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Pittsburg dispatch. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, October 03, 1889, Image 8

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024546/1889-10-03/ed-1/seq-8/

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NOW IN THE &RAYE.
Scenes and Incidents at the Funeral
ofthe Late Capt. W. E. Jones.
A CORTEGE OF OYEli 4,000 PEESOKS.
TVorlmen, Millionaires and
- , Dignitaries Attend.
Military
THE MAGNIFICENT FLOKAL TRIBUTES.
.Frotestant ana Catholic Clergy Both Officiate at the
Funeral.
There has not been in many years a larjrer
funeral about 'Western Pennsylvania than
that of the late Captain W. R. Jones at
Braddock yesterday. The horror caused by
the accident which injured Captain Jones,
vras all mellowed by the general sadness
yesterday. It was a remarkable public
tribute.
The remains of the late Captain "William
31. Jones, General Manager of the Edgar
Thomson Steel "Works at Braddocb, were
laid in their temporary resting place, in the
Mills vault, Monongahela Cemetery, yes
terday afternoon. Representative steel and
iron men from various parts of the country,
and many relatives and old friends, were
present to pay a last tribute of respect to
the deceased. There were Gl carriages and
9 single horse conveyances in the procession
to the cemetery, while fully 5,000 work
men from the Braddock, Homestead and
Union iron and steel mills took part in the
funeral cortege. It was the largest funeral
ever witnessed in this section ofthe conn try,
and the proceedings partook more of the na
ture of a tribute of respect to some well
esteemed public dignitary than the obsequies
of a private individual. The shops in the
town were closed, many of them bearing
cards indicating the reason, and the library
and other public buildings were draped in
mourning. All the steel works were shut
down, with the exception of the furnaces,
and all the men but those necessarily em
ployed, turned ont in a body to march in
the procession.
AT THE HOUSE.
At 1250 o'clock the employes of the
steel works, wearing monrning emblems
and white gloves, beaded by the marshals,
Messrs. M. Killen and John Hutchinson,
drew uy in columns on Main street, await
ing the arrival of the G. A. E. Posts,
which, headed by the Braddock Fife and
Drum Corps, at 150 o'clock, debouched
upon Main street and took up positions at
the head of the column, and the word to
march given. The fi.e corps bore black
badges on their breasts, and the fifes thrust
within tne tunic bore evidence of the sor
rowful errand of the day.
At the house a detail" from G. A. Post 8
formed a guard ot honor. Here numerous
relatives and friends were assembled, scat
tered about the prettily kept grounds and in
the parlors. Shortly before 2 o'clock the
head ofthe column of employes arrived at,
and forming in double file passed up
through the entrance to view the remains,
which were enclosed in an elaborate casket
completely enveloped in crepe and black
silken drapings. Followins the 2,000 em
ployes were representatives of the Loyal
Legion, the Scandnavian Society, the
Heilman Lodge and Braddock Lodge of F.
& A. M., the Monongahela Council, No. 299,
Jr. O. U. A. M., G. A. Post. 59 McKees
port, 548 "Wilkinsburg, 3 Pittsburg,
191 Turtle Creek and 30 Johnstown.
Then a number of citizens were allowed
to pass through, and at 250 the gate was
closed to admit of the funeral services
being proceeded with.
"Up to this time it was computed that more
than 4,000 persons bad entered to view the
remains. The casket had been placed in the
parlor, and it was almost completely hidden
irom view by the wealth of floral emblems
which rose eight and 10 feet above the floor.
WONDERFUL rXOBA.Ii TRIBUTES.
Thousands of roses, lilies of the valley,
carnations and other flowers were used,
hundreds of feet of smilax were used, and a
large quantity of fern employed in makinz
tne designs, wnicn were very artistic Tne
workmen of different departments of the
Braddock works contributed three elaborate
and fancifnl emblems representing the
"Flame of Life," "The Monument," and
"The Flight of the Soul." The first named
is represented bv a floral piece ten feet high.
A scroll of ivy, edged with a double bor
der of yellow roses, rests on an easel, form
ing a background to a brawny arm which,
wrought in pale pink carnations, stands out
in relief, holding aloft a torch of crimson
carnations, from which life's flame, repre
sented by tiny theaves of wheat, flares.
The second piece, "The Flight of the
Soul," is eight feet in height. At the base
the earth is represented by a great broad
plateau of palms, ferns and mosses, amid
which a pair off tongs and a broken rail,
fashioned of white carnations, lay Above
is a dove and still above are the heavens,
represented by a crescent and star formed of
pink, white and yellow roses. The crescent
in diameter is almost four feet, and hun
dreds of roses are required in its formation.
The third piece, "The Monument," repre
sents a shaft eight feet in height rising
from a mound ot croton, maiden hair fern,
colias and smilax. The shaft itself is of
pure white carnations, roses and dahlias.
-One design showed three soldiers' muskets
of standard size stacked to form a triangle.
From the center of these, which are fasn
ioned ofwhite roses, was suspended a camp
kettle made of different colored flowers. The
whole rests on a triangular base of yellow,
pink, white and red roses.
Among the others were an army badge
containing the inscription, "Our Comrade,"
a large plateau of Le France roses from the
Americus Club, a plateau of La France
roses and andianthem ferns from the Home
stead, works.
EULOGIES PRONOUNCED.
Shortly belore 3 o'clock Rev. Dr. T. N.
Boyle, ot the M. E. Church, accompanied
by the Bev. E. Earle, of Catasauqna,
and the Bev. Father Hickey, of the
Braddock Catholic Chnrch, entered the
liall. Dr. Boyle said that the services would
be brief and "then called upon Eev. Mr.
Earle to read an appropriate lesson, after
which Dr. Boyle offered a prayer for the de
ceased, for the bereaved widow and father
less children, and the men who had so long
been associated with him. The Eev. Dector
then delivered an eloquent enlogy on the
late general manager. He said, among other
things:
He, like all others.had his faults. Ho bad an
impe'ruous nature, was easily aroused and un
der the excitement of the 'moment he swept
down npon everything in his way with the
velocity of a tornado. But tbe sky soon cleared
up and there eh own forth with brilliant hues
the sparkling rajs of a generous nature that
proclaimed he was uimsell again. Indeed it
was bis considerate kindliness that so quickly
redeemed him from all thought of violence
and uncovered to view a tenderness that
prompted all classes to recognize in him a
brother. He was a patriot, lie was chival
rous. He was a progressive citizen. In every.
thing that tended to advance tbe interests of
the community, he was an Important factor.
