OCR Interpretation


The Memphis appeal. (Memphis, Tenn.) 1886-1890, September 01, 1886, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of Tennessee

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024448/1886-09-01/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

3
TflE COTfOS ItUEKEf.
Week 1 Statement sT KMlpta ! at Htm?-- Wrm U Itirm far aa Taaa
jndlaig September 1, , for la Two rreeedlng lean.
oiricuL tiacRxs or tbe meupbis cottoz hub ahum.
WUr OMaiamt-at af KaJpaa4a mt fatlaa Fraut Itaiakli far the
UaaaalldalMl NlAtmrnt mt m.i. iklanMia. tki 'ain
Taar Kudlajc lapi. 1, 1MI, aa4 for Ik Two rrvavdlac Taaro.
Prlraa of t'oton In Mempbla, far lb Tear Boding Hrpt. 1, 1M4
OmClAL FIGURES Or Tilt MEMPHIS COTTON EXCHANGE.
orncui n0MM3 or run m in puis cottox bxcbasqm.
THE SURPEISLNO IXCBEASE OF
RECEIPTS OK THE S1AP1E
MEMPHIS DAILY APrEAL WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 1, 1880.
n
K
4
BT RrVHH.
5d
w -
33
5X
WH
EN ore
B r
So
if
So
IS
ter
3
t
At Tils Port During the Tear 1885-.lSSS-FIgnres
That Indicate
More liraphlcally
THAN W0I1DS THE RA1E OF
PROGRESS
That Memphis Is MakUsg as a Mar
ket of Unequaled
Facilities.
The cotton season of 1SS5-SG is at
an end the eoVm season of 1SS6-87
is about to bcgiii. Tho old year
peace to her ash's has been laid
tranquilly away, and all eyes are now
turned witWager expectation to its
youngtr and! seemingly, more pros
perous successor. The new year
promises hopefully, bat ere starting
out on our commercial pilgrimage
ior the ensuing twelve months, we
think it will Lc well to review the
past the situations which have dis
closed themselves from month to
month, and the results whieh fol
lowed. The history, though not a
pleasing one, is not altogether bar
ren of bright spots, and its recital
may serve to point a moral and in
culcate a lesson to those who
stranded, and tloee who nearly went
down amid the rocks and breakers
which inevitably beset the paths of
reckless speculation, an over con
fident venture. The cotton sea
son of 1885-86 was born amid
gloom and disaster. Oldham had
beon shut up for four months the
hum of her busy wheels was silent,
her work rooms tenantless. Fall
Hiver was likewise closed, or partial
ly so, as were also many of the prin
cipal cotton factories both North and
South. Dismal forebodings as to the
future were freely indulged in by the
pessimists, and general apprehension
was the order of the hour. These
forebodings were not destined to be
entirely realized. As the Beason
progressed, affiirs b gan to improve.
' Trade in America sprang ud as if by
magic. Stocks of dry goods disap
peared rapidly and idle spindles re
commenced work in every direction.
Tidings came to us from Lancashire
of large sales of cloth and increased
prosperity among weavers, though
English spinners were said to be doing
badly and losing money every day.
This cry had been chronic so long,
however, that many'disbelieved it,
and others thought that the trade
would regulate itself as the sea'
sou advanced. It was hard to
realize that one department of the
industry should be reaping a golden
harvest and the other mourning in
sack cloth and ashes. At all events
the situation was full of promise, and
the world of traffic was sanguine as
to the future. Cotton, strauge to
say, did not share iu the better feel
inir which seemed to nervade all
other departments of trade. On the
contrarj, Middling uplands, which
opened iu New York September 1st
atlOJe and io. Liverpoolat 5Jd, grad
ually shrunk in value until the de
cline culminated the 27th of Febru
ary at 8 II 16c for middling
iu New York, and 4 ll-10d
in Liverpool the lowest points
attained either since or many
years previous to the American war.
A variety ot causes transpired to
produce this unnatural and extreme
low range of prices, though nothing
in the situation warrauted it. The
wail ot the English spinner; hie
hand to mouth policy ot buying-, the
enormous and unwieldly stocks of
cotton piled up in the South in con
sequence thereof; the Anglo-Irish
political iuibronlio resulting in a dis
solution of Parliament; a general
election and change party su
premacy; tho steady and un
precedented decline in silver, and
the constant and increasing raids of
the bears who used every hammer
available to beat the market down,
each and all contributed their quota
and the result was obtained. JIow
far this silver problem will continue
to affect the market remains to bo
seen. Should tho decline go on, its
effect on cotton would soon reach the
rcductio ad absurd um. For instance,
if the value of silver bullion should
by any chuuee shrink 50 per cent
more, cotton, in the proportion
which recent declines have affected
it, would be worth nothing. Indeed,
the freaks of trade lately invoked by
this factor of constantly declining
silver have been almost grotesque.
To exemplify: Trade from India and
China has been very good in Man
chester. Largo sales of cloth were
effected. To repay themselves, the
weavers had to draw on Calcutta,
Bombay and other points. The ex
change was of course payable in sil
ver, and wbeu offered had the same
effect as thruwiug so much
bullion on tho, market. Un
der tbeso offerings silver de
clined, cotton in sympathy declined
with it, and the world was trctd to
the novel spectacle ot good trade
torcing eotton down. This situa
tion ot affairs is anomalous and un
natural aud goes to prove that th
decline in silver enters more largtly
into the value of cottoi than is
either natural or justifiable, end we
think another season will rcgulat it.
It the Orient persists in using a de
based currency she will simply have
to pay a higher price for her goods.
Anyhow, India exports more taaa
she imports, aud as she collects for
her exports in gold she can well af
ford to pay a premium on her im
ports. But w have digressed from
our subject. During the heavy re
ductions in values which we have
alluded to Memphis declined from
9o for middling to 81c. Recognii
ing tho utter absurdity of the price,
in face of the situation Memphis
factors determined to quit selling.
The responsibility was great, but
they resolved to take it. Many of
them covered up their tables and
locked up their cotton rooms. To
buyers who had sold for delivery
abroad, and who went on the mat ket
lo make their selections, they said
3?
H
f-ta
a.-
3
B.pt-4
84
42:
2( a;
15
Mi
5"
1
ft
4
18
0.. .2
m
374
845
1.1411
4fV
4421
1.W
2,215
3.577 1
4.1U8'
21!
8st
774
213
164
2"ll
1,415
5iil
4
5'
451
1.721
ytis
U2
2,172
3,315
2 271
2,20,
W7I
,41S
2,511!
3,4i
S8
,471
2.ti7l
(113
.33
liU
5,:67i 1
H,2ia 1
4.5MI 1
5.4fk): 1
,1C1
Not.
2,7 5
3W9
,'.U1
4. '.57
4 431
S,3'4
,V5
,372
.urn
2,fii
2.1M3
1. K3U
1.8T!
2, Ni
3.45'
5.J
5.457
3,'yyi
4 8
4.WI; 2
4,f.2!t 2
Dec 4
2(7
11
6,8u0
4 55!
4.777
4.HH 1
3.2ti 1
W2
18
1,6'Mi
1 ,S;i7
1.367
6X,t
4.130
1.00
2,344
4,4ii'Ji 1
Jan..
... 1
s
15
2,W
1,111
41
2
2.61 J
.;l
2.K-4
l,57rt'
4t(i
l.'ttl
i.jhI
2,017
5te
17S
1.57B
5?U
1,424
701
:w'
67"!
l.iwi
1jJ4
iti
trr
74
;;7
W.l
mm
Siil
72iH
r.... 5
10
1.132
7W
IK
4 lt
1.2-.3
l.two
14.5
M.i
1.1 111
1.4M
4ffi
1,(44
M4
2.SI
517!
