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The Memphis appeal. (Memphis, Tenn.) 1886-1890, December 29, 1886, Image 3

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024448/1886-12-29/ed-1/seq-3/

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THE CITY OF NATCHEZ
AKD THE B. S. HUES TOTALLY
BESTEOTED
By Fire at Cairo The Lots or the
Hayes and Her Bare eg Will
Amount to $lv000,000.
0AiBO,ItL, December 28. Fire at
6 o'clock thia morning destroyed tbe
Mississippi Valley transportation
ateamer, R. S, Hayes and four barges,
ad the Anchor Line steamer, City of
Xatchfi, while lying at the bank. The
ire ia anppofed to have originated in
the aft cabin of the fctentoer Hayes,
soon enveloping the whole boat, burn
ing her to the watei's edge. The fire
preadto the City of Natchta, lying
just below tbe Hayes, and in a few
moments ehe, too, was a maw of
flames. Tbe barges alongside of the
Hayes, loaded with cotton, soda a-h
and sundries, aleo took fire and wera
completely destroyed. NothiDg bnt
the wrecks of tbe horned bulls rs
main. The City of Natchez was built
at Jefiersonyill', three years ago, and
was valued at $100,000. She was one
of the finest boats cn the Missimippi.
The Hayes was built by the Valley
Company about five years ago and
valued at about 50,000. The loee of
the Valley Company'a bargee and eon
tents will make tbe loss reach about
$1,000,000. The insurance is not
known at present. A etrong north-'
west wind at the time of the fire held
the boats into the bank and prevented
tigs from ravin g the Beet 1 he barges
lying on the outside of those burned
were cut loess and towed to a safe
harbor by tufle. The wrecked burn
ing hulls are being towed to the other
aide of the river and beached.
bATEB ABOVT THE BURNING,
The steamer Natchea, which burned
at Cair this morning, was owned by
the 8t. Louis and New Orleans Anchor
Line, was one of the most noted boat
plying the Lower Miteissippi river,
was valued at $120,000, ard wrs in
sund for i60,000. The R. 8. Hayes
was a tternwheel brat of powerful ca
pacity belonging to the St. Louis and
Mississippi Valley Transportation
Company, valued et f 50.0OJ and in
sured for $20,000. The barges burned
were the No'. 8, 49 and 91, and tbe
Iron Duke, and wore valued at $10,000
each and not insured. They were
owned by the same company a tbe
Hayes. The Iron Duke and No. 49
were polled out end sent down the
river, and at la' accounts were still
burning. The Iron Duke had about
20,000 busbe s of corn as cargo, the
No. 49 had 2070 bales of cotton on
board, the No. 94 had 3,000 sacks of
salt, and the No. 28 carried 150 drnms
of caustic KOda. There wrs probably
other cargo to; yet reported. All the
cargo was insured. The loss is esti
mated at $400,000.
A Den. en tod Una Ilanga Hlniaelf.
New York, December 28. A Put
nam (Ot.) special Buys: Aogustus
Picbet, a wood chopper, 60 years of
age, was found suspended to a tree in
the Quinnebago forest, about (even
miles north of Putnam, Sunday, by
two hunter?. It is supposed he banged
himself while demented. Three
months ago, while officers were at his
house to take him into custody on ac
count of his strange actions, arising
from habitual drunkenness, a member
of the family, speaking in French,
said to him : ' They are going to take
you to the madhouse i run for the
woods." Upon hearing this he broke
for the door and ran, chased by the
officers, who failed to overtake tbe
wood chopper. He has not been seen
since then, and it is supposed he
tanged himself soon after bia escape.
Portions of the body had fallen to the
ground and his fingers were fl ashless.
He leaves a large family.
A BefrlgerailuK Home Cave Ia.
St. Lewis, Wo., December 28. At 2
o'clock p.m. today a water tankon the
refrigerating house of the Heim brew
ery, in East Ft. Louis, fell through the
roof, killirg John Keefer, an employe,
and break iDg the pipes so as to liber
ate a quantity of ammonia gas, which
was inhaled by two men whose names
are unknown. It is feared they will
die from the effects.
A Woman Burned to Crisp.
