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The Memphis appeal. (Memphis, Tenn.) 1886-1890, October 01, 1886, Image 6

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024448/1886-10-01/ed-1/seq-6/

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ivmiPHIS DAILY ATOEAL-.-FiuDAYr 'OllEnirisS'
4 4
BYTHEAXIZOJAMAJDES
FROM THE PACIFIC TO THE AT
LIN TIC,
Bj Rail and Rlver-Tho Gigantic
Scheme of Pen to A Told tiolnff
Rouud Cape Horn.
Nw York. September 30. The
Timet has tbe followiog interview
The iriaantic scheme of establishing i
direct line of nhs?iKe from the Atlnt:c
orcan io the Pacific, "acroa country,"
frcm the mouth of the Amazcn river
to Lima, in P.ru, which wn begun in
ISTl.by tbe Peiuvian Government and
interrupted eight years later by the
war between rem a ad (Jlnii, lias re
ceived a new bae of life, and work
has again actively bfgon. Senor Joie
B. Samanrs y Ocampo, of Peru, whj
st ent two years in exploring ttiat part
ol Sjr.tn America uirunnu wtncti it is
proposed t run tbe line, and wno
has iu t pub'iebed a bo k 'KI Diario
de la Expedicinn 8ama.ru s y Ocampo'
jtsjiib hk tbe country, nas Dien
made Governor of the Hta'e of the
Amnions, Pern, in which State or
piovince moat of the engineering is to
be done, and is in charge ol the work,
Ttat tP'nt'eman ia now in New York,
but will atait for the Amazon with
Senor Mariano Prigador, his secretary,
next Saturday. To a Timet reporter,
who taw hiui ve.'tTday at ttie Jio
tel Espanol, in West Fourteenth street,
Senor Sarnanes ixpinined the scheme.
"The Peruvian Government," be
laid, "flrit began work on this projee;
In 1871, whm Ilemy MeiRKS, the
American er.ainecr, took rha'gn of Iho
work The h!ea was to build a rail
read from Lima up to Cerro de Pjs:t.
adisume of about 1(0 miles riiiht
acrono the Audcs ranue tiom trier i
wagon rond alout ninety miles long
wa to bn built to l'orto miovo, wtncti
is on the Ucayali river, at a point a
litt'e above whore that river becomes
unnavivable. From this town boats
weie to run down the Ucayali liver to
where it eiupiioi iuto the Amazon,
and from there down the treat liver
to the Atlantic ocean. The total dig-
tanrs from Para, tho town situated
right it the mouth of tbe Amazon,
and from where vessels wire to d irt
and at which they were to arrive, to
Poito Nuevo, as the vcfssls would
make it, ia something over 4L'00 miles
Mr. Mentis, up to the time of bin
death, obstructed seventy miles of
the railroad, at a coat to the Peruvian
Uoverninem ol -lU,lXU,(HHi, and suc
ceeded in doirg rt.ally the heaviest
anilnvet d lHcnlt portion of the en
gineering work. The road that bo
built runs acrota the mountains at
one point the rails are laid 12.000 f jet
above the level of the sea; and all
that ban to be done row is to finish
the road 'over (ompaiatively good
trao a ..t, (iround, that is to say, all the
work necewary to tbe completion of
the railroad, and that is really the
entire work, for when that U drme and
the wsgnn road built to Porto N uevo,
there we are. The thing is hcom
llBhed. "Last February the Peruvlitn Griv
ernment awarded the contract to fin
ish the railroad to Mr. M. P. Grace, of
the tlrni ol W. R. Graca & Co., of New
York, and bo ia actively at woik now.
It will probably take from five to eii
years to complete the entire work
railroad and wavon road and will
probably tot fiom $15,0C0,O0O to '.0,.
