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The Memphis appeal. (Memphis, Tenn.) 1886-1890, March 20, 1886, Image 3

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MEMriHSrPAILY APPEAL SATUUDAY, MARCH 20, 1886.
HOTLG FOR ALDER ,10
IMPLICATED IX THE BROADWAY
RAILROAD FRANCHISE.
Continuation of the IaTeslifi'Jnn bj
the Senate Committee Jrehio
ia the Court-Room.
New York, March 19. Toliee In
Kjtector Bj rnos was avert -at hi, ufln-e
this morning preparing to po out,
when a reporter asked Urn if lie was
going to drag his net far more uliler
niwn to-lay. lie smiled at the ques
tion, and replied : "That is a matter
that I would rather rot talk about. I
am in hope that the evidence is suffi
cient to wan-rant the arrest of some of
the guilty -one. That is for the Via-
tnct Attorney to decide, lie is g-'ing
ahead car.tiously to get evidence that
will stand in court. To me it looks en
if he would come pretty near get-
tins it."
Is it true tliat all the aldermen of
1SH4 are involved?"
"Nearly all. There are two" the
inspector spoke warmly and with
arnetst emphasis "of whom I can say
here now that they are not tarred
with thatsti 'k Aldermen Grant and
O'Connor, a Dumocrat and the Other
a Republican. Of them, it snn t e
positively and absolutely stated at
this stago of the inquiry that they
were not bribed ; as to the renthe
inspector panscd.
' As to the rest?" queried the re
porter.
"Well, as to them you will know
shortly who were bought an 1 who
were not, or, perhaps, I might better
say, of whom it can be proved that.
tliey were bought. Ix't it refit till
then."
Allusion was made to the trilvcrwiiro
ecrrane of Jaehne, who, in the role of a
fence, dragged Inspector Itvrnes into
unpleasant notoriety.
'Everything in its turn," said the
inspector, calmly. "Ik'fore we get
throngh with this I will come pretty
near showing up some things in con
nection with that matter that are not
now as plain to the public as they
might be. That attack on me, I be
lieve, was made bv parties who were
cognizant of what I was doing with
Jaehne to throw discredit on me, or
turn oil the wrath to come. It did
not work and it won't now. When I
am through with the more important
work on hand, there will le time to
show up that little affair -in its bear
ings on me.
Speculation was rife at police head
quarters as 1 1 the identity ot the law
yer employed according to Jaehne. bv
his fellow aldermen, to cover up their
tracks by overhauling their private
books and papers and fixing them up
to bear the scrutinizing gaze of the
Senate committee. JriKixjetor Byrnes
would not tell who lie was, but said
significantly that his turn would come
m its season.
Paid a long-headed politician who
haunts the corridors at police head
quarters, "There is another aspect to
this thing you haven't thought of. If
it turns outto involve the rpeal of the
Broadway franchise by the Legislature
.an enormous array of inmience, polit
ical and otherwise, of power and
wealth will be put lwdiind Jaehne to
protect him from harm, and that same
power will be exerted to intimidate
Inspector Byrnes, on whose testimony
an this now rests.
"What will bo the result ns to
Byrnes?"
"1 believe it will accomplish noth
iug. His record is clear, and attempts
to intimidate him will, I think, be
productive of little prolit or credit to
i hose who try it. Beyond him well,
we shall see this is going to be a big
light.
Alderman Jaehne, with his counsel,
Richard S. Newcomh, walked down
Broadway to-day at 11 o'clock and
went into the postoflBce building to
attend the session of the Senate
Broadway Investigating Committee.
Mr. Jaehne looked very meek and
seemed anxious to avoid notice.
the roof of the cars to the wires, as
given t--day on a sM'ia train run. by
the Chicago, Milwaukee and Kt. Paul
road, from Chicago to Milwaukee and
return, was very succe scful. Sealed
messages written by and addressed to
the passengers were" sent by the Morse
system from Chicago to the point
where con -e users for the new sysU'm
were placed, and from Mere we're tel
egraphed to the operator (in the train
running thirty-five miles jier hour
and delivered to the writers. Practi
cal telegraphers and electricians wore
nnanimous in proneancing it "a won
derful thing," and something thought
capable of great development.