Fckahton, Pa., December 28. Last
evening Mrs. John Burke, of Irving
avenue, while going up stalls with a
lighted lamp, fell to the bottom and
she was stunned. The lamp exploded
and set her clothing on fire. Before
she could be rescued she was burned
almost to a criep. Her husband, who
is blind, wis unable to render assist
ance, but k is cries brought help to the
' house, which, however, unfortunately
arrived too late.
Accidentally Hilled Her Daughter.
Middlitowm, O., December 28.
Mrs. Hendrickson, wife of Er-Folice-maa
Hecdricksen, while showing a
neighbor last night bow she would
treat tramps if any molested her, took
a revolver from a draw and fired a
shot in the air from the door. As
she was returning it to the drawer tbe
weapon was in some way again dis
charged, and Mrs. Hendrickson's
daughter, Stella, 6 years old, was in
stantly killed.
A Loaaanatl ve.Unn Into Street Car
Chicaoo, December 27. A few ruin
ates before 7 o'clock this morning a
stockyards car left O'Neil street for
the yards, with the usual crowd on
board. Three minutes later it crossed
the bridge over tbe river and slowly
went down the grade toward the tracks
of the Chicago and Alton railroad.
The conductor ran ahead to the
tracks to see if any train was coming.
As he looked he saw the St. Louis
express dashing down toward the
crossing. He signalled the driver to
lookout The driver set the brake,
but slowly and surely tbe car slid
down the grade and on to tbe tracks.
The driver and conductor yelled to
the occupants of the car, but the win
dows were thickly coated with frost
and it was impossible to see out, and
the fifteen men and boys did not know
of the danger which was now close on
them. Tbe engineer of the train saw
the atreet car and blew the whistle.
It was impcssible to stop tbe train,
and in another instant the engine
struck the street car. It was knocked
into splinters, and passengers were
thrown in every direction. Those
who witnessed the accident rushed to
the crossing, expecting to see many
dead bodies. But happily no one waa
killed. Four men lav on the ground
groaning in pain. They were picked
np and taken into a neigLboring drug
store. A hasty examination was made
and then it was seen that, beyond
few slight bruises, none of the men
had suffered injury. In tbe mean
time the train bad been checked, but
after making sure that no one was
killed it ptocesded into the city.
Two Fasnenger Trains Collide.
Washington, December 28. There
was an accident on the Metropolitan
branch of the Baltimore and Ohio
railroad today, by which two collid
ing passenger trains were pretty badly
wrecked. The collision was betwoan
No. 67 going west from Washington
and the second section of No. 12 com
ing from Chicago. The Chicago train
waa very lata and should have taken
the aiding at Rock ville, but instead
tried to make the aiding at Silver
Springs. It was within three miles of
the latter place when it collided with
tbe Gaitberebnrg train from this city
that left at 9 :30 oVock. The Qaithers
birg train was also making for a switch
when tbe collision occurred, and each
train was about equally distint from
their respective sidings at the time of
the accident. Tbe trains following
the accident tcok the routs by way of
the Relay Hou. Conductor Ride
nnur, of the Gai'hersburg train, was
badly in jar id and a number of pa?ten
gera were cut add bruieed, but none
Bciiuiirdy hurt.
tiTe nARPisa pabiy.
Wnat Harper's Weekly Hal to Say
About Tlielr Keeeplton at
tbe ftunth.
Harper't Wetkly: The gentlemen
who on behalf of the publiHhing bouse
of Harper & Brothers have recently
made a prolonged excursion in tbe
Saa'.hern States, returned a few days
ago with tbe most delightful impres
sions of their Journey. The party,
which made the tour on the invitation
and as the guests of Mr. John H. In
man, a merchant with large icteresta
North and South, and a devoted and
enterprising friend of American in
dustries, waa composed of Messrs.
Charlea Dudley Warner, Kirk isnn
roe, Charles Graham, John Carkin,
Horace Bradley and William Armitage
Harper, authors and artists, and a rep
resentative of the Harper Publishing
House. Tbey were received every
where with a courtesy and kindness
and hospitality which cannot be for
gotten. The object of the visit was to
tee the "New South," to observe the
eochl, industrial and educational
changes of the last few years, in order
that the actual condition cf "the
South" might he faithfully reported
by pen and pencil, and the good feel
ing which springs from accurate
knowledge, and which binds every
part of the country more clrialy than
ever before, may be confirmed and
strengthened.