000,000. Mr. Grace accepted the
contract nnder the conditions
that he would build the roads
himself, and then for nintty-tiiue
yea's from the time of the beginning
of tho work, or. until 1085, he and bis
heirs are to derive all tbe bene 11 ta and
emoluments accruing therefrom. At
the end of that t me the Peruvian
Government acqulreRlpoBnesflion of the
i ,.i i,i n'i. ,i ... i : .i.
will result from this groat work are
Immense. Aside) from the gieat sav
ing of time and money by avoiding
me long trip around tape Horn lu
sending freight or merchandise or pas
sengers, wiucn win 1)8 the direct re
sult, it will open up a hitherto un
known and almost unexplored coun
try, 'which fo- natural and productive
richnens will, I think, exceed any
other country in the world. The
scheme by the government ia m t s j
much meant as a money making ven
ture, but is (specially intended to de
velop and populate tnat pait of Pern.
"Now let me ts 1 jou of tho cxm!
route to be pim urd, and how it U pro
posed to etr.ct transportation. We
will, if yon phase, s'art. (rem ti e At
lantic ocean and go over tn Lima. At
Para, which, ts 1 wiid, is tho littl
town at the Aninm'a mou'li, from
which we s'urt, we boaul our li'tle500
ton etrnmhoat and start on or.r long
trip. Wo keop on up nud up the
Auia ,u, following iU tlioufand and
one turns, until wo git tj Xauta.
There the river Ucayali empties its
waters into tho Amazon, and as the
Annum takes a rjlmrp northern bend
here, we have it ti it elf ami gs on
np thn Ucayali, l eading strati ht for
Porto Nut vo. Wken we g t to Provi
dencia, bav nit come soniething like
3iH)0 miles, we find that the river ia
getting pretty shallow, and that if we
go much lurlhur in our 600 t in steam
er we will run nground. So we got oil
that boat with our effects and transfer
omselves to a smaller steamer one
cf 350 tons and ro on down until we
get to Poiti Nuevo, 4'200 milej having
b en traversed in about twenty-five
days. Here the second change ocenrj,
and we get into our carriuges or
coaches or wagons or what ver kind
of vehicle we can get and drive over to
Cerro de Patco, where we meet the
railroad, and then by that means go
down to Lima. The liver trip bat
been made as I have described it up
to Providrncfa for mauy years, and
one Btemuir only of HS0 tons lias boen
ma down to Porto Nuevo. ltnt the
rest of the trip overland very few peo
p'e ever ma le.
"At Ci rro de I'asno are the cele
brated li.vor mines, which aro owned
lm:st entirely by the Peruvian Gov
ernment, and w hich havo been worked
at irr.guhr interval ever sincM the
ronqii' et of Peru t y thn Spaniard'.
Ninrc thn' tims it is es hv.ated that 40,
Orotonsof pnri silver have bf on taken
from the miner, hml fcient Ua men,
who lurrf thoroughly txrmined the
'pi nt.' ea that (he silver tiken out ia
an ii'liniti simal qtiani i y in compari
aonti tl:e amount ol (lie precious
metal that i t ivm in the cround a
meie fccra eh en the lieh lode. Of
cott'so, opening up the contemplated
route i letirtihie mining work attain
with rnloubkd vinor,and many peojilo
re go ie to get very rich. About
three nioiitliB ao Hit. Gin-o i-ent h
comm s ion of engineers t i ins.nct
the minial land iu the vicinity if
the1 e mine', with a vi?w of begicning
extensive mi ling operntione, and thn
BiireeiH will ?rohab'y promt their
tfj.iiti'i No York in two nion lis
from tow. Lxt-ntive immigration to
tnin ne coa'iti y, bo rich and aJo-d-ii;puch
u i iin let oppor uuitiis f r
le s D stiii to ihu n!.t kind of po
pie, willbeteihti' U'ly enccurHed.gnd
a eoeii ty f ir that purprsu w ll bid-t-.b'iuhi
d as to id as :t is practii aUe to
da io. Ti e government ofTvis tvry
inducement to sstt'ers to rs'abt'ah
ihemeelves in this country. It mikes
no distinction li clao, color, caste or
religion In 1 mm 'grants. The only
coodit'oos SHked are that immigrants
be cot panpers and that they be will
ing to woik and ta make tbe most of
the opportunities given tbem. Land
will be allotted 1 1 each man or each
family wishing to sHtle in a quantity
hereafter to be fixed npon and joa
may ba sara that it will be a liberal
quantity and they will be afforded all
laatul protection. 1 thick that Tern
having gotten through with its dilfi
cultife, iias etiled down into a long
period of tranquility, and that immi
grants will have nothing to fear from
war or revolutionary convulsions of
any kind ; they ceid have no fears of
losing what they have made after years
ci ion.