2,m,
S.1.58
4iM.
Mar.. 6
1.717
i,n
1.0K4
sat
SH7!
3i5
W7
121
1.170
tMS
472
2TS
SIS
aw
awt
SIT
U4
m
IB
aei
74
57
2M
8 t
1.201
Aril
MS
74V
575
788
377
IIS
V
IS
ttifli
142
1ST!
2ft4
ll4
674
101
51
im
in
4)H
44' I
471
21
3451
811
1M
2l
144
47
041
11
va-.
67
u
MS
Mi
lui
41
21
as
1
60
13W,
'ana .
4
11
(Mi
lit
7l
34
051
64
31
418
364
24
217
3
aTw
120
1S4
7
14'
I'l
11
241
j
SO
11
Ml
Wl
13S
14
5
s
Jily..- 31
5'
1
67 1
35:
7
7
23
14
30
August i
i:t
211
6-i
60
271
S
so
6 1
"!..
i.5
11.
7
1201
38'
3
2
32
IS
12
14!
5
5i
2
10,
-I-
Total...
77.61658.llll43 WVH81.f48'24.4iala.2f.7ll9 67lll7.442lw.a"9 20 8571 7.W ll.a73'a n1545i(6l430127,.46(IO77
we are offeriot- nothinir. The ef
fect was electric, jnd in many in
stances ludicrous. The buyers were
first astonished, then alarmed and
etartcd in to cover their short sales
at the best figures they could. An
advance was inaugurated and eotton
gradually moved up from 8r0 for
middling to !3c. The cfTcat was felt
in New Orleans and other points and
prices everywhere improved To)
Memphis merchants, however, is due
the eredit.ot havine made the first
stand against a decline which threat
ened to impoverish the entire South
and of bavin established and main
tained a higher ranee of prices than
have existed or been obtained in any
other Southern market. During the
latter part of the 6eaon Memphis
has constantly quoted and obtained
3-lGo more for cotton than New Or
leans and ji more than St. Louis,
and well has ehe been rewarded.
Shipments from point contiguous,
to other markets have flowed in up
on us and Memphis roceipts have
iacreased from -130,000 bales in 1SS4
85 to nearly 550,000 b.iles in 1885
86. Another year it is safe to
prophesy that she will receive and
tell 600,000 bales.
The sterling integrity of Memphis
factors, the vigiiant care with which
they watch the interests ot their pa
trons, the unyielding determination
with which they resist the tendency
to lower prices, the low charges for
handling cotton, are all potent fac
tors in bringing about tho convic
tion to cotton producers that Mem
phis is the liios: desirable market to
ship to, and that conviction is spread
ing and gaining strength with the
progress of years, and at the present
rate of progression it will uot be
many yean before Memphis has es
tablished her claim to be considered
the chief cotton market of tho
South. Her geographical portion,
her unequaled facilities (or transpor
tation both by rail and water, her
proximity to leading centers of cot
ton production, all point to the des
tiny indicated, and the pluck and en
terprise of bcr merchauts may bo re
lied upon to achieve that result.
6I.CTk.MBEb.
The season opened with a stock on
hand September 1st of 1431 bales.
Middling cotton was quoted at 93c,
afaiust 103c the same time in 1SS-1. a
decline in value of lc, due principal
ly to favorable crop prospects and
general belief that tne crop would
exceed 6,500,000 bales. Ou .the 4th
of September the market declined to
9jic, in sympathy with a correspond
ing tall in values at New York, Liv
erpool and other great cotton cen
tors. On the 8th the price of mid
dling was lowered to 93o, and on the
Hth to 9c, which ficure was main
tained until the end of the month.
Keceipts of the month were 19,726
bales and shipments 8216 bales, leav
ing a stock ac the close of 12,872
bales. Sales during tho month were
11,850, ot which 950 were to export
ers. O'TOIKII,
There was steady but gradual do
cliae in the value of the staple dur
ing the month under review. Mid
dling opened ctober 1st at 9to, ad
vanced to 9 5-16o October 5th, but
receded again October 7th to9c, at
which price it remained until Octo
ber 14th when it declined to 9 3-lGo
On the 22d it fell to 9Jc. on the
28th to 9 l-l5fl, and on the 30th to
9c, at which figure the market was
quoted dull. Jteceipts of the month
were 105,879 bales and shipments
64,940, leaving a stock at the close of
5H.K11 bales. Sales during the
month were Ct.000 bales of which
to exporters 29,850.
NOVKMHES.
TTni lin i .fl iianni rtf 1, o w pa.
ipts tbe market oontinuod to de
clin. On the 5th of Novotnber
middling was reduced from 9 to
H 1 ft-1 (rt nt. vhirh rtrlrA snips
wer freely made, breaking tho mar-
act nexi uay io ojo, wnere li re
mained until the 11th, when the
rtrlAA via . nain n n n A n Q
1316o. On the 16th the market
Harassed to bit for nudaling
nd ruled steady at that figure tp
Morember 19th, when the pric ad-
vanAfld tn Oc. and hnlrl flrmltr t
that figure until the close of the
month. Keceipts of the month were
the lnrirpflt nn rpenrit 1.M1 Tli K1pO'
shipments, 101,536 bales, leaving a
stock at the close of 102,989 bales.
Sales during the month were 82,150
bales, of which 53,400 to exporters.
IfECBHBEK.
Under the weight of heavy re
ceipts at all the ports tbe market
again eased off early iu tho month
and remained drooping until the end.
On December 1st middling was quo
ted at, 9 cents. The next day it de
clined to 8 15-16o; December 3d the
quotation was lowered to Sic, at
which figure it remained until De
cember 7th, when the price receded
70
818
7
70
It
t
245
73
1H.1
844
2H
6
Ki
2ul
212
250l
511
1.200
2 1W
S4
831
2,2.
1MH
'M
620
3.4.'4
4 "7.11
8.2f4
1.161
1,175
Hit
(U5,
l,li:
Iflll' I.)
I iW-Jl
7
U 01
l.a
31
4;
a'i
H58
3iltti2C;243!23
8. Rii :u s-'m'Aj
6.WS3
l.ON
817
1.030
1,17
6.Si4
2,01
211
tAt
4 UJ0!;ii.uS3l27
3,fv')i:(4 3352S
4,oooi:i4.64i.i .13
i.imiiiw fiA M
1.S27
1,217
7.244
5.3M)I
2"4
174'
472
1.4V
734
1.2i3
1,475
5.1H1I
2,34i
1.217
W2
822
4.0U
7ul
4,(W)!:t4 WO,:,
7.437!41.10S',33,
6,Oll!33,973 25,
2 V'J :(1J,17
1.20()il7.2'l 8.
1.121
370i J.OSIli
22-11 3 kii'Jl
r
3i:
H5H
1.12S
1,1 l
1.2"
m
102
l.n
807:
422 4 8u'
24i't
041
4711 t iH
2iii
136
6
45i
lti 2,0'Oi
44 '11
2V0! 1,S4;
51ii
115
6'4)l
375
;io
2.'5
544
lirt 1,W!
in:
144
81
15
183
2fS
1.5U
174
l.HOi
l.WK
241
913
175
225
454
416
5U
2;1
2.12i
356
"i"4S
186
""
mi
20
175
1,5 LK
1.44U
l.ar-n
1.4MW
8
S4W
m
M
W
111
lv
7
10i
117
12-1
i
181
Wi
53
41
W
T
S
2001.,
SO!
