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Pittsburg dispatch. (Pittsburg [Pa.]) 1880-1923, November 06, 1889, Image 6

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PETTIHP fMTfl I IMC TEEMER'S VERSION. iS5KJ?.,&?Jf,SSSffi fate op the bcndees. BLOOKER'S DUTCH COCOA, :Tzf 3TBEMEt-:BT
111 I I fit II I Ih III I litM. I ..nh cnTrn-PiPhthR of r mil kpIMtip- A former Knniai Constable Telia How the ak "tflJl: iTk -K a . -. - - ,." '?bW $-
Brotherhood Constitution and
By-Laws Framed. .
A LIVELY MEETING HELD.
Ganzel Beported to Have Signed
With the Bostons.
TEEMEE'S EEPLY TO AL HAM1I.
Persons Alleged to be Backing the New
Local CInb.
GENERAL SPORTIXG MEWS OP THE DAI
The Brotherhood ball players held anoth
other meeting yesterday, and formulated the
censtitution and by-laws. The meeting was
lively. It is stated that Ganzel will not
play with the Brotherhood. There are vari
ous Tumors about who will support the new
local team. Teenier, the oarsman, replies to
the charges of Hamm.
JtriCIAI. TXUQBAM 10 THE DlSrjLTCH.1
Kew Tokk, November 6. There was a
rousing meeting of the baseball players and
their backers at Nick Engle's, on Twenty
seventh street, this afternoon for the purpose
of talking over their plans for "Wednesday's
meeting. The selection of names for Presi
dent, Vice President and Secretary caused a
red-hot fight, and much of the time was con
sumed in talking over the ability of differ
ent men. .
The Brotherhood has decided to go ontside
of their -organization for men to act as Presi
dent and Secretary, and will pay tliem a. high
Ealary. Just who are the candidates was not
made known, nor will it be known until to
morrow. A LrTELY J1EETIG.
This afternoon's meeting was more lively
than that of Monday and more business was
transacted. In fact all of the plans of the or
ganization were fully outlined. There were
some 25 or 30 players present as well as several
of the backers, including George Wright,
General Sixwell and Al Johnson. Now and
again a player would come down stairs from
the star chamber meeting to report progress,
buthis report did not amonnt to much. It was
clear, however, that the boys were having a
very lively time. One thing was certain and
that was that the players did not look so down
hearted as when they made the official an
nouncement that they had decided to break
away from the League.
2.0T GOING SMOOTHLY.
The players said that matters were not
moving as smoothly as on Monday, bnt that n
serious Internal dissensions had occurred. The
capital stock of each club Is to be 20,000, and
the players are expected to take half of that
amount.
Jack Rowe, of Pittsburg, was asked if it was
the Brotherhood movement that culminated
to-day that induced White and himself to go
to Pittsburg when they did and play the sea
son out. Tes, that it was," be said. "We got
a long letter from John Ward, and upon con
sideration determined to go to Pittsburg.
After I had been there a few davs a reporter
asked me how I liked the place. 1 think I told
him I liked it as well as Oskosh, Kalamazoo or
some place of that sort. We
PLAYED AGAINST OUR TTILL
there, and told Nimick. so. We wanted to get
a release, but all the satisfaction we could get
from Stearns, of Detroit, was 'play in Pittsburg
or get off the earth.' The League has brought
this action on itself. Imagine a case like my
own. We were not permitted, on account of a
rule distorted to suit the purposes of the mag
nates, to act like free men and play where we
chose. I feel like a manumitted slave."
It is thought that the rules of playing will
suffer very little change. There was some talk
of calling a foul tip a strike when held, but it
was strenuously objected that nothing should
be done that would tend to affect the batting.
THEIE CONSTITUTION.
The meeting came to an end at a late hour.
Secretary Keefe said that a constitution and
by-laws had been agreed upon and it will be
presented at the meeting to-morrow. He said
that it was reported that Ganzell had signed a
League contract, but did not know what there
was in it. Nothing, however, had been heard
from Clarkson. At the meeting to-day Judge
Howl-ind, T. C. Prince, of Boston, and JI.
Shrive, of Buffalo, will be present Keefe savs
that no grounds had been secured in Brook vn
as yet. The players he saj swill not want any
advance money.
A Mr. Love, of Boston, was at to-day's meet
ing and it was decided that the plajerswere
not compelled to take stock In the new clubs,
and In case money was wanted it could be had
from other clubs. Keefe says that the list of
backers, as published in a morning paper
yesterday, was wholly wrong, and that if thev
were the men who were at the back of the
scheme he would at once get out.
THE LEAGUE'S FLANS.
President Young Talks Abont What the
Macnntea May Do.
rSFECIAI, TELEGBAK TO THE DISPATCH.!
Washington, November 5. The declara
tion Of war upon the part of the Brotherhood
was more generally discussed here to-day than
the political battles going on in the various
States. At League headquarters President
Young was found busily engaged over the New
York papers, intent upon gleaning the details
of to-daj's meeting at the Fifth Avenue Hotel.
"Now that the issue has been made by the
Brotherhood, what does the League propose to
dor
"Do," repeated Mr. Young, with a look of
determination in his eyes. "We propose to
take the bull by th horns and protect uur own
Interests, otherwise the bull might toss us.
Onr plans have not been matured j et and I am
in no position to SDeak officially as to onr future
action in dealing with this matter."
"Have you had any correspondence with your
colleagues of the League relative to the proba
ble course to be pursued?"
"I have had no communication from anyone
connected with the League since the procla
mation was issued. I have talked witn a num
ber of persons on the subject and I have re
ceived various suggestions as to how the
League might defeat the Brotherhood's
scheme, but I hare refrained from expesrog
anv opinion in the matter, preferring to await
the meeting of the League next wceL."
"Wuat is the nature of the suggestions
made?"
