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The Memphis appeal. (Memphis, Tenn.) 1886-1890, April 17, 1886, Image 1

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MEMPHI
FPEAI
JL
H
no
ESTABLISHED 1840.
MEMPHIS, TENN., SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 1880.
VOL. XLYI NO. in.
A
THE IRISH LMD BILL
LAID BEFORE THE (OISONS BT
MB. GLADSTONE.
Tbe Premier's Speech Kxplalni-nr
the easie-rYhat It Is t..
petted to Accomplish.
WHAT
PAKSELL THINKS
TUE BILL.
OF
Chamberlain's (Speech Defining- His
PoMUon ok the Irish
Question.
Londoh, April 10. Mr. Gladstone
froponnded hie Irish land bill to the
House of Commons this evening.
There was hardly any excitement at
tending the event, compared with the
enthusiasm which attended the mem
orable proceed irgs of yesterday week,
when toe home rale measnre was pre
sented. At noon to-dsy but ninety
rests on the floor of the house bad
been "hatted," and these were neatly
- all taken by Irish members. At 4
o'clock the house was crowded to its
utmost capacity.
MB. GLADSTONE
rose in bis place at 5:25 p.m., and was
greeted with cheers. Wben he begun
to GDcak his voice was loir and hunk v.
He (aid the government was d rected
toward securing contentment among
the people of Ireland and tbe perma
nent restoration of social order. The
speaker's proposals would greatly btn
efit the tenants cf Ireland, but tbe
landlords were the r-rincipal object of
the measure, although he thought
many of these landlords were most
hostile to the government's policy. At
the outset the speaker wisbtd to make
the most emphatic denial that it was
the intention to ask tbe Scotch and
English to run any pecuniary risk on
account of the landlords of Ireland.
TBI HISTORY OF IBILAMO
was one long indictment against its
land-owners. Agrarian crime had
originated and increased under the
absenteeism of landlords and raising
01 rents, as meir expenses while away
from Ireland increased. Oppression,
wedded to misery, bad a hideous
progeny. Urime bad been endowed
with vitality to perpetuate Itself and
hand down its miserable inheritance
irom generation to generation. Eng
land was not clear of responsibility,
for the deeds of Irish landlords were
tnglian deeds. With the power in
our own hands, we have I oked on
and done nothing. Alter the union
absenteeism became general. National
sentiment cca .ed to have a beneficial
influence on the relatiots between
the landlord end tenant. The union
itself was obtained against the sense
and wiBhes ot every clas by
WHOLESALE BRIBERY AND UNBLUSHING
INTIMIDATION.
The land act was intended to go into
'effect on tbe came day that the home
. rule bill woald become operstivei It
con, a not go on without the operation
oi me omer, wnicn would provide
legislature in Ireland to appoint
statutory authorities to deal with' the
landed estates and act between vendor
and purchaser. The DnrchitM
be made through the issue of 180,000.-
AAA t 4.1 . .
vju ox iuree per cent, etoca issued at
par. These new Irsh consols might,
with the consent of the Treasury, be
commuted for stock of a lower de
nomination. If the stock could
be issued for the State, Bcrip of
equal amount would be issued for
the same purpose. The act was to
give tbe landlords the option to eell
nut uoder its terms. Its enactment
was co t nned to agricultural holdings.
and did not include mansions having
demesnes and woods. The State au
thorities, acting between the peapant
and land-owner, would purchase tbe
mnu iroin the latter and put the peas
ant in possession as absolute proprie
tor, subject to an annual rent charged
to the total payments of the purchase
money. The St.-ite would not force
tbe small occupiers to become pro
prietors. In districts where the
POPULATION WAS CONGESTED,
the State Would have the power to de
cide whether expropriation of the too
crowded lands snonld be compulsiry.
Nobody except the immediate land
lords would have the option to
eell to the incumbrance, and
that he must eell by fore
closure and not at option for him
self. Application to sell would have
to be made by all the tentnts on an
estate, and all these applications and
sales wonld be registered. Tenants
would, be required to give security for
costs in certain cases. The Land
Commissioner would be empowered
to refuse application. The basis of
prices would depend npon the rental
for fixed period. The judicial
rental of 1845 would be thee andard
in all cases wherein the rent of the
land to be sold was then fixed. In all
other cact s tbe LandCommission would
have tbe power to arrive at a price by
comparing tbe other judicial rentals
with Griffith's valuation. The Land
Commission would also be allowed to
examine the s'ate of the books con
cerning etates fjr ten years back.