28l
54
10i
8K.5
SSi
617
sort
12 WO
45fl
4
37(1
822
84
US
101
IS
lav
i
4
ii
8
5
82
11
8
SSfl
S4T
68
14
2K7I
en
2
u
a
(M
i7:
60
41)
1M
T4
1M
4a
30
40
1
104
1
U
41
48,
40
SU
4H
41
2
18
. 41
.......
a
80
30
0071
34
Hi
Ml
6
iH
98
18
8
II
2t
14
a
2
10
4 U7
1.U64
I.J22
670
3V7
21
11
S
4
6
8
164
SO
10
80
10
sot
1
31
'i'.l
l
2
U
IS
6
13
Si
71
So
30
3"
30
8"
30
21 1
8
0
1
1,
4
15',
a1
31
1
to 8 1316o, followed tbe next day
by a dooline to 8o, at which figure
the market remained steady until
December 15th, when another reduc
tion took place to 8Jo. No further
chaige was recorded until December
28ih, when middling declined to
8 9-16e, where it remained until De
cember 31st, when it reached to 8fo,
and closed steady at that figure. Re
ceipts of the month were 142,171
bales; shipments, 85,374 bales, leav
ing a stock at tbo elese ot 158,333
bales. Sales during the month wero
69,100 bales, of which 43.000 were
to exporters;
JAM'AitY.
Tho beginning ot a nw year
usurped the hope among cotton
men that a turning point had been
reached and that better prices might
be looked forwarded to with confi
dence. This hope was dettined to
disappointment. The market became
better for a. few days but soon re
lapsed into the former condition of
affairs, the price at the end of tho
month showing no variation Jrom
the ruling figures at tho beginning.
January 2d middling wau quoted at
8 916c. On the 4th the price ad
vanced to 8'11-lOc, and this advance
was maintained until the 16th, when
a gain of an additional sixteenth ws
recorded and the price of middling
fixed at 8jo, which price was steadily
held until the close of tho month.
The receipts of the month showed a
marked falling off from the figures
of tho month preceding, aggregating
33,475 bales, acainst 112,171 for De
cember. Shipments, 50,698 bales,
leaving a stock at the close ot 141,
110 bales. Sales 47,300 bales, ot
which 29,625 to exporters.
a jr.ur.li ) .
This was a disastrous month for
tho staple, the net loss in prices
amounting to c per pound. The
month otpeued with middling at
8 11-lGo ; on tho 8th it declined to
8Jc, and on the 10th to 8 9-16c. No
further change in prioes was ex
perienced until the 18th, when
prices wero lowered to SJc, followed
the very next day by a further de
cline to 8 7-16o. On the 23d there
was another loss of Jo to 85c, and the
tone of the market quoted irregular.
On tie 26tb the price of middling was
reduced to 8tc, the lowest figure of
the year (and the lowest since De
cember 0, 1878, when the price
touched 8jc), nnd so remained until
the clso of the month. The re
ceipts for the month were 35,802
bales; shipments, 39,185 bales, leav
injr'a stock at the end of the month
ot 137,727 bales. Sales, 33,525 bales,
of which exportors took 18,850 baUs.
ifAtu'n.
During this month a healthy reac
tion set in, and under the general bo
lief that cotton had touched a point
below tho cost of production, specu
lation beoame active and the price
advanced rapidly. In New York on
March 1st August futures advanced
19 points from 9.08o to 9.27c. On the
31 the price of August deliveries
had reached 9.45o, and from that
point there was a steady advance un
til on March 5th tbe prico touched
9.70c. New York spots also ad
vanced from 8Jc March 1st to 91c
for middling. In Bytnpathj with
this advance our market jumped to
8'o Maroh 3d, 8i March 4t,h, 8c
March 5th, and remained at the lat
ter figure until March 13th, when
8 9 16d was tho recorded quotation.
On the 15th it aain advanced toSjje,
and on tho 18th to 8f o, which figure
was maintained, with slight varia
tion, to tho close of the month. Itc
ooipts for tho month, 30,302 bales;
shipments, 63,604 baits, leaving a
stouk at tho close of the month of
104,365 baloi. Sales, 57,600 bales, of
whioh exporters took 45,950 bales.
A PHIL.
Further gains in the prico of cot
ton were mado during the monih un
der review. Middling opened on
the 1st at 8o, advanced to HJcon
the 9th, touched 9 a on the 12th and
remained at that figurs until tho
16th, when the price weeded to 8io,
where it romained till April 30th,
when the market advanced to
8 15 16o and was quoted firm at that
figure. Keceipts ior the month were
11,706 bales, shipments 48,512 bales
leaving a stock at the end of the
month of 66,533 bales. Sales, 40,350
bales, of which exporter took 24,
650 bales.
HAT.
This month was uneventful, and
diminished receipts gave the market
a quint but steady tone. On tho 3d
middling advanced to 9c, which price
was maintained till the 10th, when
in sympathy with a decline of Jo in
New York spots, middling was low
ered Jo here to 8Jc, at which figure
the market remained steady in the
face of liberal offerings' and free sell
iug. On the 15th another decline
was noted to 8 13-16o, lollowed by a
'a. 1 o b 1 i : gS SS S? 8 S -arriD Silm. Ctosmo Plicis.
r? r? rS r rS rt 1 " I? i? ""K F P r ft s s g F"
p- p f- i- P !r. i E i i : 3 : CJ 5 S 5 1
grt 4 . loO ! 992 1,1'U 2.5H6 Sept 4 20 902 1.672 loo loo Nom'l Nom'l i ! 9
1: 15 .. i 177 1 1-. 489 1.239 11 1.1H lof. i,499 1,125 1.12 Nnm'IIKoB'l ' 9'i
. 18 .. 271 223 2f '18 li W2 aa 1,183 18 3,Ul 0U 4,8U 2,0'd 2,05" Nom'l Nom'l '2 9'J i"J
' 2 2,499 5 14 l.Jnl 1.731 4V5 2,070 2 6,i S.731 8,127 4,075 4.1.76 Noiu'UNom': 9'Z 9V? M
Oot...2 i.V 1 2,942 1.201 84 1,149 144 5.(71 9ul 3.291 Oct 2 11.721 5.671 14.177 l.Kio 4. Kid f.,,500 Nom'l Nom'l !'. V'l !''-
9 1.181 :t J,wi 4.307 1,147 269 1,S5 11 9,2 S.f.w fi.mi 9 15..' 81 9.9.U 19.7i 4.9"i 5.8ri IO.hwh om'l Nom'l Vl M'2 lt'4
16 1.625 4 2.8041 S.H90 2,415 11 1,047 S07 1I.V9S 10,111 V,Ki5 16 .'l,S2n il. will 29.123 4,:t'i 0.2. Oilu 5(NlNom'l Nora '1 9 3-10 9 7-11
23 2.S67 153 4,94hi 3.S92 S.I35 791 2,441 25 17.2f.2i 9,2ii 1,IM l 2it,24'4 17.252 88,114 10,90(1 7.H'4;i.75(i kooi'l M '.Hi 9 7-10
30 S.532 81 4,u72 3.493 S 332 1,151 1,019 2,8 20,9.17 19, '18 16,209 30 34 829 20 917 51,506 6,550 10.45(l16,(lilil Nom'l 8. H4 9 V4
Not....... 6 3.U5I W 4.420 5,550 2,"ii3 420 12 969 U.i lH.'dKI 1H.743 Nor 0 :.IH". H :m ili.iti ll.n5.li 8,15(1 20,11m Nom'l 8J Wi 8'u 9'i
13 3,066 2.9S1 1,W S,6wi 4,070 8'9 4,8.15 094 23.12; I8,i 17,927 13 :!4.;fi U92 W.378 1H.HMI ,W' 25.750 Nom'l u 2 8 13-16 1".