"As to the agricultural possibilities
oi this conntry, immigrants will have
a large cssortrcent of pursuits from
which to make a selection. Peru is
the nchest of r-'outh American cinn
tries, and th's part is Peru's richest
rection. Amorg the product are
coffVe, rubber, cocoa, larsapurilla,
copaivs, tobacco and ivory outs,
under the crude way now in
operation, dealing in salted flih
fish caught in the rivers and
prepared for shinment is tbe prioci
pal Industry of the natives, and a very
mora lve business it is. too. roe in
traduction of soiae of yonr shrewd, In
dustrious Y an keep, bowever, will, I
think, revolutinnin rnling nursui s.
Leaving avriculltue out cf the Ques
tion, those immigran's who want to
get rich quickly on exercise their
natural talents in getting out silver
In tbe mines at Cerro de Pbhco, or if
th-y went to lo :k for gold in a profit
ab'e way they can go np and settle on
the Pa tazi liver, or the Moiona liver.
or the Santipgo river, in each one of
which gold i xials in more or less la'co
quantities. No systematic etf jrt has
ever been made to work these river?.
bot the native themselves make a
good deal of money by the simple old
process of washing out 'pay dirt' along
the liver banks by band with little
wooden pans. Tliey cm make from
$1 to $5 a day in th's primitive man
ner, and sometimes make neb hauls.
"In Peru a man en select his own
climate,; for in Peru there Bre all
k nils, and this pait of Peru is es
sentially healthy. I ana under thn
Imnrewion ttut as aon as thn railroad
Is finishod, and ai soon ss"poopIe who
want to emigrate lenrn of the oppor
tunities awaiting them iu Peru, the
country will bs pipulated in a veiy
short time, and populatad by people
who can make the most of what ia
given them and. in enricbinir them
selves, develop the count y. One of
these days not very far distant Pern
win tie sometiitnir like the United
Htatet settled wan flonrishirg cities,
intersected by railrjads. civiliied.
rich, powerful, and combining in
itself all the ingredients that go to
ward making np one of 'the' conntries
of the globe. In my opinion this work
of the givernmeftt will be for Peru
what tne building of the railroad con
noclinir the Paoific aud At'anticoceana
in America was for the United State
As jou see, I am very sanguine, but I
am sure that the same statements
which I make to you have eood. solid
ionnuaiinn. "
Manor Ham ares and the gentlemen
who accompanied him. lenvinn here
on Katurdav next, will arrive at Pjra
in about two weoki from that time,
and will make the trip a he described
to tne reporter.
MARTIN, TENS.
Bob Taylor 4'lnb t'rmd-Th
Woaibrr PeaMaals,
THE PLEURO-PiEUM0MA
DISEASED CATTLE QUARANTINED
AT CHICAGO.
Ihe Disease Near Kankakee, la tbe
Ylclnlt j ol Some Very Large
Slock Farms.
IHIlDlCHICIi
looaRasrosDiaoa or th apfbal.!
Mabtii. Tknn . Sintember 2!I-W
had a heavy rain night before last, and
nur mills, whica for some time tiavs
been closed on sec Hint of no witter.
will now start np again.