For such a purpose there could be
no' happier selection of a leader than
Mr. Warner. His trained faculty of
shrewd observation, his just mind and
ready sympathy, his great intell gence
and large experience in travel, his
tact and humor and cbeericeas, which
make him always a charmini com
panion, especially fitted him for this
enterprise. His csmpauiona were all
animated by the came spirit, and the
little private embassy, we are sure, was
a very happy representation, which
"the North ' cannot send nor "the
South" welcome withont mutual ad
vantage. The party left New York on
the 2d of November, and proceeded to
Lynchburg, Richmond, Danville, At
lanta, Augusta, CbarlFston, Knoxville,
Chattanooga, South Pitteburg, Nash
ville, Birmingham, Montgomery, Pen
eacola, MoMle, New Orleans, Baton
Rouge, Vii'kfbmg, Memphis and
Louisville. They were received with
friendly warmth by the Mayors of the
citiee and boards of trade and industrial
corporations and clubs and prominent
citiasns. In New Orleans Mr. Charles
Gayarre, the historian of Louisiana, at
a pleasant meeting of the municipal
authorities and other citixms, made
an eloquent and admirable speech of
welcome, breathing the most gener
ous rational spirit, blended with a
just local pride. The members of the
party visited, under the best auspices,
the schools and colleges and mines
and factories and plantations, seeing
the various processes of many indns
tries, and cbtaining specific and valu
able information of every kind, and
they have returned with the protonnd
conviction that the impulse of a new
and healthy life has penetrated the
whole frame of life end activity in
thoee StateB, which will tend to make
the common national life stronger and
better.
The results of the observations end
the conclusions of "the Harper party"
will appear in continuation of the se
ries already beaun in the Harper peri
odicals upon "the new South." Po
litical differences and the friction of
races are yielding to the beneficent
touch of healthy indnstrial enterprise
and a freeh prosperity. Mr. Warner
has already done a great and truly na
tional service in recording bis views
of the social situation in the Southern
States, and his wine and judicious
spirit is that of patriotic men every
where. Peace ha ;h her victories, and
her leaders are not less highly re
nowned than those of war. We shall
be very glad if this little "voyage of
discovery in the South," as it was
payly and happily called by Mr.
Gayarre, shall result, as we do not
doubt that it will, in binding more
closely interests and ties and a com
mon welfare which know no South
and no Mortb, but only one land, and
in confirming the lines of Goethe,
"North and Booth and every land
Kit within Hli peaoeful hand."
T11E EXPRESS BOBBERS.
Their Capture Proaonaeed by Col;
Weir to Bo the Flaett.
Cincins ati, O., December 28. Col
L. O. Weir, superintendent of the
Adams Express Company, who had
immediate charge of the Beach for
the men who robbed their car near St.
Louis October 25th, returned today
from Chicago, where he had the pleas
ure of seeing his plans perfected. His
instructions to tbe detectives were to
find the robbers and not lemporiit
with a view of recovering the money.
He says he directed the Pinkertons to
spare no money in the search, and he
pronounces their work the fineBt that
he has ever seen, and he has had con
siderable experience of this kind, hav
ing been called to assist other compa
nies in like rases. He declines to
speak as to Fotheringham until the
men are taken to 5ft Louis and further
investigation is made.
A SNOW SHOE EXPEDITION
Orsranlaed ay tbe Mew Torn World"
trader tbe Leadership of Lleat.
Scbwatbn.
Niw York, December 28. The
World makes the following announce
ment this morning: The World has
organized a snowshoe expedition
under the leadership of Lieut Fred
erick Schwatka, of Arctio fame, for
the midwinter exploration of that
wonderland of this hemisphere, the
Yellowstone National Park the ex
pedition consisting ot Lient. Schwatka,
a scientist, an artist and photographer
and several Crow Indians as guides.