"Oh. they are almost too numerous to men
tion. There are some persons who advise the
League to try and break the Brotherhood ranks
by buying off some of the most desirable pHvers
and trusting to the other to follow like a flock
of sheep. Of course you can understand whv
such a scheme would never do. It would be
placing a premium on desertiouand unfaithful
ness and in direct conflict with the best interest
of the games. It bas also been suggested that
a combination between the League and Ameri
can Association would be advisable, and that
idea mets with considerable favor. It is evi
dent that the Brotherhood will, if success at
tends tneir enorts, enaeavor to capture the
Association players, bnt they are waiting to see
how tbey are going to come out in their con
test with the League. There are otherproposi
tions that have been made, all of which will be
duly considered at the League meeting.
M3HCK AND HAXLON.
The President Thinks tbe Slnnager's Action
Looks Queer.
President Nimick was extremely indignant
yesterday at the conduct of Ed Hanlon. He
declines to express himself folly on the sub
ject at present, but he maintains that Hanlon
has all along given him. Nimick. to understand
that he, Hanlon. would manage the National
League clnb here next season. Mr. Nimick
soid vestercUv:
T would rather not talk on that subject, for
I am liable to say something I might regret. It
is bard to think a man could stand up and de
liberately lie to you. His step looks queer. As
for the management ot the club being thrnst
upon him, what has that to do with his actions?
It is a long lane that has no tnrnlnr. I tell von.
Yes,
, 11 is true iuanager Hanlon did save the
Pittsburg clnb some money In a way that I
can't telfyou."
Mr. Nimick also added that he can soon get
a good team together, and he is certain that
baseball will be alosing game here next season
ilor everybody concerned.
1 m IW " m " '"""MH WIT'" " ' T m T I I" ' "-fill T-'lTT -1IIW IIIHIIWsl IF
TEBMBR'S VERSION.
The StcKrciporier Rrplles Co Hamm'a
Charges The Race Woi Fixed In-
trrrilloc Statements .Abont the
Arrangements.
JIcKeespoet, November 6. In answer to
the statement mado by Hamm in reference to
the late Saudaur-Teemer race, Teemer bas the
following to say: "I do not deny that Gaudaur
was to win the race as be thought be was.
Hamm tells the truth there. Such was the
arrangement made by Hamm, Gaudaur and
myself, but at the same time my intentions
were to row It ont on them simply because I
had to go into the arrangement in order to tret
the race, and I tried to do it, too. and I was
prevented by Hamm. As to Hamm's remarks
that I owe him money, I can say emphatically
that I do not, and that I never received a
penny from hiui that be did not owe mo for
value received. I never got a cent from Hamm
that he did not owe me. I could produce, if I
desired, Gaudaur's receipt to me for money I
owed Gaudaur. but which I did uot pay him.
but he receipted for it and knows why. He is
not in the controversy, and I do not desire to
produce it unless be would have it.
"In reference to the trial. In which Hamm
says Gaudaur beat me so badly a week before
the race, I can add that Mr. Pnngle, sportiDg
editor of TUB Dispatch, stood at the foot of
Walnut street and saw us as we passed that
point, while rowing on the Monoogahela river.
We met a half of a mile below the point where
Mr. Pnngle stood, and were rowing up as we
passed him. I was between one and two ooat
lengths ahead of Jake. We rowed a quarter of
a mile further and stopped. I was still a good
boat length ahead of Gaudaur. This Mr.
Prin;Ie can vouch for.
"Hamm also says, that when he made the
race and the arrangements by which Jake was
to win, he used Mr. St. John's name to do
so, and that he left Mr. St. John under the im
pression that the race was on its
merits, and was square. To this I will say
positively, that Hamm again jnmps
the truth. Mr, St. John knew all about the
race and the arrangements under which it was
made (Jake to win it), and he was a party to it.
If not, why did Hamm give George Bates a dol
lar to take his and Gaudaur's clothing over to
the steamer Elizabeth, where Mr. St. John was
quartered, at the same time giving him instruc
tions to tell St. John "to go ahead and bet, no
matter how far ahead Teemer was that be, St.
John, knew or understood everything. I can
produce two men who heard either Hamm or
Gaudaur say. This is the place to foul him,'
as they rowed past a point opposite Demmler
in going to the starting point of the race. Those
men stopped there to watch and see if anj
tlung of that kind would occnr, and they
will corroborate me in my charges that Hamm
fouled me and right at that point.
x was compelled to enter upon tne arrange
ments to get a race, but I meant positively to
row it out on them, and when they found it ont
they determined to defeat me and did so in
this way. Immediately after the race Mr. St.
John gave George Bates $10, instructing him tu
go buy a revolver and guard Hamm and Gau
daur's boats that nteht. Now. that mnnev was
given to Bates for his services, bnt he did not
want the public to know it, and therefore
he gave the instructions about protecting boats.
The lobelia poisoning story is simple. I will
add in reference to it that not "two nights,"
but the night before the race Hamm. Gaudaur,
Wickerson and myself were at my house, we
all drank out of ihe same bottle. Hamm says
he did not get sick. I was not nor was Mr.
Wickerson, bnt strange to say Gaudaur was
sick. We all drank of the same bottle, and no
one was affected but Gaudaur. It mav be
added right here also that they knew next
morning that I meant to row the race out on
them, and the lobelia story came in handy in
consequence. The lobelia story is simple and
ridiculous, and I brand Hamm not only in this,
but in all of his simple and weak efforts to in
jure me, as a teller of untrue stories, and a
man who has forgotten what the truth is. I
can furnish more data in reference to this
matter that will soon close up Mr. Hamm or
anv of his party, if necessary."
(Signed.) John Teemeu.
Somewhat DiscournglBg.