Tweniy years rental would be a
nominal purchase in exceptional cases.
Twenty-iwo years rental would make
a purchase. Applications for a eMe
would not bs received after March 31,
1890. Ten millions of pounds of the
stock would be Issued during 1887;
r20,000,000 in 1888; X20.W 0,000 in
18S9, and 200t0,000 in excess the
two succeeding years.
WHIM JE PBOPOSALB
were firet placed before the speaker's
cuiimnurs ue proposed to raise 130,
OUO.OOO immediately. Mr. Chamber
lain and Air. irevelysn both objeced
to this is a wholesale irsae which
would depreciate values. The speaker
.i . . .i I . . , . '
luereioro inanaea Dotfi gentlemen lor
having given him occasion to recon
sider tbe oiiginal proposition. He now
thought it was an error to ask forth
with for anything like theoutside esti
mate, and belipved that by appoint
ing a receiver for the general rente,
armed with snfficient authority to
collect thtm, but without com
irg into contact with the new
pioarielary, the repayment of
the purchiKe money would bo amply
becnred. Tbe change npon the Inch
exchequer would be 2,(100,000 per
annum, to meet which it would be
able to levy for rents amounting to
2, 00,000 per annum, and this turn,
would be tbe fir t charge on the rents
and Uxes raised bj the Irish g ,vern
mect. Adding to this the imperial
contribution, the sum paid to England
by Ireland would be 6 2.2,000 per
annum, secrj'nrl on a revenue amennt
ingto 1 10,850,000, no portion ol
wbih wonld be pHd to any pur
pose nn'.il 6,000,0 J wi paid iUj
TBI XMQLI8! IXCMIQCIR.
.fhe present cntr batioi of the Iih
ttx payers to Eoftltud wis 6,980,000,
of wbicb England paid back in the
Irish civil service and la the service
of collection 4,140,000.1 Tbe residue,
which seemed torepreseiit an imperial
contribution for irmy. ntvy, national
debt and imperial civil changes, wai
2,085,000 pounls. What did En
gland do with it. As an instance, she
sent 26,000 men b Ireland ar.d kept
tbem there at an annual co t of 3,
000.000, 915,00 more than the
balance men toned. That was
specimen of the economy of
the system the speaker wanted to
root up. Mr. Ghdstone commended
tbe scheme to tbeitrict, jealiun, care
ful, unbiased exanlnation of English
men. He was ctnvinced it could be
recognized as flttog part of the great
auspicious effort U sustain the plans
of tbe British LegiUtare for the wel
fare of what had ong been, and, the
speaker hoped, woild ever be, under
circumstances far wppier than here
tofore, an integral ptitr-l hermsjeety's
domain. Mr. Glad i ne spoke lor an
hour and thirty fiyi minutes, and con
cluded amid great ajp'auee.
Mr. Gladstone's propma's do not
imply a new issue f 180 000,000 in
3 per cents, but ol only 50,000,000
from the J8O,X0,iO0 in now 3 per
cants already authod.
MB. CBAMBIBUlN'a SPEECH.
Following Mr. Ghaaine, Mr. Cham
berlain read the let r which I e sent
to Mr. Ul.idstune dtidering his resig
nation bs a ruemler ot the CaMnet.
In the letter Mr. (bimbor'a n stated
that Mr. GUdi'.o.t's podcy would
throw a heavy mrden on Ore a'
B.ilnin, entailings enormous addi
tion to the ni.tiora debt and probably
an immediate iccree of tsxn'tan, net
l) S-cure tne -nnon of the King,
dom, but to puribe senaiatinn. Mr.
Chamber a'n then rent on t say that
me land propoHats.alttiougb they bad
been modified sine he i a 1 left the
Cabinet, would ttill mposeagreat bur-
aen on ureat orna i without eoilicient
security for the loins edvaicid.
The bill was calcul.ted not so much
to benefit the tenets a a sod for the
landlords. Although only 50,000,000
was ti be issued, tie option to sell
was offered to landords holding land
vaiuea at jsiou.uji'UOO. Supposing
that the full numbetof ODtons Uineli
should be accepted, tow would all the
money be provtdeu i He opposed the
bill on irinciple, tecauss it princi
pally protected the andloide. If tbe
Irian FarlianoeLt wa to be intrusted
with the protfcioi of the commer
cial daises and tht maintenance of
tocial order, wh; could it not
be runted to protect tbe
lanciorasr ine cuvernment was
putting on Ireland a burden which
no Irish member could declare to be
af air p. ice to give for the landlord's
right. Cheers The Irish people
would regard the bargain as oue im
post d by a foreign coantry, and would
be justified in takir.g the first oppor
tunity to repudiate it. If the b irgain
should be rt pud fed low would it he
enforced T The government c.ml i not
disregard the riHls to toe Briti-.ili tax
payer. Luder the Inciasiug depres
sion in trade hvn lrcds of ttiou auclaof
hard workers in England would prob
ably be thrown out of employment.