They propose to enter the park early
in January. The routs will include
all the important geyser basins, tbe
hot springs, tbe tower falls and the
grand canon of the Yellowstone. Tbe
party will be as thoroughly equipped
as an Arctio expedition, and will
doubtless be able to push the work of
exploration regardlesa of the rigors of
the season. The moat remarkable
features of the region will be carefully
studied, photographed, aketched and
described,
MEMPHIS DAILY. APPEAL-WEDNESDAY,
THE RET. n'CLIllJf,
U5DER INDEFINITE SUSPENSION,
SUMOXED TO ROIE,
Whither Re betms DUlncllaed to Go
it Id Attitude In Favor of
F nolle Schools.
Naw York, December 28. The
World ia at last enabled to state on
the very best authority that tbe Rev.
Dr. MiGlynn is under indefl..iU su
pention, both rs a rector and a priest.
A priect hhih iu authority in the arch
epi coDal dloceee, and holding close
official relations with Archbishop
Oorrigan, avd last night : "Tho state
menta that Dr. McGI vnn has been sum
moned to Rome to defend himself are
all at fault. Dr. Mcilynn has been
(ummoned to Rome for censure, and
tbe only thing left for him to do ia to
recant. Toe idea of tbe Catholic
Church ftdvocitiog the abolition of
property in land is preposterous. The
Catholic Church does not advocate the
abolition of property in land, and will
not do so. That ia commanism, aod
the church hae pronounced asaiiwt
communism. Besides, it is absurd to
say that the abolition of property in
land will remedy the evils of pvrriy.
Its effect, cn the contrary, will be to
intensify tbem. I do not know what
Dr. McGlynn intends to do about going
to Rome, but ray own opinion is that
he is not going. As to latitude, there
is no latitude. He haa been summoned
to Rome, and ho is exacted to
go at once. Of course, if he
had written to Rome aubmittina
any good reason why he cannot go
immediately, he will be granted a
reasonable extension of time, but 1 do
not believe be has dene this. I be
lieve he has simply ignored the whole
matter. The fact ii, that Dr. Mo
Glynn's whole attitude for many years
has been one of antagonism to the
policy of the Catholic Chnrch. He
first opposed the establishment of
parochial schools as un-American and
as antagonistic to the public school
system. Now the establishment of
parochial schools is designed for the
pnrpess of teaching religion in tbe
schools, which we cannot expect to
do in the public schools, aa tbey are
dt signed for children of all denomina
tions. Then, again, when the ques
tion of depriving the Pope of his
temporal power came np, he rather
t)ok a position again at the Pope in a
matter which, to eay tbe leaat, was not
exactly Catholic. And, finally, when
this agitation against propuity in
land arose, he tank a stand against the
chnrch again. Now, the Archbishop
has dealt very leniently with Dr. Mc
Glynn, and given him every oppor
tunity to set himself right. Bat he
declines to set himself right, and as
the matter is an important one, there
was nothing left for the Arohbiahop to
do bnt ti refer his case to Bme.
There it is at present, and Rome must
decide it. Rome does not care for
individuals. The maintenance of dis
cipline is mnch more important to her
than tha influence of any individual,
no matter what estimation he may be
held in by hia congregation."
THE FAM00S ASIDOYKR CASE.
The Trial Begun Yesterday la tbo
Catted Statea Hotel, Boston.
Boston, Mass., December 28. At
10 o'clock this morning the now fa
mous Andover trial began at the
United States Hotel in this city. There
were present the full board of visitors,
the complainant, respondents and
counsel on b to. sides. The large din
iug room ol the hotel was. filled even
the standing room along the walla be
ing occupied. A considerable portion
of tbe audience was made up of clergy
men, but many laymen and a number
of ladies were present, and tbe large
audience paid tbe closet t attention
from the opening to the close of the
long session. After CDnsiderable time
had beeu spent in preliminary debate,
Jndge French offered in evidence an
editorial article in the Andover Review
for April lBt entitled, "The Bible a
Theme for the Pulpit," ard Prof.