If tho Brotherhood of Ballplayers shall find
no more substantial support elsewhere than in
Philadelphia their career as independent ex
ponents of the national game will be brief, in
deed. To those who are familiar with the in
ception and progress of the Brotherhood move
ment, the entire affair assumes a farcical
aspect, in despite of the earnest asseverations
of players who have confused retribution with
injustice. The baseball sky is not all rose
color, and the question with the players is
simply whether they shall abdicate their posi
tions as exponents oi tne national game or take
the chances of unorganized independence and
endeavor to convince the public that they have
been persecuted and vilified by their former
employers. On either side is presented the
horn of a dilemma; and the stars of the base
ball profession will be'fortunate if they be not
tossed on the one hand or the other into the
slongb of oblivion and innocuous desuetude.
Philadelphia J'rcss.
TVnO ARK THE BACKERS
RIayor McCallln and Sir Kerr Deny They
Are !upportlne Any CInb.
There is some mystery as to who is going to
put up the money for the Brotherhood club in
this city. Mayor McCallln and Mr. W. W. Kerr
both emphatically deny that they have invested
any money in the scheme or that they have
been asked to put up any money. Mr. Kerr
also states that the Exposition Park has not
been leased to the Brotherhood. Now that the
Mayor and Mr. Kerr persist in denying that
they have any money Invested in the Brother
hood, the names of various other gentle
men have been mentioned as the back
ers. However, a local player still in
sists that btaley and Galvin were
delegated to ask the Major to support the
scheme, and that be promised to do so. The
Exposition Park management is anxious to as
sist the Brotherhood club in any way. and it is
understood that if that club leases the park,
the management ot the latter will help to put
up a handsome grand stand and grade the
grounds. Mr. Kerr estimates that to do this
properly will cost 312,000 or 515,000. But he is
confident that the club will be a great financial
success At any rate he is prepared to buy
stock in the club if matters are explained suffi
ciently to him.
George Meyers, theagentjof Brunswick and
Bilke Billiard Company, stated last evening
that he had been approached to take stock in
the proposed club, but had not yet made up his
mind about doing so. It was rnmored that
Mr. Witnerow, of the Dtiquesne Hotel, is back
ing the project, but that gentleman could not
be seen last evening A well known gentleman
from New York, however, was seen at the hotel
and made a few signficant statements on the
matter. The gentleman has big business inter
ests in this city, and absolutely refuses to have
his name published In connection with the
scheme at present He has been at the hotel
ail week. During a conversation he said:
"I saw Mr. Van Cott at New York a tew davs
ago, and he told me that the Pittsburg stock
holders had not been selected and would not be
until after the meetings. There are plenty of
gentlemen ready to take stock, and Mr. van
Cott informed me that I might be given an op
portunity to take some Pittsburg stock, as I
was shut out at New York. There is a very
large amonnt of money behind the Brotherhood
in New York, and I can assure you that it is
a go."
Mr. Meyers leaves for New York this morn
ing, but be states bis business is not of a base
ball kind. Hanlon is representing Mr. Kerr at
New York.
S03IE BAD STARTING.
Tho Rnces nt Knihrllle Not a Very Great
Snccets.
Nashville, Tenn., November S. The
weather was cloudy aud very cold at tho park
to-day. Only five races were mn and the fields
were Lomparativcly sma'L A good crowd was
iu attendance. The betting was close and rac
ing very good, barring the starts. '
First race, purse for S-ycar-olds, selling and
maiden allowances, four aud one-half furlongs
btarters: Zufalo 112, Vashti 110. Happiness 108.
Happiness won by a length, Zufalo second, two
lengths In front or Vasbti third. Time 5S seconds.
beCOnd race, nurse rnrX-Tpar-nldfl nnd nnu-nril
in ii .:::""':: ..::: -i
ociiiuK auutauce5.-f-veu ana one-nail lurion
nrs
.ther-
riarcers: Brown Duke lii Birthday hl cat
lnc H HI, dymnast 111, Beeelvcr 111. Amos A 108.
uiurclilll Clark 100, Bonnie King 105, Balance 103.
UucklcrlOZ. Amos A. won bva nalfluicth. Dnck-
ler second hard rushed hv balance third
1.39
Third rape, nurse, a free h&ndirAn rnra t-mt.
olds and upward, one ind one-sixteenth of a
mile btaners: uotlta Hardy lltt Cashier 107,
Prince I ortnnstus 105, .Vdcrmont 102, Queen or
Tramps lie Cams lot. Quotation I0U, Dier 100.
Pete Willis 08. War Peak 90. Prince Fortunatui
won by a length; Monita Hardy second half a
lenpinin iroutor uarus third. Time. liaHf,
I ourth race, pnree, i free handicap for 2-year-
uius btc inrionjfb sianers: unneua uu, Jessica
104, FranV bhaw 100, blsolee K8. Fakir 107, Amelia
106. I'olemuB 108. Lizzie C lei llirr iWt on
Basil Unts93, Uen. Holland 95, Cadaverous 9o.
Langtress So. Basil Dnke won by a length; Lizzie
C. second a length In front or Langtrcss third,
lime. 1:04!.
I Ifth race, purse, for 3-year-olds and upward
that have been beaten and not won a race since
beptcmber 7: selling and maiden allowances; six
and a half furlongs-Starters: Meditator 110. Ke
gardle&s 110, Trobus Ktt, Itosi l'carl lis, Dudley
oats 102. Weeks lie. Enterprise 101, Boy Blue 83.
Dudley Oals won byl hair a length. Bov Blue
second, -one and one-half lengths In front of Itu
rardlcss third. Time, 1:15.
The following are entries for to-morrow:
First race, five-eighths of a mile, 2-year-olds,
selling I remont 89, Kenllworth 99, Kevlvate 101,
.Nannie P 102, Kadcllffe 107. Lew Carlile 109,
Bomalne U, J. K. t reed 112, Morse HZ.
becond Tace. three-quarters of a mile. selling
John Morris 87, Jim Jordan 87, Vivian 89, iover
ernorRoss92. Kalance97, King Eoxbnry 102, Con
signee 109. fackhorse 102. Koto 102. Passion 102.