Tbe schools, the library and tbe churches did
not appeal to him in vain for substantial help.
He exercised rare judgment as to what should
be done in tbe way or public improremcnts,and
was alnays willing to share the responsibility
of making them.
Ho was a successful manager. The employer
and employe are here to-day to clasp bands over
bis casket and testify to his worth. He jealous
ly watcbed orer tbe Interests of tbe company,
and, with ajbrother's heart, exercised his au
thority and energy so as to promote the welfare
of tbe men. When the fatal stroke came he
shared it with one of thohumblestsubordinates
in tbe mill, and when he was dying in the bos
pital the great "steel king," as be looked upon
him, broke down with grief. May tbe sad
events of the past week cement the bonds by
which tbe capitalists of this firm and tbe men
In their employ are related to each other.
He was a devoted friend. One to whom yon
could go without any fear of betrayal. There
are mourners here to-day who were boys with
him. Tbe distance they came and tbe expres
sion of sorrow they make tell us teat tbe friend-
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Tm a m i ? m nil tflTHOfy lift MM8iiMMtf 'n fatfMjIWrtftwTi 1 1 m iiniT"iiillr1nWBMn T-irifflliHiSlBMiHrTli m
There is a vast multitude of people from every
sphere in life who, with tearful eyes and trem
bling lips, join in saying, "He was my friend."
PROMINENT PEOPLE PRESENT.
Eev. Earle spoke of his early association
with Captain Jones, and paid a glowing
tribute to his memory. The casket was now
borne to the hearse by the pallbearers,
Messrs. James C. McWilliams, George
Keenan, James Mullooley, Lapsley, Tolan,
Higgins, Martin, Treese and Purdy. Mean
while the various organizations had drawn
up on the pike, and the procession to the
cemetery began. In the first carriage were
the Kevs. Boyle, Hickey and Earle; second,
Andrew Carnegie, H. C. Frlck, Captain
Hunt and George Lauder, all of the firm;
in the third, Alex Hamilton, Owen Libert,
James Thomas and Captain Lapsley; fourth,
the foremen ot the departments; fifth, Mr.
"Will and Miss Cora Jones, children ot the
deceased, and Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Bowman;
sixth, John L. Jones and Mrs. Jones;
seventh, Mr. and Mrs. Lewis, and relatives
ot the family occupied the next three car
riages. By request of Mrs. Jones, tbe
arrangements were entrusted to Superin
tendent James Gayley, C. C. Treetees and
Captain Lapsley, the details being carried
out by Mr. Enssell, who had charge of the
First ward morgue at Johnstown for three
weeks.
A3IONG THOSE PEESENT WEBE:
Judge Hanklns, of the Orphans' Court: John
Chalfant, George Bryan, John Walker, a
former member of tbe firm of Carnegie & Co.;
Chairman W. It Abbott, Mr. Irishman, Gen
eral Hastings, the Hon. John Dalzell. Coroner
McDowell, Colonel E. J. Allen, Commander
Thomas L Stewart, of the Department of Penn
sylvania G. A. R.. and Adjutant General Mc
cormick, Chill Hszzard. Colonel Bonrchof, of
Jos. Home 4 Co.; Sheriff JlcCandless, Dr. Mc
Candless, Henry Phipns and Mrs. Phipps,
Andrew Carnegie and Mrs. Carnegie, George
Lauder. H. V. Oliver, H.M. Curry. Colonel
Gray, Colonel T. B. Washington, William G.
Park, of Park Bros. & Co.; Mr. Gregor, of tbe
Union Mills, and Swabb, of Homestead, Judge
Slagle, H. C. Fnck, Captain Robert Hunt,
Alexander Hamilton, Isaac Chandler, Joseph
Williams, Dr. Walters and Joseph Qmnn, all
of Johnstown: Samuel. John and Da via Thomas,
and Daniel Wilson, of Catasauaua: Owen
( Kibert and John Fritcb, of Bethlehem; Charles
.Kennedy, ot Cleveland; inomas cartwngnt,
and many others.
The services at the grave were according
to the Masonic ritual, and the Eev. Father
Hickey, who was a warm friend of the late
general manager's, made a touching allusion
to his worth. s
GRAND JURY MATTERS.
Yesterday Was Lively for Jurymen In Bev
eral Respects.
When the returns of the grand jury were
made to court yesterday a communication was
handed to Judge White asking for a return of
tbe bill found against John Prince a week ago.
Jndge White said that he would have to refuse
tbe request, as the bill was f onnd a week ago
and no reasons for its return were given. H.
H. Phillips, foreman of the grand jury, said
that there had been a misunderstanding about
tbe vote on the bill, but His Honor declined to
return the bill unless the request was signed
by a majority of the grand jnry.
Mr. Phillips at this point called tbe attention
of the court to the fact that the attendance of
the grand jury is so small that it is almost im
possible to get a quorum together. Thoso
present then, be said, were always in attend
ance, and be would like tbe Court to reserve his
remarks until to-morrow.
Judge White replied that It was the duty of
the grand jurors to attend and he would sea
that they do attend, and wonld tell them their
duties when court assembles in the morning.
He then directed the clerk to note wHo were
absent and said that they would receive no
pay.
Trial List.
Common Pleas No. 1 Huquevillo vs Sei
bert; Vetz vs Baufield: Hutchinson vs Welti;
Tineberg vs Capp; Werner vs Jenkins &Co.;
Eowe et al vs Lynn; Thier for usevs Pollard;
Pentecost vs Eatniaier; Cills vs Long et al;
Barnett'vs Murdock et al: Barton vs Smith et
al; City of Pittsburg vs Markowitz; McNally
vs. McCallom: Chronicle-Telegraph vs Fleming
Bros.; Frederick vs Clark & Co.
Common Pleas No. 2 Eckart vs Brann.
Criminal Court Commonwealth vs Michael
Cornelius et al, Alois Bruno et al (2). L. Roth
slein ct al (2), Elmer Pillow. J. J. O'Brien, Jos
eph Christroniz (2). Lydla Frank, Marv Kamp,
Joseph Gilbert. Eliza Hart, Mike Wild, Pat
rick Marnon, Bert Terney. J. P. Young. Mark
Wishart, Edward P.Hesser, Thomas Powers et
al. Dennis Davis, Thomas Aldridce. Kate
Bchimmile, Kate McAully, Mary Viclc, John
Burran et aL John Rodger, Patrick Hilletal.
