OCR Interpretation


Pittsburg dispatch. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, July 02, 1889, Image 1

Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024546/1889-07-02/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

7
.!. BUSINESS ? NpU 3P44?i"UJft WOAJJJ HARVEST Sff- ' j
? ' rORTT-FOUIlTH TEAS. PITTSBURG,. TUESDAY, JULY 2, 1889. . ,- THREE CENTS
. . . - ' i I
A CAREFUL CORONER
Reasons for Moving Slowly With
the Inquests on the Johns
town Victims.
NO TIME FOR PREJUDICES.
The Yerdict Must Be Fair, and Accuse
Nobody Unjustly.
UITOETANT EVIDENCE BE0UGHT OUT.
Testimony of Tiro Men Who Saw the Dam
Break They Nerer Sow the Water Rise
so Rapidly The Feeling of the Jobns
lown People Deceitful Appenrnnce oT
the Dam n to the Volume of Wnter It
Contained What the Jnry Saw Yester
day Another Adjournment Till Thursday
Conference of the Governor With the
Iiocal Finance Committee The Boroueha
Favor the Conaolldation Scheme.
Coroner Evans is moving slowly with his
inquest for the purpose of securing a full
and fair investigation of the causes of the
break of the South Fork dam and "the ex
tent of the responsibility as far as possible.
The jury doesn't intend to be influenced by
those who feel indignant at the amount of
property destroyed and the terrible losses of
lifeubut, on the other hand, it doesn't mean
to shirk their responsibility.
iritOM A STAFT COEItESrONDEXT.J
Johnstown, July 1. Coroner Evans
and his jury viewed the South Pork dam
to-day, and took the testimony of two wit
nesses. Before the jnry left Johnstown I
overheard a prominent business man re
mark: "Why does Coroner Evans go to so
much trouble before the verdict is rendered?
Everybody knows the dam was always un
safe, and that settles it."
Coroner Evans may have his own opin
ions about the safety of that lake, but 'he is
doing nothing rashly. He is proceeding
slowly and according to law with the in
quest. Naturally, the people of Johns
town feel bitterly against the men who
maintained such dangerous fishing grounds.
You can scarcely find a man in the town
who doesn't think they ought to be held re
sponsible financially.
The Universal Feeling.
The feeling, to tell the truth, is universal
and strong against the South Fork Fishing
Club, or somebody else unknown, who
backed the dam enterprise. Even the jury
men find it a difficult matter to lay aside
their prejudices, and with the people in
structing them how tc decide, they tts!ize
they have a very ticklish task to perform,
On the one side is the immense loss of life
and property that the treacherous lake has
caused; on the other is the phenomenal
rainfall, and whether or not the catastrophe
was produced by causes and forces over
which humanity has no control.
All the facts must be brought ont in the
case before a fair and judicial decision can
be reached. Said one of the jurymen this
afternoon:
I know jnst how the people of Johnstown
feel about this matter. Their losses have been
heavy, and tbey pronounce the lake an insecure
structure. Men who before the dam broke
thought It was all right, and even when warned
laughed at the warning, are emphatic in tbeir
declaration that the reservoir was nothing
more than a mud all, end a constant menace
to life and property. But even with such
strong influences pulling at us, we intend to bo
jnst, and have no intention of injuring either
tide.
Deceltfnlncas of the Dam.
At a distance the dam looks insignificant
enough, and more than one man, deceived
by its gigantic proportions, wondered bow
it could have done so much damage; but,
when one stands on the top and looks down
into the great basin, that is sufficient. The
jury had this experience, but it didn't take
them long to discover that the reservoir
held a large body of water. Against the
breast of the dam the ravine is narrow and
deep, but up the valley in front of the club
house it widens out and covers considerable
ground. Just above the dam is a short
curve, and standing on top of the reservoir
the observer can get a full view of the
basin.
Two of the jury walked up to the bend to
see what was above. "When they came back
one of them said:
A Significant Remark.
If I had known such a volume of water was
dammed up in these mountains behind such a
mud puddle, I would never have remained a
day in Johnstown. I tell yon, boys, it was
awful.
The jury made a very critical examina
tion of the structure, but they kept their
opinions to themselves. They noticed that
the puddling toward the top consisted
principally of slate. The material 4s not
nearly as good as the clay used farther
down. Coroner Evans thought this was a
mistake, and he questioned if the good clay
had been put in all the way up, whether or
not the disaster might have been averted.
''I am not an encineer," said another
juryman, "but I think this riprap should
have been better. It is nothing but loose
stone, dumped in with a cart."
Engineer John G. Parke explained that
the stone did not add strength to the dam,
but was intended to keep the waves from
washing away the earthen embankment.
One of the Points of Interest.
It has been stated that tbe dam was lower
in the center than on the sides; indeed, the
testimony of one of the witnesses shows that
It was, and the jury were quite particular
in determining this point. This part of the
embankment is gone, and only an ugly gap
Is left The parts of the wall remaining ap
pear to the eye to be on a level, but it is
understood that there was a slight depression
in the middle.
"When the jury had satisfied themselves
with tbeir examination two more witnesses
were called. A New York correspondent
and TnE Dispatch representative placed
boards on their knees and took down the
testimony for the Coroner. The latter has
found the reporters useful in more ways than
one, and he is glad to bave them with him.
"We all sat down under a tree on the edge of
the dam and proceeded with the court The
testimony is given below:
A Sinn Who Saw the Dam Break.
John Rorabaugh, a farmer near-by, who
saw the dam break, testified as follows:
I saw the dam about 8 o'clock in the morning
of Mar 31, It was raining fast and the water
in the lake was rising. The water was running
out ot the waste weir. It was back and forth
between my farm and the honse until noon.
At that time the water was running over the
top of the dam. I came down to tbe dam after
dinner and at that time it hadn't washed away
any of the front ot the dam, I then went
home and about 2 o'clock I saw the lake drop.
I knew the dam had broken. Tbe center ot
the dam was about a foot lower than on tbe
sides. At 1 o'clock I walked across the top of
tbe dam when tbe water was up to my ankles.
The boom in the waste weir broke and blocked
the end somewhat. Tbey tried to null the
pieces out. Tbe water in the weir was half
way up to the bridge. I bave lived here since
1S41 and I never saw the lake so high before.
Tbe dam now is not any higher than when tbe
State bad it. Tbe dam had sunk in the center.
It was
Bnllt Up Below With Timbers,
and these gave way. If the water hadn't gone
over the dam it never would have broken. The
waste weir should have been deeper, but even
then, I am not sure that tbe water wo aldn't
have run over. In filling up a break in 18S1
they merely dumped in tbe stone and dirt, but
that break bad nothing to do with the last one.