A. IRISH LANDLORD
AXD THE MISERY HE FATHERS
IX AX ERICA. i
Sow
HUMBOLDT, TtNX.
tirowtri or Strati lrrlo Preparing
I hnlp to Hew York ud
Oilier Northern ('Hint.
TUB INVESTIGATION ONTINl'ED.
The arrest of Alderman Jaehne
seemed to greatly increase the interest
tormerly manilcsted in the investiga
tion of the granting of the franchise of
the Broadway surface road. Chairman
Low of the committee was the first to
arrive, followed by ex-A'derman
rinck. A murmur spread through
the court-room as Alderman Jaehne
entered, accompanied by ex-Alderman
Cleary. His counsel, Mr. Newcombe.
followed, and Alderman -O'Neil, Re
J.flcey and ex-8heriff Bowe secured
seats within the inner railinir. Alder-
. man jaenne, tar troin trying to avoid
the coze of the socctators. alnnrf on bv
V .. . ..I'. IT '
the 1udg-8 bench, in full wow of all,
uAi ..! (.11 :.i i i i
cuavung ciierrjuny wtua am inenos.
Tor the. day he promised to be a big
ger mm) than ex-eenator -Conklinir.
. When Mr. ConMing entered he called
for a Iderman i'earson, but xhe latter
tailed to lywoiKi.
iMr Uonkhnir--A Iderman a-earsonis
called as a witnte.
-titill no answer. When Alderman
Peason did not appear. Mr. 'Conklinc
i. i - i t. - .....
imjiu a long consuiiauon with mis col
league, and again called "James Pear-
eon.'
Na answer.
Mr. Conkhns-Mr. Newmbe. Mr.
Pearson is one of the men fornwhom
you, we responsible. Will you note
that we want mm 7
Mr." -Newcombe I promise! -to pro
duce lur.i if you would give.Dxe notice.
l wiu.notity him
A. B. iKirkland, accountant olXhe credit, mortgaires, poverty and starva-
commiAtee, testified that in the Murray tion ? Or will it be "corn" with "mill-
Jlill llauk lie examuied the signature ions in it. As-we plant co shall we
ICOERISPUKDIKCI tIT TUB trFIClL.I
IhiBoi.tiT, Tevx., March 19. Law
court is in session here this week,
Judge Aden presiding by interchange
with Judge Carthel, who is holding
court at Union City. The docket is
un'isually large both on the civil and
criminal sides. The slander suit of -V.
J. Williams vs. M. T. Cox is now be
ing tried, all of the local bar and re
presentatives f the Trenton bar be
ing engaged. Judge Aden is making
a good impression on our jieople by
his readiness and ability in presiding.
A portion of the blink burned in
the late lire is being rebuilt. O. C.
Sharp will ocenpy one of the rooms,
and has gone to the market to lay in a
stock of dry goods.
The acreage of strawberries, now
one of the leading rrops of this vicin
ity, is large and promises a fine yield,
(irowers are making arrmigements to
ship direct to &e "Eastern markets,
New York, Philadelphia, Cleveland
and Pittsburg a the Chicago market
proved unsatisfactory last season. A
cooling house has been erected fur that
purpose at this point.
judge jonn romers ot lresden,
cnanceuor oi ims envision, was in
town to-day en route to Brownsville
Judge Vomers commands the fullest
confidence of the people of Humboldt,
By his long, faithful and able adminis
tration of theoiliceof chancellor he has
justlyearned the eminence of the first
chancellor in lennessee. He will be
re-elected.
political notes.
Desoto (Miss.) Tiuwt: Farmers have
sown more oats than common, prepar
ing ior me srarcny oi ieet in the sum
mer.
Little Bock Democrat .- Now ami
then the -opinion is expressed that
Araansas might have had a mm
larger slice ol the official pie it our
Senators end P-cprcscntatives had
fought for it.