Henry Bnpple et al, Bridget Flaherty (2). John
Haulon, George McClocen, John Falligan,
Eugene Holder and Paulino Keller, Antonio
Polanto.
Olnny Years Back.
In the suit of Thomas A. Ingram against
Moses and Richard Walsh a verdict was given,
yesterday, for tbe plaintiff. The case was an
ejectment suit for ground in Crafton. Tbe
controversy arose m regard to the marks di
viding the lands of tbe two parties. In 1794 a
white oak and a black oak tree were two of tbe
marks dividing tbe two sections of land. In
the course of time tbe trees decayed and fell,
and were replaced as marks by stones. Tbe
stones, it was claimed, had beea- moved, or
shifted their position, and a dispute arose as to
tne line, resulting in a verdict for Ingram.
A good appetite is generally restored to
adnlts and children alike by Dr. D. Jayne's
Tonic Vermifuge. A mild tonic, an excel
lent anti-acid, and the best of vermifuges.
"Where worms are suspected give the ver
mifuge; for whether present or not, the
strengthening action of the medicine is
sure to do the child good. Sold by all drug
gists. A Home Industry
Deserves support. Messrs. Frauenheim &
Vilsack have for years been making their
celebrated Pittsburg beer in this city. Good
jndges pronounce it pure, wholesome and
nutritious.
A Photo Gallery Crowded.
Teager & Co., 70 Federal st, Allegheny,
are doing tbe largest business in this city,
owing to their fine cabinets for 75c per doz.
dnring this month. Come early. Bring
the little ones.
Black pros grain silk, 65c, 75c, 85c and
?1 a yard; the best values ever offered.
ttssu Huous & Hacke.
Visitors to the Exposition, don't fail to
call at Steinmann's and see the most elegant
line of new novelties in jewelry in the two
cities, at lowest prices. 107 Federal st.
TTSSU
Economy i Wealth.
Then why not economize by nsin? "Walk
er's wax soap? It will outlast all others,
and does not injure the finest fabrics, tt
Handsome figured ganze de chambry in
black and beautilnl light colorings, particu
larly for evening wear.
ttssu Hugus & Hacke.
Pbotocrnphera Sick
Because they can't compete with Yeager &
Co.'s 75c per doz. cabinets. Come early for
your sittings. Bring the children. Gallery,
70 Federal st, Allegheny.
S5. Solid gold spectacles carefully ad
justed to the sight See them at Stein
mann's, 107 Federal st., Allegheny, jeweler
and optician. TTSSu
Brocade velvets, beautiful two-toned
effects, actual worth S3, our price 75c a yard.
ttssu Hugus & Hacke.
Exposition' The famous Mannerchors
at 8 r. si.
Geand millinery opening to-day at Bos
enbaum & Co.'s.
Men's fine neckwear at James H. Aiken
& Co.'s. 100 Fifth ave.
Grand millinery opening to-day at Eos
enbanm & Co.'s.
Cabinet photos, $1 per doz. Lies' Pop
ular Gallery, 10 and 12 Sixth st. ttsu
Exposition The famous Mannerchors
at 8 p. m.
Those slightly imperfect draps d ets,
$2 50 quality, we are selling at $1 25, are a
rare bargain, Hugus & Hacke.
ttssu
THE"
BRMER SUSTAINED.
Judge White Justifies the 'Squire's
Sabbath Legal Business.
VICTORY FOR THE L. & 0. ELEMENT.
A Queer Story About tlie Signing of Eev.
Father Brennan's Will.
IT WAS EEJECTED BT THE EEGISTEE.
The Diamond
Street Widening
To-dsy.
Litigation On
Judge White sustained Alderman Brin
ker's appeal from a fine imposed upon him
for receiving Law and Order suits on the
Sabbath. The other court news is all im
portant. Judge "White yesterday handed down an
opinion in the case of tne appeal of Alder
man Brinkcr from the decision of Alderman
McNulty, who fined him $25 and costs for
engaging in worldly employment on Sunday.
The "employment" consisted of taking an in
formation brought by Captain Wishart against
John A. Martin, on Sunday, August 1L Jndge
White decides the case in favor of Alderman
Brinkcr. in his opinion Judge White says:
The evidence heard in court and not contro
verted was that some, If not all, of tho parties
thus acensed, had been In the habit orcarrylng on
their worldly employment on the Sabbath, and to
evade the penalty ot the law nad connived with
a constable to make Informations against them
early Monday mornlnit before a certain Alderman,
who speedily disposed of the case by entering
judgment for the defendant, thus making a Judi
cial record or acquittal. The defendant testified
that the objecto? taking the Information In this
case was to prevent 6uch a palpable Judicial mce
and bring the offenders to Justice. Under these
circumstances, and with that motive, even 11 the
defendant was mistaken as to bis rights ana
duties, be cannot Justly be charged with pursuing
his worldly employment on Sunday. A Justice or
the Peace, or Alderman, who keeps his office open
on bunday and transacts ordinary business may
very properly be charged with a violation or the
Sunday laws, but that is not this case.
Continuing Judge White said that this case
was an illustration of the careless if not reck
less manner in which some magistrates make
up their record. The record, he said, showed
that the defendant pleaded not guilty, but
afterward refused to call witnesses and public
Jy admitted the charge made against mm. ue
was charged with engaging in worldly employ
ment on Bunday, which he specifically denied,
but admitted taking the information on Sun
day, which be held was not a violation ot tha
law. In conclusion judgment was ordered to
be entered in favor of Alderman Brinker.
John A. Martin yesterday appeared at the
Sheriff's office and paid the amount of tne
special execution issued against him for the
fine and costs in ono of the appealed cases de
cided against him by the Court. A second exe
cution was immediately issued against Martin
at the instance of Attorney Yost for the fine
and costs In another case of a similar kind.
A PRIESTS WILL.
Rev. Father Brennan's Bequests Rejected
by the Register.
Register Conner yesterday refused to admit
to probate the will of the late Bev. Father Ed
ward Brennan,- of Mansfield. The will, which
is a short one, was filed a few days go. It leaves
Father Brennan's estate, worth about 1.000, to
tbe Rev. Father James Keenoy, pastor of the
Crafton Roman Catholic Church. The will was
witnessed by tho Rev. Father James Fleck-
ineer and Patrick HammiL After the will
had been filed Father Fleckinger, at the Regis
ter's office, swore to witnessing the execution
of the will, and that the signature was that of
Father Brennan, and that Father Bren
nan was of sound mind, etc., when be signed.