2l 6.802 2 2l'J 4 939 2.44'i 4,1)4 CM 4.5WI J.3S 28 IM 20,211 10,747 20 34 640 28, 1 86,622! 8 8i0 10.960 lS.'Kio Nom'l 8"i -J 9 9
27 .8,147 1,664 3.270 3.2K2 2.S42 711 5 iM7 4,264 20.8V, 15 217 15. 4M 27 il.:W. Lv..s i'.,:iv.';il,200 6.400 16 tm No'l s-'1" 8! 9 9S
Do.. 4 4 (IS4 U60 4.901 4 611 913 C95 4,289 1.243 2I,0 10 278 27.754 Doo....... 4 V4.9iio 21,ii l"9.676j 8,4"0 6,20j14.Hni Nom'l 8 5 16 8 9-16 s'i tfj-lft
11 4,6'H 5,621! 4 749 1.(1,14 Sill 8.902 219 2.I.080 19.818 14.340 11 41,llf I II ..S"'l30,l'fl!13,250 R.lW'Ollx.liKi Nom'l 8"i S ? 014
18 4 606 3,i'j 4i4 2 611I m 8.447 161 19,157 21.110 21,338 II 31 WaH.1.57jl44,V!!l'12..V Mf4MH,H) Nom'l 6' k! ? j.J
2'. 2, 8ti; l.M 1 9.4 6.4 4M 1,98-8 K4 4.8J1 19.654 )8,9i'.0 13,441 2.1 31,2 9 19,554 IV.. IV,', 8.400 l.i.N) 1:1,166 II J'F H' d'v 11' d'y 11' d'y H'd'y
Jan 1 2 2-V. 1,0.!6 5.4141 4,i2 2. J 177 3.121 250 10.471 14.W8 13,9m Jan. I 17,21 1 10.471 lj7,396 4.100 6 9,100 U' d'y H' d'y H" n" II' d'- II' d'5
8 2,t3 138 2.025 S.;i7 l.2t 7'9 2.34 34 IJ.61W 16.9.T .3os 10,779 13 .W 154.018 0.2H-I 6,260jl2,45o 7 S 8'i 8 11-16 'A.
15 110 1-.166 976 1 709 147 2 2w6 J,0Ol 8.4U 13,911 15.397 16 5,322 8.406 161.5.32 8,(k'( LflKI 9,5'Kl 7, 8 S'J 8 1116 'J
2; 3,604 601 1.681 l.h( l,5"t 663 2,425 11.399 8,911 18,611 22 7.471 II. 299 147.704 6.900 10.45O 7' s (' 'S'. 9'J
2' S,i'4 1,974 955 1,41a1 4J Sv J.S10 1.7'X IS 519 14. J Mi l,54(l 29 7.11 13,519 144 J"4 1.72.5 3,776 7,600 7 8 Z S1? t'i
Feb 6 2,'6,i 1,221 423) 1,401 941 3.18 1,(, Hit 8.104 7.0.171 15,165 Feb .... 6j 7.UI7 H, 4141140 037 2.700 2,448' S.llk VZ 8 5-16 8 11-16 ''.
1212.011 1.V94I 677 . 1J0 Ii4 .t" 175 ,2l 18,5.16 1o.Sk6 1 6 12. 6,820 1J7. 840 ,3Vi 2.250 11,675 7 3-167 11-16 .8 3-10 8 tt-16 "'.I
191 2.173 1,639 I 375 1,071 774 11 1.480 10.414 12.991 10,793 19 9.6U5 16.414 138 9.11 1,680 3,800 7.42VI 7 714 8 7 16 9'i
3 3. 44 1,86V 3 '00 1.2.85 1,44" .... I 40U 108 13i 11 466; ,00e 2 12 84 0 3,5 188,368 1.760 6,600 9.J60 t.i 1. 7; 8'.!
Marah .. 8 1.S9I 1.914 l.37 V" 81 53 3,1 8.486 11,371 U.14A ilaioh... h 9.75 u 8,84 1.1W,.80 60 7.3U1 12,700 7I 7, 6'! (? (iv
12 3,2114 1,197 674 1,113 3.165 999 4, M 11,131 15.437 11,4 12 7 61 6 I3.H3I HU.I15 8,a.80 J.V- 12. lv 7', J, 8'
19 3.H46 1,377 l.ttS 1,11 1.840 39 7,114 14,795 10,66 U.6,5 19 4.4,5 1 14,7v IB, 871 ;16,141 6.060 31,i 7 h'? h'. v
:6 0.310 07 1.150 3,6 3,140 U l.(t 104 16.784 9.971 14,786 36 J,u7 1 18.78 111,131 I.OM 1.90 7.W1 li Bij 8'? f? 2
Aprtl 3 4,441 S) ,6i 1.M7 771 . 3.ai 12.M7 7,037 19,782 Aprl.... 2 3.U 1 13.17 1H,5 6,150 . 600 D.iNI 11-M 7S 0V t'? (AT
II 3.410 3011071 4 t Iff 1,743 11.307 I.M 10.M 9 4, U.7 8,l7.l 7.1-80 4.960 11.100 716 8", S'J 9'
V 3.8HO ,TO iai 1,141 3M 9 1,97 10,681 7,111 7.060 16 3 .U 4 11.841 W.1441 .) 2,869 JJ.(6(I jC JJ 8 t'l
23 3.8 J 1,611 1.091 M4 3.910 H,8 4.1m. 7. KM at 2,63 5 li UH 7 4T! 4.100 S.vwi 7 I06 TU 7 K1 '
30 8.M 1.U60 1 041 3 03O II 3,734 11.464 3,M: 4,9!SS SU 1,514 11,4.84 0 38318,85.1 I, Ml V T6t) TV jj, 8 1V16 di.
Mar 7 1,407 ' 1 300 ) 061 36 1,244 4 766 8 J54 H ... . 7 1,8V ,5,241 M.44 I 8o 3,3.5 9 826 7V 7j 8', 9 9' J
H 1 7 1J.T37 S67 30 l.0 5,d 3.970 3.360 14 2,277 5.61 f 371 l.i (J.7t ll,.uj V2 fC-l H"J 8'i 9 f-10
21 1 167 1 3695 030 140 3.3W) 7.349 2,109 3.151 SI 1,1' 7,949 81.737 3.200 7.6U' 10.700 T T-lfl 7 15 If. 8 5.16 8 H-lfl 9 6-16
1.10J 8.398 i;..-5 110 1 099 . S.64 3.U1S I.6. 3S V61 l,W (Mti I.C5 l,U J.f 1 7J, f" 8, '. .,
J.D4 4 1 221 1.984 461 II. 454 . S.8t fl.7T H.4T4 1.757 Jan ... 4 4.187 0.778 4,7 1.7181 fl50 S.8 7 7 8;. -l
11 3,306 3 349 3 161 46 ...1 17 U.OTI l.iOri, 8.361 11 1 (4 11. 073 31,166 3,960 24MI 8.7m 7S 7?, W, .i n;,
16 741 1 160 8.13 M 894..: 1.99 7.93 4 383 3.764 HlJli 7.94.1 35 438 1,375 1,400 S.775 jC 7j; 8
26 217 161 746 1,57 150 415 1,241 2,123 1.866 25 hi 3 24.1 32.737 9f,0 2,050 3,000 7 t. 6 h1. !.