Last (Saturday night there wes a Bob
layior Ultib orRaniaed here. Several
eiittiuwHstic speeches were made
Each member will wear a white rcse,
ar.cl on tbe 8th of October will go in a
oiciy io union uty to cheer for the
c iming Governor, Bob Taylor. The
c ub will also vitit Dresden on
the 15th of October, when the two
brothers spoak tho-e. Although the
old Duke of York n.et with disaster,
and an ignominious ene', Bob Taylor,
the chief of the White Rose, bearing
inn pure nr.u. epoiiesa Danner ci tbe
Tennessos Democracy, will carry it on
to vl to-y, and amid cheers and the
firing of ennnon will safely plant it
upon mo inner walls of tbe citadel.
Justice Hall Wilson has moved into
town.
Mr. J. G. Parry, who has boen a
compositor on ttia Martin Jlfciif, left,
yesterday for Memphis. We wish
him success.
Mr.'. Annio Gi'christ, of Nashville,
tho talented rind popular novi liH, aud
au'dor n( Rovhnrat, ia viaitirg friends
in Martin.
Mies Georgia Foster, who for several
weeks has been vimtlng friends here,
boa returned t htr homo.
Dr. J. P. tMiattian has removed
from Kaleton to Martin. Ashe is one
of the be.-t citizjna in the county, he
is gladly welcomed to Martin.
Mr. John Kennedy and wife are
both very sick. We Irnst they will
scon rc over.
Mrs. Williams, of Mountpeller, is in
Martin, visit ng her son, Mr. Gus
Williams.
STRIKES AMD HOYCOrTd
Hint Do, Rays tbe M. or L. of tbe
Went-ArbKratUa Haul Nettle
DUpatea.
St. Louis, Mo., September .'10. The
Knights of Lsbor in tbe West, and
more particularly thoss in St. Louis,
have de.ided that strikes, like ths
boycott, must go, and that it should
no longer be recognised as a necessity
in the order. While this important
decision is not publicly announced,
the inlormstion comes from unques
tioned authority. The fact is that
eoine of the knights consider that thia
haB been one of the sreateet obstacles
that the order hue had to meet. What
aciion in this iiapor'adt movement
will be taken in tbe U chinond, Va.,
meeting is yet unoertain. the St.
Louis delegates, however, it is said,
are inr-tructed in favor of a law which
will dianerse entirely with the strike
ayrtt'm. Arhit'atioo will hereafter be
the p ,liry of the Western knights in
quiRiioos of wages and labor that re
quire adjustment. The S'. Louis
kuiitb's may aek the U chmoud con
vention for a committee, whose spe
cial duties will be to investigate and
settle ail differences ot thia character,
wiiti suggestions Irom Utand Master
Powderlv.
Arcll ul to a I), R. t'onaal.
WiNNirno. Man.. b'oDtember 80.
l'ni;d Miaiea Consul Taylor was
thrown from the s age at Niche, Dak.,
ycHUMuy and I ad bis rigtit leg frac
tured iu two places. At lust accounts
he was dolni? well.
Flahuim) in their pearly sheen,
l'r. m the glorious coralline,
Si-e tho'e tott a uutarniehed I
White alike the back and ff-nt.
Yes, by ihe fragrant tOZODONT,
May beuuty's mouth be garnished 1
Chicaoo. III., Sep!ember 30. The
Kti'e Board ol Lvn fctock Comruig
sinners has prac ically completed its
la ors, and Prof, Salmon, chief if tbe
Bjreau of Animal I ad u try, le't to
ldpht. The members of tbe board,
however, will remain here and watch
the nrreress of the diteaee, and the
Inspectors wi 1 be kept on duty to de
tect new ae. Tee brard is awai Lpg
some action ou the part ot tbe (statu
authorities.
Prof. Hilmon thinks there are about
2400 cattle quarant ned, and cot 000
as stated. If the disease spreads to
beabhy cattle they will, of course, be
Isiiated as tbe dissaeed ones now re
A ttrict watch is b ung kept at the
stockyards for eigne of tbe dif ease,
but no evidence cf it baa b.en dis
covered. A few ca?es of Texas .fever
have been toted, bnt no p'euro pneu
monia. Tbe dissfe reported in the
dispatches from Vi'ginia, as existing
among cattle ol that section, is prob
ably Texas fever, rrot. Bulimn in
vestigated tbe disease eome weeks ago
and Dronounced it fever, which is as
cerl'.us as pleuropneumonia, although
it uisappeais in cold weather.