Tbe next day Patrick Hammil, the other
witness, called to be sworn to his signature. He
refused to swear to what Father Fleckinger
bad, and said that his wife bad signed the will.
Ho related that on September 8, when Father
Brennan was on his deathbed, Father Fleck
inger wrote ont the wilL It was placed on a
book and a pen was handed to Father Brennan
to sign the will with. He said it was all right,
and was about to do so, when he fainted.
Father Fleckinger then called Mrs. Hammil
and told her to sign the will for Father Bren
nan. She did so, signing the name "E. Bren
nan." Father Brennan afterward recovered,
but was too weak to bave signed bis name. He
was told that Mrs. Hammil had signed it for
him.
The Register, upon this, held tbe will over.
Father Fleckinger afterward appeared and said
that what Hammil said was true. He said that
he was nndor the impression when he swore to
the signature that it was a valid and lawful
signature, out that when be swore to It he erred
in not relating the circumstances.
Register Conner took the evidence in due
form, and yesterday gave his decision refusing
to admit the will to probate. He held that it
bad not been properly executed according to
law. Had Father Brennan authorized Mrs.
Hammil to sign the will for him, or afterward
approved of her signing it, the signature might
bave stood, but there was no evidence that Such
was tbe case.
Fatber Brennan leaves a mother, brother and
sister, but thev have not appeared or put in any
claim for tbe estate. If the Register is sustained
the estate will go to them.
A Qncmlon ofConstltutlonnllty.
A supplemental bill was filed yesterday by
the Howard heirs in the suit against the city of
Pittsburg relative to the widening of Diamond
alley. Tbe supplementary bill contains ad
ditional reasons set forth to show that the
street act of May 15, 1SS9, is unconstitutional.
They claim that tbe title of tbe bill passed is
defective; that tbe provision for the assessing
of benefits is unconstitutional, and that other
sections of the act are violations of the State
Constitution. The case will be argued to-day.
Controller Morrow and Chief Bigelow say the
allegations are old, and they are anxious to see
them tested.
J. O. Slemmons Fined.
In tbe Criminal Court yesterday John O.
Slemmons, tbe wholesale jeweler who was In
dicted for aggravated assault and battery for
shooting some newsboys who tormented him
with an air gun, pleaded guilty. Judge White
ordered him to pay a fine of 25 and tbe costs
of the case. ,
, Tbe Need of Early Correction.
The pranks played by a naughty liver need
early correction. Prompt, pleasant discipline
is administered with Hostetter's Stomach Bit
ters, which expels bile from the blood and
directs it into tbe proper channel, healthfully
and painlessly relaxes tbe bowels and renews
obstructed digestion. From malaria and
chronic rheumatism the Bitters affords pro
tection, and it promptly checks kidney and
nerve trouble.
TriE special family tickets issued by
Hendricks & Co. bave been so largely ap
preciated by the public that they have been
requested to extend the time, which they
will do, until November L Come early
and avoid the rnsh. 68 Federal street.
30 Days of Grace
On Hendricks & Co.'s special family tick
ets, good until November 1. Bring the
children.
A Life-Size Crayon for 85, -
Also one doz. cabinets of anybody for fl, at
Aufrecht's Elite Gallery, 516 Market st,
Pittsburg. Bring baby. Use elevator. D
Its superior excellence proven in millions of
homes for more than a quarter of a century.
It is used by tho United States Government.
Indorsed by tho heads of tbe great universities
as the Strongest, Purest and most Healthful.
Pr. Price's Cream Baking Powder does not
contain Ammonia, Lima or Alum. Bold only
vi latus. x bxii a pr11 uivn .isjxb sU
2TEWTORK- CHICAGO. . ST. LOUIS.
, PURE
pRPRICE'S
CREAM
Baking
"4SjsssSSs8BSSSSSiS
1
PITTSBURG - DISPATCH,
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
DPS
Presents in the most elegant form
THE LAXATIVE AND NUTRITIOU8 JUICE
OF THB
FIGS OF CALIFORNIA,
Combined with the medicinal
virtues of plants known to be
most beneficial to the human
system, forming an agreeable
and effective laxative to perma
nently cure Habitual Consti
pation, and the many ills de
pending on a weak or inactive
condition ofthe
KIDNEYS, LIVER AND BOWELS.
It is themost excellentremedy lenowb to
CLEANSE THE SYSTEM EFFECTUALLY
When one U Bilious or Constipated
SO THAT
PURE BLOOD, REFRESHING SLEEP,
HEALTH and STRENGTH
NATURALLY FOLLOW.
Every one is using it and all are
delighted with it
ASK YOUR DRUGGIST FOR
MANUFACTURED ONLY BY
CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO.
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.
lOUlSVlUE, Kt. NEW YORK, K. Y.
jy9-77-TTS
osisriTa- "WEEK
Don't Pail to See Superb Collection in Every Department.
J. O. GROGrAN,.
CTe-relen? am-cL Sl"v-en?S32CLi"bli.,
443 MARKET ST.,
YISITOBS FROM POINTS OUTSIDE THE CITx
are requested to look for our exhibit of
WALL PAPER
AT THE EXPOSITION.
We are showing some designs which are entirely novel, possess
ing decided merit.
WM. H. ALLE
WXI. TJtTJVTCTiE, 3rATfA.GEK.
SNAP
On account of tbe agreeable surprise given to our customers for the past week we will
continue forone week longer to sell double-barrel, breech-loading shotgunsat the following
onequaled low prices: New Baker, top action, etc, E23; top action, steel barrels, rebound
ing hammers, pistol grip, at $10 GO; side action, twist barrels, all improvements, at $11;
top action, twist barrels, rebounding hammers.patent fore end,etc,at 12 SO; topactlon, re
bounding bar locks, laminated steel barrels, at 515: L X. L. breech-loader at 20; Thomas
Parker, Never Miss, at $22 60; L. C. Smith, hammerless, at (60. Each gun sold is guaran
teed to give satisfaction or money refunded.
IKI. SIMZIT, 934 Liberty St,, Cor. Smithfield.
Bend name and address for Illustrated Catalogue and Price List, free of charge. 8e29-TTS8n
PITTSBURG, PA.
20,000 GRADUATES.
The best accommodations.
The best methods. The best results
Send for Circulars.
Night School Opens
GrtJsfJD
OFHSTTIsrGr
WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY,
October 2 and 3.
MAGNIFICENT EXHIBIT
-or-
A grand aggregation of the finest
Fatten Sob m
TRIMMED MILLINERY,
Embracing innumerable styles adopted by the leading modistes of
Paris and London. Also many exclusive and rich designs by our
own artistes, making this season's display the most complete ever
shown in this city. On this occasion we will also display a fine line of
MOURNING MILLINERY.