Smytbe'a speech at the American
Board meeting at Des Moines, Ia., last
October, said rpeech being printed in
a great pamphlet entitled, "The Great
Debate." Counsel for respondents
aeked that whatever portion ot any
book or any document was to be urged
against tbem should ba definitely
pointed out. On this point Gov. Gas
ton, one of responder. t s counsel, said :
"Prof. Smythe is willing not only that
thia tribunal shall know, but that the
world shall know all that ho has said
and all that he has taught and all
that he believe?, but in the
trial against him it ia but fair and just,
aa it is legal, that what the charge
agalnet him is shall be speci
fied." At 11 o'clock, the complainants
having rested their case without offer
ing aoy other evidence than that as
cribed above, and citations from the
Andover Review, and the book made
up mainly of republications from ed
itorials in the Review, entitled Progrti
tint Orthodoxy, as specified in the
charge?, Prof Theodore Dwight, of
the Columbia Law School, opened for
the respondents in an address of great
length, learning and vigorous elo
quence. Hia masterly presentation of
his client's case won at an early stage
each an outburst of applause from ap
parently tbe entire audience that
President Seeley, of Amherst College,
chairman of the Board of Visitors,
the tribunal before which the case
ia being tried, announced that, if in
the future there were any demonstra
tions of approval or disapproval, the
room would be cleared of spectators.
Prof. Dwight was still speaking when
the hearing waa adjourned until 2
o'clock p.m.
GROWS
BITTERS
OoMblaUf HUH wHlt PCEK VEGETABLE
TONICS, qilcklj and eon pi et If CLEANSES
u4 ENRICHES H.BS BLOOD. Oolekeas
ttMUoaf ULIr-mdEldier. Cfoftntb
WsBpfoxioB, mkm U ikli tatoU. IttoMmot
JaOratiMtotJi, MaMhvmdairii,erpiBweo
tipttloa-lLL OTHKsJ IBON MEDICINES IKK
Phj&Um nd DniCaTisUvTwwbm roaniind Na
D. If. S. Ruoauea, of Virion, Mm., mytt t
twoommmid Browo'i Iron Bi.rn u ft valuable tun to
ft awriohinc Uw blood, and rainovinc all drapeytitl
jrmptuma. It do out hurt U UwtU."
. Dm. R M. DKiJKur, RTtlrtt, Ind(t asjit "I
DAT pt-Awribd Brown's Iron Hitter in cjwj of
aUifpTnla and blood difmm. alo whan a tonle waa
wftdad, and tt has prorad thruufUiy aM-Mfactory.1
Mr- Wm. Btbms, 91 Ht Mary Hi., Sim Orleans, L
ayai M brown'" iron Bitten reliPi. mm In a oaM
of blood potauninjr, and I boarUl ouutfUMid to to
IbrMa needing a blod purifierr.
Me. W. W.MoWAHAM.lWamHa, Ala. taw; I
bare been trmihlml from chiMboud with lis. pure)
iMuod aod armttmn on mj laoa tn bottU of
Drwni inn nuieni iim.'KHi a, ywrint mix i
oaimui apeak luu lutflily uf tin valuable kMdiciv
Ckmaln ha abovnTradfi Mark and crownd rwd Ifaaa)
on wrapper. Take D ottWa Mad uui b
tUJUaUCAl 4H UAJ,TtmU. U
(V
aT
r-5 l w-tf"S ffi "'
II, ilL iii iMtsClci tJlaliil i w fiCti
(NIWUKNNOKM TO MKAfHiina HORTOW1
COTTON :Fik.Ol37,:F8LS5
Old Stand, No. i) Union St., Memphis.
W. A. GAGE & CO.
Cotton 3F.9ioto:rs3,
No, SOO Front Street, t 3IettMa Tfriaa.
SUGGS &-FETTET
WHOLESALE.
GROCERS, COTTON FACTORS
And Commission merchants,
260 and 262 Front Nt. Memphis. Tenn.
fttiii Factors, WMesMe Oroca?S
mm v
olier.Thomto
Cotton Factors, Wholesale Grocers,
No. 806 Front atreet, s Sfemplila, Teoss.
L. D. MULLIKS, of lata J. R, Godwin A Co. JAB. T0N91, lata of J, W. Oaldwall 0-
MULLINS & YONGE,
Cotton Factors &Commission Merchants
No. 1 Howard's Sow, Cor. Front and Union, Memphis.