Jmir 2 13J 803 600 961 3T5 624 8.373 1,361 1,669 Jly 2 397 8,272 19.0.81 760 4,426 8,176 , l !"',
W 7 9 1,814 244 574 . 816 8.951 881 K4i 9 190 2.361 p.iurtl 1,0481 3,276 4 175 7V 8' 8
10 573 1 3 804 60 63' 4,019 3,024 l.ihi 16 m 4,019 13.672 1,176 1,176 K 81 1" i';
23 3 816 60 l,S!f , 3,591 067 277 23 5"9 3,691 WAV). 1,900 1.1KNI 7, P 8j 9', 9
M 32 840 2,203 60.. 143 8.321 2,418 1.990 30 308 3.88 7.687 300 1.226 1.625 72 85 8 H 9'
AoBiMt... 500 '.011 116 241 60 2,104 896 2,077 Aatatt. 6 fr5 2,lhS 6.984 32n 926 1,250 72 f . S 9 . 6",
' 13 ...... 297 SOU MO. 1.099 692 653 13 14 5 1.099 4.856 100 100 i H Wi 9H !",
ai . " ...... 446 211 677 1.286 910 20 87 al 677 4.467 478 475 T 8 8 4 9 9'4
27 9 181 100 60 294 1,891 846 K 177! 2J4 4.3r '8l 6f0 T' 8 8' 9 to,
31 a5::::z 22. 102.: 41s w 41S im M 8 -L
T(,tl KI7190 38731 112698 97. 284151 H 11.624 105066 18.819 542.460 4.12,681) i'tl.VHl j T"t1.. I '.4.'k566,.'yl 1460 HW 2O70UI 47M.V) 1
?9
280
474
1,023
2 170
S.OM
1,113!
S.0H6
C tJ6
n?i
9.241
,829:14,099
,.V. il,18l
,947 22,180
.''1
I'L.
Mll2,X2
4o.1k80.092
12sF.8.296
7lVi'24.St4
.9.ll!24.2.'4
811127.722
92S'28,S.'i7
670129, 71
19 475
9,934
8,837
6.909
7 5V1
8.316
l.66
7.844
S 999
S,3
6,125
I.6K8
I.0V7
I.T09
I
10.7791 7
S.tt2;10,
.471
7.1 10
7.0S7
.1
9,805
9.71"
7,116
0.4il
.71
1,441
4,4
I.4W4
I.6T)
5.274
,6U
,4'
743
.054
l,47
4.97
1.514
i n
I.
1 964
1.197
1.261
1.649
88
421
S.U89
404
269
271
SiC
240
1.697
242
217
216
80
1.6B6
lilui
55
606
4T5
61V
Ml
4144
.974
240
196
1251
l(Wl
2M
131
277
181
494
S65
565
145
278
177:
267,
309
IS)
S4i
further drop May 18th to 8o. On
the 20th an improved tone ret in, and
the market advanced l-16c to 8 13
16c, followed by another advance on
the 24th to 8c, which lirioe was
steadily maintained till tho end of
the mouth. Receipts for the month
9499 bales, shipments 29,765 bulcs,
leaving a stock on hand of 46,217
bales. Sales, 39,525 bales, ot which
exporters took 20,525 bales.
JUMJ.
The market during tbo course of
this month was unevonttul and with
out fluctuation in price. Middling
opened June lstatoo, and the price
remained at that liguro until the
30th, when it advanced to 9o. Re
ceipts for the month, 4198; ship
ments, 28,895, leaving a stock on
haud of 21,570 baits. SaleB 17.150
bales, of which exporters took 8225
bales.
Jl'I.Y.
The courso of tho market during
the above month was marked by a
firm tono and steady advance. Mid
dling opened June lot at 9c, ad
vanced on tho 7th to OJo, and on the
9th to 9jo, which figuro remained
unchauged until the 22d. when
another gain of jo was recorded, ad
vancing middling to !K'o, at which
point it romained steady until the
close of the month. Receipts for
tho month, 1766 bales; shipments,
16,dll bales, leaving a duck on
hand of 7325 bales. Sales, 11,075
bales, of which exporters took 1500
bales.
AIJUI'Nr.
Tho courso of tho market during
the month under review was again tin
favorable.the price yesterday showing
a net dcoline ol'Sclromlhc figures at
which the month opened. August
2d middling was quoted in this
market at Ogc; August 10th it de
clined to 91c; August 23d to 95c;
August 25th to 9c, at whioh prico it
closed yesterday. Receipts during
the month, 1351 bales; shipments,
4070 bales, leavint? a stock ou bund
at the close of 4009 bales. Tho ovcot
of the month was the receipt on
August. 18th of three new bales, two
from Mississippi and one from
Arkansas. They cla86od striot mid
dlicg and were sold for 28c a pound.
tOTTOJf MOVEMENT.
MrmnliiK Annual Cotton Ntatrinnnt.
JVtii! recelDt. Mftion 1887-86 615,560
40 Uil roeeipta,eaon 1881-85 ,...4,iO,127
Inoreafe -il5.4(9
Throush cotton thi year - 69,243
XktouKb ootwn lavtyiur 41,011
Incret-e ." 18.217
ATeraae wfiiilitr'r bale thi yenr...lb 489 86
Aver. go woiKbt ter bulo lift )eiir...lb..493.58
Decreaie - 3 73
A verag-e Prices of All Hridra
Tli is htl
Y. nr. Yfliir.
I)o-
cremo
- 1.44
- 1.16
Ordinarr oontn... 7.31) N"ui.
UooiiOr'i'tiary...ron.tt... 8.00 9.49
Low Middling. ..co,.H... 8 47 9.91
Midd lif nt:.. 8.84 10.10
flood Middl-na.renU... 9 33 H.40
ui.i.ii:.. kvu u nt in 60
1.07
- 1.13
lc..,,.. ..In. iu,, Kaln (nftflia int.l
dllntl th li rear 043 30
Areraite value per bale (buaii mid
dliu4)lat year 49 85
D.'eraaae. 8 6 66
Total yalue of year'i reiwiit $23,0.'3,(8i7
Total ralue oflaat year't rocsiptn. 21 441,631
Increta 2,181,170
Home eontiumptlon thin year 489
llome eotiaumiition last year 1,313
Decroate
Ilaloi lew crop received thin year
Buloi now crop received la-.t year.
Deeraaae
KV1
... 30
..103
.. 73
Part Rpetlpla.
The port receipts at the
during the past two seasons
follows :
18R5-80.
seaports
wero as
1884-15
1,520,157
463,14 t
229,8.12
727,6'Jo
612,959
91,92
651,784
71,188
lai (C5
80,938
67.6H4
330.730
Nw Orloaui..
(lal ronton......
Mobile
Savannah
Cbarlealon
W ilmingloa ..
Nortsik.... .
Haiti nor......
New Verk
ItoiUn
Philadelphia..
Varlooj
Total
, 1.737.93a
713,'66
247,2.12
...... 802,261
602,950
1110.982
...... 66.1,8X1
...... 89,212
6 360
. 185,621
71,641
324.083
..,404,838 4,744,107
Bertpta by Klver.