- .
TTieJLadtesofthe two cities and neighborhood are respectfully
invited to this, our Twenty-first Grand Fall Opening, which, we
think, will excel all former efforts in this direction.-
Ieberbaum
'510, 512,514 MARKET ST.
THUKSDAY,
'OCTOBWt?fip$pgp
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS.
SEAL : KILLING
IN AT.AS17A.
J. a. BEN3STETT & CO.,
IktAJfTTFjVCTTJJBEItS.
I A niCC Ashing to purchase Genuine
LnUlLO Alaska Seal Garments can get
them at Bennett's.
We are direct importers of Sealskins.
We know good Sealskins.
We cannot be deceived in bad Sealskins.
We are manufacturers of Seal Garment?.
We are the only manufacturers of Seal Gar
ments in Pittsburg.
We can give you a perfect flt. If you wish
your old Seal Garments made over or changed
into any other sbape.no difference how diffi
cult it should be. wo can doit. Our work will
always be tho best, our fits perfect and our
prices the lowest.
J.G. BENNETT & CO.,
Hatters and Furriers,
COR. WOOD ST. AND FIFTH AVE.
OC3-S3--WTSU
OPTICAL AND MATHEMATICAL GOODa
bnecialty Correct fitting of lenses and
frames. All styles of Spectacles and Eye
Glasses. Experienced Opticians and our own
factory and workmen are our inducements,
.E.STJEllEi, Optician,
E44SMITHFIELD ST.,PrrT3BURG, PA.
fe227-TTS
PITTSBURG, PA.
OC3-21
517 "Wood
S"bxee1j,
SelO-TTS
NO. a
SPECIALTIES:
Bookkeeping, Shorthand,
Type-writing, uoml Arthmetio,
Penmanship.
Address J. C. SMITH'S SON.
Monday, September 30.
aul5-79-TTS
and most desirable stock of
AND 27 FIFTH AVENUE.
cMrsea
liiiiiiiil Hats.
NEW ADVERTISEMENTS,
Mau5
rmcur
Is now fully prepared to advise gentlemen re
garding the "Correct Thing" for fall wear.
Double Breasted Sack Suits, "Very
Swell"," to order, 820.
Trousers, English out, 85.
313 SMITHJj'IELD STREET,
PITTSBUEG, PA.
Samples and self measurement rules mailed
on application. se30-MTn
J. DIAMOND,
PBACTICAIi
OJ?TXCUV-N,
22 8IXTH STREET. The Eye examined free
of charge. Spectacles perfectly fitted.
ARTIFICIAL EYES inserted and
warranted to suit.
sel2-8-TT3u
EL FOX,
SCIENTIFIC
OPTICIAN
Patentee and sole manufacturer ofthe Eureka
Eye Glass. No chain required. Eureka nose
wades fitted to other eye glasses.
Oculist's prescriptions a specialty. All kind
of lenses ground and spectacles made on the
premises. 908 FENN AVENUE, PITTS.
Seventeenth and Chestnut, Philadelphia.
my28-92-TT3
Latest improved Spectacles and Eye-Glasses;
will fit any nose with ease and comfort. The
largest and best stock of Optical Instruments
and Artificial Eyes.
KORNBLTJM, Theoretical and
Praotical Optician.
No. 0 Fifth avenue, near Wood street.
Telephone No. 1686. selD-DSO
CELEBRATED
GRAND
DENVER RANGE
Sold by all stove dealers. Manufactured by
GRA3?F, JBCTTGTJS A CO.,
632 and 631 LIBERTY STREET.
iu6-63-TT3
P
.A. T E IN" T S
O. T. T.EVI8- Solicitor of Patents.
311 Fifth avenue, above Smitudeld. next Leader
office. (No delay.) Established 20 years.
se25-60
BTEAOIEBS AND EXCURSIONS.
TTT'HITE STAB LIN E
f OK Q0EENBTOWN AND L1VEEPOOL.
Royal and United States Mill Steamers.
'Adriatic, Oct. 9, 5:30 p m
Teutonic, Uc.16, 10 :30a m
lAdriatlc. Nov. 8. 1pm
Teutonic, aot.u, nam
Germanic, Nov. 20,3pm
Britannic Nor.27, 8:30am
uermauic, uci. a,3piu
Britannic Oct. 3a 10 am
r From White Star dock.
root or en renin st.
'Second cabin on these steamers. Saloon rates.
S50 and upward, becoud cabin, ps and upward,
according to steamer and location of berth. Ex
cursion tlcketi on favorable terms. Steerage. (3).
White star drafts payable on demand In all tbe
principal banks throughout Great Britain. Ap
ply to JOUii J. McCOKJIICK, 401 Smlthfleld St.,
Httsbur?, or J.BKHCElSMAX, General Aent,
U Broadway, NewYort. ocl-D
STATE LINE
To Glasgow, Belfast, Dublin
and Liverpool.
FROM NEW YORK EVERY THURSDAY.
Cabin cassaee 3i to S30. according to location
of stateroom. Excursion SS5 to S90.
Steerage to and from Europe at Lowest Bates.
AUbXIN BALDWIN CO., General Agents,
63 Broadway, New York.
J. J. McCORMICK, Agent, Pittsburg, Pa.
felS-o
AMERICAN LINE,
Sailing every "Wednesday from Philadelphia
and Liverpool. Passenger accommodations for
all classes unsurpassed. Tickets sold to and
from Great Britain and Ireland, Norway, Swe
den, Denmark, etc
PETER WRIGHT 4 SONS,
General agents, 307 Walnut st- Philadelphia.
Full information can be had of J. J. McCOB
MICK, Fourth avenue and Smithfield Street
LOUIS MOESER, 616 Smlthfleld street.
mhlS-es-rra
RAILROAD.
A LLKGHENY YALLEY BA1LKOAD-
UI
Trains leave Union Station (Eastern Standard
lime): juttannug Ac. s.ra a. m.: hukkj,..
daUr. 8 ti a. m llulton Ac. 10:10 a. m.: Valley
Camp Ac, 11:05 p. m.: OU City and lloBols Ex-
Sre,SK)0p.m.;HultnAe.,5p.m.:lUttannlng
c.lOD.m.; BreebumEx.,S)p.m.: Klttann
lng Ac., 5.30 p.m.; Braebum Ac.,6p.m.tHul
ton Ac., 7-50 p. m.; Buffalo' Ex., dally,
8:50 p. m.; Hulton Ac. 9: p.m.: Braeburn Ac
11:30 p. m. Church trains Braeburn, 12:10 p. m.
and 9.35 p. m. Pullman Bleeping Cat betwaya
Pittsburg and Buffalo. JAS. P. ANDEBSON,
U.T. Agl.t DAVID MCOABGO. Ben. Snot.