BU ataria.
atVataw 9 BVallVBSs
iKkuMAm Ta
TTIietaaale Qroeera, Cotton Itaiteffii
132 m3 234 Front SL, Memphis, !a
Mi, I, Jfc miXnT wnla Ul waul. Um U tk w.u(,( aa 4 ul. f an
at Mrr .Warn. OvtMa Warah.ai.. Wi WukiaaUa itraai.
HHA1I H .
MANUFAOTURBRSIOFiriBST-OLABS
Steam Engines, Boilers and Tank Work, Cotton Gins, Cottoi
Presses, Wood Pulleys, tihafting, Agricultural
and Plantation Work,
ANDZDBALKRSI5
Corn ctn3L ct"wlIV;ills.
warlWo haro tha LARGtEBT WORKS of th kind In tho PalUd Statai, and will Boat
prloai for lama quality of work. Band far Catalog frioa-Liatal
ana xaiumoniaM.-
T. B. SIMS, Prea't, OEO. AKWOLO. W.-Prwi't, W. II. HIKOAT,
CITIZENS INSURANCE CO,
DOES A GENERAL FIRE & MARINE BUSINESS.
19" Country Stores, Dwelling and Glnhonaea a Specialty.
I&" Leases Adjusted Promptly, and Paid at Hemphla.
DUIHOTOHH.
W.'.v. WILKERSON, GEO. ARNOLD, J. W. &I0HARDSON. T. I. ISf IIS
W. P. TttTWAVANT. T. B. WTMR. JOHW AWMTHTRATr.
.aa-aiTO
UHOLESALE UQUOn DEALER
g . sra Aifp tso front BTUExrrSusmrr-
p. a. 1UT01.
ALSTON, rJflURY & CO.
And Commlpslon Merchants Hay, Corn. Oatu, Bran, Chop Tend, Oil-Meal,
Lime, Cement, l'lastar, UnlMlng- and Fire Vrick, Etc
Cor. Front and Union, 1 Howard's Bow, Memphis.
DECEMBER 20, 1886.
5
Chickasaw Ironwork
JOIIN E. EASDLE COTKOPR'S,
08 Socond St., Mcmphla, Tenn
POUNDERS & MACHINISTS,
MANUFACTURERS AND DRALBHS IN
J.iiKlues, Holler, Nawintlla,
Bradford Corn and Wheat tM
Cotton Frew, Cotton Uiiiw,
Nhafllng, Pulleys, JUIc
SPECIAL, NOTICB-Wa'arapnparad to AH ordn
on toon Botloo. for tha cl.L.ratod Modart Patcai
WroothMiui Pulley, Wi oarrT ia I took oval
Two Hundred Aitortad bud.
aarH.nd for Oatalocua and Prloa-llit.
Hip
rnaa. Olarh.
aa. ffcuk.
Tennessee
H. H. aTACaT.
4.
I JHO. S.TOO?. M. It. MoSOVAM.
'oof, Mciowa
Wholesale Grocers anil Cotton Factors
, And;Oealera in IVevee and Hailroiul Supplies,
No.'74 Trrtnt Sfyot wTftmph. Tawwawaa .
WM. DRAN, Prti't I JAMES RBtLLT. VIoa-Praa'K I JOHN LILLY, Sao'7 and Traai.
DEMlli CQFFBB &SPCE Co.
Coffee Roasters, Spice Grinders.
Importers and Wbolr.it la Doivli r. In;
370tEI- OofOJ3,lSl3iOOEl
Ti;,.h-j 205 Main Street, Lee Block, Memphis.
B I H KITO KM
Wwa Tt.an. John 1 HIT. JitIi. Irnnn R.lllr. w. H. rtoon.
MECHANICS SAVINGS Mi
NO. 7 MADISON STREET.
PAID IIP CAPITAL, 1 1 1 : 1 : t (100,000
Intoreat Paalrt oxx X3o?oavltaa.
r ATCRDATM HBrll. 7 OHXOt K P.M.
H. U. KATZENDEBGKB, President. U SATZEMtEREB. Cashier.
BOA BO OP DIBEtTOKM.
BAP01KON ItTLL,
W. H. OA H HO 1. 1.,
JOnN A. P1NIH,
3. W. HOMO MR,
W. B, 6ALBHEATH & 00.
COTTON ,I7OrHr:OLS
?5 STATU Nllti:i"r, HUSTON, MANS.