While refusing to assiet diearving
crofters in Hcolland and postponii.g tbe
claims of the Eogidi laborer, could
tbe government consistent' grant
large bums rums for the benefit of the
Irish peasantry f Chuers In ct n
clusion, Mr. t.'hamberlaiu taid he wis
not an lirecnncilable opponer t ol Mr.
Gladstone's poliry. If the Und iro
posals should be sufliciently modified
ho would be happy to be relieved of
the duty of continuing his prtetnt at
titude oi opposition. I
MB. PAKNELL 1
said that, not having had Mr. Cham
berlain's advantage of a Cabinet seat,
he was not prepared to express a too
confident opinion upon the merits and
demerits of the scheme until he had
seen the provisions of the bill. Mr.
Cnaiaberla n hod spoken in deservedly
complimentary terms of Mr. Davitt
and had expressed a desire to know
the latter's opinion of the land nur-
chase bill. Mr. Parnell ass' red Mr.
Chamberlain that Mr. Davitt would
not act from motives of personal spite
or jealousy Parnellite cheers but
solely out of regard for Ireland.
To the speaker it appeared that
the appointment of a Receiver-General
was unnecessary and absurd because,
according to the Premier's statement,
the receipts from the customs and ex
cise duties in Ireland will amount to
only 20,001). Of the total amount
payable by Ireland to the Imperial
Exchequer, would it not be sufficient
security if England took a lien upon
the revenue collected by Irish au
thority in the event of tne customs
failing to y eld a rum siflfi ient to
meet the imperial chnnresT Ihean-
pointmentof a Receiver-General would
be most offensive to Ireland, bo ause
u wouiu snow a reluctance to trust
Irishmen even for the sum of 20,000
pounds. Ihe object of the Irish mem
bers was not to make the measure a
party question, but by yielding as
much as possible to settle once for ail
this troublesome, difficult and danger
ous matter. If the Irish landlords
threw out the measure he hoped tho
offer to assist them with English
credit would not be renewed, but that
the bill for the government of Ireland
would be pressed forward by itself.
tlear, hear J
MR. VOKl.KV
announced that the bill would be in
the members' hands Monday. Per
mission was given to introdu.e the
bill, and the second reading was fixed
lor wav i:itn.
mr. Gladstone's statement
of the provisions of his Irish land bill
lacked completeness and eloarnees,
and evoked no enthusiasm, even the
Parnellites remaining silent during its
delivery. In the course of his remarks
the Premier said : -"I m strongly im
pressed with the belief that it is Dot
possible for Parliament to acquire any
tuHiiuaie iuea oi ine measure except
upon a close inspection of it," The
bill itself met with general acceptance
and this will have influence in curtail
ing the debate. The vagueness of M r.
Gladstone's language on the proposed
issue of 3 per cents caused a period of
surprise and confusion as to what
amount should be loaned to the Irish
eicbequer. In explaining this sec
tion of the bill, Mr. Gladstone said :
'Purchases under the act are to be
made in a 3 per cent stock issue I on
application, probably, of the Land
Commissioners to the Treasury, under
regulations made by the Jreasurv.
The 3 ner cent, stock will, in all likeli
hood, be what is termed the new 3 per
cents. The atno nt of the new 3
per cents is 1SO,000,00(1. quite
sufficient to insure extensive dealings.
It so happens that the mass of the
I Irish dealings in stocks is about (,
000,000 in consols against 27,000,000
in the new 3 per cents. It is, there
fore, probable that Block will be most
convenient for the Irmh holders. "The
House interpreted this language to
mean that, in addition to the 18,
000,000 new 3 per cente already in
existence, there will bo a fresh issue
of 50 00,000 on account of the Irish
exchequer.
Mr. Chamberlain's Rpeech made a
great impression.
WILL SUPPORT CHAM BET I. A IN.
The Seotcb Liberals held an in
formal conference and deeded to
support Mr. Chamberlain, un'ess the
loan wa reduced to a sum suttlcient
to assist in the purchase of the smaller
holdings.
HOW THE BILL IS HK. EIVKI).