Little Rxk Demrcrat: The creator
the spread of knowledge anion-? the
people the -better are they enabled to
take care of themselves. It is igno
rance that causes so much destitution
and distress among the poorer classes
in mo fjouui.
. r i ....
iXAsnvu.ij! jjimixrmnn: the crying
want now is for some patriotic crank
to inaugurate a fashionable craze that
wul create a heavy home demand for
a southern hardwood. There is a mon
ument waiting for the man who will
supply thn want.
Hoi.l.Y Kl'KINiiH (M'ss.l F)ntu,r.ml
The President has only had occasion
so far to veto one little bill, but he
will doubtless show Congress what be
can do in the veto line before the ses
sion closes. He is not afraid to sav
no," when he considers it npcptwnr'v
or advisable.
Fort Smith Tribune: Conflicts be
tween capital and labor are ermlnnllv
but surely assuming serious propor
tions, and there is either a defect in
our laws or an improper enforcement
of them; and unless the proer
remedies are goon applied the results
may prove most disastrous.
Fort Smith Times: The President's
message to the Senate has been the
topic of conversation of our men this
last week. It is the unanimous con
clusion that President Cleveland has
put on his "fighting garb." and
charged the Republicans' ring and
knocked Edmunds out in the first
roand.
Little Rock Democrat; There is one
most commendable thing in the pres-
eiu ranroau sirme. it isthe "boycott
winch the strikers have instituted
against intemperance. It has been fre
quently noted, during the present
strike, that the participants have keot
nwny iroin me saloons and lemained
quiet and ord rly.
V inwunRn HerM: Yes. farmers at.
the South will do well to see to it that
there is a short crop by one-half, at
least, next fall. ; It is their only salva
tion from the hands of the cotton fut
ure gamblers. As we have before said.
let the Southern planter disappoint
mem in ineir crop estimates, by pro-
oucinga snon, crop, uti the cotton
planters bull the market for once.
Tub Jackson MuoiMnpian savs of
the option law now in force there : It
amounts 'to a complete prohibitory
law of all towns of less tlian one or
two hundred voters. After a county
is carried -against prohibition it still
requires that an applicant for license
shall present a petition signed by
iwemy-uve. real estate owners in the
town, or supervisor's district'if he lie
not in an incorporated town.
Littlb Rock Democrat It will
soon be time for the planters to plant
their crops. What will they plant?
Will it be the same old eong, cotton.
Illinois, Kiihs and Nebraska the
Mates in Which He Has Katie fled
Ilia HaDger Tor Land.
TOC
FOR THE
'A3
of the .bark and found th name ef
lhomas Jhiguire, in which I1 ;the
checks .were payable to Mr. Uufl'y.
l here were discount amounting .to
JWHKl-on lofs in 102 D street, owned
by Mary Dn fly. Mr. Wm. D. Tall
man was . called and responded, but
before his examination Harry J.
Hume, a brother-in-law of Pearson,
was . sworn. Mr. Tallntan was then
examined, and said that his wife was
Aldermm Pearson' sister. Pearson
has three brothers-AIexiiider, Will
iam ami James. Tallmaa's business
in 1884 wwgente' furnishing goods at
the Southwest corner of KisMi avenue
and Twenty-fourth street. The firm's
name was Pearson & Tallniac. Pear
son was then an alderman.
The testimony .was continued at
conaderable length, but nothieg of a
startling nature developed.
Mr. I. B. NofcoN.cachier of First Na--tional
Bank of Sing Sing, N. Y., (dif
fered gneatly from eostiveness and dys
pepsia, due to overwork and want of
regular exercise. After wasting much
time and money in eeekjiig a remedy.
he began taking the old reliable Brand
Teth's Iills. two every night for three I
weeks. He now has a goxl appetite
and capital digestion, and will answer
any written or personal inquiry re
garding his remarkable cure,
FdlMtn'a Now Ti-lPicraph Sjmtrm.