Puente 102. Dutchman 107. Churchill Clark 107,
Both 109, Bed lm 112, Tommy 11112.
Third race. mUe, dlvtded-MecEie H 90. Ben
son OS, Pantelette 97. Vermont 100, Argenta 100,
bolld Silver 102, 1'robus 103, Ten Like 112.
Fourth race, mile Cruiser 102, Marchma 102,
Tom Hood 105, Queen Trumps 105, BrandolctlelC.
Marion V 10. .Nevada 111, Wary 111, Woodcraft
117.
fclflh race, seven-eighths of a mile, selling
Fosteral 103. Lake View 108. Kittle B 108, Jnitlce
110. Brown Duke 113, Deer Lodpe 113.
bixih race, nine-sixteenths of a mile Venango
lou. Little Kabblt 100. Destruction 100, Arralel 110,
BallrhooHO. Mary Mack 110, Vashtl 110, Little O
-' --.--- - .:. . "-- . :r tm wtfjH ia ii ip ifjii:iie mikii. - " ' ja
110, Mora ua, Lsngiresi iu.
JACK GLASSCOCK'S PLANS.
Still Talking About What lie Intends Co Do
With the Booster.
ISPECIJlt. TXLKOIUlH TO TH DISrATCH.1
Indianapolis, Novembers. If Jack Glass
cock has any purpose of casting his lot with the
striking Brotherhood, it is not apparent in let
ters which he is writing back to personal
friends in this city, in which he scarcely ever
fails to refer to -his return in the
spring, and what he expects to accomplish
with the club next year. Glasscock is put
ting a good deal of faith in the pitching
ability ot Byrkitt, of the Wooster Club, and
he expects to sign him with Indianapolis before
the spring opening. Wooster demanded 12,500
for his release, bat Glasscock angrily retorted
that be did not want to Day tne ciud ouingnr,
bat would give S500 for its pitcher. Henry
Boyle has concluded he must cuanse the style
of his delivery, and to that end he proposes
practicing the coming winter. After the sea
son closed New York made no secret that tbev
"were on to him," as they expressed it, and
other clubs were also fortunate in solving bis
delivery sufficiently quick to guess pretty
closely what kind of ball was coming.
President Brush, of the Indianapolis League
club, does not appear greatly alarmed. "It's a
few days too quick," sa(d he, "to talk much
about what the League action will be. The
players have done nothing but what we ex
pected they would do. They have made a
statement of their troubles, and there the mat
ter stands, and until they say to the League,
'We do not care to meet yon,' the situation re
mains the same as it has been ail season. The
policy of the League will take shape later on,
and it will not claim anything not its due."
Roche to Retire.
New York, November 5. Following-the re
tirement from the turf of Mr. A. J. Cassatt and
the sale of that gentleman's horses comes the
announcement that Richard Bocbe and Byron
McClelland have decided to close their partner,
ship. It is said that Mr. Roche bas had enough
of horse racing, at least for a while, and Mc
Clelland will probably train for himself or some
prominent owner. The McClelland-Roche
string, which includes that game little 'race
horse Badge. Bradford, The Lioness. Heydey,
Lord Peyton. Warsacn. Fredcrich I. and five
high class yearlings, will be sold at public auc
tion by Colonel 8. D. Bruce at the Elizabeth
race track on Thursday, the llthlnst.
Resnlts nt Elizabeth.
Elizapetit, N. J., November 5. Fir6t race,
one mile Badge first, Lavinla Belle sec.nd. Mar
tin Kussell third. Time, 1.53.
Second race, six furlongs Fordham first, Brad
ford second. Tipstaff third. Time. 1:21 M.
Third race, six furlongs Tnlla Blackburn first,
Civil Service second, Robespierre third. Time,
1:2.
Fourth race, one and one-sixteenth miles King
Crab first. Castaway 11 second, Theodosius third.
Time, 1 J8X.
Fifth race, one and one-sixteenth miles Hey
day first. Stephanie second. Barrister third.
Time. 2.00.
Sixth race, six furlongs Glendale first, Bohe
mian second, Arab third. Time. 1:22.
ritubnre Bill Beaten.
Newbubo, N. Y., November 5. One of the
hardest fought prize fights thathas taken place
along the Hudson river in years, came off early
this morning at Highland Falls, below this city.
The battle was between Jim Daly, of Philadel
phia, and Bill Gabig, of Pittsburg, and was for
a pnrse of $500 The fight was fierce and fast
from start to finish, and after the first few
rounds everything was in Daly's favor. There
were about 200 sporting men f rem New York,
Philadel phia, Newburg. and other cities. Tom
Martin, of this city, was the referee. The bat
tle lasted 11 rounds, and was given to Daly af
ter be had knocked Gabigout in the last round.
A Great Outine Dny.
fSFECTAI. TELEOEAjr TO THS DISrjLTCTM
New York, November 5. The second an
nual fall games of the Outing Athletic Club
were held this afternoon on the grounds of the
Brooklyn Athletic Association. There were
about 1,500 spectators. A great drawing card
was the match at throwing the lb-pound ham
mer, throwing the 56-pound weight and potting
the IB-pound shot, between A. A. Jordan, of the
New York Athletic Club, and M. W. Ford, of
the Staten Island Athletic Club. It resulted in
a victory for Jordan, and the prooabilities are
that these two men will consider it a final set
tlement of their differences.
Ktlraln nnd Seholes.
Tobonto. Ont., November fi. The boxing
contest between Jake Kilrain and John F.
Seholes. of this city, at the Mutual Street Rink
last night was witnessed by abont 1,000 people.