From opinions gathered in the lob
by of the House of Commons it is
learned the Conservatives believe the
amount which the land bill proposes
to expend in buying out the landlords
will not be enough to cover the pro
posed purchase. Maj. Sanderson, M.
P. for Ulster, cannot separate tho bill
from the home-rule scheme. He
thinks the former measure fair if
the latter (is also accepted, but
the gove nmunt cannot sell the coun
try on a twenty-years' purchase. 'I ho
Irish members are divided in their
opinions on the subject. Some are
willing to pay for the liddancu of the
landlords, but the majority consider
that eight or ten years is a
long enough time in which
to complete tho purchase. Mr.
Davitt lays the only persons who
will benefit by the scheme will be tho
absentee landlords, who will jump at
the opportunity to sell, anil be de
lighted to g-t r'l of their property.
Many Radicals are pleased with tho
reduction of the sum and consider the
security good. Others consider the
amount extravagant and predict Unit
the bill will not pass in its present
form.
BURYING TUE DEAD.
FIKDRAI.N or THE VIC ins
THE ST. CI.OI'I CITI.ONE.
The Iorfor Ntlll Bnnj A Mr mil n
lb Wonnticd The II ei mo
tion of Property.
St. Cloud, M.nn., April 10. Solemn
requiem was held in. the cathedral
this morning over the remains of
thirteen victims of tho cyclone,
Father Steinper officiating. Similar
services took place in the church of
the Immaculate Conception over the
remains of four. The services were
conducted by Fathers Gross and Cas
per. Both churches were heavily
draped. The funeral cortege passed
on its way to the cemetery through
the devastated district. At'out 2000
persons were present from all over tho
country. The dead were buried in
two large graves, nine adults iu one
and eight children in the other. Mrs.
Stein was buried yesterday, and Mrs.
Feclir to-day, in the Nor b St 'r Protest
ant cemetery. Annie Siebetz, nine
ye. rs oi age, died tins morning from
tneellerts ot a lracturo ot the skull
n ill am itahlman, a farmer near
liuckman, a town twenty-five miles
from here, and a workingmad named
Clark, on Senator Buck man's farm
were both killed.
hifty-four wounded have bean at
tended to at the hospital. Thirty are
there at present and five at the convent.
fcvery house in the vicinity has ono
or more wounded. Those in the hos
pital are under the charge of five
doctors and fifteen Sisters of St.
Benedict. Two out of ten on whom
amputating operations were performed
will die. the doctors are very busy.
and have had little sleep. Win. Short-
ridgc, who Had both legs amputated
lies in a cntical condition. Mrs,
Junglcn was in the hospitul this morn
ing, looking after her wounded hus
band and two children. Three of her
children who were killed were buried
this iriorni: g.
Fourleen dead were buried in the
cemetery t Sauk Rnpids to-day. Ten
doctors have been in attendance, and
a large number of nurses from St.
Paul and Minneapolis are look ine ait
the wounded. Nothing has been done
to remove the wreck in either rt.
Cloud or Sauk Rapids.
l tie 1088 01 property in tst Cloud is
estimated at $70,000, and in Sauk
Rapids at 1280,000. The wreckage on
the railroad is estimated at 120,000.
About a dozen photographers with
instruments are taking views here.
Tho hnA-o nf VA.,ar II, .11 tho Ct
Cloud banker who was killed at Sauk
Rapids, arrived here this afternoon.
and was conducted by members of the
Council to the depot on the way to
&.aiamazoo, Mich., tor interment
Doalraetlve Cyclone la Testa.
acroba, Tax., April 18. A very
destructive cyclone passed through
the southwestern portion of this coun
ty Thursday night. The storm moved
in a nortbe sterly direction sweeping
everything before it. Thus far it is
known that a dozen persona were in
jured, two of them seriously. The
residence of J. H. Green, two miles
south of the vil age of Rome, was
picked up and hurled a lomr distance.
Mr. Green, wife and two daughters
were all badly bruised. The residences
ol I). K. Uecer and Charles Swanson
were demolished and Mr. Becker, wife
and three children narrowly escaped
death. Two of the latter were in-
ju-ed, while a traveling man named
V. F. Pace was seriously injured. The
large residence of John licard was
next swept sway. Mr. Beard, his wife
and five children were carried a dis
tance of fifty yards with the house,
but none of them were fatally injured.
The residences of W. VV. Rawson, J.
N . Thurmond and others shared the
same late, much live stock was
killed, and the loss of farm prop rty is
very great, ine lull extent ol the
damage is not yet known. JNot a
fence or tree was left standing for
many miles. Parties are out succor
ing the injured.
