OCR Interpretation


The Memphis appeal. (Memphis, Tenn.) 1886-1890, April 22, 1886, Image 2

Image and text provided by University of Tennessee

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024448/1886-04-22/ed-1/seq-2/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 2

V -
ME3IPIIIS DAILY APPEAL THURSDAY. APRIL 22, 1886.
TOE RXIGnrS OF LIBOR.
THE HIS AKD OBJECT" OF THS
OKGAMZATiON
Farther Explained to the House In-
Tftitlttins fommittfe Test!
007 of Witnfiws.
Washington, April 21. The sec
en. ! ocmiou cf the Libor Investigation
Committee in Imiii in the rrom of
tlm Homau Committee on Eleitions,
lare airy apartment, which was
crowJeU t itt utmost capacity by
newspaper men, pm-toog directly in
terested in the inquiry, and ipecutora
attracted there by a feeling of carios
ity. The boar of meeting was fixed at
10:30 o'clock, bat it iu nearly an
boar lsv.er when the committee was
called to order.
Mr. McDowell, a rather nnder-eixed
man, .with high forehead crowned
Withauitof dirk hair, and loaking
abotjt the age which be gave, thirty
eight. (fa worn and examined, lie
itaUM that be was a manufacturer of
machinery. He was member of the
KLiuhts of Labor, but held no official
posit on.
Ttie C! airman Without divulqirjg
any of your secret, will you please
state wlia' ire the objects of t'nat or
ganization ?
Witness To elevate the members
by beliiing them to educate them
ejlvee; by helping them to save that
which an average workman lias wasted
through bad habits; ti lift him from
the condition through which he has
fallen throniih m h habit-, and make
him thereafter an employer instead of
an employe; to so educate him by
comparison of ideas and by discussing
qunntions that help to educate, that he
is able to deal wi h and f rap the sub-
tects which affuit not only hiinulf,
rut his employer; that he may In
come a better woikmnn.fiommand bet
ter wages, and by co-operating with
his employer help him to such prod's
that be will bo ablo to pay better j
wages.
The Chairman A to th re any in
junctions on the Knig'its of Labor
tinder which the public could not
know all that you have stated ?
Ihe witness I do not undernfand
that there is anything in the rules ol
the organisation which prohibit any
member from telling just the facts
that have been brought out by your
u remponse to question by Mr.
Crain the witness mado a statement
coverlj alj the details of the attemt
to arbitrate Id t Ween lh Kn'.uU "of
Labor. repwBfmted by Mr. Powderly,
tad the Missouri Pacific, represented
by Mr. Goa'd. He read the letters
which passed between those gentle
men on March 27 and which have
already been published.
The witness not having a copy of
one ol trie letters una. bwayne rose
and said, that as counsel for the rail
road company, he would be glad to
supply the copy,
Mr. Buchanan said that while he
did not object to the admiaaion of
papers in the possession of anybody,
he did not wish it to be uudtirstocd
that the committee had taken any
action in regard to pnrticj being pres
ent by connsel.
The Chairman We have no cotin
eel here.
Gen. Swnyne apologized for having
addretsed the committee in the capac
ity of counsel ; he thought it was an
understood thing that counsel was in
attendance. The witness then pro
ceeded with his statement.
Allur delivering Mr. Powderly's
second letter to Mr. Gould he bbw Mr.
Gould personally, and that gentleman
expressed a desire to see Mr. Powder
in ..J 1,1,,11.. !,.. .I--
They mt Mr. Gould on the fallowing
day. Mr. Hopkins joined in lha in
terview. Mr. Gould expressed him
self fo strongly in favor of arbitrating
the differences that it seemed, to wit
ness, that an agreement was sure to be
reached. They met again in the even
ing, and Mr. Gould produced and read
to Mr. Powdarly, as a result tf the
morning conversation, a telegram he
proposed to send to Mr. Hoxie. Mr.
Gould read the telegram down to the
woida "We see no objection to arbi
trating any difficulties between the
employes and the company past or
futqiv," and then asked Mr. Powderly
if it was satisfactory, "Bo far," Mr,
Powderly answered. Mr. GouiJ said :
'Then 1st it end there." The witness
suggested that Mr. Gould should put
the telegram t lit j the form of a letter
to Mr. Powderly, and Mr. Powderly
agreed that if the General Executive
Board approved of the rest of the let
ter the men would be ordered back to
work. After Mr. Powderly left Mr.