The water up the stream was very high, but it
was not over the fences, because they are not
near to tbe water. Tbe dam did not leak. Tbey
put in some hay to keep it from Ioakmg. They
did this when they patched it, in 1831. I hauled
two loads myself abont a half a ton in each
load. It was put in to keep tbe water from
washing out the dirt. No more bay was used
for packing. The dam was repaired without
puddling the earth. ,
George Gramling, a miller and lumber
man, testified:
I was here when tbe dam was washed out. As
nearly as I can tell I came here between 8 and 0
o'clock in tbe morning. At that tune the water
must bave been
Within Six Feet of the Top.
I stayed at tbe dam until I got hungry, when
I went borne for dinner. Then the lake lacked
about 18 inches of beinc full. Going home I
met Colonel Unger, and I told him 1 thought
tbe dam unsafe, for tbe water was rising fast,
and when I came back, at 1 o'clock, the water
was running over three-fourths of the dam,
clear et er to tbe west side, and tbe water was
about half way to my knees. It was about 2
o'clock when tbe water commenced to wash
tbe dam away. At first it was only a small
channel, and then the sides began to cave in.
The riprap on the center of tho, dam was not
heavy, having been made up of small stones. I
don't think it took more than 15 minutes to
drain tbe dam. The water never ran over be
fore. I was bere when it was only six inches
from the top, but after tbat thev put two feet
on top. For tbe upper side of tho dam they bad
good clay. When tbe old dam was made they
Pot the Cloy In tbe Layers,
but when the reservoir was made higher they
dumped in the material, and the finer stuff
rolled to tho outside, while tbe coarse stuff
went to tbe center. Tbe new tilling was not as
strong for preventing the water washing it
away as tbat used by the State. I told Colonel
Unger to cut the bridge over tbe waste weir,
bnt he was excited and didn't say anything.
Tbe Colonel ordered the Italians to build up
an embankment to hold tbe water, bnt they
didn't seem to care about working. Tbey were
a jolly set. At first the water leaked through
the new filling, but it got tighter every year.
Tbe Coroner adjourned the inqnest until
next Thursday evening, when he intends to
close. He is anxious to secure tbe testi
mony of Lieutenant Bees, of the United,
States army. ,
Sir. Caldwell, of Ebensbnrg, with Mr.
McKesson', a competent engineer, made a
complete survey of the dam last winter for
a map of the county, which he will soon
print. At that time he pronounced tbe dam
ucafc, ?'id he is not mrprlsod that it Vroke.
Isbael.
A SECEET SEANCE
Held by GoTernor Bearer, General Hast
ings and the Johnstown Local
Finnnce Committee The Reg
istration Unsatisfactory.
J.FEOM A STAPP COBBJCSrONDEXT.l
Johnstown, July 1. Governor Beaver,
General Hastings and the Local Finance
Committee held a secret seance to-day.
General Hastings said after the meeting
that thelittle gathering had been entirely har
monious,'andno new plans were formulated.
They agreed to stick to tbe old ones, and
push the work on this policy all summer.
The Governor will hurry up the Chicago
houses, and Master Carpenter Hughes was
instructed to build 100 two-story structures
to begin with, and more will be added if
tbev are needed.
The Governor told the committee the
cheering news that Judge Cummin, who
will have charge of the distribution of the
funds, will be here to-morrow and begin the
work at once. Tbe meeting was very satis
factory aud the members of the financial
committee left feeling encouraged and in
better spirits.
The appearance of Judge Cummin is
awaited with interest. He is a "Williams
port man, and when be went there and
stayed almost a week after his appointment,
his action was regarded by the Johnstown
people with suspicion. Thev conceived the
idea that he intended to take good care of
his own town, when they did not need the
money half so sorely ar the sufferers in tbe
Conemauch Valley.
The distribution of "the local funds will
hardly be made for another week. The
work of registration has been unsatisfac
tory, and tbe committee finds, on looking
over the list of names, tbat about 1,500 will
have to be stricken off. These people were
not touched by the flood, and some conten
tion is bound to arise. It is surprising how
far and wide the people have been scattered.
The registers received, letters from all parts
of the countrv asking them not to forget
their old friends in the distribution. Mr.
E. T. McNeilis, who assisted in the regis
tration, accounts for the small list of dead
in this manner. Said he:
Many of tho registers did not know until
tbey had banded in their reports tbat tbe list
or dead was to be taken, and for this reason
it is incomplete. Besides.
some of the living,
A mAnv fnrcrnt nil
in tbeir anxiety tn get the money, forgot i
about the dead. So much time has elapsed
since the flood tbat I do not believe an accu
rate list of the dead can ever be made. The
people are too widely separated.
CONSOLIDATION IN FA70B.
All the Borongbs Heard From Wish to Join
the Combine.
fiiom a staff coBBEsroxDjerr.j
Johnstown, Jnly L The question of
consolidating the boroughs was discussed
this afternoon, at the conference of the
committeemen elected. East Conemaugh,
Franklin, Upper Yoder, Morrellville and
"Walnut Grove were not represented. Those
present passed resolutions recommending
consolidation and appointed A. J. Maxham,
Colonel J. P. Linton, and G. T. Swank a
committee to study plan's.
The conference adjourned for another
meeting next Monday, when it is hoped all
the places interested will be represented.
Only Six Bodies Recovered.
ITBOX A STATT CORHESPOXDZXT.l
Johnstown, July 1. Six bodies were
recovered to-day. , Three were recog
nized as those of Mrs. George Hager, her
servant girl, and F.J. Daly, the Auditor
of the Gautier department. The others
were unidentified.
Clearing tbe River Forks.
'FROM A STAPT COBBISFOXDKXT.l
Johnstown, July L Major Phillips
started this morning, with a large force of
men, to clean up the forks of the river. He
is making good progress.
THE OFFICIAL YOTE.
Returns on tbe
Prohibition and Suffrage
Amendment
u Forwarded to the
Secretary of State Facts
That the Figures Show.
ISrXCtAI. TZLZOBAX TO TnE DISPATCH. J
Harkisbubo, July 1. The official re
turns from the various counties have been
received at tbe office of the Secretary of
State. There is but little change from the
figures as originally given, although the
majority against tho suffrage amendment
has grown somewhat. The following are the
particulars:
Prohibition
Amendment
Suffrage
Amendment
V
Adams
Allegheny
Armstrong.,
Beaver
Bedford
Berks
Blair
Bradford
Buck
Butler
Cambria
Cameron
Carbon, ,...
Center
Chester.