Have sed Tongaline, and it did its
work splendidly; have found it good
in cases of flatulence, where constipa
tion prevails, and these are numerous.
N. Newell Bill, M. D., Strawberry
Point, la.
Tne Fayoe Bribery relig'Ktloa.
Columbus, O., April J 0. Considera
tion of the report cf t'le Piyne
brili-ry inventigation commi:-
tee wai resumed in tbe House
this morning, on a moMon ti
pos'poce tinext Tnnrsdiy for the
purpose of periling the evidence. The
moti"n was defeated, as was also fiat
of the substitute of iii minority fr
the mfjority report. The m j iriiy :e-
p rt was ad jrttd by a Dirty y.A". to
gether with the res.lutiou crdtring
the same forwarded to the United
S ates Senate for consideration bythat
body.
SENATOR ff UlTTilORSE.
THE
MAN WHO WILL
JAIKSOX'S SEA r.
FILL
Ills Career iu Stale and National
Politics-1 he High Position He
Occupied In Congress.
lirlCUL TO TBI iPPIiL.I
Nashville, Tenn., April hi. As
predicted by tho Appkai., Gov. Bate
to-day appointed Gen. W. C. Whit-
thorne to succeed Howell E. Jackson
At H o'clock tho Governor received
Senator Jackson's resignation. In ten
minutes he turned to Adjutant-Gen
eral Cantrell, his private secretary,
and dictated a telegram to Whiu
thorne, who was at Columbia, inform
ing him of his appointment. At 3
o'clock Gov. Bute received a teleeram
from Whitthorno accepting the nom
ination and return ng thanks tor the
distinguished honor. A few minutes
afterward the lemocratic Executive
Committee of Maury county, of
which Columbia is tho county
seat, wired to Gov. Bate their
enforcement of his action. During the
afternoon and niyht telegrams from
nil over Midi'Io Tennessee, and a few
from the other sections of the State,
poured in on the Governor indorsing
1 1 is action.
vi hen the telegram announcing the
appointment was sent to Columbia
(Jen. Whitthorno was at home, two
miles out in the country. The tele
graph messenger was mounted on n
horse and started In a gallop for Whit
thome's homo. Columbia was ex
pecting the news, however, ami
when the boy started with tho
glml . tidings, a doen confiden
tial friends of Whitthorno were
at the telegraph ollice seated
on horseback. The telegraph boy
stepped out a side door and dashed
oil', hoping to outstrip Whitthorne's
fri nds. They saw him as ho sped oil'
and away they wont in pursuit. Tho
horsemen dashed headlong through
the streets the messenger boy leading
by a dozen lengths as the cavalcade
swept th ough the square. The ex
pectant populace knew what
THE MAD RACE
meant, and cheers for Columbia's
favorite son arose exultant on every
side. The harbingers of victory rode
as if for life, but the messenger boy
kept l is own and bad the best of the
race. Gen. Whitthorno saw the horse
men dashing through his grove and
met them bareheaded on the porch.
As the b y handed him the dispatch
his friends reached his side and excit
edly tendered their congratulations.
tie was hurried into a buggy and
started for Columbia. The cavahade
increased as it neared the town, and
when the citVMwas reached Gen. Whit
thorne was the center of a thousand
exultant friends. Ho was con
ducted to an improvised platform
and to the refrain of rooming cannon,
with cheers rising on every side, bats
and canes flying through tho air, the
now Senator spoke to his (edow-tewns-
nieu for a few. minutes. He labored
under deep feeling wf ich ut times al
most choked utterance. His audito s
seemed wild with joy, and every man,
w. man and child in I'olumliia was
present to
no HIM HONOR,
At the conclusion of his speech Col.
Duncan B. Cooper and lion. K. R.
Cormack of the American wera called
upon and spoke briefly. Such nn ova
tion was never paid a man in Coluuv
bia. In this city tho appointment
was received with general approba
tion. It was not a surprise, as the do
velopmt-nts of tho post two days had
prepared me puhlic here lor the Gov
ernor's action. A number of promi
nent Democrats to-day visited th?
Governor to express their indorse
ment of his election. To-night the
Burns Artillery fired a salute of
honor 'of seventeen guns from
the State capitol in honor of the new
Senator. It is understood that Gen
Whitthorno will leave for Washing
ton to-msrrow night. There is no bad
feeling perceptible from the friends of
uisappoinieu aspirants, ine extreme
good tooling manilested on all sides is
a subject of general comment and
congratulation. It is felt that tho
Governor lias acted wisely in select
ing this trained and trusted legisla
tor for this important post of honor.