OoulJ placed Uiu letter in wit
ness's hand with the understanding
that it the order t o go to work was
issued ti e order and the letter
weie to be given to the press thnt
night. Toward the end of the inter
view Mr. Gould received a telegram
which seemed to disturb him and said
thtrj was something wionst iu (St.
Louis. The witness said: "Don't at
this stage split hairs. Tell Mr. Hoxie
in taking the men back tow. rktj
that pud. Mr. Gould wiahed to see Mr.
Powderly, but that gentleman could
nctg), ami witness attl Mr. Turner
went to see Mr. Gould with the ques
tion from Powderly: "Do 1 uuder
stand from your personal let'er of this
date that your company refuses arbi
tration and must I so telegraph to
Martin Irons?" i Mr. Gould was not
in and Mr. Hopkins answered bv say
ing: "No; we do not. He is not so
to underttind that letter."
Mr. Buchanan inquired whether iu
fact an order for the men to go to
work had been issued by the Execu
tive Board as a result ol the negotia
tions and correspondence.
Witness replied that such an order
bad been issued on the evening of
March 2Mb.. The order was piedi
cated, be said, on the correspondence
and on . the undtirstauding that an
actual tolulion had beeu arrived at.
It was not until noon ol the utit day
that any suggestion cf a misunder
standing had reached him. The ulti
mate result was that three members of
the Kxecutive Board went to S:. Louis
Mr. Hays could not tell the committee
what took place there. Witneaa was
not present. Another attempt was
made at New York, through Oyrns W
Field.to bring about a conclusion, but
it tailed.
Mr. Burns Have yon sufficient evi
dence to enable vou to state that the
men on s'rike at St. Louis would have
promptly obeyed the order to resume
work if Mr. llcxie had complied with
toe order sent to bim by Mr. Gould.
Witness I have not the slightest
donot ol it-
Mr. Burns Have you any evidence
tending to show any secret instruc
tions from Gould to Hoxie inconsist
ent with his teli graph dispatch em
bodied in his letter to Mr. Powderly?
Witness Nothing except the allu
sion in Powderly's lpatch to the
"letter of instructions" that and the
order issued on the line.
v Mr. Crain What was the original
cause of the strike?
Witness in reply to this question
made long statement, involving the
difference between the principle of
payment of day work and piece work,
and tuoted Gc aid as saying that by
making a change of that sort in the
Western Dnicn Telegraph Company
he bad effected a saving of 80 per
cent He ' ceded that the general
came of this strike and of recent
strikes all ovei the co unrrv had been
the successful strike on the horse-tar
lines in New York but February, that
ha 1 commanded fuch universal public
sympathy that workmen, whenever
they had a grievance or wrong, j jined
together and made applications to
form assemblies of Kuigh'sof Labor.
This wan eo general O at the order
had increased more in the month of
Februa-y last than it had in the prior
eight years. As an a idit'or.al reason,
be alleged the universal system of
watering railroad eto k, which made
it necessary for railroad managers to
eciew down the rates of labor as mnch
as possil la.
, Mr. Crain asked what remedy be
could suggest for that, -
Wit was replied that the remedy
was te enforce the law. The law of
veryMta'e required that dollar for
dollar should be paid for railroad
stock, but that provision of lsw was
evaded by the railroad managers form
ing themselves into a credit mobilier
and a Cons ruction Company and is
suing to themselves $100 of stock for
every fl or $10 of work.
The Cbairmau And your theory is
that tho exactions made upon the
men employed nn the road arc caused
by the attempts to enable the railroad
cioipiiniea to pay dividends on wa-
tumi tu: !
Witueae Tha. is the theory, and
there Is groat irritation about it all
over the country.
Mr. Grain la there no way In your
orKaniiitiob by wh'.ch the action of a
District Assembly ordering a strike
ran be pased npon by the Kxecu'ive
Cjinniitee bef ire the strike is per
mitted? WitnessThere is no law ol the or-
ennis ition on the subject. This whole
thing was unexpected and unprepared
for. The whole epirit of the organiza
tion is contrary t j strikes. It has an
educational (jiei n'z ition.
Mr. Crin Dj yon not think (it has
so struck met that Mr. Gould himself
was verr firly disposed toward your
organisation?
Witness TLat has been my full
impression from what I taw of him.