They boxed four rounds of three minntes each,
Marquis of Queensberry rules. Seholes was in
first-class condition, while Kilrain was very at
and ont oi condition, .toirain
wa.A nn thi. flu.
fensive most of the time and Seholes did m t
of the fighting. The general opinion was th it !
Kilrain did not exert himself as much as he
has been Known to do.
Dog and Gorilla.
Fort Wayne. Ihd., November 5. W. H.
Stewart, owner of the gorilla Angola, to-dav
accepted the chaUenge of William Wilson, of
Marion, to match Angola against the latter's
bulldog, Jack, in a fight to a finish for a pnrso
of S700. Stewart offers to bet S100 that tho
gorilla will whip the dog in less than threo
minutes, and another 100 that the dog will not
come ont of it aUve.
Sporting Notes.
The National League may be inclined to Join
the Clan-ca-Gael.
Slosson says the New York tonrnament can
go on without Schacifer.
We may expect some fun in the Brotherhood
concerning the "loaves and fishes."
Geoiige Me vers, the local billiard agent,
thinks that Schaeffer will play in tho New
York tournament.
The admislons of Teemer and Hamm cer
tainly ought to knock all interest out of pro
fessional boat racing In Pennsylvania at least.
It would be interesting to see the Brother
hood join tbe Knights of Labor with such men
as Messrs. Johnson, Van Cott, etc. They would
make great Knights.
The season is finally over
For baseball and tennis and sneb.
And the baseball reporter's no longer
The boss of the office not much. Ex.
THIS SETTLES IT.
Tbe Sorouls Society of New York Tnlks
About Atrophied Fncnlilcs.
New Yoek, November 5. "Is1 is better
for the progress of mankind that all the
faculties of tne individual should be har
moniously developed or that some faculties
should be allowed to become atrophied for
the special development ot others?"
This was the question that Sorosis talked
about yesterday aiternoon at Delmonico's
after a luncheon of six courses. The ques
tion was pnt by Mrs. Lucy Lee Holbrook.
Mrs. Alma C. "Johnston read a very bright
paper on the negative side. ilrs. Merrill,
of Boston, better known as "Jean Kmcaid,"
said a few words. Mrs. Jennie M. Xozier
read a very clever and scientific paper and
Mrs. Emma W. Higley talked very wittily
in a serio-comic way.
Mrs. Helen Campbell, Mrs. Anna Ean
dall Diehl, Mrs. Mary A. Newton aud Mrs.
Hester M. Poole all read interesting papers,
and Mrs. Clymcr then decided that the con-
J elusion had been reached that in some cases
atrophy was necessary for certain faculties,
but that a spherical cultivation of all facul
ties was as a rule tbe best for humanity.
Mrs. May Biley Smith read an original
poem, Mrs. Marion "H. Wilcox sang and
Mrs. Margaret W. Eaveuhill read.
ROGERS' ROYAL
snw
A Steictlv Vegetable BESTORA
TIVE to the BEAIN and NERVOUS
SYSTEM.
There is no substitute for this remedy.
IT CURES, it GIVES NEW LIFE, it is
PURE and "WHOLESOME.
Sold by druggists. Price, $1.
Prepared only by ROGERS' ROYAL
REMEDIES CO., Boston, Mass.
noWS-""
IU I58 rC w 1 111 If
1HI isll w 1 IU lbs
A former Kansas Constable Telia How the
Fnmlly Wu Shot.
rSFXCIAT. TILIORAK TO TUB DtSFATCO.1
Los Angeles, Oal., November B. By
accident to-day a Dispatch correspondent
came across a man who clears away the
mystery surrounding the fate of the Benders.
His name is If. Coberly. He has been in
the employ of the Street Superintendent
here. Coberlv says that in 1882 be was
constable of Havana township, Montgomery
countv, Kansas. The Benders moved there
in 1887 and opened a wayside tavern, from
which many strange disappearances took
place. The authors of the crimes,were dis
covered by the murder of a man named
York, and vigilantes proceeded to the tavern
to mete out' punishment. Beaching the
Bocky Hill region, Coal creek, a few miles
from the desolate Bender tavern, the posse
was halted and 100 bullets whizzed through
the air.
Three of the ontlaws were literally rid
dled with balls. Their bodies were not
bnricd. They were thrown among the
rocks on a hillside, where wolves probably
led upon them jno investigation case was
ever made by the authorities, bnt yon can
rest assured that the Bender family will
never again be heard of in this world. The
next spring three more bodies of murdered
men were fonnd in Sunn creek, and, all
told, it is believed Bender, killed 17 people,
including a child that was burned alive.
IN A BAD BOX.
A Lumber Dealer Chnrsed With Forgery
and Evasion of tho Lnw.
New York, November 5. Horace F.
Burroughs, the Hnnter's Point lumber
dealer, whose yard was closed in Angust
last by order of the Secretary of the Treas
ury, nnder suspicion of having been the
scene of smuggling operations whereby some
2,000,000 feet of lumber escaped paying
duty, was arrested in this city last Saturday
on the charge of forgery, on information
furnished by Donald Lee and others. The
prisoner was taken late Saturday night to
the Elizabeth street station bouse and locked
up. Sunday morning he was taken before
Judge Gorman, at the latter's house, and
released on bail.
Mr. Burroughs was admitted to $6,000
bail on the previous charge. The Govern
ment in that case claimed that it had been
defranded ont of. some $4,000 by the disap
pearance of 2,000,000 feet of Canadian lum
ber which was admitted in bond, bnt Mr.
Burroughs asserted that it was on the wharf
and had not been sold to American dealers,
as the special Treasury agents asserted.
It is now claimed that the lumber in-
specter's certificate was forged, and that the
lumber was disposed of contrary to law.
NOT ENOUGH PIPE.