Milwaukee, Wis., March 19 The
exhibition of the working of the Edi
son system of telegraphing to and
Ironi moving trains by induction from
reap. '1 here is tune yet, least two
or three weeks, fcr plantc-; to reflect
upon the rumouii policy which the
"all cotton" system brings d i its train.
Nashvilie Lwrkiernmn: Thework-
ingmen and the cmporationt; are the
actors while the general business of
the country is the ) rincipal sufferer.
S he workmgoien and the corporations
understand this, and hence it is that
lwth are anxious to isstifv tlM-mselves
bf fore the business pi blic. The only
solution' of the diflioulty is in the
hards of tlie workingiuen and t'ie cor
porations. The plain duty of both
ib.uj agree loan immenia:e aroittation.
The Women NiiAraiclai.
BosroN, Mass.. March 10. Tlx- Na
tional Womans' SuUrnge Atsor iation of
Massachusetts, in session here, adopted
resolutions to-day that as oak- the in
competent and dangerous are right
fully excluded from self representa
tion in a republic, tke Federal Gov
ernment should acknowledge ami pro
tect women in their inherent right
of self-reprew-nhition ; that whitf
heartily co-operating in efforts to se
cure municipal and Mate suffrage, it
recognizes that the enfranchisement
of the women will not be complete
without a national constitutional
amendment.
Iiesolutions of thanks to Senators
Hoar and lhiwes and several members
of the House; to their friends in the
New York and Rhode Island Legisla
tures and in the 1-abor and Prohibition
parties and to the press, were also
passed,
Chicago, III., March m. About six
wi-eks ago the Tribune published an
article on alien landlordism, showing
that an Irishman named William
Scully, now residing in London, Eng.,
is the proprietor of between 75.0OJ
and MO,U0t acres of the In-st farming
land in Illinois. The writer of the
article, on visiting the Scully estate,
claimed that the lands were tilled by
a wretched class of tenants, from
whom are expected enormous rentals.
Almost the entire proceeds from the
sale of their crops went to pay rent.
The article attracted much attention,
and numerous communications on the
subject have been reivived from var
ious parts of tho country. Among
others, a prominent citizen of Kansas
strongly deprecated alien landlordism,
and called attention to his discovery
that large tracts of land in his own
State were owned by Scully. Follow
ing a suggestion derived from this let
ter an investigation was instituted,
the result of w liich is published this
morning. The article says: "A tour
of Kansas and certain port ions of Ne
braska developed the rather startling
information that the title to more
than 1(10,000 acres of the choicest
prairie lands in the sister States of
Kansas and Nebraska ie vested in the
name of William Scully. All of these
vast tracts have been added to his
landed estates within tho last live
years, and although ouly a small por
tion is under cultivation the same sys
tem of farm renting that exists in Illi
nois is rapidly being introduced in
these States. Between t-ixty and
seventy families have bound "them
selves to Scully, and so long as they
remain on his land they cannot throw
off the yoke that holds them hi
slavery. Before obtaining a lease
they must agree to waive all rights of
exemption, and until their rent is paid
everything they possess, in.-luding
the growing crops, belongs to Scully.
Asa rule they are the poorest farm
ers in every respect in tho country,
and very few of them can obtain credit
from the merchants. The lease that
binds them to Scully is virtually a
chattel mortgage, and all other claims
against the tenants are shut out until
Scully gets his rent Each tenant is
obliged to sign a lease for a period of
life years. On unimproved lands tho
tena. t pays only the taxes the first
two years. The third year he pays
taxes and f 1 an acre, and tho fourth
and filth year ho pays taxes and tl 50
an acre. No provisi'onis made for the
renewal in the lease, and at its expira
tion the tenant must either move off
or submit to whatever rent the land
lord chooses to exact. In leasing an
unimproved farm, the tenant gets
nothing but the land. All improve
ments must be made at his own ex
pense, the landlord furnishing abso
lutely nothing. Consequently the
Scully farms do not present an at
tractive appearance. As a rule, the
tenants, having no aspiration beyond
the mere task of keeping body
and soul together, are shift
less and improvident, and make
little or no effort to im
prove their condition all ambition
seeming to be exhausted in providing
shanties for their families to live in
and shelter for their stock. Having
no money to start on, most of the ten
ants are compelled to hire out to their
more prosperous neighbors during the
liret two years of the strnggle.and thev
are satisfied if, during the first two
years, they succeed in breaking the
prairie lands and raising enough seed
corn to feed their stock. J lie three
remaining years they can ?aise from
thirty to fifty bushels of corn to the
acre, and, by close economy, quit the
place, when their lease expires, as well
off as when they began."