Clarion ....
Clearfield
Clinton
Columbia
Crawford
Cumberland
Dauphin
Delaware
nt
Jrie
Fayette
Forest
Franklin
Kulton
(reene..
Huntington
Indiana
Jefferson
Juniata.
Lackawanna, ....
Lancaster
Lawrence
Lebanon
Lehigh
Luzerne
Lycoming
McKean
Mercer...
Mifflin
Monroe
Montgomery.,..,
Montour
Northampton....
N orthnmberlaod
Perry ....,.....,.
Philadelphia...!,
l'lke ....i...
Potter,
Schuylkill
Snyder
Somerset .....
Sullivan
Susquehanna....
Tioga
Union ,
Venango
Warren ,
Washington
Wayne ,
Westmoreland...
Wyoming ........
York
a 167
3,505
45,799
3,913
s,zn
S.677
22.43S
4,033
3.498
9.018
.415
4.889
33,444
6,582
4.414
6,842
16.385
7,050
6,708
12,069
7,034
3,549
289
2.997
4,629
11.733
4.898
6,155
1,862
4.801
6,991
4.809
6,941
3,308
1,480
6,910
7.656
S92
6,464
1,603
4,763
4,342
6,869
4,633
2,201
7,751
9,813
4.197
4,313
11.108
11,642
5,258
1,656
5,700
2,786
1426
12,970
1.885
10,300
19.SU
'467
S.780
. 278
4.7SI
693
.147
XK9
3,r
0,33
6,903
Z.47:
563
Ki
417
607
884
C9
4,
S.RI4
3.191
2. 738
4,100
373
3,882
SI I
1.330
4.589
8,415
471
2.654
4
6,723
2,241
2.570
608
S37
a, 701
M52
2,13.1
2,607
7.51S
a. 779
5,062
4,339
ex
5,163
915
2.181
641
3.843
4W
1.800
1.160
4,014
4,42!
8,737
5.5.15
3. (Ml
2,163
2,147
1,066
158
1,433
1.579
S. 978
4,142
414
4.914
7.154
SI3
3.604
54
3,113
J, 096
4.SSS
4,076
1.J37
7.8S9
7,190
4,486
MS)
1,142
31
Z.831
2.S91
230
407
1087
402
S"J
265
2,452
l,l
9,896
18,271
1,583
6,752
,956
7,334
247
946
584
1.734
890
J.717
2,r9
100
267
2.P52
204
533
1.280
l.OEo
1.779
1L145
ii,(m
14.967
6,681
2.038
4,556
2,054
6,838
2,034
970
2,882
LSS35
2,585
4.K
1.11
2, a
14,358
I. 621
11.15
,063
0,KJU
2.214
7.101-
:v'i
1.S0S
2.610
20,883
1,122
997
12.00
2.64S
4,299
1,425
6263
3,563
2,237
4,411
2.S4S
8,879
3,386
14,398
2,965
11,409
26,463
US, 963
111,727
SSO
1.574
4,180
947
2,079
667
BE)
1,546
16,490
2.359
3,451
961
55
1,449
3,225
252
4.8H
HI
4.7S1
2.305
285
4.713
1,605
5,409
3,532
6,761
3.637
1,412
1,908
2,672
4.757
2,770
8,184
1,041
1L4U7
1.
229
798
796
1,310
469
547
83
1,535
Z.5Z1
8,291
2,259
6,341
ToUls 298,17484-644
183,371
420,623
The majority against the prohibitory
amendment is 188,027, and that against the
suffrage amendment 236,952. The total vote
on the prohibitory amendment Is 781,261,
against 819,212 for Governor Iiy 1886, 763,
216 for State Treasurer in 1887, and 997,668
for President in 1888.
' THAT 1TD0W JDKi
Is Now nt Work on Another Interesting;
Murder Trial.
Chakieston, S, C July 1. On the 9th
of March last, three days before Captain
Dawson was killed, "William Hunzenmaire's
throat was cut from ear to ear on King
street, this city, by John "Weir, a factory
operatire. The murder was the result of a
bar-room row; Slunzenmaire, -Weir and a
number ot others had been drinking, and a
general melee took place in the street. "Weir
almost severed Mnnzenmaire's head from
his body with a razor. Tbe trial of "Weir
began to-day before Judge Kershaw.
Tbe State is represented by Solicitor
Jervey, and "Weir is represented by Judge
Twiggs, of Augusta, and Captain Simon, of
Charleston. The jury consists of seven
white and five colored men. Three of the
white and three of the colored men served
on the JIcDow jury. Quite a number of
witnesses were examined to-day, The case
will probably continue till Wednesday. The
result of the trial is being watched with con
siderable interest.
A COLORADO TOWN IN DANGER,
Durnngo la Being; Wiped Ont by tbe Devour
ing; Flames.
Dueango, Col., July 1. At 3 this
afternoon a fire broke out in the south part
of the city, and in an incredibly short time
the flames, assisted by a strong wind, spread
in every direction, leaping from building
to building, until, at this writing half of
the town is in ashes, Every business house
and public building in tbe city, with tbe
exception of the postof&ce and Strater's
Hotel, is burned to the ground. The wind
is still blowing and the lire is entirely be
yond control. The telegraph office is
threatened and may soon go. What the
final result will be cannot now be foretold.
Should the flames be communicated to
the residence part of the city which is not
unlikely what was but a few hours since
the flourishing city of Durango will soon be
nothing but a mass of charred debris and
ashes. The fire department responded, but
were completely powerless. The origin of
the conflagration has not been learned.
THEY CANNOT COMPROMISE.
Trinity Church Moat Pay 81,000 for Im
porting a Preacher Under Contract.
"WASHlKGTOjr, July L The Attorney
General has given an opinion to the Secre
tary of the Treasury expressing grave doubts
bb to the authority ot the latter under sec
tion 3169, revised statutes, to compromise
cases arising under the alien labor contract
law. The question arose on the offer of the
officers of the Church of the Holy Trinity,
of New York City, to pay $100 in compro
mise of the fine of $1,000 imposed upon
them for a violation of the alien labor con
tract law in the engagement of a foreign
clergyman.
The District Attorney at, New York and
tbe Solicitor of the Treasury,recommended
an acceptance of the offer. Tbe question
was subsequently submitted to tbe Attorney
General, with the result as stated. The
case had been previously appealed to the
United States Supreme Court.
ETERITHING IS STRAIGHT.
The Count of the Notes and Stamp In the
Bnrean of Engraving.
Washington, July L The Commission
of Treasury experts appointed to count the
stock of notes and stamps 'and paper there
for on hand at the Bureau of Engraving
and Printing, concluded their work to-day
and found everything correct Mr. F. O.