My impression was that he wanted to
be fir; that he intended to be fair. It
has always ssemed to roe that Mr.
tloxm Zr. ! r m BOra.
wuigo. UO wai unwilling to come
d0T, and that when Mr. Gould found
him rebellious in not carrying out the
arul'rauoa he ouiint to have issued a
Eositive ordr ti that effect, or possi
ly bad Mr. Hoxie resign. But he
turned round and split hairs with the
committee. He had agreed to arbi
trate everything, past, present and
future; but be would not take this
special arbitration out of Mr. Uoxie's
hands.
Mr. Crain You mean that Gould
permitted himself to be controlled by
Hoxie?
Witness That is the way it has ap
peared to me. Still I cannot under
stand the letter of instiuctions
offered by Mr. Hoxie.
Mr. Cruin With the exception of
thnt, eiicuimtnnco, which seems sus
picious, your impression is that Mr.
Hoxie is the responsible party for the
continuance of the strike?
WitatsE Yep, sir. I never met
him personally, but, from talking
with thoie who nave met him. I am
s r ingly inclined to that opinion.
Mr. Buchanan A statement has
been in ado in the newspapers to the
effect that you and Mr. Gould were
working this maiter together for the
purpose of Its effect upon tha stock
market. I do not wish to humiliate
vou enough to ask you if that be true,
but I simply mention the fact so as to
allow you to make any explanation
you desire.
The Witness I never saw any state
ment to thai effect; I never had any
acquaintance with Mr. Gould until I
met him la connection with this mat
ter; I have never bought or sold a
share of stock on a margin. There is
not a word of p ossible troth in the
suggestion.
Mr. Burns Do you think that the
system of pooling the earnlnge of the
railroads bad anything to do with the
strike? i '
Wits -INo. The mofet economical
management is that which necessi
tates the least expenditure. The gen
eral theory eu to the building up of
new lines of railroads, causing com
petition and reducing rates, is a grand
mistake. Business should be done
with the least possible investment,
not only of labor, but of capital; sud
until the possibilities of a single rail
road are exhausted a second line
Bhould not be built. But there is
lomething in the way of government
supervision of railroads, by means of
hieh the dpih H a resulting from non
competition shall not inura alone to
the railroad company but to the whole
people. Take, for instance, two cities
like Bnffa'o at.d New York. The New
York Central had a line of railroad
between those two cities, and had a
monopoly of the business. It cost
that company 00 per cent, to operate
the road, leaving 40 per cent, of net
earnings. Another line was built
along side, sod there yott have got 100
per cent, of expenses. If the
thing could be regulated so that
one railroad should do the busi
ness it would get not only a fair
ritoro of its capital but it would be
enabled to give lower rateB of traffic
and bettor wages to its employes.
Mr. Burns There being already
two riilrciUs built and beimr ooerated.
is it better for a majority of the work
ing people ol the country that there
should be competition Letweon those
two lines, or that there should be a
pooling of their earnings ?
WiUiess It would be better that all
tho business should be done ou the
one 10 ul at the minimum of cost, and
that the benefits of it should go cot
alone to the owners of the road, but
to the country at large. In other
worde, you must not double expenses
in orucr to got economy.
nr. iiuins would you then sug
gest the abandonment of one line of
road and the concen'ratiou of all the
business on the other?
WittietE I certainly should..
Mr. Burns That would reduce the
number ol employes one-half.
Witness Yee, 'it would; but they
would immediately rind employment
in other walks of life where they
would not be living by a tax upon the
country. I do not think there is a
railroad in America which has been
pressed to half its carrying capacity.
Mr. Parker Does not the trouble
arisi partly from competition of labor
ers? Is not that ons of the bottom
sources of all this trouble?
Witness No: you will find that the
greatest difficulty ban not been a de
mand for increase of wages.
Mr. Parker I would like to hear
your views as to an adjustment of this
competition in labor.
Witness The subject is a verv
broad one, and it is one which bus
been the subject of discussion since
thepe troubles began. One of the best
suggestions thst has been made to me
on the subject I wonld like to repeat
It is that a conference should take
p'ace between representative men
frrm the labor ognizatioDS and rep
resentative men f on trade organizt
tions; tbat they should meet and
thoroughly disco ts the whole subject.
As to this c-n'eet between capital and
labor, I look npon them a being nec
essarily p rtners, as much so as man
and wife. Such a discussion as tbat
would be approached by railroad men
in a different spirit from that which
they would manifest in a ditcuis!on
with subordinate brakemen. In this
way there would be gathered the wis
dom of able men who have been
thinking oyer the subject. I don't
feel th it I have had enough experi
ence to be able to lecapitu at a the re
suits of cuch a conference.