Much space is devoted to an expla
nation of tho careful and systematic
manner in which Scully secured the
lands through the guidance of his
agents, who are experienced and per
fectly familiar with the country, the
price, it is said, ranges from $5 to $8
I per acre, and it is claimed that much
of tlie land is now worth at. least 130
per acre.
MARK
CURC OF
NEURALGIA, RHEUMATISM am NERVOUS HEADACHE
TON) I A i a pnninrt of th h.njia or Friendly ! Am ouoTinood . iftrr tin it, thu ToraAUa
IMlttldjl, Whl-rv It hM UWIK l-x-u luoti as a Vaf- . P"tt', .-l.!,l yd .;.. 1 rur-tr-,, imilMvttaW
ualle rcuiMly by tlie nau .
rrB " """I :n. of Tonita with
V wyAtww (M.r ii.t-n ,, ni hIkm cur
tlve properties rmvc Ixvti immiunlily troh-d.
JrvVVA.m durea no i.U,l, Ml (.rl'iV-u.
It contains no Opium or Morphine
BUMu.W&Lik Colli, it 1) , bi. Luuat. Mtx
ralgift. It tinirivrn nif irrfM-t iu,ri-fft4-titL
l B UarKunm. M P.. FucbafT. IB.
III.. 11 W.t Tl.MflAIIMW tn V 1 I -
' autot kbeummlixm. m it h 1ti tmtt Uwt nwnha.
te J n vu,k. m. i) v..ur...A ra
run s.M.r. ill all liKUtiUlftlti. 11.11 r.t'.n InMJ.AK I r It HOTTt.K
A. IV.ELI.IER, 7t M.t 711 WASHINHTON AVKNPK M" totlia.
DILLARD & COFFIN,
COTTON FACTORS,
Kg Cnh AdTiinoyw to Hfrliiui anil lltntrM.
IT
1
AND TRUST COMPANY.
BOAHZ) OX1
MICIIAKL OAVIV,
TUU.MAS loYI K,
T. II. MILHUKN,
SI, COLKMAN.
WM. K.vmKNliKnOEB.
I-
a. V OCPWKBKKH-
AVIli V. HAPIiHN.
Ml). (ioi.i),-n I u,
NAMIlWIj, l-'llVM
ni Eeml-
1TAP0LK0N HILL,
LOUIS IIA.ATJhH,
8. H. BWiioK.s,
ANHUKW KKNKERT.
JAMKS S HOBISbON, WM. K.vmKNliKnOEB. HAHDWh. 1'
-D ioiit reotired in lurai of VI anil uiard. and InUreit Hud 011
nnnuaur.
a-W buy and ie'1 loeal Invottinent Pondu ami Pumritioi nenf-raHy, rf lx, lolu
trastcn, aud, ia goaaral, ciaonie any flnnnciitl bufineta Mquirlng a tufo andratiulbi
mrcnt.
W iue dmft , in unnil tn unit imrchn'wii, on nil nrt nf Karni-e.
"Wi have a ecuiniudiou '. null for lha deiu.ait u: vuluiiblun, alneb ii at tha orvloe of
our customer, Vtr of har(e.
1). P. IIAHUEX, rresIdcDt. EWI). (iOH)SMITlf, TUe-rreshleiit.
JAMES KATIIAN. Tn'-lller.
. Gavin
!i..&L.
Joba H.Suiilaan.
rana. Clark.