An Oil Well Supply Famine Which Berionfly
Affect Production.
"Washington, Pa., November 5. Field
operations have been somewhat retarded by
the pipe famine which has existed since
early in the summer, and at present shows
no signs of cessation. Operating is, there
fore, rather inconvenient in this field. Sev
eral wells have been standing untubed for
weeks. A number ot drilling wells
have been standing idle for some
time, and in a few cases for a period of
months. An operator who by some scheme
can get the desired supplies, is considered a
very fortunate person, and is buttonholed
quite often. The scarcity of pipe is only
partly explained. The best reason given is
that the demand ior casing and tubing is
greater now than it has ever been, as oil
statistics show. The mills have large con
tracts for line pipe for gas operations.
Ohio, Indiana, Pennsylvania and New
York are heivv buyers, and Kentucky and
West Virtinia are buying in lar e lots. A
few mills axi uot rni n'rg up to their full
capacity on account ot the Icaruity of gas
fuel.
REAL ESTATE SWINDLERS.
Minneapolis and Indiana Speculators Have
a Blc Scheme on Hand.
Dcltjth, Minn., November 5. There
was exposed to-day the details of a gigantic
real estate fraud perpetrated by swindlers of
Minneapolis and Indiana.' The victims are
very numerous, and are mostly persons liv
ing in Minneapolis and in the sonthern
part of Minnesota, Ioh.i and Indiana. A
division nine miles from this oity, where
land is worth $16 per acre, was platted and
;i en a similar name to that of a valuable
division inside the citv.
Over $337,000 worth of transfers many
of them, of course, fictitious were recorded,
some ot them to-day.
LECTUKES FOE TWO PDEP0SES.
Rev. Father Itlnttbewr'a Object in Coming
From Cork to America.
tErXCIAI. TELZOKAM TO TDK D1SPATCH.1
NEwXOEK.NovemberS. The Very Bev.
Father Matthew, of Cork, has called on
Archbishop Corrigan and obtained formal
approval of his mission to this country.
Father Matthew is here to deliver lectures,
the moneys accruing from which are to be
devoted to a two-fold purpose.
In October, 1890, will occur the centenary
of the birth ot the Kev. Theobald Matthew,
the great temperance reformer, and a cen
tennial celebration will mark the anniver
sary in Cork. Father Matthew's firstlecture
will be on "Liberty."
X feel like saying
something BAD I
S(0.Bj
BE WBSE!
BOOTS AND SHOES DEESSED WITH
Wolff's
Blacking
NEVER GET HARD AND STIFF,
Always look neat EqnallygoodforMen's.'Womon's
or Child's Shoes. No blacking bmsh required, and
tbe potuhing is dosein three minutes without labor.
TVATERPRO OF and warranted to preserve
leather, and keeps it soft and d arable.
Sold by Shoo Stores, Grocers, Druggists, 4c.
Try it on your Harness.
WOLFF & RANDOLPH, pkiladelpkio.
3TWTSTJ
JOHNFLOOKER & CO.,
MANUFACTURERS OF
Flocker's Lubricating Hemp Packing
FOB BAILROAD USE.
Italian and American Hemp Packing;
Clothes Lines, Twines, Bell Cord, Fish Lines,
Chalk Lines, Night -Lines, Sisal Bale and Hide
Rope, Tarred Lath Yarn, Spnn Yarn, etc.
WORKS-East street, Allegheny City, Pa,
OFFICE AND SALESROOM-89 Water; it,
ttsbqrg. Telephone No. 1370, OC2369-KWS
4HISL
ilb. M&&AS
Y-v-?'
ME
&s5p?BSSSSSM
mlizwBlslHF
H sB " 13 u w-JfJ i-T j K 'TsK r
ila 841 1 ill"??!.. CHOICEST. PUREST. BEST. TBT IX, '- . k
- TO. r? ' JAMES ARCHIBALD ft BRO..
. VM . UVERY AND SALE STABLES, -1 - -I
mm
THE WBiTHBB.
For Wettern Perm'
tylvania, and West
Virginia, fair, ex
cept light rain or
snow alonp the lakes;
stationary tempera
ture; westerly winds.
PiTTSBuna, November 5, 1889.
The United States Signal Service officer la
this city furnishes the following: "
Time.
Tlir.
7 her.
Maximum IfniD 44
i.37
.11
12-00 V.
Minimum temp... . 31
Kange 10
Mean funin..
1:00 F. X
2.-00F. Jf. 42
5.-00F. U
s-oor. x 40
Precipitation. 00
Hirer at:0D,r. x.. 8.3 fet,
hours.
a of fall 1.1 in2i
River Telexrrams.
I grSCTAZi TZLXOlUJIS TO THS DISPATCH.!
Moboantown River 7 feet 6 inches and
falling. Weather cloudy. Thermometer 45 at
Wabeen River 1 8-10 feet and stationary
Weather cloudy and cold.
MUST GO UNDERGROUND.
The Time Fixed for Barylng the Electric
Wires in Philadelphia.
Philadelphia, November 5. City
Councils' Law Committee has again fixed a
date for the removal of overhead wires, bnt
this time it has arranged a graduated scale
to gnide the companies in obeying the law.
This schedule, which was adopted yesterday,
is as follows: All electric light wires be
tween Vine and South streets' and the two
rivers must be under ground by De
cember 1. 1890; between South" street
and Washington avenue, Vine street
and Girard avenue, and Grav's
ferry and Girard avenue, West Phil
adelphia, by December 1, 1891; and all
other parts of the city except the rural sec
tions by December 1, 1892. To bury the
telegraph and telephone wires the companies
are given a year's more time in each district
than with the electric light wires, so that it
will be December 1, 1893, before the wires
in the outskirts of the city go underground.