Tbe Dlaraae at Kankakee, 111.
KiKirimii Tr.r. . S uite nher 30
Twenty-five of the 100 bulls seat frcm
a CvJcaim dititille'y before tbe quaran
tine to Tripplet'a ranch, near St. Miry,
Kttikakee county, have died, prcuum-
alily of plcuro pueumonia. Tne herd
of bulls dyii'g off, presumably from
pleuro pneumonia, are on ihe Trlpplet
ranch, recently purcha-ed by Mi.ier &
Pogue. Bui's were shipptd to tho
ram h recently from Rice's distillery,
Ch cage, some eay becauee they wera
not doing well, and othora that they
word cent to be reduced to et"er;. Ths
pymptnnsare the eame as described
in Chicago. The ranch is on tbe State
linn aud joining the largest s ock farm
of Indiana, neigbbiring with the lare
ranctiei of Utotey & Uregory rl Utile t-
gi, Lemuel Milk ol Kankakee, and J.
W. Gall of Cincinnati. More definite
uiiaiiB are noi now noiainauie. as uie
ranch is sixteen miles from tne near
est telegraph or telephone station.
An Eipert Bent to Chicago.
Kansas Citv, Mo., September 30.
Gov, John S. Marmaduke was seen to
day ard asked if he would take any
steps to qnarantine the State against
Chicago tattle. The Governor said:
"I have tent aa expert to Chicago to
lo ik Into the s tuat on there ai d re
port to me. If he finds the situation
as eorioui as indicated in tbe dispatches
from tl atp'uje, i shall certainly quar- i
antite tbe Hta'e."
MANUFACTURERS OF FIRST-CLASS?
Steam Engines, Boilers and Tank Work, Cotton Gins, Cottci
Presses, Kood Pulleys, Shafting, Agikultural
and Plantation Work,
AND DEALERS IS
srWa hav the LAWflKST WORKS of the kind In the Tnited Pfatei, and will meat
li loci for aame quality of work, bend for CnUlosae, Prioe-LiiU
nd "X'etdmoDiali.-Ml
emplilsu-
ai - T ntspKe,
Speer's Cotton Gin
1
REMOVED TO
Iluling from Mulberry to St. Martin Stree ts
' 0
Insurance and Sacks free.
aTThe Largest and only Complete Gin in the city.
BBest Vield. Best Sample.
I
Tried in the Crucitle.
I
About twenty years fio I dincoTored a little eoro on my check, and the doctors pro
nonncnl it cancer. I li&vo tried a number of physicians, but without recolring any perma
nent In mUt. Amon;j, t'.ie number were ono or two Fcciall!H. The medicine they applied
was like Ore to the eorc. ciiiwii!! intcnue pain. I enw a ftatement in the jiapcrs tcilins what
B. 8, S. had done for othera ilmilarly aOIlctvd. I procured some at once. Before f bad used
the accond bottle tho Bciyhbora could notice that my cancer waa healing up. My general
health had been bad for two or three yeurn 1 haa a hacking cougn ana spit blood contin
ually. I had a severe pain in my ljreunt. After tulting nix bottles of 8. S. 8. my coneh left
me and I i;rew stouter than 1 hud brcri for several years. My cancer has htaled over all but
a little iKt aliout the size of a half dime, nud it U rapidly disauyutrini;. 1 would advise
very one with cancer lo give ts. S. S. a fair trial.
Mits. NANCY J. McCONAUGllKY, Asho Grove, Tippecanoe Co., Ind.
Feb. 15, 1880.
fiwift'i Specific Is entirely Testable, and seems to cure canr.ern by forcing out tho Impa
Ues fruui the blood. Treoiue on blood and Skin Diseases wailed fre!.