WholvxHlvi Hrocr, Cwtloiii Factor
Anrf CcsKr.iissicn Kerchantj
232 and 234 Frost St., Memphis, Tec&
KRIKFKS AIIAMH ADO JEJTeHWO!
Mr.'I. N. RAINKT rlovotm hia'whole tlmo to the wc!nlirg and n't of all Cotton antruaUd
LTJMBEJSl YAKD!
BriieiCatWsifflfict'rti
Jirinkley. Ark., Minnifa-liir'r8 of
YELLOW PINE AND OAK LUMBER,
ioi)ui:itn
I)aor, Soli, lilindF, Pres-eil Flouriiitr, (Villnr, M'entbcr-lloarilliigr,
C'j pit'HM MiImxN h, J.atliN, Kl.
a-0ur fanllltio ro nnaorpa'ed by any fawmlll In tli Honlh for 81 in ordnrapromiitly.
Kloorini, Ct-ilni(, SidinK, fcti-ii l.uiul-fir and (lyprena Sbinnlen a upaaialtr i alao, Frumlnn
Lumber of all dimenaiona. We uiuko tho wbulennle llunineaa a ipeo al filature. Urdora
aotlnited and prompily flllod.
GEO. UVY iTtllalIill, AGENT,
No. 124 Jefferson Street Memphis, Tennogseo
C. B. WIIESMAN.
EDMUND M.UlKUKE.
warn & mum,
STAPLE AID Fl
INCY GROCERS,
369 MAIN ST!, MEMPHIS. 7ENN.
THE LIVERffiORE FOUNDRY AND MACHINE C0IPAY.
FOUNDltl & MACHINE DKl'T, 1G0 to 174 Adams St., Memphis.
Iron ana ...
Ilrwr-a ' f " '
Eniclnra,
aaw-HIH
liar Iron,
Heller Iraa,
oo, Rand
tad
heet Iron,
miul
riivoinic
QIUKTt
mm
TRUE
vim
wii .Lisiri-.
EXTRACTS
MOST PERFECT. MADE
Purett end uliwifrtt Natural Fnilt Ftarort,
Vanilla, Lemon, Oranne, Alninnd, Knse, etc4
ili.vor as delicately and naturally aa the fruit.
PRICE BAKINQ POWDER CO.,
CIIICACO. 8T. LOUIS.
unei- jwiiia, 1 rev - f r '"it a . -v -a xnln.
LmifiMM ar
Generel
Rfnlr.
Railway
Nappllee
IllON & RAILWAY SUITLY DEP'T, 22(i and 228 Second St
Vfiuroeaaora In ah In department to JOHN MANOUUfi.) i
airWr'te n fnr irfunimHon nn ANV 'MIISil tn e'tharHne, '
Boots and Sho es I
ADLEE BRO. &00-, 261 0MN ST
EGGS FOIt HATCIIlNli.
FROM eholee yarda of White Leahorn,,
Uoudnna and Fit flan ea. fi per 13. My
atook are firgt-claaa, aad guaranteed to be aa
reireaented. 1 abip la litbt baaketa and in
aureaafe arrival.
W. M. WIHK. Knrrnt City, Ark.
HUMPHREYS'
Hamuli of all Siseases,
a, r. urarnKRva, H. o.
BIOHLI BOUND 1
CLOTH and UOLD
Mailnd Free.
unornin'SPti.iioa, nmn
Ke,fra,Con(rfiion, LoilammatlAna.M .2
Vortna. Worm Fever, Waxm Colio.... 21f
Oryln Colic, or Tihno lnianta, .25
ttlarrbeaof OhiMrenor AdolU.......
Ilvainlrv. Orloioa. BUioaa C1ouaM
( holrra Morbua, Vorniuu 3
ouh. Oold. Hronehitla. UH
euralsla: Tootharhe. t- aeearhe. Jl A
Headarliaa, ick Headaobe. Vertlen.. Jit
HOMEOPATHIC
lVapepaia. atiliooa Htomaob........
Niippr:aiied ov l'alnftil lerioda.