The New
Nrnntor tit
oroer.
Political
Washington Curran Whitthorne was
born in that part of Lincoln county
subsequently made a part of Marshall
county, lsnnessee, was raised in Bed
ford county, attended school at Ar
rington Academy, Williamson county,
Campbell Academy in Wilson, and
graduated at East Tennessee Univer
sity. He was a student at law under
James K. Polk at the time of his elec
tion to the Presidency, with whom he
was adecided favorite. His father was
an Irishman, bis mother a sister of
the late W. II. Wisener. Gen. Whit
thorneentered polities at an early date ;
was a memher ot the Ktate Senate in
1K55-6-7-8, and was Spemker of the
House in lt5t-00, having been elected
to the Senate over W. L. McConnico,
a Whig, and one of the foremost
orators of te State. The canvass,
fr in the ability with which it was
conducted by the two men and tho
enthusiasm thereby infused into it,
acquired a State importance. The
district was regarded as honele sly
Whig in politics, and Gen. Whitthorne
was considered even by his friends as
the leader of a forlorn hope. He
made
A BOLD FKinT
against the apparently overwhelming
odds, and at once became a Demo
cratic champion. As Speaker of the
House Whitthorne made reputation
as a fine parliamentarian. In 18o0 he
was selected for elector at large for
the State. He canvassed the State
from one end to the other, meeting
more competitors from the ablest of
his opponents than was ever done in
any former political canvass in this
State. This canvass easily placed him
among the foremost political debaters
in the State. Upon the breaking out
of the rebellion he Itecamo assistant
adjutant-general, serving with Gen.
Anderson in Western Virginia in
1801. In that year he became adju-tant-gneral
of tho State, and served
in that capacity until the close of the
war, being voluntarv aid on the stalls
of Gen. Hardee and others in the cam
paigns of the Army of Tennessee. ,As
adjutant-general, while Isham G.
Harris was Governor, the strong
friendship whi.h has always existed
Ix-tween them was formed and ce-
tnentcd. After
to the practice
which be
the war he returned
of his profession, in
ACHIEVED
GRRAT SUCCFSrf,
until
the year
IHll, when he was
elected to the Forty-second Congress,
where he continued to servo without
intermission until the close of the
Forty-seventh Congress. During his
service in Congress I-is most n arked
work was as a member of the Commit
tee on Naval A flairs, of which he was
chairman for six years, though at
other times on other committees, nota
bly the Special Committee of the
Forty-second Congress on Affairs
in the South, the Com
mittee on the lnteroceanic
Canal (Forty -sixth Congress), and
Ievees, and Improvement of the Mis
sissippi Kiver (rorty-seventh Con
gress). In Congress be established a
reputation for prudence, conserva
tism, sagacity and indexible honesty
and fidelity to the lKmiocratic party.
Since his retirement from Congress he
has resumed the practice ol law at
Columbia, Maury county, which has
oeen his home for years. He n sixty
years old and has a large family.
lialahiaol Hoaor.
IsrsoiAL to tii ArriAL.l
Nashville, Tenn., April 10. The
Hon. P. R. Albert and the Hon. 8. F.
Wilson were eleited representatives
to the Supremo Ioelgo to-duy by the
G and Lodge of Tennessee. Knights
of Honor.- Normandy Lodge No.
2)37 received tho silken banner as the
best lodge in the State. Tho report
of tho treasurer showc t a balance of
$2100 51 in the treasury. Tho lodge
adjourned m'ii (fi this afternoon.
II ELI N A, ARK.
A Rise of F.iqr Inrhea Daring
Pnnl Tweaty-'oar llonr.
ISrlOIAL TO TBI ArriAL.I
Hilena, Ar.K., Ajril 10. Tho river
has tisen in the I nut twenty-four
hours at this point f)"r inches, and
niw lacks three foot seven inches of
being to the high w t;r mirk of l2.
The opinion gener.i'ly prcvailo th.it it
will be lmi0H.-lle ts keep the w'fr
off the eiitird country subject to ov-'t-fliw
on the West side of tin Mi bia
sippi river from iuamodiitely b-lov
Helena t the gulf. The
reason of this is on ac
count c f tho lisveos on that s'(!c of
the river bsinginsuch a C"iidiii jn
that they will not prevent trm m-
croaehments of the water. Mr. Crtw',
D. vision nupnrlntondent ot the
Leveea from Austin to near Glendalp,
Miss., wss in Helena txlay, snd re
ports that there is not a particle of
danger from tbe levees In that lec
tion.