The receipts of the Cotton Ex
change furnish the. following statis
tics of receipts of cot'on by river:
K.t Ad.mi...-..... 26,508
Jai. Lea .. . 24.3IKI
Coaboma 16 5 9,
Chieka.aw .. 12,414
Joe PeUri ...... 6,395
AnohorLine 5,'.i,7
Gavoao . 4,246
PeSioat - 4,503
Overton 4 045
Kene Mtr ready 3,611
K. W. Cole - ",438
Alberla 2 98
I'onn Ad ii mi - 2 705
M illS. Hay 2,4'33
H.L.Cobb 2,0Tiii
Enquirer - 2 029
T'lCT l.WI
KdKoater 1.2.14
Winmo - l.'mti
Merai.hiaand Cioclnuati Packet Co.... 3(l
Varloui 3,2,4
Total....
129,8
Larcrat 4'arKOl4'aUu bySleararri
Tho largest cargo brought into
Memphis during tho season was hy
the Will S. Hays, November 10, 1885,
and
Conaltted of. 2.H1
Kteond largett itt I birHw, Nov. 8.. ....1,53)
Third laraett by Cliirkaw, Nov 26 1,61'
Fourth lamo't by Kale Adama. Nov. 23. .1,181
Ki ih lanest by Jiu. I.oo. Si r. 5 1,043
Hixth laravtt by Chieka.aw. Ho: 15 1.00
reveuth latgoat ty Cb;ckaaaw. Oct. 26 1,138
tlirckt on Hal l Jmilla
aaxrkrt at the 4'lM4r Ilia Maaaou
'i'wrlve trara far,
The following is a statotucnt of
stock on hand in ourmarkot AutiUHt
31st tli i -i year, aud at the same date
during tho past twelve years, in
which it appears that stock was
worked dowu to the lowest figures
daring the years of 1S78 79:
1876
1876
1877
1876
1879
1880
1,872 1881 8.184
5.l'S 1882 1,615
6,192 1881 8 481
954 184 6,646
386 1885 1,31'J
0.384 m 4,4)99
FIBS l' Uil.ES.
Wbein anil
Vthrrn Itrcolvert
IN 46.
8 loon
Tho first bales giving the prefer
ence to eotton grown iu the district
contributing tn tho Memphis matket
received at Memphis since tho war,
arrived at the following dates:
1866
1867
lMM ....
UO'.I
1870
1671
1872
1873 ....
1M74
1875
1876
1X77
1878
1879
Wl ..
li
1S82
SN3
1881
188i
18!rt
Auifiiat 18
AiiKiiat 31
AuKUt 17
AuKUit 25
AukukI 21
AuK'i-t 3
AiiKin't 16
AuftuKt 21
AmruHt 11
Aiuuat 2'J
AUKU.t 18
AUKift 21
Auttni't 13
AuiiukI 30
Auiuct 19
Auirutt 6
.Soi.t. 2
Aiiuust 23
AiiKUat 27
A usual 15
Auiiuat 18 ,
., Arknnana.
Miaaiahi'il,
MiFaittfii'iii,
Ti'iino foo.
MiaiHcii'iii,
TVniii'aoo.
ArkauHiia.
Mii'aii.aii'i'l.
Miabi..aii'1'i.
Arkiini.it i..
MiN.ifaii't'i.
MiHisHii'iii.
AtihairMplii.
........'I'oi.li. .
WiHrtiltMiplil.
'I'ouiieaaro.
M iaainai toil.
.Ml? ii.
Arkitii'-ii'',
MiHaiaii'id.
' I Arkatuaa.
- Hiaalaaipi'l
Firm liluoin null pcu Iloll
Tho first bloom received during
tho season at the Cotton Exchange
was from J. II. Riscoe, Bolivar
liauding, Mis., on Juno 14th. The
first bloom hint year arrived Juno
17th, ngainHt, June 30, 1881; Juno 1 1,
18i; June 17, 1882; June 13, 1881;
Juno 10, 1880; Juno 18, 1879; Juno
7, 1878; Juno 22, 1877; June 14,
1876; June 16, 1875: Juno 13, 1771.
Tho first open boll roccived at the
Cotton Exchange this year camo
August 9ih from Robert Webb,
colored, of Dunlop avenue, Mem
phis. Tho Grt open boll last year
was roccived July 16th.
YAlt'E F COTTON
In Pound. Pr lllf mil l.v fu'rnnil
luinl ol Hnlttn Much IhJ.
TV'ir. lluln.
182t) 3o()
18tO l.WO
1K4U ( J,5,(8)
I5,IKI0
35,00(1
1.4')0,000
8,11110,000
7.5OO.IK0
6,620.009
U,8no,uo0
8,080,0110
8,520,11(10
' ,C"0,I0I)
U.eou.uoo
10,260,000
ir,,iKi,ooo
lrt,Ml OOO
23.ooO.UiU
20,lai0,iio0
25,0"". 0,0
:ti ,iki,0"0
29,5'8,5'0
89,.Vi2,S5U
36,650,617
37,61 KI.OOl
82,861.981
22,MO,080
27,070,61
20,040,4'
20,887,7'
17,4',6,8'.'2
2t,".r.2.5'.:9
23,0381,109
18,625,8
1t5,(19,524
22.9I7.92U
2', 441, 811
Itl.OU.OO?
1846 . 75,000
lN.1 150,0110
150-61 163,000
1851 ,52 172,1100
1S52 53 2n2,000
1853-54 188,151
If,4'iv5 2"2,0O0
IKm-uU 295,246
186 8-59 3i'),72ll
HV.9-60 398,721
1800-61 300,6.:"
1866- 4W lia.'w
l8rl-7 218,20
1867- 66 253,207
1H68 69 247,696
1669-70 290,737
1K70-71 611, 4"3
1871-72 S80,2:
1872 73 415,268
1873-74 429,327
1874 75 322,001
1876- 76 487.37H
1H76 77 :ts,:i'i8
1877- 78 412.393
1876-79 :iHil,129
1879-80 4119,800
1B80-H1 ..470,267
1881-82 ."339,210
1682 83 610.7H9
1883-84 ...450,077
I6M-86 430,127
1(85 86 545,066
The value of the receipts this
year was obtained by reckoning tho
cotton on a basis of middling at 8.81c
a pound, and at the rate of (13 30
per bale. Tho average weight of
this vear's cotton bales is 489 86
pounds each bale, which is 3.73
pounds below the avcrago last year.
III(bat Price of f'oltan From IN99
le.
The following were the highest
prio(:s of middling eotton at New
York in the years nam ed:
1826...
27
14
12
13
11
13
11
12
17
16
.., 20
..! 20
17
12
. 16
10
11
9
9
9
9
8
11
14
14
10
11
10
1S56...
1867..,
J868...
1869...
I860...
1861...
1362...
1863...
1864...
1865...
106...
1867...
1868...
1869...
1870..,
1871...
1872...
1873...
1874...
1875...
1876...
1877..
1878...
1379...
1H8II...
1881...
1862..
188.1 ..
1681...
188.")...
, ia
16
14
12
11
28
08
88
II 90
1 21
62
36
.3.1
85
2.554
:::::::: 4
:::::: p;
...... ll't
13''5
IS 6-16
13 3-16
Y.
13 3 10
13
,. 13 3-16
,;.'.'.'.'.'jl lVld
It 7-16
1826
1827..
1828
1829
1830
1631
1832
1833
1834.
1816
1S.!
1817
1816
1839
1840 ;
1841
1842
1KI.H
1844
145
1HW
184'.
1616
1819
16 0
151
1652
1853
1851
1855....
,11
1886 .