Graves, the ex-Chief of the Bureau, left
Saturday night for Seattle, "Wash. T., where
he will open a bank. His successor was in
ducted in office to-day.
STILL AFTER TERRITORY.
Another Island in the Pacific Annexed to the
British Crown.
Washington, July J. Tho Depart
ment of State has been informed by the
United States Consul at Auckland, New
Zealand, that the Island of "Snwarrow,"
in tbe Pacific Ocean, has been annexed by
the British Crown, the commander of tbe
warship Rapid having hoisted the British
flag on that island on May 1 last.
BEFORE THE EATTLE.
Slight Odds on tbe Great Fight Are
Now Offered on Sullivan.
ONE BIG BACKER FOE KILEAIN.
Pony Moore Comes From Engiii'itr With
$14,000 to Fat Up on Him:
JDJIPED THE EOPE A THOUSAND TIMES.
Mississippi's Goiernor Offers a Seward for the PngiN
ists' Arrest.
The final arrangements for the pugilistld
contest between John 3J. Sullivan and Jake
'Kilrain are being completed. The friends
of both men appear confident, although the"
betting odds are so mewhat in favor of the
big resident of Bos ton. Governor Lowiy, of
Mississippi, has issued a proclamation for
bidding the fight, and offering $500 reward
for the arrest of the principals.
rSFICIAI. TELIOKAM TO TBI DISFATCH.1
New Yokk, July 1. "Pony" Moore,
father-in-law of Charley Mitchell, the
pugilist, arrived from England to-day. He
had been expected earlier, and Mitchell's
visit to this c ity last week was partly for
the purpose of meeting him. He went at
once to the Police Gazette office, and after
being duly interviewed, set out to see a
little of town beforp going to Baltimore to
join Mitchell. .
He said that he had come over solely to
see tbe Kilrain-Sullivan fight, bnt that
while he was here he would like to get on a
match between Sempsey and Mitchell. Mr.
Moore is said to have brought with him
$14,000, the whole of which he proposes to
place on Kilrain at suitable odds. Betting
on the fight in this city is dull, chiefly be
cause tbe Kilrain men want more odds than
the Sullivan men are willing to give. The
ruling rate is $100 to $80. Arthur Lumley,
of the Illustrated Newt, has sent $5,000 to
New Orleans to be placed on as nearly even
terms as possible.
COULD NOT a EI TAKERS.
It was San Francisco money which Mr.
Lumley has been holding for some time,
and which he was unable to get taken in
this city. It is believed that a large part of
the big lots of money to be put on this fight
will go to New Orleans, in the hope of the
odds being better there. A letter from Bis
marck, Dak., to tbe JUuitrattd JVew says
that the odds there are $1,000 to $700 in Sul
livan's favor, and that $10,000 has been put
up at that rate.
Tbe Police Gazette train for the fight will
start from this city on Thursday morning.
It will have on board a large party from
here, and will take on Kilrain, Mitchell and
others at Baltimore. McUaarey, tn
fighter, with a party of friends, will be on
this train,
Sullivan, having postponed his departure
from Belfast for Rochester until 3:13 to-day,
at the solicitation of his trainer, devoted th
forenoon to his usual work. As the weather
was cloudy, the daily jaunt was omitted,
and the exercise was confined to indoor
work. For 15 minutes Sullivan put the
heavy ball, and then hammered the
heavy yaw-hide bag for three quarters
of an hour. "If he lands
one of those in the first round," said Mul
doon to tbe reporter, as, with tbe old swln
ing richtsad blow, Sulljf an sent the balTf' Sullivan and hisparty had to run two
whining to the planking, "about
5.000
people will leave the ring side disgusted at
tne Drevity 01 tne contest.
" JUMPING THE EOPE.
Apparently not a whit tired alter h,is
hour's labor, John seized the skipping-rope
and, with a light and airy step, skipped
1,000 consecutive times without a miss.
Muldoon then threw a huge blanket over
his charge and led him to a conch where he
lay for a minute perspiring freely.
"Tell my friends about this," said John
to the reporter, "so they can refute the state
ments that my legs arc jjone."
A dispatch from New Orleans says: Sul
livan will spend Friday and Saturday at
Spanish Fort, where preparations are being
made to receive him. The 21-foot ring, or
square, in which the great fight will take
place, will be surrounded by another ring
at a distance of six feet Within this will
be seated the representatives of the press,
the seconds, bottle holders, etc., aud a cor
don 'of police.
Outside of this will be another ring at a
distance of 45 feet, within which those hold
ing $15 tickets will be seated. Police will
also guard this ring, both on the inner and
,outer sides to prevent any interference with
tne ngniers or uieir secouus. jv passage way
will be formed to allow the fighters to enter,
jumping oxer the ropes of the onter rings.
THE PINAL AEEANOMENTS.-
Prof. Denis F. Butlsr has been given the
superinteudency of the construction of the
ring. Tbe ropes used in tbe Sullivan-Ryan
fight at Mississippi Citv will also be used in
the comiug fight Captain Jamieson, of
Meridian, with 20 resolute Mississippian3,
will have charge of the inner ring. In addi
tion to this special guard there will be a
reinforcement ot 40 tried men from the city,
who, with Jamieson's guard, will preserve
order.
So far notices have been received that
parties have beenmade up to come to the fight
lrom Hazelthurst, Vickjburg, Greenville,
Memphis, Jackson, Tenn., Cairo, Houston,
Galveston, San Antonio, Fort "Worth,
Pensacola, Jacksonville, New York, Chi
cago, Montgomery, Denver, Mobile, Birm
ingham and St Louis about 2,000 in all,
to date.
Betting men are still wary, but there is
no end of interest in the fight, and New
Orleans is now affected with the worst kind
of athletic fever. Curiosity is expressed as
to when the trains are to leave for the bat
tle ground on the morning of the fight That
point has notyit been definitely decided,
but it is believed that an early special train
to carry press reporters, telegraph oper
ators, backers of tne men and interested
parties, will leave the citv between 4 and 5
o'clock on the morning of the fight for the
ring side.
kilbajn's plans.
Attached to this train will be in all like
lihood a coach carrying one of the princi
pals in the fight It is though the one will
be Kilrain, who will occupy tbe coach dur
ing the nieht and not leave it until he gets
out and shies the castor in the ring. Ar
rangements will probably be made to have
Sullivan, his trainers and seconds go over
the evening before, it being thought that
quarters quite near to the scene of the fight
may be obtained where the big pugilist can
have a quiet night's rest
These arrangements are being made be
cause it is not thought desirable to have the
two men go over on the same train. When
the first train gets to the grounds all details
will be perlected, and everything gotten in
readiness to have the pugilists fight in
stantly after the arrival of the excursionists.