-Al7riM()RE AND OHIO
KAILKOAU-
For Washing
JD Schedule In effect May 11 1833.
ton. 11. a. Ilaltlmore. Philadelphia and new
-Dill
York, S.00 a. m.. and 9:20P- T V"m
berland, '8:00 a. m., tl-oo. 90a p.
Denaua, -tt:w a. m., ii-w, -vim p. .". Yr
nelliTllle. :40 and 8rt0 a. m :, M.OO
and 9:20 p.m. for Uulontown, J6:M, "8:00 a. m.,
11 0 and $1:00 p. m. ifor Mount Pleasant, : and
fe:0O a. m., and $1:0 and :00 p. m. Por
Washington. Pa., 6:. : a- m, J?:!! 8:M
and 8.S0p. m. Por Wheeling, fM,3M a. m.,
3:35, "SO p. m. Por Cincinnati and St. Louis.
6:a. m., "8:30 p.m. Por Columbus. : and :
a. m 8:30 p. m. Por.Newarfc .: 9M0 a. mn
3:35, '8:30 p.m. Por Chicago, t:t j ;
3: and 8:30 p. m. Trains arrive from New
York, Philadelphia, Baltimore anu vwumgtuu,
8:10 a. m. and "SiM p. m. Prom ColnroDus, lAn-
clnnatland Chicago,
"7:S a. m. and "9-00 p. m.
Prom Wheeling, ?:, 10:50 a. m- wu, -.w p.
Tnrotlffh KlMnfnir cars lOixmuiuic "u-
I?
lngton and Cincinnati.
Wueellnz accommodation. 8:30 a. m Bunosy
only. Connellsvllle accommodation at s- .
Dally. Datly except Sunday. JSunday only.
The PltUbnrg Transfer Company JflU call for
and check baggage from hotels and resldeneej
upon orders left at B.AO. Ticket Offlee, const
PlfMi avenue and Wood sjejfc CHAS. O.
BCULL. Gen. Pasi. Agt. J.T.ODELL, Oen.Mgr.
prrrsBUHG and castleshanmonb.k.
1889. until further notice, trains .rnn"t?Ji0J
on every day, except Sunday. EMtera standard
time: Leaving Pltuburg-JO a. m., J-;?
8:00 a.m.. 9:3b a. m.. 11:30a. pi Hp. a?,JP
n, DUO p. aw :Mp. o.. 8:3P'?'v,p,?J;X
u2op. m. Arllngtmf-S: -. 6s0 5rJ?
a. m.V 8:00 a. m., 10:20 a. m.. 1:00 p. m- : p. tfe,
:p.m., d0p.m.. S-SOP- m.. 7:10 p. ra.,10M
p.m. Sunday trains, leaving Pittsburg 10 a-JJij,
p.m, Amngtonaoa.m Jmltf0p.o.t
p.m. P.P--wlIjr jiHjr, BWK
i onmmer iime aaoie. ,v "" ""r'sri-S
f II l& 0 I
w-ri. A.Ui ioo-s-
-;sr.,y
- -v
NKW'ABTBRTINMOHfrs
y
t-ISrOTIEi.
Store will be closed next Saturday until 5 o'cloak, atwttohhov
business will be'resumed and carried on as usual until 11 o'clock. F. M.
KTJMLdJrarsi
MAMMOTH OUTFITTING
ESTABLISHMENT PACKED
-wxrn-
FALL" and WINTER GOODS!
A Complete Men's Clothing Store.
A Complete Boys' Clothing Store,
A Complete Tailoring Store.
A Comnlete Iia.rKpn' OnaV fitnrfi.
A Complete Hat and Cap Store.
A Complete Boot and Shoe Store.
, A Complete Furnishing Goods Store.
A Complete Trunk and Satchel Store.
A Complete
MEN'S CLOTHING, BEADY-MADE.
Men's Fall Top Coats, $$, $J, $io,
RaQrlu-marfo Ifan'c 3nif Dress, Semi-Dress and Business SttitA
" ' all are cut in the latest style and made
up from the most fashionable and best wearing woolens. Our ready
made garments are considered the best made and best fitting ready-made
garments obtainable, and they are unquestionably far superior to any
you'll find in any of the other stores about us. We won't take the space
here to mention but a few of the lots represented in our stockr
Black Cheviot Suits at io.
Black mixed smooth Cassimere Suits at 12.
Brown and black mixed smooth
A big line of fancy Cassimere Suits at 15.
Wide Wale Cheviot Suits at S18.
Plain Worsted Suits at $id. t :
Oxford mixed English Melton Suits at $2$i-
Fancy Scotch Cheviot Suits at 20. '
Fancy Worsted Suits at 18.
Boys' Clothing, Ready-made.
J " '
Children's Clothing, and our prices,
quality of goods considered, are
Suits as low as $2 and up to 20.
Children's Kilts, $2 to Sio. Children's Overcoats, $2 to 15. Boys'
Overcoats, S3 to $25. Boys' Long-Pant Suits, $$ to 25. ,- '-. tj
Tailoring to Order. wn doine mu,ch td 5s not so5j?f
a when you consider the attractiveness and qual- '
ity of our woolens and our low prices. Suits to order from fine'plaia
and fancy Lbeviots, Uiagonals and
Fall Overcoats, to order, 25 to
Heavy Overcoats, to order, $25
Trousers, to order, $5 to $18.
IAMBS' and CHILDREN'S CLOAKS, &e.
Ladies' NfiWmarkBtS. 4? assorted lot of 200 extra quality Aix la.
Lhappelie Beaver, combination stripes and
plaids, fancy Scotch mixtures and Jacquard effects, at $10 each; im
ported to sell from $16 50 to 20. '
Ladies' Walking Jackets, ft
Stockinette Jackets, many of the
at $$ each; imported to sell from $8
V f . V l C 111 n V
Laoies onon wraps, c
Drocauea
French Ladies' Cloth Wraps, all satin-lined and elegantly trimmed,. a
10 each; imported to sell from 715
Ladies' English Seal Plush Garments. jSSftJESJSKfc
Wraps, Newmarkets, Directoire styles; Raglans, etc. all made from, '
genuine English Seal Plushes, guaranteed not to wear off at the edges. .