H nttaa, too noroae rerK
rouD.
Malt HK-um.
ja
odIl Difltcnlt Cruthiiur.. ii
um. KrTHfoelaa. Kreutiona mlt
ltbunia.-Um. Ehpiimatio l'alna....M .MS
Hfpelaa, KreptioolM
mimatie l-.lna..
frTerand A auo. t'hllla, atalaoa... .40
Calarrh, Inllaraia, (Vld IntiielleaiL Jl
honnlnc onH. VKiMintlJoaaua.. 'J
tienrral ItcMlltyJ'byaioal Wnitii.aa JH
Kidney HUonae....M.....
rnoua IMXIUv....iS...............l.
I rlnary VeUDCe,Wettlnir Bed. ... Jktl
Kl.i a.ra of llio Heart. PaliirUU.ion.l.U
SPECIFICS,
bold by IlnaC-M, or wut poetii'l on rffpt 34
Notice to Planters.
QIX HUNDRED bnsbela of the ealabrttod
Allen aeel lor aale Inquire at
Marob 14, 16.
UANAUliRuIL W0BK3.
ftTHT. fa Jft '
WLDOUGLAS
S3.00.J
. SHOE
latest Novelties in Footwear
FOR SPRING AND SHMMKR.
KLRttAHT HTTLfeHI
BIPKHIOB WORK VIA SHIP
liOWEUT PBICEHI
AQEST3 FCH TUB FAMOUS
Y. L. Douglaa 8J.00 Calf Shoes
In Button, Lao, and Congreaa.
Illnetrated Calaloaue and Prloe-Llat
wall.it rree tin apiinraMon vm
HILL, FONTAINtfi CO.
Cotton Factors and Wholesale Grocer
Front HI., Mem hl Tenia.
HILL, FOiTfflE & CO.
Cotton Factors, Commission fJerchants,
Wa. Konth Wn!n ... HU T.oul.
L. D. MDLLIN8, of late J. R. Utdwln A Co. JAB. Y0N0K, lata ol J. W. Caldwell A 0t
MULLIRS & YONQE,
Coiton Factors &Commission Oerchants
No. 1 ilflwanl'H Row, Cor, l-'rontand Union, KemphtH.
Fnlme
f Isoratoa & Co
Coltoa Factors, Wholesale Grocers,
Ho. 300 Front slrecf. : JflcmnlilN. Teun.
S. Q. HKKNDON.
JOHN CALH005.
BEBNDON & CALHOON,
MERCHANDISE BROKERS
And MwniiructiircrV 1 gen (at,
g54 Sefoiid St.. RoomH 8 nd 9, I p-Stnlr ttfmnhla, Tfnn.
Tflppbon 7..
W. A. GAGB & CO.
Cotton Jfc,"rcox"53,
Bfo. SO" Front Nireel, : 51enuli(N. T-ba.
Chickasaw Ironworks
if if, lm my
J0ILM K. KAXDLE A CO., PR0rU'.
.- -aj
Second St. Memphis. Te cm.
UNDEKS & MACHINISTS,
MANUFACTUHER8 AKD DKALKRS I -
' II8III4-K, ICoIIci-n, NHWialllat,
Brmllortl Com Hint M lirut MIR",
Cotton I'rfts, Cotton aiii
RhnHlii, I'ulleye, rt.
NVfcl'lAa. MMIK K-Weareorcpnredtollll ordan.
on ii-iii Botloe, far tao oele. rated (WMlarl falsai
Wmnilu .i... fulle;. Wa carry in atock over
Two Hundred Aaaorlnd riva.
ear tAnd for Cwt:l"irie and Prle-llat.
SI J DUE BROS., of Como, Mian. F. M. KORPLCET, Resident Partner,
COTTON FACTORS,
No. SftSTiwnt Struct MontiO! T-nv
m
E iW LIFE MS. C
op jtrxxr Yonic.
Itlllliltn A. SI'MtIV, t t i i : l'reHtdrut.