The train proper carrying spectators will
probably get off about 6 o'clock in the morn
ing. The scene picked out, it is said, is not on
the railroad track, but is not tar enough
away to' make it difficult to reach. The fact
that there are several spots on the line of
road in several parishes sets at rest all doubt
as to police interference. If there should
he any indication of interference by officials
at tbe point selected, an event not at all
likely to ocur, tbe train will move on a
piece further. v
JTJBT A I.ITTI.E odds.
JackBarnett,- Sullivan's representative,'
this morning received a dispatch from Mr.
James Magruder, of Richmond, Va., stat
ing that he will leave immediately for this
city. He also telegraphed that be had
$1,000 which he would like to place on Sul
livan. He would be willing to lay. the
$1,000 against $800. Twenty-five cars had
been engaged for the day of the fight, but,
from present indications, fully ten more
will be needed. A party of 25 sports will
arrive from Denver this evening. Birming
ham is sending a delegation of 100 to the
fight. rf
A telegram from Jackson, Miss., says:
Governor Lowry to-day issued the follow
ing proclamation:
"Whereas. It has become a matter of notor
iety tbat certain persons called John L. Sulli
van and Jake Kilrain, from distant States. In
tend, on some near day ami in defiance of law
and good morals, to engage in prize fighting;
and.
Whereas, It has been reliably reported that
Such prize fighting is to take place within 100
miles of New Orleans, and is likely to be
within the limits of this State, now, therefore.
I. Robert liowry. Governor, in the name and
by the authority of tbe State of Mississippi,
sensible of the wickedness, brutality and de
moralizing influence of such crime, call upon
you by your oaths of ofllce to use all vigilance
and endeavor to .prevent the commission
tnereof within your respective counties by
promptly apprehending all persons engaged or
being about to engage therein, as well as their
alders and abettors, and deal with them as the
law directs.
Governor Lowry has strengthened his
proclamation by offering a reward of $500
for the arrest ot Sullivan and Kilrain and
their safe delivery to the officers of the
county in which they may attempt to fight.
KILRAIN'S FRIENDS.
They Ara Confident That Tbeir Favorite
t Will Win the Fight.
BALxniOEE, July 1. Thousands of peo
ple came to see Jake Kilrain to-day. Hal
stead's Hotel was their stopping place, and
there the crowd loitered throughout the
morning and evening to catch a glimpse of
the man who in a week will meet John L.
Sullivan in the prize ring. Of the result
of his trip to New York Mitchell said but
little, bat that was sienificant, and the visit
seems to bave resulted to his liking. He
met the Sullivan people at Coney Island,
and found them intent on having the fight
transpire.
They wanted a fair field and no favors
knd seemed assured that such would be
given them, and with both parties anxious
to fight he said there was no likelihood of
there being any hitch in the arrangements.
Jnst exaotly what day this week and by
what route he and Kilrain would go South
he had not determined. Those who got a
good look at Kilrain yesterday pronounced
him as a man fit to fight for his life, and'
cbuld not conceive his being anything else
than a winner.
j. SUIiLITAN ON THE WAT.
The Big Fellow NotsE'n Rente for the
Southern Dnttle Ground.
Rochester, N. Y., July 1. John L.
Sullivan, William Muldoon, Charlie John
son and Joe "Warner boarded a special train
at Churchville Junction, on the "West
!$hore road, at 10 o'clock this evening and
oined about 48 New York sporting
n who were on their way to
ngnc Duiuvan ana Aiuiaoon
e trom Belfast to this citv this
giuuuu, UUk JCtk UC (.U VUHIUO hUC VUT
ine and drove to Chili station on tbe "West
AwAn. kni l.r. .i.n IhI. n.u .. ..:...
Shore, thinking to meet the speoial there
and avoid the crowd at Bochester. It was
rumored around this city that Mayor Par
sons intended to arrest Sullivan under the
Jaw which forbids any person from leaving
-the State to encage in a prize fight, and the
trip out into tne country was to avoid this
e- possible continzencv also,
miles from Chili to Churchville in order to
catch the special. The big fellow says that
he is in just as good condition ashe was
when he fought Ryan. Sullivan to-day
weighs 197 pounds.
TWO DIFFERENT DECI8I0NS.
The Judge Give Ilia and Then the Com
plainant Takes Up III.
Kansas City, July 1. A sensation
took place in Police Judge Boland's court
this afternoon. Last Friday O. Paxson a
prominent wealthy stock broker of this
city was arrested at the instance of J. J.
Halpin, a brother of Maria Halpin. Hal
pin accused Paxson of a serious charge in
connection with the former's wife. The case,
came to trial to-day before Judge Boland,
and no less than four witnesses gave crimi
nating testimony. Judee Boland, however,
announced that no case had been made and
dismissed the case.
"That's your decision, is it,"cried,the en
raged Halpin, "then this is mine," and
with a heavy walking stick he struck Pax
sou a blow on the bead that rendered him
unconscious. Before another blow could
be inflicted Halpin was arrested by an
officer. Paxson is in a critical condition,
but his injuries will not prove fatal, so the
doctor says.
LONGENECKER'S PROGRAMME.
Be Want to Try Burke With the Ifest of
the Cronln Snipect.
Chicago, July 1. The regular grand
jury for the July term will be impaneled
July 22 unless the State's Attorney calls for
a special grand jury before that date to
carry on the investigation of the mr.rder ot
Dr. Cronin from tUe point where it was
dropped last Saturday. But there Is no
present indication of such a proceeding.
"I will not ask for a special grand jury,"
said Judge Longenecker to-day, "unless "we
get some new evidence that would enable us
to indict others for the crime."
"Will you go on with the trial of Coogh
lin, Sullivan, Woodruff and Beggs when
their cases are called this term?"
"I can't tell. I want to try Burke with
them."
TACKLED THE WRONG MAN.
Three Tonng Fellows' on a Spree Attack an
Inoflenclve Individual.
rSPICUX TILIOKJLK TO TUX DISFATCTX.I
Eeie, July L Augustus Foster, a young
man, went out on a frolic this morning, and,
with two companions, entered the premises
of John Knobloch, where they began to
destroy the shrubbery, and when Knobloch
remonstrated they attacked him and he
fired at them, shooting Foster through the
left eye. Foster is still alive. Knobloch
went to the police station and gave himself
up. He admits shooting Foster, and says
he shot to kill him, as it was done in self
defense and in the protection of his property.