In'
ti, t.;. .!,. c... ..,;.i,ii;
a iiu uinuai " ii;i) ior uuuutiu ..,-
lands in New York for the cottou
year 1885-86 was on September 1st,
when middling was quoted at, lOJe,
and tho lowoat 8 1316c, I'ebnmry
26th and 27th. The lowest r.ic-'
roachod in the period of yeprs given
above was 4o in 1815. In 1813, 1S4 1
aud 1848 tho lowest figuro reached
was 5o. Tho next lowest was 6o in
18-16 and 18J9, aud 7o in 1855, sinoo
when tho lowest was obtained lo
oembsr 31, 1878, at,8 3-16o.
Kontlily Kanae of Prior.
The folbwing table bIiows the low
est and highest figures of the Mem
phis cotton quotations fur middling
for each month ot tho season:
Lowat. Ilisbeat.
PP 91 9r'4
Ort ..9 9 6-16
Nov.... 6 18-16 9
Deo ... 8 9-16 9
t.ewfat. Illvheat.
it,.,, I, kU K5.
8:
8
iril....r.
15-10
May H"
-lune 8'u
9
9
Jan ....8 9- 6 Hi
July 9
rob.....8' 8 1 10 I Aufutt
As a comparison of prices wo givo
tho talilo for tho precodtug season,
18S4-85:
Lo"t. Illuhott.l Lowat. llii.'ho.t
8.P ... f-i 10'i
"larcn.i'ra I'D
April ..10 3-16 10S
May .. Ill 3-1(1 10,',
.iuii..l""., lit' I,
July ....HI 10'a
AuKuatti4 10
vol..,, v ;
Nov.. 9 M6 Ki
ie.... 9
10
IDS
!
,ian..l'"'4
Fab. ..10".
The lowest prico t.f middling cot
ton iu Memphis, durini" the wholo
season was from February 26th to
March 2d, inclusive, whon middling
was quoted at, 8c.
Nlainha on Ifiauil In I no frnitliU
innrfcrl hi ilia i la.eel tli Nrnaon
iwrlvr liwrallai".
The following in a statement; of
stin k mi hand iu our uiarket, August
3Ut this year, and at, the same date
diiritiuvhe p'ht twnlvo years, in which
it appears that stocks wero worltcd
down to ih" lowo-t figures during tho
yenrs ot 1
1675
187')
, 2 5721
6.1' 3;
1881....
18S2
1883
1681
1885....
188(1....
8,184
.".ius
8,481
6,61(1
1,302
4,609
177.
5.292
956
386
6,384
18', 8...
1679 ..
1810...
I'llli FS AM WEIHHiS
Pur ISH5-SU nu1 tliai aim PreriMlloi;
YvnaH.
Tho general averago of prioes at
Memphis fur tho past seven years
was :
85-8ti 84-ar. 83-81 82-88 81-82 80-81
Ordinary.... 730 n.HiT 8 47 7 93 9 46 ?.(3
(lood tlrjl... '8 IKI 9.49 9..l 8.84 10.40 8.98
Low Miif..... 8 47 9 91 10.00 9.48 11.28 9.98
Mlddl nz 8.81 10.10 10 33 9.63 11.65 10.75
Hood Mid.... 9.33 10.40 10.65 10 22 11.98 11.34
Mid Fair... 9.16 10 59 I t.t 10.62 12 3" iioni
Thn avcniitn weiuht nor balo for
18S5-86 wns I8!).8(i pounds, which is
3.73.1css than tho year ln-foro. Tho
average in 1881 85 was 493.59 pounds;
1883-81, 49.'l pounds; 1882-83, 499 1-3
pounds; 1HSI-82, 476 1 3 pounds;
1880-81, 492 pounds; 1870-80, 490
pounds; 1K78-.9, 491 pounds; 1877-78,
488 pounds.
COMPAU.imE CROP.
ITollril Ntiita' Total !t.llon Crop for
hilly li Vi'Mra
f8jjli mwioiiW-t;!. ..
3,262,887
...2,9:ui.o27
.. .2,617,3:19
..J),5'.'7.845
.. 2,931',6I9
.,..3,113,762
...,3.Kr'l,48l
4,609,770
....!1.(56.080
1821
4.,.:.,iai iN.a-iH
1842-23...
l6it-24.
1824-26...
1826- 211...
)82il-27...
1827- 28...
1828- 29...
1829- 30...
16UH1I...
1831-32...
1831-3:)...
18:-:H...
16U 35...
KV5-36...
18: 16-37...
1817-38...
1838-39...
18:,9 40...
1840-41...
1611-42...
1842- 43..,
1843- 41...
1844- V..
184.5-46..
J8I6 47..
1847-48..,
1846-49...
U49-50..
1150-61..
1851-l'2..
.. 496,1)0(1
lai'4-lk':
.. I9 158
H'.5-66.....
166-67....,
1457 68....
.. 669 Jltl
.. 7W),II27
.. 957,281
.. 727,691
.. 870,416
.. 976 846
..1,0 iu.Hl
,. 9"7 478
..1,070,488
..IVI24
,.l,"i'.,828
1858-69
I8fi9-6i)
1860-61
1H.11 to 186.6,
1805-66
I860 67
167-(W
IH68 69
uo rot'ord
,. 2,193,987
,.C,o!',774
.2,.9.4,'i.'l
. .3,i:tt'.i:v.t
...3,164,046
..4.352,317
,..y,07l,.5l
,..4.'.H6.508
,..4,l7o.:l88
,. 3,827,815
,..4,632,118
.4,474.('i''9
,..4,773.8'.5
.6, 074, ,',5
,..5,7'il ,V.',2
...6.0115. 760
...6.450.11 18
...I,'.' 19,766
.. 6,7l3.aK)
.. 6.7m. 16)
.,6'iO,tl"0
6'19-70.
...1.360,752 .1870-71
...I,4'.'J,930 1871-72
. 1)1, 197:1872-73....,
...l,3ll,63J 1873-74...
.. 2,17,83! 1874-75....
...1,6',I,'.H6 1 876-76
. 1,6 3,671 1676.77.....
...2,378,876:1877-78. .
...i,03ll,t0'.ll378 79
...2.3'.ll,5irt:l87'.l-80....
9,100,537 1880-81.,.,
1,778,-Vd 1881-8.!...,
V,374,6.',l 1882-M...,
2,7'.!8,59'1 88.(-6I...,
2,096,707 1884-86,. .
2,:ira",269 1885-86...,
3,UI5,022I
exact number of bales for
Tho
iSKfi 8licaunot now bo siven, because
it takes time to obtain the ovorland
movement and Southern consump
tion; tho etiinato will be not tar
from correct. The United States
port rpceipts for the year amount to
5,404,6S6.
August 27th th world's viniblo
supply was 1,152,226 bales, against
1.176,971 tho same time last y ar. a
decreaso of cotton in sight of 21,748
bales compared with same time last
year, and a dcrase of 397,s2 hales
at the same time in 1881 and 580,479
balos loss than 1883.
J. 1C. Uodwin t. 4JJo.
This firm la loca'ed in the ccntor of
the city, convenient to do a stlricty
first class cit'on wtl'lnu lmlno?s, iu
which they hava bo n continuously
ergasol for the pt m-venu-on ytar.
t prattiio itiak"a pef ctthey c r
ta'n y unHert-t nd t)'. litisfni-ra In all
ita vr.ed detiiis. With bnndAueo
cf cpiUl li advuace on bhijnnt-ii'8 rr
co too in 8 tor 6, and with an excellent
oganizitin ol thoroughly romp' t' tit
aasiftautsin ev ry dop 'rttient of tlio
bit'ii't'S', tint Ari'SAi. ltela tlitt it is
doii g t lit) public a fivir 'iy jecom-m-Tia
n tbe fl m o' J. K Gndwin A
Co., ss one of the voi y b-ittwhom
thy ran ahip catton in this cr any
other tityj , ,
il. V. l'KAKCK t'O. i
4'atlnn Farlora Hiit 4'niii.xlH'oa
.Kl'trllllli t-, t'NO FrlilltKil . i t.