The Chairman Do you think that
the time has arrived when this coun
try will be compelled to f ay who may
come to it and who may not come ?
Witness It does seem to me tbat
our capacity to absorb Chrittsndom is
somewhat strongly taxed.
Mr. Buchanan We sre troubled as
much by pagan as by Christendom.
MB. POWDKBLY
was then recalled and gave a history
of the Knights of Labor. The organi
sation, he said, was intended to take
in not only the man tbat worked at
the bench, but every man who toiled
by hand or train in any honest occu
pation. We left out one or two occu
pations, lawyers and bankers, because
we fslt they were fully capable of
tak ng cire of themselves.
The Chairman How sbjut preach
ers.
Mr. Powderly Once in a whllo we
get one of them. We will not take in
a oaloon keeper. Even if a member's
wifa begins to sell liquor we icake
him take a divorce, not from his wife,
but from the organization.
The Ch uiman Io other words, it is
a benevolent society for the protection
of all kinds of people who toil aud is
eLt'roly within the law.
Mr. Powderly Yes; it is entirely
within the law.
Mr Parker What is the number of
the present membership.
Mr. Powderly Our present mem
bership does not exceed 500 000, al
though we bave been credited with
5,000,000.
The Chairman Are women mem
bers ol the organization?
Mr. PowJoily" Y') on an equal
footing with meu.
The Chairman-. When W w9Pen
prat J"'- '
Mr. Powdarly In 1881. We claim
that if women peform equal work
they Bhould receive equal pay. We
have an assembly of women with a
membership of 1300, and from the
day of the oran'zalion to the present
day a single expulsion or suspension
has never taken place. They manaie
their affairs in such a way as to reflect
credit upon them, and to be a pattern
for the men.
Mr. Crain Do you make any differ
ence as to the admission of colored
men into the organisation?
Mr. Powderly We make no dis
tinction in regard to color, creed, sex
or condition, We have one assembly
in New Y'ork where the president is a
Roman Catholic, the vice-president a
Presbyterian and the man wLo occu
pies tho next pouitio.i a Hindoo. Col
ored men seldom enter the assemblies
of white members. They have as
semblies of their own, an i are manag
ing thorn very nicely.
Mr. LuchiiriBn Up to how lately
have you workel a your traile?
Mr. Powderly Not since Ma'cb,
1877.
Mr. Buchanan Since that time vou
have been engdig-d as you aro now ?
Mr. Powderly Yes, principally. I
wo:k harder now than I ever d;d;
eometimes eighteen hours a day.
mb. m'dowki.l,
npon being recalled, and ooked as to
his connettiou with tho Knights of
La' or, said that be had beeu conccted
with the oruan za'.ion cbout eight
years; that he was a machinist by
trade, and Unit to-day he was at the
head of one of the largest miicLina
works in tha ctmutry.
The Chairman There io nothing
tbat you know o! in the organization
which is incoLsirilent with obedience
to law and with the administration of
government?
WCUowell- Net i nn whatt v3r. On
the other hand, it is a pnrfect sup
porter of the law in every particular.
Mr. Buchanan Your observation is
that the fairer treate the better paid
and the mote contented the American
workingmnn is the better ci'izn he
makes?
Mr. McDowell That is exactly
true.
Mr. Powderly One of tho things
which a member of the organization
proiuieesjo do ia this: "We shall,
with all cur struggle?, support the
lawa made to Larmouizd with the
the Interests of Ubor and cap;td."
Tho commi'.t.e aJjaumed until 11
o'clock to-morrow, w hen, it is under
stood, the examination of Mr. Jity
Gould will be commeuced.
Nnnirlpnl Election la Illlnoln.
Ciiicaoo, I i,i, April 21. -Municipal
elections took place in many Illinois
towns yesterday, nnd in tho majority
of cases where tho contest, was be
tween license and no license tho
former was victori'ius. At Jobot, Pax
ton, Urbana, Bolvidcro, Hoc ford,
Monmouth, Mount Sterling and Lin
coln the license and high license alder
men aro now in the majority. At
Hennepin, Dwight, Anna, Mon'ticello
and other smaller towns, where license
or no license was the issue, the pro
hibitionists were victorious.