NEW HOUSES AND ST0EES.
Distribution ot the Portnble Hut tobe Ee
' anmed Again To-Day.
mtOU A STATr COBBXSrOSDXXT.l
Johnstown, July 1. Forty of the par
table bonses are scheduled to arrive to-morrow.
They will be distributed at once.
Sixty-five applications have been re
ceived for business houses on the park. The
committee will award them to-morrow
morning. 1 '
THE STANDARD AT WORK.
Ono Bio re Ezlcnaive Gobble In the Ohio
Field.
uraCIAL TILIOBAK TO THB DISrATCB.1
Lima, July 1. The Duke Norton Oil
Company have transferred to William
Fleming, of the Standard Oil Company,
leases on 365 acres of land in this field for a
consideration of (40,000.
1 ROLLICKING. TIME
Anticipated by the President on His
Fourth of Jnly Excursion. t
HE WOH'T TAKE HI3 WIFE ALONG.
A Nnmber si Rather Important Appoint
ments Made Before He Leaves,
PENNSYLVANIA FARES FAIRLY WELL.
Onto EepnMIcans Who Are Not at All Hopeful of
Their Comiag ?izht
Before leaving Washington for "Wood
stock, Conn., where he will spend the
Fourth, President Harrison is trying to
clear his desk of some of the accumulated
applications for positions at homo aud
abroad. Be made several important ap
pointments yesterday, and more are prom
ised for the next day or two.
ISrECIAl TILIOnAM TO THE DISPATCILl
"Washington, July 1. A rain which
within two hours after It becan, flooded
hundreds of cellars, floated street cars at
Center Market'and the Pennsylvania Bail
road station, and made a river of water in
nearly every street of the city, was pretty
effeotual in keeping office-seekers from the
"White House to-day, and so President
Harrison had only two or three Cabinet and
Congressional callers, and none of the rank
and file. Tbe net result of this quiet day's
work, to far as appointments are concerned,
is 1 minister, 3 consul generals, 10 con
suls and 1 commercial agent, which is con
sidered very good work for a President who
must be thinking of tbe rollicking time he's
going to bave on the Fourth of July with
tbe giddy editor of the religious New York
Independent. 4
SOME MORE COMING.
It la expected that the President will,
before bis departure to-morrow, announce
the appointment of eight or ten more
consuls, or, if not then, that they will soon
after his departure be announced from the
State Department; but whether any, of the
several applicants who expect to be ap
pointed from Allegheny county will be of
the number, cannot be discovered. It is
intimated, however, that at least
one name familiar to Pittsburg will be
among them. Notwithstanding the fre
quent announcements in regard to tbe
nearness of tbe appointment to fat offices
of other Pennsylvanians East and "West,
there seems to be a hitch in that direction.
Tbe terms of several officials have expired,
and it is known that their successors have
been decided upon, but what stays the hand
of the President or the heads of Depart
ments is known only to themselves. .Pos
sibly the lack of a spur in the form of the
presence of Senator Quay or Colonel Bayne
may have some part in tbe explanation.
MBS. HARBISON -WON'T GO.
Mrs. Harrison will not accompany the
President to Woodstock, as she had in
tended. She fears the oppressive weather
and the length of the journey might coun
teract all the benefits she received from her
visit to Cape May, and she will therefore
rest until after the President's return, and
will then join Mrs. McKee at the Davis
cottage at Deer Park.
Mr. Henry C Bowen will come to this
city to-morrow to accompany the President
to his Woodstock villa. The Presidental
party will leave Washington to-morrow in
President Boberts' private car, which will
be attached to the 3:43 train on the Pennsyl
vania road, reaching New York at 920. In
the party will be President Harrison, Secre
tary Tracy. Secretary Noble, Associate
Justice Miller, Senator Hiscock and Pri
vate Secretary Halford. The party will be
in Charge of Mr. Clarence W. "Bowen.
THE ABBIVAIi AT NEW TOKK.
On reaching New York carriages will be
taken to the Fifth Avenue Hotel, where
the Presidental party will spend the night
Next morning at 10 o'clock they will take
a special train at the Grand Central depot
for Woodstock. At Stamford the train will
be met by Governor Morgan G. Buckeley
and staff, United States Senators Hawley
and Piatt, Congressman Simmons and other
Connecticut officials.
A brief stop will be made in New Haven,
and citizens of Hartford have arranged
some demonstrations in honor of the Presi
dent on the arrival of the train at 1 o'clock.
From Hartford the train will go over the
New England road to Putnam, which will
be reached at 3 o'clock, where there will be
another demonstration, by military organi
zations and citizens, to do honor to tbe
President From Putnam the party will
proceed five miles to Boseland Park, Wood
stock, where the President will spend the
Fourth of July.
FEARS OF FACTION tflGHTS.
Republlcnn Quarrel la Several State
Threaten to Do Them Injnry.
rSPEClAL TXLIQKAIf TO TITS DISrATC'M
Washington, July 1. The factional
differences in several States threaten to do
the Republicans much injury. A number
of Ohio politicians, including several Re
publican Congressmen, who arrived here
since the Ohio State Republican Conven
tion, with one accord seem to find it neces
sary to protest that they are enthusi
astic for Foraker. Some of them pro
test too much. Governor Foraker has not
greatly changed in his character or politi
cal relations within the last few weeks, yet
some of these gentlemen left Washington
for the convention bitterly denouncing bim
as unworthy of Republican support, and
predicting his defeat it be should be nom
inated. They are more discreet now in
their public utterances, but privately they
say to their friends that they do not think
that Foraker can be elected. There are
rumors of attacks to be made on him on ac
count of bis administration of the State
Government in matters ot which tbe public
as yet knows nothing.
The Sherman men will support Foraker
only in the most perfunctory manner. Some
of them will take the stump in the cam
paign; but they will speak for the Republi
can party rather than for its candidate. Tbe
sincere triends of Senator Sherman will
never forget the conduct of Foraker at the
Chicago Republican nominating convention
last year, and they will never forgive bim.
Said one of the Congressmen who talks upon
the street in favor of Foraker, and in pri
vate denounces him:
We could have nominated one of several
men, bnt they were minor candidates. Had
one of them been nominated, tbe Foraker peo
ple would bave been dlasatlsned,,and on tbeir
part the campaign would bave been apathetic.
This was the situation for which tbe opponents
ot Foraker in the convention did not wish to
be responsible. There was one man who conld
have been nominated, and who' would bave
been heartily supported by all of the Republi
cans in tbe State McKlnley; but he would not
permit his name to be used.
Blaine Ieavr far Bar Harbor.