There are now in the city 10,321 telegraph,
telephone and electric light- poles, of which
4,649 are owned by the city aud 5,675 by
various companies. Up to the present time
825 miles of wire have been placed under
ground, but 5,000 still remain overhead.
There are
many white, soaps,
each
represented to be
"just as good as the IvGry."
They are not, "
but Iike '
all counterfeits,
they lack?7 i , r
the peculiar
and remarkable
qualities of , --".
the genuine.
Ask for - '
Ivory Soap . l
and.
insist upon naving it. "
'Tistsold everywhere.
A?
no3-101-irws
The Finest Meat-Fiavobing Stock
L1EBIG COMPANY'S
Extract of Meat.
USE IT FOB SOUPS,
Beef Tea, Sauces- and Made Dishes.
Genuine only with fac-simile of
Jnstnsvon Liebig's
SIGNATUBE IN BLUE INK
Across label.
Sold bv storekeepers, grocers and druggists.
LIEBIGS EXTRACT OF MEAT CO.. Lim
ited, London. au2!-94-ws
U
nCL-
,W,
GUN WA is a Chinese Physician.
Owing to existint; laws he cannot practice
medicine in America. So be bas prepared a
line of Cbinese herb and vegetable specifics,
which. Instead of simply relieving symptoms,
strike at the VERY ROOT OF DI8EASE, and
perform cures that are notblnc less than mar
velous. A friendly talk and CONSULTATION
with Gun Wa COSTS NOTHING. He charses
bnt a small snm for his remedies,wbicb, though
ecntle and harmless to take, are certain and
nnernnc in tbelr effects. They SPEEDILY
CUBE all blood, nervous and chronic diseases.
Younff, middle aged or old men, suffering,
onlckly restored to PERFECT PHYSICAL
HEALTH. GUN WA is a FRIEND TO THE
AFFLICTED. If you cannot call, write him,
in perfect confidence. Send for history of his
life, and bis circular on Cancer, Tumors, Tape
Worm, Rheumatism, Catarrh, Female Weak
ness or Piles. Inclose 4c stamps for reply.
Office hours, 9 A. M. to 12 U.;lo5and7to9
040 Penn JLve.,nttsliirgf, Pa,
ooi-wsu ,
100 LATE TO CLASSIFY.
FOR SALE-ORI'HANB COURT SALE-NO-T1CE
Is hereby (riven that by virtue of an
ordr oi the Orphans Court of Allegheny County.
at:3ben. term 1839 authorizing me thereto, T will
expose for sale at public auction on the premises.
Etna, Aiiegneny Miunty, i'a.. luursuar, boy,
21st. 1839. at 2 o'clock, the property of Lewis
King deecased, being lot No. fltt the plan of the
extension of stewartttown laid out by Robert
Chessman, recorded plan book. vol. 1. part 2, page
253: beglnulng on east side Butler turnpike road.
181 leet north of Freeport road: thence northward
Sofeettolotflvelnsald plan: thence esstwardly
preserving same width IDo feet to Union allev with
a two-tory frame dwelling: terms, one-fourth
cash, balance In three equal annual payments
with Interest; Norman King, administrator,, ISO
McCInre ave.. Allegheny: W. D. Moore and F.
n Mrfllrr. hli attarnxTi. li Orant St.. Pitts
burgh. A.LEGGATE k EON Auctioneers, 11
Federal t., Allegheny. no5-W. j
csjjsii WCf 9v IfAj
fi '. vV I. J M.
JAMES ARCHIBALD A BRO.,
LIVERY AND SALE STABLES.
117, 119 and 130 Third avenue, two doors below
Smithfield st next door to Central Hotel.
Carriages for funerals, $3. Carriages for opens,
parties, ic., at the lowest rates. All new car
riages. Telephone communication. myl-11-TTS
WESTERN INSVRA2TCE CO.
OF PITTSBURG.
Assets W48.60187
NO. 411 WOOD STREET.
ALEXANDER NIM1CK, President.
JOHN B. JACKSON. Vice President,
fe22.26-TT3 WM. P. HERBERT. Secretary.
LACE .
AND
HEAVY CURTAINS
FORCED SALE.
The re
ceipts of
new Cur
tains are
too large
for our
available
space.
We have
t i cketed
a large
number
of last
season ' s
C urtains
for pass
age on the toboggan slide of
prices.
LOOK IN OUR WINDOW FOR
CURTAINS
MARKED DOWN.
pJrnPa
n tl El
From $ 1 25 to . . . v . 50c
From $ 1 75 to . . . . $ 1 00
From $ 4 50 to ... . 3 00
From $ 8 00 to ... . 5 00
From $10 00 to ... . 6 00
From jSz8 00 to ... . 12 50
From $20 00 to ... . 13 00
From $22 00 to ... . 14 00
From $25 00 to ... . 15 00
THEN VISIT OUR
DRAPERY
DEPARTMENT
And see eighty other patterns
of Lace Curtains in all grades;
also Heavy Curtains for Por
tieres and Heavy Hangings at
similar reductions.
--
0. McCLMOCK
&d CO.,
33 FIFTH AVENUE 33
E05-TTS
-TJ1 Tt1fV SCIENTIFIC
JI- J3 LJ-2Sk, OPTICIAN
Patentee and sole manufacturer of the Eureka
Eye Glass. No chain required. Eureka nose
blades fitted to other eye glasses.
Oculist's prescriptions a specialty. All kind
of lenses ground and spectacles made on the
premises. 908 PENN AVENUE, PITTS.
Seventeenth and Chestnut, Philadelphia.
my28-93-TTS
Mqs
Presents in the most elegant form
THE LAXATIVE AND NUTRITIOUS JUICE
OF THS
FIGS OF CALIFORNIA,
Combined with the medicinal
virtues of plants known to be
most beneficial to the human
system, forming an agreeable
and effective laxative to perma
nently cure Habitual Consti
pation, and the many ills de
pending on a weak or inactive
condition of the
KIDNEYS, LIVER AND BOWELS.