IIR1.
RAJA At raiidftirn Nn. UVl lit tin lrr-t.
Friday. Anrll 16. 1HK). Mr. Madi.io Sua.
Imluveil wife ot Angela Ktja, aned twency
ix yean.
N tlce of funeral will be liven in Sunday
morning paiian.
TALBERT At reniilenea onrnxr Mill nnil
Fourth alrentit, Cholxea. Friday April hi,
at 4 o'clock a in.. In tho twcot)-Cllo
Tear of tail age, John H. Tl.mT.
Friend are invited to attend hii funorul
from the Central Buptiat Church, on Seoon-J
treat, near lioale, this (SATURDAY) u. tim
ing nt 10. JO o'olock. Horvioea by the Pov.
Sr. Bogn aMted by the Rev. Or. Lamar.
i i .vr.itiL mhk i:.
XAHT1N The friend and acquaintance!
of Patiick Mahtis and family are Invited
to attand bis funeral trnm hii late renidcoce,
No. 14 Wright avenue, thli (SATURDAY)
afternoon at 2:30 o'olook. Servloei at Ht.
Patrick'! Charon at 8 o'clock.
TO-DAY
(NVrtlKI)AY)
I'll EM If)
MISSES' HATS,
CHILDREN'S HATS,
Wonderful, Beautiful, Ureat la fU;U.
PKICE THEM.
TO-DAY, SATURDAY,
KREMER'S
NEW NOBBY
FAKAMIE,, IIISBILLl,
lOlII XV STSirCN,
IACE PAHAtOLfl
KLK EMBER Hats and Parasols
To Day at
r i
Money to Loan
On ImproTed plantation In
MlMBUfdppI and ArbauHan.
Installment plan 3, 5 or 10
year. Annul Inter ew I, not
In advance. No oommlanlona.
No cotton hlpmenfa, Cheap
et loan offered.
Francis Smith Caldwell & Co.
253 Hecond St., Memphis.
We have no agent.
riANOS and ORGANS
Direct ;frm;rrlory ;oPurrtiiv
era, anvloalM r ftal. Wrll
Monte riefcena & Co., Memphis
NOTICE
TUB BRfNKLBY LUMBER COMPACT
will cont.noe t receive ordari and de
liver Lumber Iron their Btilla wnthoat any
interruption from eve 8 'w-
ua7i j3A i jtiiiuna, Aireu.
WttWW
PARASOL
W
M7
Memers
BEinilM
op:ti
Ho7 Bfflpi
l-ONR WKKK COMMKNCINd MONDAY, MAY 3, IsnJ. M2.000
in added money, five raoea eaoh day, inoluding Steetileohaao and HuHles,
Oyer 300 Loraes to participate 10 to 20 starters in cadi race.
Races commence each day at 2 o'olock aharp.
HALF KATES on all Railroad. ArranKeiuenU on tbe Grouwli for
accommodation of 10,000 people.
8. 11. Montoomkhy, frWy.- H. A. MONTGOMERY. IWdenr,.
' . -a
YazorJ Mississippi Delta Timber Co.
VEU1UDLD STATION, L., IU. & T. U.K., MISSISSIPPI.
IV7 Mllea from Memphis, Tonn. U:i Miles from Vtakiburg, Mix.
Sfow-lPleEtxiira s" IMCills
Will law to Older and furnlnh trood merchantable
vpress Xj xx 1m ber,
IN CAR-LOAD L0T8 . 0. B., OARS AT TII Bill MILLS. F0K
wr $12.50 PER M.
aer Dimanfloni and Bulldlnf Lumber, Cjproni Shlntci, Prcmeil Fliiorlnf, Oeillni ami
Bidinr, kept eontuntljr on hand, uruen
FRANK IrlK.ltlOOMf
Capital, $200,000.
iralilfi
hi
J. It. (iOIIWINJWI. J.M.WOOOBAIt, Vlce-lWU f. II. K AIM K, fouler
Bottrct of
D. T. POH I'KR. J. M. OOODUAR,
W. H. lilll'UK. M. (IAVIN,
V. M . NKI.miN, T, B. H1MH.
J. M. KMiril. CI1ARLKS KNRT,
W. N. W llKr'RHON, K. T. COQI'KK,
JOUN AHMLSTKAD, 0. II. BRYAN.