Washington, July 1. Secretary Blaine
and Walker Blaine left this evening for
Bar Harbor, where the former will remain
until September. President Harrison con
templates paying the Secretary a visit
some time in July.
Another Pcnnsylvanlan Chosen.
.Washington, Julyl. Mr. William B.(
Shaw, of Pennsylvania, has been-appointed.
Chief of'the Agents' Division of thy"?) "fen
Office, in place of Mr.H.C. Bell, of.
6
NOT TO BE FROZEN OUT.
Eugene Schuyler Secure a Position
Spite of Senatorial Opposition.
rFPECTAI. TZI.ZOKAU TO TUX DISPATCH. J
Washington, July 1. The appoint
ment of Eugene Schuyler as Consul Gen
eral at Cairo causes a good deal of gossip,
as his name was withdrawn after he had
been appointed Assistant Secretary of State,
for the reason that it was feared he would
not be confirmed. In his book on "Amer
ican Diplomacy" he had scored several
Senators by name, almost as severely as
they had been criticised by Editor Hal
stead, and it was generally stated and be
lieved that the ill will which these Senators
had for him on that account was the cause
of tbe reconsideration of his appointment,
though it was officially stated his name was
withdrawn at his own request, because he
did not care to serve.
If there was doubt or his confirmation for
Assistant Secretary of State, the same doubt
will attach to his confirmation as Consul
General to Cairo, and the doubt will be
even greater, because in addition to his un
popularity with certain Senators, a number
of Senators bad candidates for this very
Consul Generalship, all of which are turned
down for Blaine's Iriend, Schuyler. It Is
said that Senator Quay had an applicant
for the place in a young gentleman named
Bostwick, who he particularly desired to
bave appointed, and if that be true the
Pennsylvania statesman may join the oppo
sition. MltflSTERJTO GREECE.
Colonel A. Zionden Snowden Secure a
Foreign Appointment Bather Unex
pectedlyNo Feraonal Effort
Mode to Get the Place.
rSrSCIAX. TH.EQBAU TO TSX DISPATCH.!
Philadelphia, July 1. Colonel A.
Louden Suowden,who was to-day appointed
Minister Besident and Consul General to
Greece, Servla and Boumania, was this
evening the recipient of numerous con
gratulations from friends who had
just learned of hid appointment.
The new Minister and Consul
General appeared in a very happy
mood, and when spoken to regarding the
appointment said: "Although I had learned
that my name was under consideration for a
foreign mission, I had no thought that the
appointment would be made soon."
An intimate friend of Colonel Snow
den, who knew of the inside facts
regarding the appointment, explained:
Colonel Snowden made no personal effort to
secure tbe appointment, although he is doubt
less gratified at this recognition by the admin
istration. I have no doubt but that Secretary
of State Blaine was very anxiou tbat Colonel
Snowden should be recognized through his de
partment, as be is and has been
for ' years his warm personal friend.
A number of gentlemen, Including Frank
Thompson, First Vice President of tbe Penn
sylvania Railroad; William O. Houston, Presi
dent of the Union ljeague; Thomas Cochran.
President of tbe Guarantee Trust Company:
A. Grlscom, President of the International
Steamship Company, and Eawin C. Knight,
independent of each other and without any
consent of action, sent letters to the President
requesting tbat a foreign mission be conferred
upou Colonel Snowden.
Colonel A. 'Louden Snowden is an ex
Superintendent ot the United States Mint,
ex-postmaster of Philadelphia, ex-Chief
Coiner of the .Mint is a member of the
Park Commission and also of tbe Philo
sophical Society, and has been tbe holder of
many other positions of trust He was
Chairman and Marshal of the civic demon
stration and celebration of the Centennial
ot tbe Constitution in 1887. Colonel Snow
den was educated at Washington and Jef
ferson College. He Is 52 years old.
AN ATTACK ON BALFODE.
Gladstone and HI Friends Denounce tbe
Outrages In the House.
London, July L In. the House of Com
mons this evening, Mi. Sexton moved to ad
journ in order to challenge tbe Government
to explain the events attending the sup
pressing of the Nationalists' meeting at
Cork yesterday, which he said were memor
able and disgraceful even under the present
regime of brute force. Mr. Redmond ac
cused the Government of prompting blood
shed and turmoil. Mr. Madden, Solicitor
General for Ireland, defended the action of
the Government officials at Cork.
Mr. Gladstone said that the Government
had, failed to reply to serious allegations
which required tne fullest explanation.
The Ministry must not complain if the mat
ter were raised again. Mr. Balfour denied
that there was the slightest prima facie case
against the Government He said that the
Government were anxious to avoid such
scenes, but members had shown that they
were not willing to surrender when sum
moned by the Courts of Justice, and tbey
tried to render the work of the police as
difficult and dangerous as possible. The
leaders of the mob were primarily responsi
ble. The police were bound to do their
duty.
Mr. Sexton's motion to adjourn was re
jected by a vote of 212 to 128.
TEIED TO SATE niB BK0THEK.
Two Iilttle Bey Drowned In a Canal I.ock
at Philadelphia.
ISriCTAL TXLZCKAK TO TUB D IS PATCH. 1
Philadelphia, July L Two bright
little sons of Thomas Brown, of 2128 Wood
street' were drowned in the old canal lock
at the western end of the water works dam
in Fairmount Park this afternoon. The
little fellows, with three others about the
same age, were fishing for minnows in the
lock. While walking along the stone cop
ing of the lock the voung boy, John, aged 8
years,sl!pped and fell into tbe water. Thomas,
his brother, aged 11, who could not swim a
8troke,pIunged in alter him and endeavored
to save him. He made a brave attempt to
reach his drowning brother,but could really
do nothing, and both boys were drowned be
fore assistance came.
John Rapp, janitor of the Undine Boat
Club house, on the other side of the Schuyl
kill, hearing tbe cries of the boys, rowed
across with all his speed and plunged into
the lock after the boys, both of whom had
sunt for the last time before be arrived. He
recovered the body of Thomas and tried to
resuscitate him, but it was too late. John's
body was recovered by the park guards two
hours later. The first that Mr. and Mrs.
Brown heard ot tbe acoident was when the
bodies of their two little sons were brought
home shortly before dark.
PANIC ON A STEAMER.
An Excursion Boat Bun Aground and Give
the Passengers a Shack.
rSPECIAI. TXLXORA1I TO THZ DISPATCH.l
New York, Jnly L The steamboat
Hazel KIrke, which runs between Canarsie
and Rockaway Beach, while on her
8 o'clock trip to Canarsie, ran
acround on Waterman's bar, near Ruffle
bar. She was going at full headway at
tbe time and her 600 passengers were
stricken with panic. Women screamed and
fainted and several men were only re
strained by the deckhands from jumping
overboard. Small boats were sent out to
take off the passengers. It was 2 o'clock be
fore the last man was pufaboard the Julia.