'f UK t)WUT bt'KC'IFlO CO., Drawer 3, Atlanta, Ga,
in
s
AND TRUST COMPANY. 1
o t
BOARD OX" 1'H.TT3TJDEJJBI. .
NAPOLEOW BILL, MIfHAEL GAVIlf, J. a. HAKDWERKSH
LOUIS HANAUKrf, TUOMA8 B'-lYLE DAVID "p UAhhVK
LAZARUS LEVY. JOHN W. COCHRAN, JAMES A. OMBKRfl
ANDRKW RENKERT. BOL COLEMAN, E W DTOObDSM ITI1
JAMES B. KOBINSOif, , WM. KAlZEKEKRflEE. BAKDWIQ PBUES. j
PJta reoelred ta sums oi and upward, and iaterut allowed on sama Eeml
aW buy and sell local Inveitment Bonds and Beenrlties renerallr, pay tatea, aeta
truiteaa, and, in general, ei.cute any finanoial business roquirinra mle andreiponiiW,.
srent. T
avWeissu drafts, In snmi to salt parehaters, on all parts of Europe. I
D. P. IIAUUO, President. EWD. SOLOSMTH, Tlce-Presldent
JAMES HaTHAN. CaKhler.
Mew Cotton Gin
Nos. 201 and 203 Madison Street, Memphis, Tenn.
UE,.T Ta" au'r s"m",le.G,;ir"'. Good weights, and remittanee, promr
n..7; x"J . .,.?":.";? ",n- D lurnisneo
""""" "" " -" ana anioaaail wieuo ootton. Un
lined en ar
ive ns a trial
5APOLEON BILL, President. W.N.WlLERS05,TIcf?rejiI!est.
fflemmis City mb.& Gea;i Ins. CaJ
lOOtS A SEHCaAL FfBJC ABO JfABIHI BCBIBU.
A QUARTER OF A MILLION'DOLLARS FULL PAID CAPITAL
J. C. NEELY.
S. H. BROOKS.
H. M. NEELY.
BROOKS, NEELY & 60.
WHOLESALE
GROCERS, COTTON FACTORS,
,il
And Commission Merchants,
S3oJUi67 Front Nfrect, : Mcmpliis, Tenn.
TIIE PRESERVATION OF BODIES.
A Sew Mrlhnd by Nlnt;ara Fnlla
Han, Called Cementation.,
Buffalo, N. Y., fiepteruber 30
Tbucdure Orarej Huelett, aged 77
vtars, nd for leveral terms a eide
jaatuecf thn N agflra County Court,
came from Niagara Falls yesterday
afternoon to exnla n before tbe Sani
tary Boxrd o' Buffalo bis method of
cetnentatian, disenverdd some twelve
years ago. Tbe diacuanoa cf it bt fore
tbe tecent convention of tbe Ameri
can Association for the Advancement
of bcioDce. earned tiitn to come beiore
tbe board to ehow that there waa
nrithing new in cementition to him.
He exhibited cement blncki contain'
in B)uciiiiui8 of fruit and the bedies
of eiiiuiala placed there in 1874. They
were changed Into a eubetaoce closely
resembling alone, and the original
colors werrt preserved to a remarkable
deg'ep. Mr. llu-lnlt ea'd lie bad
cided to cement all his family, but h s
two dungbters having ezpies.'ed the
Idea that it would be "pretty close
quarters," he had in thtir ousts s'.mp'y
encloBtd their cofBinsin the cement
ti the ttiicknf si of a foot, making
eacd into a cumbroui atone box. estr
ma ed to weigii cIohs upon two toes. He
exbibi ea h a will, made some time
si n c o, wli i all provides that bis own
bid? slia'I b embedded In cement.