It is the most excellent remedy known to
CLEANSE THE SYSTEM EFFECTUALLY
When one is Bilious or Constipated
SO THAT
PURE BLOOD. REFRESHINQ 8LEEP.
HEALTH and STRENQTH
NATURALLY FOLLOW.
Every one is using it and all are
delighted with it.
ASK YOUR DRUGGIST FOR
STF"I8.,CrEa OF PIGS
MANUFACTURED ONLY BY
CALIFORNIA FIG SYRUP CO.
SAN FRANCISCO, CAU
LOUISVILLE, KY NEW YORK, H. R
jy9-77-TTS
J. DIAMOND, Sfdfe.-,
22 SIXTH STREET. The Eye examined free
of charge. Spectacles perfectly fitted.
ARTIFICIAL JEYES inserted and
warranted to suit.
eu-8-TTsa
Vc. , rfOWt JAM.' 23. IBoSSsbs,;
x!v5) IsV A NissiHJK
iSViSKYliUDx- should read our "Illustrated Monthly." It
should be In everybody's home and everybody's mouth- Rich andf
poor, young ana oia, uemocrats ana Republicans should all gets
one. Sent FREE every month to any address. Send jus your name
and address and we'lL mail it, free of charge, regularly.
THE OLD,
uur nDerai meinoas, reuaDie
moia store wiin oargain nuniers ana tasmon seekers, and d
all competitors to the walL We show the grandest Itnni- nf i
uiotning m Pittsburg, and we urgently invite gentlemen who
usually have their clothes made to order to come in anH .
the remarkably
lucuisctvcs me
uin ui larc
lrlv Vlcif
., . w-
. C.. m.,.4
li5 luu liiusi ucauiitui ouiis at JZ2, 515 anas'
i8. We have 50 styles of Overcoats and
Wl VviA 0 merchant tailor's charge. Be sure you
visit us for either Suit or Overcoat
300 TO 400 MARKET STREET.
OUR PRICES TOUCH TENDER SPOTS
"ln economical mothers' purses.
Uhildren's Clothing such as
. tfful feature reo-nrrlJncr it-
every boy in town, and as for prices, they're certainly" the;
' lowest in the city. How do we know this? We do know
- it. There's very little about the clothing trade of this
city that we don't know. Our present display of
Clothing for boys, big and little, is the finest,
largest, choicest and most perfect that canbe
made. Prices: Small Boys' Overcoats, $1 50,
S2, $2 50, J?3, $4 and $5. Big Boys' Over-
f I I Q If VQ coats, $3 50, $4, $$, $6, $8 and $10. Suits
4 W IV I w same prices. Mothers, you should visit
V
. . ... ... ..--- ,.. . -
i3UU I U 4UU MAHrvt 1 b I Htt I .
y
No Department
s.
Has given greater evidence of
V Neverietailing a hat for
sometimes selling hats for
Nybuy same quality.for
moue Dig iois at closer prices, ana as me opportunity
r Jcomes we buy them low and sell them low. Our cus-
tom is not confined to the cheap and medium grades.
'-. We have as
show, but
so
GUSKY'S,
Lome
tnat
mff niPT nrnrrr v
3UU IU4UU fflAIUMll UinLCI.
MODELS OF
or
a
Are our Shoe and Furnishing Goods
.
siz
size they are by long odds
capacity for nunareas
V evervthinp; belonpincr to
V -' - .
ing Goods business.
piay oi uootwear
des
1
desirable make
lar sizes, but
yww,
els(
elsewhere
any city
sOI IQ sMT VO Number
KA VWiV T Oil every
- .. and finish that can be put into Footwear,
300 TO 400 MARKET STREET, canvbe found at ourpopular Shoe
Store. -;
S -, J
LET-.YOURCHILDREN call
Drawing Books which we are giving
present, but a mighty useful and entertaining-one. . - ,
Orders. by Mail Promptly Attended to.
GUSKY'S
3O0.-T 400
Mt-n4
" hsssTsssiffr
OLD STORW
goods, fairest prices, fill our mam
elegant goods we're displaying see for
ncn materials, me rauitiess shapes andS
iuc ss.uicu wursmansaip. we oner a particularly goody
wis wecK, ana we wouia surrstt an S
TTlftfTOTlf HiropnAite ., tf Ifc-5
Mbf,uk vii.i.wokd oi, piu. 12 anu-
... T..!r.l ..r a. . ir.
and we'll save you money.
We've got a stock of Boys andi
you never saw before, and the beau-
ic tif thara'a r"IfV,: .J IS:
this ooDular deoartment of ours, for Tl
v.. - - . ' '3a
V a safe Place to uy your Boys'-
Clothing. ,s i
of Our Business
the approval of the 'people thart'Orrr'
more than the whoISfaTefltlSeahd
less than anv hatter in town can!
we are constantly on the alert to closet
fine hats as any fashionable hatter can1
we don't charge an extra dollar
for the privilege (?) of havin
fashionable maker's name therein-5
in ana we win snow you
we can save you money and
give you as good 'quality eoods
i - .
as anyDoay can. ,
THEIR KIND!
Departments.., li
the largest in the city, affording
or customers at once.
We have
both the Shoe and Fnmf:i
-
We have the grandest dis-1
in tne country, snowing every.
and grade, not alone in regu
also in all widths, and then.
too, the prices are not only lower than
in Eittsburg, but lower than in
in the United States. Re-
this: Every shape and comfort,
grace and beauty, every excellence
at our Store for onejoflihe beautifay
aay. Jt's not v only an elegaiKj
- - t
&
--
m
MARKET sH
,v
i-S
?- a
itH.
a.4'
k
12 J
.mz&
9
'
m
4S&?
rffiwt
r'
it'
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