- I. er I nloia.
Trl. . ... - Vo KM.
C. B. WITE3MAN.
H'CEDEE &
F
Us
Sfl
i turn
T
369 MAIN ST!, MEMPHIS. TENN.
TRY THEM ! THY
n
Try Zcllner'a English Wnlkingfast Shoes
ZRLl.NRR'R S nenta Dhoma, In all alylea, are the beat in the city.
ZKbLNliK'8 Urol.1 !., in all ahap.a and atylea, are tbenb
bie tend beittti the United titatea.
CQIWKT S1I0LS For WEAK ANKLIVSolo Agents
erSend yoarorderi or eome and exam'ne their grand axortaent of FINK B0QI8., .
tiUOKi AN L hLIPPKKlj.-M
ssziZjXaKrxm c oo aoo zux.A.xrc' mxt.ia9.
aarfllndtrated Catnlognea Pont Free on ApMrtlon.-
101
WHOLESALE
Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery,
AND
GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING GOODS,
Nos. 326 and 328 Main St.. Memphis, Tenn.
WE ARK IN DAILY RBORIPT tvb li'lIRAULR UPBIMH AMD MCBMCa
UiKIIIM, which we offor to the Trade ui.on the uinut favorable terma. Our prioee
will com i.re favorably with thoae of any market In the 1 nited btatea. We are Agenta for
TeaiiPHHre MaunructnrlDg Co.'n 1'laltU, DrDlM, Slioctlng, Hhlrtlnf, Etc.
X.Tl tVTTVTTVr O-yVXjTI.
mmmmmmmmm mmmmm - - - . 1 . I
Boots and Shoes!
ADLER DR0. & CO., 261 LMIN ST
V.LDOUGLAS'
&3.00.J
punr
t !7
4; & BEST TAN
0K0. W. TOMLIN.
TOMLIN & BBNJES,
MANt'FACIURERS OF
Fine Carriages, Buggies, Extension Top & Lakes' Phaetons,
KOAI) WAdlUNS AM) Sl'KKDINM UIMJIES.
WE HAVE TUI3 DAY FORMFD A COHARTNKRSHIP AND PUR(7HA?ED TDK
Manuia tur ng Dopartaient ot the VVoodrnff-Ollver tierriarn and H.rd.re Ho., and
leaaed the building in rear of their repofitorv, 174 Main atree' , where we ahall rootinue the
baaiaena. and devote our entire time an 1 attention to aervlng nur cujt"nir". We hU
mke Henairlng a peo alt and guarantee firat-rlaia work in all cao. Our Mr. TOMLIN
eaa had charge of tnia Factory for yeara, and ia too well known to require lel'erencej.
Having eold our Manufacturing Department to Meaara. TOMLIN k DEKJES. we ;h.r
fally reoommend them to otir f len-l. and rnatnmr..
WAIIIIHI I'l'-OMVIH '4llltltJK HtHltWHK 0.
And Commission Merchants
Nos. 34 and 3G fflnrilNon Ntreet, Hliuiyl.ltT
P. KVADDU. W.F.DUSATAT. alAKTIB EIU1, J. E. S ASK.
P.E5CoOADDBH & (Oo
GROCERS & COTTON FACTORS,
Wo. 308 Front street, Memphis Tenn.
WI have thia day admitted JOHN K. MA-K aa a met ber of enr tr-. to date front
M reh 1, im. P. McCADDKN A CO.
CAKD. Our MR. MA8K Will Wa hjj apeolal attention o a'l fnttnn fow.l n-A t ..;
OUT
f-i A If
Money to Loan
On lnirored plantation in
MInIn autl ArkanMM.
Iiihlallinont plan -3, 3 or lO
yeiirx. Aiiiui.l lulerenl, not
In nJvaiicc. No ooniiiiiaHiooii.
1ooUoii lilpiuonlH. Cheap.
vhI loan ollerrtl.
Francis Smith Caldwell & Co.
26 Second St., Moniphi.
Wf Inivo no agent .
PIANOS and ORGANS
lalrrrt from fwrlory ( Prarchata
frn, anviuc 85 prr rent. W rile
Monle rirltcrm & Co.. Mffmpht
EDMUND MctiRine;.
W1TESM&N,
5
THEM! TRY THEM!
7.KU.N KR'.i Hoy.1 Nhora are the beat that aro made.
7-KI.bN EHM I'hllalavn'a Mlaovia will aare you money.
HKI.I.NHl'H l.nfllna' Mioeia ateid llliprra are the hand
omoKt, aliapelleit and moat atylleh, and are cheaper than any
ninera oi eiiuai graue
ZEI.LNER'B an l.adleV Kill Hattaaa Shoeai.
with ailk wonted butt n holea, are the cteateal bar
gaina you hava aver aeea.
&
Latest Novelties In Footwear
FOR EPRIN0 AWD SHMMSR.
1LF.UAKT RITLftat
DPERIOK WOBKW AalKUir
LOWEST PBIt'Mt
AQBNT3 FOR TUB FAMOUS
W. L. Douglas ?J.(M Cnll Shoe-i
In Button, Lane andCoogreaa.
ar Illnatrated Catalogue and Prii-LUt
Mtnt.ii Kre. on aimli''ion "ei
WM. BSNJIia.
Mm

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