All this time the rain was falling in tor
rents. The only misadventure tbat occurred dur
ing the transfer was the overturning of one
of the rowboats by an exrited woman who
jumped from the Hazel Kirke and landed
on tne guuwail of the small boat She was
rescued.
CLAIMING! BIG CITT.
i,hn K. Moore Determinedly Pressing
&i, His Claim to a Large Portion of"
iND LOTS OF SAN FRANCISCO.
After Fruitless Litigation of Thirty-Four
Tears, He Trie3 Ajpiin. ,
HIS CASE IN THE FEDEEAL
COTJET."
Many Citizens Securing Titles From Him as Well i
from the City.
John K. Moore does not relinquish hi
claim to a large portion of the city of San
Francisco, although knocked out of court
in California for many years. He has now
brought suit in the United States Court,
through his son-in-law, for the property.
EFZCTAI. TXLXOBAX TO TUX DISPATCH. 1
Middletown, N. Y., July 1. The ac
tion brought in the United States District
Court of California by David D. Houston,
of Mlddletown, N. Y., as assignee of
John K. Moore, against the city and
county of San Francisco for the re
covery of landed property" there of
almost inestimable value, bids fair to
rival, in the vast interests involved and in
prolonged and stubborn litigation, tho
famous case of Myra Clark Gaines against
the city of New Orleans. The extraor
dinary story of what Is known as the
"Moore claim" to the ownership of a square
mile of land in the city of San Francisco is
now for the first time correctly told.
Among those who went to California
during the early days of th gold excitement
there in 1849 was John K. Moore, a boas
carpenter and builder of this town. In
stead of going up into tbe mines
he remained in San Francisco and
engaged in' building operations, and in
speculations in real estate. Among other
property acquired in 1830, hp bought ofan
old Mexican resident named Fernando
Marchina, a tract of land about a mils
square, which grant had been granted to
Marchina in 1813 by Manuel -Michel
Torenas, then Governor of Alta, Cala., in
reward for distinguished military services.
how he got the pbopebtt.
Moore paid Marchina $25,000 for the prop
erty. It was then a tract of barren and va
cant sand lots. It is now part of tbe city.
of San Francisco, occupied by public parks
or by blocks of private residences or busi
ness buildings, and is of immense valne.
Moore proceeded at once to take possession
of tbe tract, and to put up buildings on a
section of it, some of which buildings are
still standing. He retained undisputed
possession of the property lor three years',
until 1853. Then he left on a lone visit to his,
old home at Middletown. While he was '
away the question of the validity of tho
Marchina grant was brought in as a collat
eral issue in a case before one of the
lower State courts'. The court held
tbat the grant in question was
defective and vo'id, whereupon tho
municipality of San Francisco, which
had a show of a secondary title, stepped in
and drove oft Moore's tenants and took pos
session of the property and parceled it out
in, parks or for building sites. OfuMcgrj;'
return he set at work to recover his property'
by suits ot ejectment against parties claim
ing title from the city, and by other forms
of litigation.
lengthy litigation;
From 1854 to 1888, a period of 34 years,
the question of the Marchina grant has been
in stubborn litigation in tbe courts. At .
length, something over a yearago, the Su-
perior Court, the ultimate State tribunal,
pronounced the grant invalid. Undis
mayed, Claimant Moore now began a new
acton in the United States courts, using
the name of his son-in-law, David D. Hous
ton, a highly respectable business man of
this city, as plaintiff.
Moore asserts that he has recently dis
covered new and unimpeachable evidence,
tending to settle beyond further controversy
the validity of the Marchina grant A num
ber of the more eminent lawyers of Cali
fornia have undertaken to carry the claim'
wrough the United States Courts, and speak
confidently of ultimate success.
Tbat there is come merit in the Moore
claim is shown by the fact that many of the
shrewd and careful real estate buyers of ths
city take tbe precaution to get title from
him as well as from the city. The trustees
ot the Odd Fellows' Hall, just built on
Market'street, paid Moore (7,000 for a quit
claim deed of his interest in the site.
THE SHAH IN LONDON.
HI Asiatic nignnes Received by the Prince f
of Wales,
London, July 1. The Shah of Persia
arrived in the Thames this morning. An
immense crowd of people was gathered on
both sides of the river for a distance of miles
as the launch containing the Shah passed.
The Shah and the Prince ot Wales had
lunch on 'board tbe launch before they
landed. The Shah was very affable. Tha
weather was clear.
The Prince of .Wales and his ions re
ceived tbe Shah at Gravesend and accom-'
panled him up the river to the Westmins
ter Palacestairs. The Princess of Wales and
her daughter received the Sbah at Bucking
ham Palace. '
FEOM OCEAN TO OCEAN
Two Young; tads Beat Their Way From Sam -
Francisco to Washington.
Washington, July 1. George Clarke,
aged 15 years, and S. J. Dick, 17 years old,
arrived in this city to-day from San Fran
cisco, after a rough experience. They spent
their last 15 cents for ferriage from San
Francisco to Oakland to take the train
across the continent and beat their way
here.
They were frequently ejected from trains
and roughly handled, but persevered, and
finally succeeded in reaching this ciir.;J
The boys were formerly employed by the
Western Union Telegraph Company aad'i
ran copy lor tne Ban a rancisco Jixaminer.
FAILED BDT C0MPE0MISED.
An Agreement Reached With the CreeHte
ef a Philadelphia Iron Firm.
tSriCIAI. TXLXQBAX TO TIL DISPATCH.!
Philadelphia, July L The ereditenj
of the suspended firm of S. Robbins & Sot
iron manufacturer, were in session fortbreej
hours to day in the office ot John Sparhawk,1
Jr., belore they decided upon a course ,ef .
acwuu. ijia sbabcmeui. miuuocu rac
creditors showed that the firm owed 1186,-
153 58, with assets amounting to $88,721 SfcVi
The creditors finally decided to aeeept 75 j
per cent oi tneir claims in tne ursrs notes I
at one, two and three years. The firm, whisk
emmovs 3uu men. win continue business, t
O'Brien la Out on Bajk
Dublin, July L Mr. William O'l
M. P.. was arrested at Cork for sseakfaMrl
at a meeting which the Goyernmetif kM
prohibited, ana was released on bail." - -J
N 1
SI
.L
i:
fiJT2

xml | txt