: 1 09,000,000
benpeat
Nnrraaadrr alnra Indoracd oa Pollolra.
laa lh World
IVo rorfolluro.
ill ECfaiaxliioi-,
JNO. F. WILKERSON, Agent,
2 I oil on i;xrliiiK- llullutnx, Mtiiiphirt.
No.
NAPOLEON HILL, President. W.N. WILKERSON, Ylce-Preoldetit
II. J. LYNN, LiUtiiUu. ,
inp City Fire k a
Ins. Co.
OOEN A UENKRAt, t'lRK AND niWIlEN,
A QUARTER OF A MIIUGN-DOLLARS FULL PAID CAPITAL
FURHTKNMHIM,
0. MA.NhKIELP,
DITU-jO VO XT fl
WM. I. IM'l.K, JAMBS K1C1I.1.V,
V. E. MVKKH, W.
JOHN LOAUUB.
P. Ur. l llKLL.
EaWITZliAMIfsCo
WLoieNA lenlora and Pabllnhera,
UBic XEIOTia..33
Bole Aieati for the followlnc Flrat-Claaa InatrnmenUi
Steinwav HUil 3E5Ln.aEt"fco
o"Y AllTa)Sl.-.HANIOB at A'lf, OAHI.RR, tl. n. FEASB at
OKOANS
nni.nn. if. raaaa aa . .
WIIKIMHIa,
HAM I IN. I LIIIiUH a WAKIM. I7HI
VAUtt tori'AUI UKUAN.
aWA NEW rOCTAVS PIANO FOR O.-M
Write (or OaUlonnwi. Notk 323 wnd 25 NKOOND NTm NEMP1I IN
D.T. rOKTEH.
.1
tors
SaeoeflwrB to POntEB, TAILOR ft CO
oh Fac
ANSA
WO. SftO FRONT STREET, i i 1IEMPHI8. TJCWai '
Ti
AJfDBEW BTEWAET, Vow Orleani, ANDREW D. G WYNNE, Mamplua
r
WholesaleOrocers, Cot.Factors
NO. 8S0 AND 898 FRONT HTOKET, MllMmiS, TESWa,
ABD
STEVART BROTHERS & COIJPAM
COITON FACTORS AND COMMISSION MEKCMANTS,
NEW ORLEANS. LOUISIANA.
CHESS-GARLEY C01PMV,
Oils c5b HTEtT7-l Stores
' Ofllco, 349 Front Street, Mempliig, Tenn.
New Orrictgro Pi nrm
GEO. Vf. TOM LIN.
WM. BKNJES.
TOMLIN & BENJES,
MANCFACTUREUS OF ' i
Fine Carriages, Buggies, Extension Top & Ladies' Phaetons,
BOAD WAGONS AND SPEEDING BlfiGIKS.
WE HAVE THIB DAY FORM 8D A COPARTNERSHIP AND PURCHASED TI1R
Manufa--turina Dnuartmnnt of tha WomlriirT.OllvArLl.rrln.tfA and If -alw ir. in . .n 1
iaa.au ms omiuina in rear oi tneir renoBitorv, j iv Main airee- aaere k
buaineaa. and devote oar entire time anl attention to rvio&- our n
Bt.ke Kepalrinc a apeo-altr and i.ar.nte fimt-olaaa n. in ail 01 h.
t aa had chare of thia Factory fur yeaa, and ia too well t.. own t
Havina- aold our Manufacturine Denartment to Ms,ra. T0V-
fdlly recommend them In our f icii-J." ani nii.fomr -
IHIIKl.ii,l H a Kilt 4r. I' ¬
ll coaliiup the
' .'t-cri. We (hull
0 it Mr. IuMLIN
riwi.ia ii'ijrence.
V.y i I.KN JES, we eheer-
n 'he ro.
O.K.HQUOK&CO.-
No. 389 Main Htrcet, Ilciiiphis.
Pianos and Organs
AT.LO W.ST;PRICUS;F0U CAS!i;oUTI ME.
Sheet Music and Books. New Pianos forlKen t

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