Mrs. Henry Ward Bkrcheb uses
and gives away over 300 Allcock's Po
rous Plasters every year. She writes
that she has found them a "genuine
relief for lvmnt of tho aches nnd pains
w hich flesh ia heir to." The Hon.
Samuel J. Randall slid that they cured
him of inflammation of tho kidneys
w hen everything else failed, and cured
him of a severe cold that threatened
to run into pneumonia. The Hon.
James W. Hosted writes that they
cured his son of chronic rheumatism
and relieved him of serious pulmo
nary troubles.
The I.nnra Morn Murder JNyaiprjr
Bkpsswu'k, Mo., April 21. The"
detd b uly ofJLsura Stern, a handscime
young girl of this city, eighteen years
of ace, was found in the pub'ic school
grounds yesterday morning. The cor
oner's jury is now holding an inquest
over the body. Many think thnt the
girl was murderad on account of sus
picious circumstances surrounding the
event. She left home at about 9
o'clock Monday night, saying that she
was going to visit her man led et's'er.
This is the last that was seen of her
until her corpse was found.
Sk-olfB EmnlHlon r Pare
Cod Liver Oil, with Ilypopbosphitee,
in Pulmonary A flections and Scrofu
lous Diseases. Dr. Ira M. Lang, New
York, says: "I have prescribed Scott's
Emulsion and used it in my family
and am greatly pleased with it. Have
fouad it very serviceable in Scrofulous
diseases and Pulmonary aflections."
THE TELEPHONE LQUIR1.
H I'M PH BEYS OF THE GLOBE
COJIPJSY BEARS
Testimony to tinrlacd's Worth as as
Honest Man and Incor
ruptible Officiu. 4
Wakiiikgton, April 21. The Tele
phone Investigation Committee re
sumed its labor this morning with
the examination of Vt. J) Humphreys
of the Globe Telephone Company of
-ew jorat. in bepieiutier no caneu
upon the Attorney-General, but Mr.
Garland had cot him short off and re
fused to hear him. "1 told liini." said
tho witness, "that I did not come to
see Mr. Garland, but to see the Attorney-General,
that he must not con
sider himself individually in the case
but as Attorr ey-Generel. He told me
positively that he would have nothing
to do with ir. 1 told him he must
have something to do with it, that I
had no other recourse, but he still re
fused to say a wont. I then asked
him to whom I could go; to refer me
to somebody, but he sad he could not
and would not refer me to anybody ;
that he was estopped from any action.
I went there to get some expression of
opinion but I did not manage to do it.
Finally I presented my petition to Mr.
Goode, and it was referred to the In
terior Department. I was considera
bly worked up, and thought he should
have more nerve. However, I went
away feeling mnch more respect for
Mr. Garlund than I had before. He
certainly convinced mo that he was
incorrupt."
"Did you go there to corrupt him?"
inqu'red Mr. Kanncy.
"I did not," responded witness; "I
mny have had a susp cion regarding
tho reform protcnoions of the Demo
crutic HilminiHt ration."
Chairman Boyle But you think
better of it now?
Witness I found thnt some Demo
crats were honest
Mr, Kanney ( arcnsticnlly) And
especially if they served your purpose.
Witness I think if an honest man
lives, it is Mr. Garland, and Secretary
Lamar is another.
Assistant Commissioner of Patents
Vance was the next witness, and his
testimony was uninteresting. During
hi8 ex"m.imioa Mr. Rfinney said that
tlle C-rman had impeached his
(Kanney's) motives, and that he must
withdraw his remarks. The chairman
refused to do so, and Mr. Kanney said
his ttatements were false. Some ex
citement ensued, tut Mr. lianney
withdrew his remarks, and peace
reigned.
Adjourned.
School Strike at Iat Nt. I4nla.
St. Louis, Mo , April 21. Not Io be
behind tho times, about fifty boys at
tending the upper school in East St.
Louis, went out on a strike yesterday,
demanding shorter hours. These boys,
armed with pickets nnd broom
handles, marched in a body to the
Clay school and endeavored to per
suade the scholars to follow their ex
ample, but met with no success. Tho
upper boys declare that they will not
attend school until their demand for
shorter hour is irriinted.
THE LIVERVORE FOUNDRY
FOUNDRY & MACHINE DJS1MT,160 to 171 Adams St.,Memphip
Iron and
Urns a
CaatlUKs,
Enftlnra,
-.,,''" ,v -
-'--"-TT fl
Kaw-Mllla,
ri- Mill'
Honse
1 nn( A
Ilnlllin
Work,
Gpnrral
'.Krpalra.