He sei J further that he Dot infrequent
ly CFment d ra-k ti at the Falls. At
the UiikUud Cemetsry, he faiil, tbe
ground is wet, and it Lad been fouud
to work perfectly. The guars escape
Inrouvn the cement very slowly, and
a perfect copy of the b.idy is lef r. "If,"
Bind the cemoiitationiat, "ve had tha
uony ot Moron in such a proctas, we
could now g ve t very college in the
world a ptrfmt model of Uod's chosen
leader." He rays be has no scheme
to work, and only wants to give the
world thn Loui lit of tin expfriments
BROIVN'S
IRON
BITTERS
WILL CURE
HEADACHE
INDIGESTION
BILIOUSNESS
DYSPEPSIA
NERVOUS PROSTRATION
MALARIA
CHILLS and FEVERS
TIRED FEELING
GENERAL DEBILITY
PAIN in the BACK & SIDES
IMPURE BLOOD
CONSTIPATION
FEMALE INFIRMITIES
RHEUMATISM
NEURALGIA
KIDNEY AND LIVER
TROURLES
FOR SALE BY ALL DRUGGISTS
The Clenuinr tin Trade Mark and crasitd Red
Lines on wrnpprr.
TA.KE NO OTHER.
Non-Resident Notice.
N.. fcW, It. P.-In tha Chano.rr Conrfof
hhelby County, Tenn. Anna MoUinnlset
al. it. John 11. Lsnt w et si.
It Rliiwarins- rmm (ilntriir'iMln.n En ihl.
oauje that tha delendsnt, John H. FilvBiD.
is not to ns round in his eiiuarv ;
ll Is therefor, nril.rad. Th ut' )-,. L
ills aoioTsnM herein, at th.ooart k-usein
Memihi, .hlby county. T.nn.,in or hetore
the 8rt Monriny in Oorolwr, 11, and pload,
aner or ilemur to complainant's bill, or
Ihe same will be taken for contossed as to
him and et f. r hearinir exparte; and that a
copy of this order be published ono. a week
fur lour successive weeks, in th. Memphis
Appeal. This 1 day of September, 1&S6.
A copy nitent :
8. I. MiiDOW FI.L. Clerk and Master.
By II. F. Walih, Deputy Clerk and Master.
Craft a C roper, Sols, for eonipl't. frl
NOTIOB
To Real KMate Owners and Agents.
LiAttilitt D.vtnr sidewalks to pat down
X will find it to their interest to apply to
W. II. LliCKKY. i M. ,!,... nr .k,.,. mil
Second. Contractorlfor BU wart's Uraon
llhio faT.meBti,
V. B. SIMM, Pres'l, GEO. ARNULO, V.-Proa't. V. II. KEHSED&T, Sec'y.
CITIZENS INSURANCE CO
DOES A GENERAL FIRE & MARINE BUSINESS.
Counfrj- (Stores, Dwelliugs and Olnhonscs a Specially.
IiOnncb Adjusted Proiuplly, aud Paid at Heinplilf),
W. N.
Z3IHXIOTOIIB.
WILKERSO!f, GK0. ARNOLD, J. W. EICHARDSOK. T. F. DUFFIN.
W. P. DUNAVANT, T. B. SIMS, JOHN ARMI8TEAD.
AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS
AT CRAIG'S SEED STORE
39 Union St., Memphis, Tenn.
FS
HER MARBLE WORKS
Corner Adams and Second Sts.
TTTE DKSTHR to OALIi YOUR ATTENTION TO OUR LAROE STOCK OF FIBHSW V -
M nassi.ii. We arc prepared to turmch new work Irom latest designs on short noti;
ALL WORK GUARANTEED TO BE FIRST CLA&
In every respeot and to Rive entire satisfaction.
Ws Solicit VOnr natrnn.ir. m.nA P.nn.,1 haf vn aqII .t.b
before pnrchins elsewhere.
S. UANtSFlSLD,
Offlee
mnBOTORBil ' ' ' ' ' ' :
WK. I. COU , JAMES KBILLT, 30WS L0A8O
D. . MTIKii. w. O. BITJULtT
19 MailJn Street, SXexaphiB, Teiin
nissoisUTio notice
BYMTJTIJAL CONSENT, the firm of Alston, Crowell A Co. is this day dissolved, E. W.