FURNISHINGS.
Our Furnishings department is full of beautiful things for gentle?
men's wear. NECKWEAR. All the latest and most beautiful stylesjia;
Tecks, Puffs and Four-in-Hand Scarfs. HOSIERY. Silk, Merino?
Wool, Cashmere and Balbriggan. UNDERWEAR. More than 160
different styles and qualities, from 25c to $5 per garment. GLOVES.
Dent's, Fown's, Perrin's, Fisk, Clark & Flagg's in all shades'and colors.
ENGLISH NOVELTIEb. House. Coats, Dressing Gowns, Smoking
Jackets, etc
KAUFMANNg
Fifth Avenue and
KATLKOAD3.
PENNSYLVANIA BA1X.KOAD ON AND
rter September V, 1S89. tralm leare-Union
Station, ntttbnrfc u lolloir Eastern standard
Timer
MAIN LINE EASTWAH1J.
Vew York and Chicago Limited or muman Ve-
ttbnlefallrat7:Ua.m. .
Atlantic fexpreu dally tor tn; Kart. a.m.
Mau train, dally, except Bandar, 5i3ua. m. ana.
diT. malL 8:) a. m.
Vj eipreis dallr at 3.-C0 a. m.
uau
eiprew dally at 1:00 p. xo.
Philadelphia express dally at i:X p. m.
Eastern eipreu dally at 7 :li p. m.
fast Line dally at 8:10 p. I
GTeenabnrir expres.oiiij p.
m.
a. weer aays.
AUtfirongU tralnj connect t Jener JCUTirm
boati of "BrooUrn Annex" for Brooklyn. If. , Y
aToidlngdoubleferrlaie and Journey thrown K.
Y.Clty.
Tralna arrtye at Union 3UUon as ftUow:
MU Train. daUy VS9" 5"
Western Express, daUy ,V2!r 2"
I'aclllcExpres,ally .... DISS'S
Chicago Limited Express, dally J-.Sg-
FaetLlne, dally U:5iP-
BOUTllWESr rKNN KAILWAl.
Tor Unlontown, t ana Jia. m. and4p.
m.. without ehanice of ears: li p. nci?nieci!
tag at GreenaburjT. Trains arrire i from Union
town at 9: a. m.. U:IB. S5 and 8:10 pr m.
VEST I'ElfKBX'uT'ANlA WVISlOa.
From FEDEBAL ar. UTATIOW. Alleinenr aty.
Mall train, connecting ror BlalrsyUle... :4ia. m.
ExoressTfor BUtrsylUe, connecting tot
Botler vsi""i ?:i?,-2-
Bntler Acccm S:30a.m 5:aand ottap. m.
Bprlngdale Aecom.iftUa.ixL3and fflp.m.
North Apollo Aeeom. ....11:00 a.m. and S.-OOp. m.
Allegheny Junction Accommodation
connecting ror Butler. ,5:2 5" 2
Blalnrllle Accommodation i'jftuFfcr wat??
Trains arrtye at FEDEKALaTKEET STiO'IONJ
Kxpresj, connectlnr from Butler 10 a. m.
Mafi Train. i"A"i,y!S5' 2
BnUerAeeom :10a.m., 4:and7a0p. m.
BlalrsyUle Accommodatlon....:i;.....- -2!p. m.
Freeport Aecom.7:)a.m.. 1, 7a)andn0p. m.
On Bnnday lodo a. m. and 70 p. m.
Bprlngdale rccom....a7,Jl:.a-.jMP. 2-
MOKOHGAHELA 1117130.
Trains leaye Union station. Flnsourg. as folloirs:
FMMoaVngahela City, West Brownsyllle and
Unlontown, 3:40a.m. For Monongahela City and
West Brownsrllle, 7.-OJ and 10: a.m.and M p.m.
On Bunday, lKllp. m. For MonongaheU Ctty, i-M
p. m week days. . .
Urayosburg Ac., week day , too p. m.
West Elizabeth Accommodation, edOa.ln 1KB,
tat and HJSp. m. Bunday. 9:40 p. m.
Ticket omces Corner Fourth ayenua and Try
street and Union station. ,,....
C'UAS. E. 1 U U IL J. It. WOO 11,
General Manager. Gen'l l'ass'r Agent,
Xierrr ezprtu
11 :00 a.m. weekdaTt.
PANHANDLE EOUTE- JULY 8. Bft ONIOM
station. Central Standard Tint. Leare ror
Cincinnati and St. Louis, d 7:3) a.m., dop and
d 11:14 p. m. Dennlson, 1:44 P. m. Chicago,
H.-0B, d 11 114 p. m. Wheallng, 7d0 a. nj., Ui&S,
t:10p. m. BteubenTiUe, WSa. a. Waihlngton.
8J5, IJ6a. m.,l:K,J:314:lS,4:S5p. m. Bulger,lflU9
a. m. Burgettstown. 311 J6a.m Sap. ?vM":
Held, 7:14, 9:ao, UtfOa. m., lrOR, . d SdSl 18SS
From tbe West rtlSo, d6.-oo a. m..j
, d5l
m. Uennuon. .a)a.m. 8teuoenTuie,fwiip.
w
too, 0uap.m xiqrgeiis.
town. 7:15a. m..Sa.m. Washington, 16,7,
8:40, 106 a. m SiX, : p: m. Manslltld, 4:36,
8:30, 11:40 a. nu. at4s. 3J6.M ana snip-
Bulger, liisp,
MoBonslds, dedt s.au,gM
J. Bj
OWT1 w
atr!,04br trains, exeecH
.:i
t-f'
FROM BASEMENT TO XOO
A Complete Children's Cloak Stor&O
Rohe and Fur Goods Store.7
$12, 15, 2i8, $20, $22, 25, 28,30--
Cassimere Suits at 12. , r 'r$'
s fcpartmeni -xrepietyrith
the latest novelties in -Boys' a
fit and style of garments, styleaftd
indeed very low. .Boys' Knee-Pant.'
Children's Jerseys, $3 to $7 50I
5t
Cassimeres, 25 op to ?6o.
50.
to 80.
AmS
w
sSL "US ASSISES
quality German'
... . .v.. . ..ot
lot elegantly
trimmed in Astrachari, .'
to ?io.
4Mw4 I AK lkAf 4hM4h JK D A. A-
u"c" - t. 'uu .tr"? )t
.Morocco
comDinauons, siuc siciinenne ana
to $22 50.