I
iTS-ri-a.jBtJ,
IKON & RAILWAY SUPPLY DEP'T, 226 and 228 Second St.
(Successors In this lepnrtment to JOHN MAK0QUE.)
ans-Wrlto n for informntion on ANY 'I1IINQ in either line.
MEISTERS.
MASONIC
J. A. BAILEY.
J. L BAILEY & CO,
3F HVCT
Second Street, Memphis.
A
I.AR0B AND COMPLETE STOCK OP
Miitrinlit. Piimp. Oriva Wnlln, Trim, Li -
FRANK F. WOODS.
WOODS & SWOOP E,
GWIAGEU1&IES.WA60NS.
Harness Saddles, Agricultural Implements and Machinery.
UEOKGI.l COttRI.VED COTTOX AXD COBN PLANTEB.
33 Weoonl Mrpei. ftlniihl. Tenn.
W. A. GAGE & CO.
Cotton Factors,
IV o. 300 Front Street. : Ilemnlit. Tenn
DILLARD
OTTON
3f empliift, Tenu
Its" Vth 4IvHiireei to
AW AKD PLAK1KCMIIJL, SAfMARO,
Doors, Sash, Blinds, Molding, Lumhor,
Lath and Shingles, Flnn, Oiiiss ud Cedar Twla,
W. 2ff. ILAXD EMAN,
Pratidcat of the Grant LOUISVILLE COO.
KIKR-JOl'KNAL CO.. tclU what
h knowi or
Wintersmith's Chill Cure.
Orrics or the Cortrra-JouiKAL.
Dr. Winfef-.Miu, or I waive rule I bar
observed fur many yean, the vain of your
remedy prompting me to y, in reel to
your reqaeit, wnat I xnow or your Cbill
care, ibe private aurnce or iti etnracr
I had. and the food reaulU of iu efforts 1
Bad observed on Mr. it. W . Meredith, who,
for more than fifteen years, had been fore
man of my oflire, induced me to test it ia
mr family. The re-ulu bare been entirely
atitfaotory. The firt eie wm of two
J ears' standing, in which I believe every
nown remedy bad been tried with tempo
rary reliel the chills returning periodically
and with sremingly increased sevrrity.
Your cure broke them at once, and there has
been no recurrence of them for more than
six months. The other rase was ol a milder
form, and yielded more readily te other
remedies; but the chills would return at in
tervals until your medicine was used, since
which time, now several months, they bave
entirely disappeared. From the opportu
nity I nave had to judge, I do not heiitata to
express my belief that your Chill Cure is a
vnlunble speoilo, ana performs all yon
promise for it. Kespei-tfully,
W. N. BALDEMAN.
ARTHUR PETER k CO., Agents, Louis
ville, Ky.
Humphreys1
HOMEOPATHIC
I
ICS
CureDiaeMMoX
Horses, Cattle. Sheep
DOGS, HOGS, POULTRY,
In nso for over 20 years by Farmers,
Stockbreeders, Horse It. 1L, &o.
Used by U. S. Covornmont.
3 STABLE CHART f
Mounted on Rollers & Book Hailed Pres.
iluniptirRiVMrd. Co.. 103 Fulton 81.. N. T.
mi iiiinnrryrsrssrwiitj-BPBMwwsBss)
SPECIFIC No. iti
iu uc JO yvirn, Tha only nurcjeseftil renipd; tot
Nsrvous Debility, Vital Weakness,
and Pro t ration, from ovr-work or other cauwflL,
$1 ,nr viol, or 6 vinlttand larru vial powder, for
Sold by iHu'mtiHTH. rinc powtp.nd oi receipt of
pritx Hiiwphrcjv'M.'dlcliMl., 101 VulUa 1M., . V.
J. F. IIOLST &BR0.,
(SCCCSSBOBS TO Q. B. BOLBT i BRO.
Funeral Directors,
330 MAIN ST., MEMPHIS.
A FULL and ooraplote stock of Wood and
MeUllio Canes and Cukets, Cloth-Covered
Caskets and Burial Kobes always on
hand. r Orders by telegraph promptly
Sleld.