Cnwli Advancea
Mercantile
Capital, $200,000. Surplus, $25,00!!,
S B. OCDWLf , Pratt i. X. OOUOBaV Tlac-Prean. C H.llVlUEE, CjatoQI
0BSoMra Xllarootoartn
arA&rMiiwi ana SHaaa mt fawi nmnaa.f a tmmi Ojaai-J
amalaaaa mm a. kaontal AtanaaVaa M VmtiaatMmnuim
BMII lUlLII' ll!-.l3Ll!UJW.IlJiaL-i..'JJlia U XI JaUjnjJUInaJa3g
1NHATTM SAKS 8A
AND TEUST COMPANY.
BOARD OI TH-XTOTCaHl E1S9.
APOLKOW BILL, MIOUARL OAVIN, J. H. UANDWKREia
liOyftt HANADKK, TIIOMAH BOYLB JDAVID P. 11ADUKN,
LAZARUS Litvy. JOHN W. COOIl HAN, JAMK8 A, OMIIKKM,
Snurbw khnkeht, holooleman, kwp, OOLDHMITU,
fAMEH S. HOBINbON, nA&DWltt iltHKa.
ww I.potlt raoaiTad la to ml ol $1 and upward, and lnUr.it allow.d on aama BtuH
annually.
aar Yi' bur and toll looal Invaitm.nl Bondi and Saonrltlai r.n.rally , par taraa, act ai
traitaaa, and, 1b canaral, azteata any Bnanoial baain.n raqalring a lala and ratpoailala
airont.
a Wi Ihu. drafti, In mail to mil purohai.n, on all part of Enropa.
aarWohaT.aaoiaiiiodioni Vault for tbo dopoilt ol TaluaLl.i, which ll at tha larrioa af
onr euitomari, frea of Vnar(,
O. P. UADDiUi, Praaldent. EWI). OLOHIITH, Tlee-Presldeat
J AM FN HATH AN. Taaklnr.
KELLY, IIOPER & CEILLY.
WHOLESALE!
Or ocers & Cotton Factors
Ha. CSfl nala Street, OayoM Block.
LOOK ODf-BiTMl
Coufoctionfl, Olacofl, Nongat Caramels, French Fruit Glaceo,
Cream Bon Bona, Fine French Handmade Creams and
Bon Bons, Chocolates, Ices and Nougatlnes.
Ioa oan find th.M tooal " AT RETAIL," In any quantltl.i, at
The Peters & Sawrio Co.'s Retail EstaWishinent,
No. 43 JeOeraon Street, Uppoalte.Tbeir Factory.
Th.aa ara tho Inoit Oonl.otlom that tha M.mphli Pnbllo haro oror had tho opportunity
to purohaia.
tflTTry Onr "Wfew TreHiii liOnfw "IMIflona."
joRcrn HVUAumAW. bkkht raasiK.: JOHKP1I VAOKH
FADER, FRANK & CO.
Mi Montt mn
1Mt Front Street, OppowleC?nwom Ilonwe.
s. b . bbtis. a b.
(avvoaaaoBa to wntm, doas co.i
ULclesalo Grocers mi Cotton VzrJrxz
Kz. a 1-2 ind 13 Unlen Street, jSemphlg, Tean.
VF. T UOWDIIE.
COTTON
S4l and SO Madison
H. 0. PBAECl.
M.CePEARCE & Co
Cotton Factors & Commission P.srchMs,
:Wo. 280 mOSTISTHEEP MK!1.VIIIS. TENN.
irotaan Warohonao Woo HH ind Tfalon ajtvoot.
If. ETAYHOB I CO
Cotton Factors and Commission Merchaists.
Ko. 3H Frtnt Stroet, Corner of Monroe, Memphis, Tenir.
J. 8. MoTIQHl. W. 0. PAXTXaon.'
Q m Co.
A. oonRN,
T. F. TDBfN.
J. H. fllHCOH,
A. B. WKYKRH,
on Coiialiiinciits.
i.-j i
ad of HA
IS
moBR. w. a wati
N. I. llOWDKr
FACTORS,
St., ; S?emyliiao Ten,
iJOTlS L. MoCLILLAS.

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