Crowell retiring. The remaining rartners, P. N. Alston and H. 11. Maury, will oon
tinne the busioesa at tbe o'd siand, corner Front and Union streets, assuming all liabilities
and oolleoting all outstanding aooounts. E. W. CHOW ELL.
P 8 ALSTON
Memphis, Tenn., September 1, 1886. H. H. .MAURY.
srOn retiring as aiove. I bespeak for my successors a continuation of the liberal patron
ace heretofore extended the old firm. E. W. CKOWKLIi.
NEW FIRM.
ALSTON, MAURY
CO.
!. LCOCHRA
)W"""")S .
L inrs r rn iniirassisas - mi i.ii mi mis ..nin ssar" f
AW UB PLASIHQ.HIIX, SATT-TjVMD,
Doors, Sash, Blinds, Molding, Lambc?,
Latb and Shingles, Flooring. Ceiling and Cedar Posts.
M. 0. PEARCE.
JOHN L. MoCLELLAN.
XLFEsARGE&Co
Cotfom Factors & Commission F.lerchs,
No. 280 FROJffT STREET, MSMP3F?3S, TENN.
' """ Wsirfhowsif Son. HH and A Vi
loss trvst.
T). W. PT.V.
Late ol Commeroe, Miss.
. F. B. RBRHON.
Late ot CotTeeville. Miss.
QERHON & HOBSOft
WHOLESAL
samhobsAn.
Lata of Brooks, Neely A Co.
E MRS.
Cotton Factors and Commission Merchants
324 Front Street Memphis Tbhth.'
1
Chickasaw Ironworks'
iOHH E. HANDLE k C0.,PB0PB'S,
98 Second St. Memphis, Ter.
,0 V)'
f MFQTJmmS & MACHINISTS,
MANUFACTURERS AND DEALERS IH
JiraUlord Corn aud Wbent Mill
Cottou Pret8, Cotton Ulnn.
Shalliug, lallM, j .
SPKl'IAI. NOTICK We are prepared to fill erdert
on snor notloe, for the celebrated MsnlBrt lst.
Wroniiln-- fulloy. We oarry In stook over
Xwo Hundred Assorted mips,
SMTHend for Catalosne and Price-list.'
GEO. O. HARBIN.
JA8. A. MATTHEWS.
H. W. LEATH.
Established in 1854
WHBLESMI
hi
257 Til a in St., iSemphis, Tenn.
imam
All Cotton Covered by Insurance on Seaworthy Vessels ci
in Ginhouse. Sacks furnished to responsible parties.
121 aud 126 T0PL1U STREET, MEMPHIS.
M, g. COS
VER & GO.
1
ILL
BERIDUIIGI
MANUFACTURERS OF 'j
Doom, HnU, ItlinilsoldiiiKisnll kinds of Door and Window
FrameH, Bracket, Kcroll-Work, Hough and Dressed
Lumber, MiiiiKlot, Laths, Water Tauks, i
All kinds ol Wood Work .Executed at Short Notice.
Nos. 157 to 173 Washington street, Memphis. Tenn.
W. A. GAGE & COo
Wo. SOO Front Street, : Sferaphln,
9
(StTOCESSOItS TO HEA IIA5I A IIORTONI
COTTON
Old Stand. No. ) Union St., Mcninliis.
FIRE, INLAND AND MARINE. j
TIIE BLUFF OITYTlURMOE 00
OF MEMPHIS. TENW.
OrriCE-No. 285 MAIN STREET. f
J.F.FRANK, W. A. OAOR, M. GAVIN, J. W. FALLS 1
H. M. JAMES, DAVID P. TJADDEN, J.P. NKKLY.
J. r. lOF.l.T. Sr-lrtit I) l'.IHIll,Tt.flTwi'l M 1HIHIRI1,
W. N. BKOWl
Liberal Advances on Consignments.
SG6 Front Street,
?! emihl8, Tenu,
7

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