Smithfield Street
XD!
EA1LKOADS.
PENNSxLVASLa. COMPANT'S LLSBH
Sept. a laaa. Central Standard Tlaa. ,
TKAIM8 UEFAirr "
As follows from Union Station For Chicago, d 7m
a. m., d 120, d 1.-O0, d7:, except Saturday. Ilea
&m.: Toledo, 7tXu.m dliao. d lrtJOiud except
turday. 113) p. m.: Crestline. 5. a. m.r dOTt
land, 0:10 a. m 3:4S and d llrto p.m. and 7:3!
a. m., yla F, F. W. 4 C lty.: New Cutla
and xoungstown, 71 a. m., HOB, : p. m.;
Yonngstown and i lies, d 1230 p. ra.; MeadTllle,
Erie and Aihtabnla, 74 a. m., iliX p.m.; nuet
and Jamestown, l:$ p. m.; Manlllon. 4:10p.m.:
Wheeling and Bellalre, U9a.m)3)4B IdOp.m.:
Beayer Falls. 4:03. a-OJ p. m Bearer Falls. 99di
a. u. : Leetsdale. 8:10 a. nu
ALLEGHENY Bochester, cJO a. m.; Beayer
Falls, 8:15, 11KB a. m.: En on, IM p. m.; LeU
dale, 100, 11:16 a. m., J.-00, 40, 4:48, o:3GL 7:00, 9:00
p. m.; Conway, 10:30 p.m.; JTalr Oiia, S U:40 a,
m.: Leetsdale, 88:30 p. m.
TBAIN S AKK1VE Union rtltlon from Chicago,
except Monday 1:50, d 5.-ca d (dS s. m., d d0 p.
to.: Toledo, except Monday 1 JO, d6J5a. iel, tM
&m., Crestline, 20 p. m.; Vosngstown and
ew Castle, 9:10a.m., lS, a4 U):15pim.; NliM
andYounntown. dBJOp. m.;Cley eland, dSJOa.
a., 2:26, 7KO '
. su;
n neeung ana jseuaire, .tju
a. m., iso, is.
10:14 d. m.s
Up. m.: Kile and Ashtabula, Irs,
Hasslllon. 10 .-00 a. m.: Nlles and
Jamestown. 8:10 a. m.; Bearer Falls. 7 JO a, su.
i:iup.an., nearer i'aus, a aao p. m.: iieetaaaie,
10:40 p. m.
A11KIVE ALLEGHENY-Tron Enon, !0 a.
m.: Conway, 8:50; Hocbester, 9:40 a. m.; Bearer
Falls, 7:10 a. m 8:44 p. m.: Leetsdale. 40, 8:14,
7:44 a. m Uo. 1:48, l.-OO. t-30. 90 p. m.: Fait
Oaks, 8 8:55 a. m.: Laetsdale, S SdS p. m.: Bearer
Falls. 3 8:14 p. m.
S. Sunday only; d, dally; other trains, except
Sunday. sea , i
PITTSBURG AND LAKE EBIE RAILHOAU i
COMFANY-Schednle In effect June 2, 1889,
Central time. UiPABT for Cleretand, SrOQ. "SO
a, m '1:36, 4ilQ, 9:3u p. m. For Cincinnati. Chl
cago and St. Louis, t.-OOa. m., '138, ,9.39p. m.
For Buffalo, 8:80 a. m.. 4:W, a.30 p. ta. For Sab'
manea, 8.-00a. m.. 4:10 pm. For Youngstowa
and New Castle, 4.-0O. 880, 10:15 a. m., 1-J4. 4:10,
9:30 p. m. For Bearer Falls, 8.-00. SiOSI, 8-J
10:15 a. m., '1:38, 3:90, 4:10, 8:u. 9d0p. m. ror
Chartlers. 5:00, J5:30 a,m., iXB, 80, 8.54, 7:14,
8.-06, 8:30, aB, 10:14 a. mT, KM, '12H4,
1:40. J30, 14:30. 4:50 'J.-OJ, 4:15, 306, lOdOp.'ffl.
ABBrvx-From UeTeland, SdO a. m, '1J:
o, iua, : p. ni. From Cincinnati. i;mcv
uu c miuu, iuu, tiv, p. m. froiDiiuuw w
W48V IU. -A,
ea. llda nj6
New Castle, ta
st.n
ttO.tt, Ditf) n. m. rrom8al4avtA-
! aon r i.n R-W
7X&
9:4fln. m rmn
m Beayer Falls. Ids. t JO, 7S0, p
a. ra., -i::m i:w, 5:38, "75, 9:40 p. m.
U, 4Y. trains from Mansfield, 8:30 a. m JaO.
40 p. Bi For Essen and Beechmont. 8.33 a.
m., 3:30 p. m. P.. C. AY. trains from ilans
fleld. Essen and Beechmont. 7:06 a. in.. ll?-.m-1
McK. & Y. K. K. -UiPACT-For ew Haren.
14 S a. m., 3:3 1 p. ra. For West SewJIon, I'S.Jp,
10:06 a.m.. JO, 4:15 n. m. ABBin-From Jiew
Uayen, tv xa a, m JrfJO p. m. From tt est Mew
ton, 8:14, t7:50 ajsn., 18, S.-00 p. n--?
- - -.wM. n.w,b. .will L. w,
10a,m., -sao. 8:14 p.m. .From MonongaheU
City. EHiabeth andlekeesport. T a. m., iss,
siIV.?- ..lr-.
, --juauy. isunaayt'oniy. ""'"" '. nS
ays'o
I Will
ii on anna;
.. j nriii a nnnra uu tsst '
Ilk I M- -- . ...
anuay. i nut run - -.- S .,..
Bandar.
uiy uexet omce. 4ui am"""
nT8BUKQ ANU WESTERN RAILWAY",.'
Trains (Ct'l Btan'd time)
Leare.
Arrire.
Day Ex.. Akron, Toledo. Kane
6:40 a m
90 a mi
7:r,p'm-
Mirer Accommooation.
CUearo Exmess I datlr)
!: p m
HJOamJ
iew OsHle AeeoBmedatlon.
4:3U p m
8:Mp ml
7h n iaa
ftissalml
. Hnt aUu Ssra tn rblMrO. IK 80. BeOOB d
U
j-afiipa jsn4 !"
HtfV
p. n.
jerom loanniowB ujt- ,
Wl
W'i
A
,r
,-V-1
!.-"J.
1
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