V F NTm AGENTS, Man and Womer
1 Mil I tU to ,slI .. TUB CHILD'!
BIBLB " Introduction by Rev. J. II. Vil
cent, D.D. One agent has sold 65 in a towi
of 674 people; odd 73 in a village ol 7W;oo.i
new agent 85 in hi days; one 2'3 in 1 succea
sive weeks; one 40 in 3 days at two diflerent
times. Experience not necessary Address
CASSELLACO. (L't'd),
40 npfirhnTrt "trt. nifuro.
AND MACHINE COMPANY.
Bar Iron,
- 'r -r- I Boiler Iron
' j!i j. A' ' '; ''2Shee Iron,
111
Railway
Jnppllea,
TEMPLE.
Q. E. WITT.
P
IB ES
PLUMBKRS. OAS AND STB AM FITTBRS,
n.l iml -tiine Pipe, ftm Kintiirm. fHohei, Ktc
W. C. SWOOPS.
& COFFIN,
FACTORS
itferobMnla and PI miters.
Ifll
x"rM'fw weiennary opecu
ANDREW 8TEW AET, Nsw Orleut,
STEWART, EWYR
Wholesale Grocers, Cot. factors
KO.3S0 AND S5S
SfEWiUlf BROTHERS & COiPAiJI
C0TT0X FACTORS AND COMMISSION EEliOIANTS,
KEWOBLE1SS, tOCIISIASA.
CHESS-CARLEY C0IP1Y.
Oils KTctVial Stores
Office, 349 Front Street, Memphis, Tens.
L. D. M0LUK8,.f UUJ. E. Godwin A Co. JAB. Y0NQX, 1U oi J. W. Oaldwrtl k 0
MULLINS & TONQE,
Cotton Factors &Commission merchants
No. 1 Howard's Row, Cor. Front and Union, Memphis.
Fulmer.f homtos & Co
Cotton Factors, Wholesale Grocers,
Wo. 300 Front street, : Memphis, Tenn.
SUGGSsPETTIT
WHOLESALE
GROCERS, COTTON FACTORS
And Commission merchants,
SGOand 202 Front St.. Meistpliln. Tenr.
A. VACCARO & Co
IMPOR.TE.R.S
WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALERS,
.T. PORTUK.
Sncceasorik to TOBTEK, TATL02 & CO.,
mtm
0. SOO FRONT STREET, i i MEMPHIS. TS3
ILL FOHTAI
Cotton Factors and Wholesale Grocers
S3S-39S ITroBtSt., SZempbli, Tenn.
BILL, FONTAI!
Cotton Factors, Commission lorcnfi,
Jffo. 11G Bontli Main St.. m. I-oasS.
LARGEST BREWERY IN AMERICA.
Jos, Scklitz Brewing Gompany,
MHjWAUK.HH.
MPMniTTC "DT VrtTF I Offland Botlllnc Worts, 10 Cnlott
S. ROESCHER. Agent, Memohls, Tenn.
' 0
.In im 1883. 390,000 Barrels.......Saln. of M.ssiphla Brancn, JOO.OOO Keg.
' Knlp. In 1H.. gno.om) Hariri..
ADLEB BRO. &G0..261 LI&IN ST
W.LDOUGLAS'
13.00
SHOE
WARRANTED,
MMil
5t!" A I V , i If
E. WITZMAimr Co
Wholesale Dealer and Publisher, '
Sol. AienU tollowing First-Class Instromsntst
PIANOS KBAHICH AC?X?Al?.i&2: "ASK
anil A MASON A HAMS IN, riH II 4 WARtiiS, HI
(JikUAil R CAUO tOlTADI ORtiAN.
asrA NEW 7-OfJTAVE PIANO FOR l0.-i
Write for Oiitaloiniw. Son. 22 and gam SKrOXSl ST.. WF.WPHI"
KELLY, ROPER & BEILLY,
WHOLESALE
Grocers & Cotton Factors,
IS: 3a;Malo Street, Gayo B1Jl.
'ANDREW D. GWT2TTS, Kinr.
0
GO.
STBEET, XESSTliW,
G. W. MAC15A3E.
fa
Mi '
Latest Novelties in Footwear
FOB SPRING AHD SVMMIR.
ZLESAKT STYLES 1
8CPERIOB WOBBI4H8H1P
LOWEST PRICES I
AGENTS FOR THE FAM0TJ6
V. L. Douglas $3.00 Calt Shoes
In Button, Lao. and Congress.
mw Illustrated Catalofu. and Prloe-Uii
Mailed Free on application.
I
rat tra jtmw r m c?
HE & 00,
1 & eo
V . . :

xml | txt