HT A lr-oNltry of ttir Nluro of Tnn
E. SLAGER,
VTV HPRINO AND 6UMMKK hTOOK la now complete, oonalnV
.VL ini of the Intent and ohoioent deniana in all the Noveltlaa !-
of the latent and ohoioent
truUiinad in loreivn marketn.
'care aa tnoonta and quality, in
huhionable eood at reaaonable
tion of inv unl-iotion of a Inrre
BHUr-iat in llla.lill I KWUNKmN, which are now ready lor Ue
Inapeotion or my friend! ana
Cor. Nerwad unci
THY THEM I THY
Try Zollncr'8 English Walklnslast Shoes
ZBLLNRR'H ft Oenta'aheii, in all (trie, are the beat In the oft.
7,KL,LNKR'IHM ttnaia'dhoea, in all nhapea and trie, an the nob-
x
uieat, ahapaliett
COHSET SHOES For WEAK ANKLES-Sole Agents
atarUend your ordera or oem and eiam'ne their rrand aa'ortment of KINK BOOTS,
BU0K ANU HLIPFKKU.-tia
saziZjZjiVTnF. oo boo ivtaiinx axi.3EirF
iarinjitratjdjn
MOTES
Will par Good I'rlcM
TRA8QY COTTON oi U1 deMrlptlotu. Head for Clrcaljir
ud Price Paid.
Mil
WHOLESALE
Dry Goodsjlotions, Hosiery
GENTLEMEN'S FURNISHING GOODS,
Nos. 328 and 328 Main St., Memphis, Tenn.
WE ARB IN DAILY RBUKIPT D4URABLS MPRIXO AMI HUH IKS
UUOIItt, whioh we oiler Ui the Trude uoou the moat favorable terint. Our prioea
will Mmaar favorably with tboee of any market in tbe United outea. We ar AfosU for A
Tenaewwe Mannfacturlng Co.'t) I'lalilK, DrllM, Mheetluir, Milrtingr, Etc.
W. A. GAGE fe Oo
No. 80 Vront Ntreet. : Kfrmi.h!n, Ttnrt
DILLARD & COFFIN,
COTTON FACTORS,
?&fiupIiiKy Tenn.
ti( fHHh 4lyHnf in Irterchatnlw tl Plvtntr.
And ('ommisston Siercham
Hon. 34 arid RCfIadlHon Kireet,
CXI-
lis Jeokgy Club
U. W. TOM LIN. WM. BKNJKS.
NEW CARRIAGE FIRM.
Tomlk & Benjes,
17 Main St., Hemphlh.
Offer Hcecial inducement in Ojn BuaKlea
of eur own mnae. at S"f; Ti Iluxiea of
our own innlte. al 112). All work war
rantrd. Oail Wore 70U ttiy.
mr Having Hi'ix-aed of our entire tck (
Vehicle nnd the .M.inuliiolurtnv Pf -urt-ment
In fci.ti TOM LIN A lIK NJIi, we
besiieaa tor thoui a onntinuanoe of tbe '
ia runuve no lone eitcndcd to 11.
WOOnitl'KP -OLIVKH
fA.HHnK ,t IMMiWAIIK (MiMPANT.
by mall reipoctiuiiy lonoiied. Aaareaa
MTKHI!VTPNeK!VT.
of
Surplus, $25,000.
" "
Direotora.
i, R. OOOWINJ
S. W. ITAl.liH.
W. P. UllNAVAt T.
R. J. BLACK.
II. K. COKKIN.I
A. W. NKWttOM.
- f. Trnnaix-ta a llfurnl tbtaihlaiaji
nihil nn
denii ni in all the Noveltlaa
My eeleotlone are male with (rwat
order to oBer to the public tbe lateet
uriooi. I wih to make aueeiai men
anertinent of the moet eleaant da-
the public, at my old rati..,
JeaTftrMB Him.
THEM! THY TIIEMl
iiMs
oiwianu Dell in ma united Dlalel.
EKLLNKR'H Bora' Kbon are the beat that an mad.
ZKI.l-N KK'H blldrc-n'a Nbwoa will tar yoa money.
ZHLLNKK'S .ndloa MImmm atatl Mli-l-erw are the hand-
and rnont atyltah. and ara oheaier Uian any
oinem ni euuai araii
ZKI.LNKR'8 w'J IjmIIm' Hid Hniao Miwoa,
with ailk wonited button holea ar the rraataut baa
aim vou have aver teen.
T
for MOTES, GIX FALLS !
ntflmY fi fti A Tr TT7
XanrvtTvroivr
? -
J

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