'lhii is 'bo t lii d ) ear t rtli -nloro
li nt, hut ti, fo.iiur nii-it Iimi, j.
U. I't an e, liiti U" i' id ntll-t v. it , 'ho
c tto i iniciHHts i f liiHi'fv l,i ., tirm-
I er ol yeitra, r (1 a we'l kn.au t'ni
n i roha' t-Mini fa-u e t 'H i. Imti ilt s
a ctioit. r " e' l'-l an i.i yonnff
man ho his be ini n co un 'i '.liio
nil i f l,H tinst. e 6 lit t. I o il' ua
li a i ti a't ttti 'i t ) 'hit Hie ' rk.
M.C. 1 t'rtr. e it C .hl'i nti i,I lia
I I o'. fola.'O ins ii. i; a i , - .rj
tl.t y rn ay tr. ihur t o t m ntiip ts
tn tin li nt ud n a,: iu o1 1 iti't ' tl-e
llhih, molt" pri e. T, i v ti ve
their oun wa'fho i t-, mn t ,1") a
c itnp"ifi,t aleiln rn I'.ni-. I, i
tii'iti 'o look u to " i t ; I, i
DS'r ns ho ior tli hi iti I, ,i -Iiivhb
Anvc, tt'i' ' o , ii '
i'. I'onc- it 0 . 11 - .- lm I- t ( f
it etui n in all on, t , ii . tiny
tl i tit:n r.i loi a i a inl it t..i:uluj
at lutvi'tt p'i if. Hr.lV.I'H (i Ad-
dirfoti, f.ir ittiny y-iu ir'nl
w 1 1 eo't: n firot' i i mi i t:l., h a a o
wi'h Mies s. Iliiiup!ir-y, I! 1; & Co.
ffS. L ttis, wi 1 icp e cm iliutu lit
ArltHtiaa'.
STKDAKT, iYlMS JfctO.,
I, mil lux H liiiii .nli' a.rnrrra unit
('niton FniMiir4 4 I.MrtfM i;uli.
Iuk huiI u Ininirnan Nxii'k.
This firm Is lo.-at d at Sot) nud 358
Fror.t ttreet, in a tmildiiiK t:o' 't ncted
specially for their tmainta. I . is one
vi the best n i largest J on O" u Front
tt'Uat, aid, lurn as it la, la ti't'irally
Crottttoil with groovroit Ttiu fiuuriu
t irs rat k wiih thn leading (I nlcrs iu
opit.l, rapacity a id doteimin t on lo
make 'Vieinphis a g'tat mark . Mr.
Uavynne h. s clurRO of iho wtiil b :sl
n6tte. Ho la a man o' exteos v fxpe
rienre aid superior btisin. i s q tulillca
'ion. Withavety larg tu..,t ii, ihe
1 ion10 buys from tir-t namii fn great
qtmntliies snt at the v. r, 1 ' imo'fs.
't'tiey rarry fall linrs ol a hiho and
fat.cy gr jcnrifs and plunt.-ti iu sup
plifs, ami fill otdors prmn t y nnd at
low pre?. As ci t .en factors they are
ami iifct the inrst mi'tik ti1. Tney
tn.veall the facilities for t a uiHitiuii a
Irrtte liU8iit"S. This flnu is cntnuvted
with.thatof 8'ewa't llros. .t Cj., of
Now Orlnina, who (1 a iari;,' bttuntua
as c tt n fa tire and romm tsi'in mer
ctisnt. Thoie who have i d ioh to
tell or groceries to buy cut be m com
niodi't d hy on ho' of these tirtu .
rLL'MItlXd,
FlU'l.Xi
.S A SI) M'GASf.
AXI SUri'LlE.
J. w.
X. IJrowni, .Mo, Sin I Nrronil
Mtrairl.
The already lare and irn-tantly
Incie-sitig diimudo r t'iu o 'vh and
caoitary p'utnbing Inn n o ssitntod
tlie carrying of STrto elmki r,(
supplies in the Utcstanl n.o '.. ap
proved B'yltB Of bltll tu' B, W8I-D-
atititU', water clrs U, trips, co k-,
valvts, etc., n well ai ih .n p'tiy
nient of large fjrea of tin tit'st
tiki led and rahatile wotktnei', n r.nler
to i xticu'e pn mp' y V.n rr.'cr' f ir ilr
woik, and "Hrnwi e, ihe I'lu ul ir,"
prepkred to tu ly snpp y llic w ats
ti-e c ty a id a irn it d ng c un ry. 1
is n t lioowga y, t r tv?u i rotit lK
go rNnwiie o f r p iitnMrg ok,
fir tho lines in wheh Bo e ia e
ggtttl-tlat s ihe fmn shii'V l p
aim steam 1 1, c t k , y.ilv, p, in ,i .
rati it itm pniiios, tl i'gi hi i
liino triium ni;s fir the ton tr, a "l
ci y t'sdr wli 01 is C'iritliii or-i
q iBtill ia mill all siz a, from six n.r.i
pi(ii) ml littngi ilou D "t
cm til Ht b'zhs, nod tn r it t.
li 1 tl e ( Mi)' a of ih j l.i. niii
as well ni mi 1 mid 'sc o ' r ti .t y
mill in ihn 1) st nt inner, M-. l'u.n.i
h'S ncoittly i (Id t RttKtii i'
hM Mt.bl ahtu i.t wi'h t j j y I r
cn'iii'g i'd t iif" i g p po 'r
sinull st ti.-i r,p t'i miiI ii. ': ti i i!
oig'it int'i vi i" riiin-'ir, ' li
i tpial to th'i capon li of any hn h in
the Wes; or Nutn.
Jn t e jai ( xtrr itio 'lie I
s'oik n"d m Hi vi l'"t sl't
u-weft tles'g '8 ar to ha f n
aud at pic bm low as in t l.
tiiarke t. ! may to pn pi r
heie that Il ia h se U tit) t
1
an'J no t-U'ffttil ,n t'ji- I "'
city of Mimp'iia, a' d it i .
ttif it.terf' of II ti iU'?e 'h-r -r '. -v
with J. W. X. llrjane, L'it S ... .1
Btreet.
Curls lun Itrtnlirrb ('uli'-wn.
The c ass aof tnis wnil a i
eti u e wnl re ipm oi Mm (1j. ' p
ifiuoerO'h. Tho very extern-ve "il
dtiniiBara raci ly spprmln n."i
pleli r, an.t will euabhi ti r 'li 'ii
to do full Justice totb ni'i-'n-a mil
their patrcu'. Theiaalog y
ismed is a very in'crestii g b 'I
Bud glvtsfall iiifirniatioo i"i" " "
sys eui of tho Br there i ud i ''i
tif off. rd hy tf'e OVilig .
corps "t tiiiy prof mo, i n.
Ivstl braii 8 io t e 8ae, t
hi d ch".niif 'l appara;., s, tii'i;
aiatotiiical mid U fo' luttr c i
phisnlov, and the d- pa tn:o:i
u.u;ca dd'awing.'ha t o 1 t.'- u
pr-pared for t' e ii, m'rg se'tion.
ISutM'rflo lor tuu " i-f j

xml | txt