OCR Interpretation


Lexington gazette. (Lexington, Va.) 1871-1962, May 15, 1912, Image 3

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024716/1912-05-15/ed-1/seq-3/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for 3

r
W. B. HARRISON W. B. HUTTON
Harrison & Hutton
(Successors to Koones A Harrison
We want to cal I your Attention to
our new and attractive line of Mat?
tings, Rugs and Druggets. Porch
Swings, Settees, Rockers and Porch
Shades. Window Shades in all sizes.
We have a new and complete line of
Furniture
of all description at special low
prices aud would be pleased to
show you.
Undertaking department contin?
ued under registered embalmer, at
lowest prices.
SAME STAND
Cor. Nelson and Jefferson Sts.
LEXINGTON, VA.
Store Phone. 22!>.
Night and Sunday
Phone, 229." and 77. Jan. 31 tf
BEST YET~
A look at my 1913 line of WALL
PAPER will convince you that tbis
line is complete, artistic in style,
magnificent in elTect and at remark?
ably LOW PRICES*
1 want you toseejthese without any
obligation on your part to purchase.
This line is full of beautiful
CUT OUT HOKl?i; KS,
PANKLS,
VAKN1SH T1L.ES,
UUKLAI'S, KTC.
for every room at the house.
Come aod look at them it will do
you gooii.
W. S. ZOMBRO
VAIN T BI' A N D DECORATOR
Phone S08
No. fi!? South Main Street
Jan. '.Cl-2
Varner, Pole & Co.
Furniture and Undertaking
Main Street, Lexington, Va.
The time has come you will want
to get the good of your oorch.
Wo have the furniture needful:
ROCKERS, CHAIRS,
SET IKES, SWINGS.
VUUAK SHADES, ETC.
Also for the Hall. Parlor. Dining
Room, Bed Room and Kitchen all of
which will prove satisfactory in
quality and price.
We can save you money if you are
going to buy a sewing machine.
I******""*"Registered Embalmer in charge
of our Undertaking Department
which is conducted in a manner
that will meet with approval.
J. F. MYERS
Builder and
Contractor
.PECIAL ATTENTION PAID TO
REPAIR WORK OF ALL KINDS
WAGON MAKING, CARRIAGE
SHOP AND ALL, KINDS OF RE?
PAIRS AT
A. W. JTVNSPILE'S Old Stand
NEXT TO HITCHING YARD
W. L. Henson is associated with
me.
Phone 208 Lexington,
Nov.22 tf Virginia
Leonard Cleanable
REFRIGERATOR
FOR SALE BY
R. S, Anderson Co.
NKI.SON HTHKKT
WANTED-MEN TO LEARN the
Barber Trade. Best, paying
work within rt?ach of poor men.
Wages from *12 io $20 weekly.
Course et un pl med in lew Keeks.
Tools given. Wages whilw learning.
Catalogue in.iili'ii frt-o. RICHMOND
BARBER COLLEGE, Richmond.
Va. may 8 12 4t
"fXTANTED -Good reliable cobbler.
Ri'_u'iir work. Apply to T. J.
HILDEBRAND, Lexington, Va.
Apr. 3 12
STRONG PLEA FOR PARKWAY
Loa Angeles Newspaper Condemns a
Proposed Plan aa Not In Inter?
data of Economy.
W. H. Humphreys of the Loa An?
geles board of public works has gone
on record as favoring narrower drive?
ways In strictly residential districts, J
and would lessen tbe street width and
widen the parkways of many now ex
latent. Thia from a purely economic
view of the matter, says the Examiner
of that city. Narrow streets cost leas
to build and lesa to maintain than
wide ones and when there are lo be^or
are paved auch Initial cost and up?
keep ia no email expense.
But there ls another side to the
question, the esthetic view of the
matter. How may we have beautiful
streets with but a narrow gr?r*en rib?
bon along each aide from 18 to 31
Inches wide? Buen a paucity of park?
way does not In the least influence the
appearance of the street. All that may
be said for lt la tbat street trees may
be planted therein, though they can?
not remain In vigorous health and
beauty except for their youthful yeara.
It may be possible for a tree to sur?
vive for many years under such hard
conditions, but what about them In
60 or 75 years, at the time when they
should be most impressive. Tbe
trunks will then have Ulled any or?
dinary parkway from curb to walk.
Shall we then cut them out or shalt
we cut a large half-circle out of the
cement sidewalk and also narrow the
driveway three or more feet ou each
alda by moving each curb toward the
mldd'e of the street? Would lt not bo
better to start right and have fine vig?
orous, healthy trees for all time and
rest assured of their enduring cen?
turies, to the continued beautification
of our city? When shall we correct
admittedly wrong conditions? Do lt
now.
MAKING A CITY BEAUTIFUL
Plenty of Treea Not the Only Eaten
tlal to Good Effects?Straight
Streets Wrong.
"When art will make our streets aa
beautiful as tbe woods and as elevat?
ing as the mountainsides, thrn lt will
be a pleasure and a rest, and not a
weight upon the spirit to come from
tho open country into the city." So
sang a great writer and a great ob?
server. Though this means, primarily,
tbe currying out of the writer's hobby
?fully planted atreeta?there ls much
more to be done before we have beau?
tiful streets
Straight streets in residence dis?
tricts, especially among the hills, are
largely wrong, though if many were
contour lines we might easily endure
a few straight ones. In folloavInK a
straight street we are Impressed with
its monotony except lt be well planted
and flanked with fine gardens. On
streets of series of graceful curves
the scene' ls ever-changing, aud we
view both street and gurdon scenery
from every possible angle, thereby get?
ting all variations obtainable. It al?
most constitutes a crime to cut can?
yons through hills, for lt will ever be
a source of regret to those of good
taste, clesr down to the end of time.
Nevertheless, we are progressing in
this respect, for many l:irge subdi?
visions of late have been laid out in
conformity to the contour of the hills.
This means, usually, that landscape
engineers, rather than civil cnglneera
only, are planning this new work.
Wider parkways are also prevailing,
still another assurance that tbe land
scape gardener and horticulturist Ib
not without influence, even in cold?
blooded business deals.
European Model Villages.
The plan of "garden cities" has been
taken up with great enthusiasm in
France and in many industrial centers
efforts have been made to follow tbe
English example of establishing model
villages for work people. A big coal
mining company mar Douat has laid
out a splendid garden village and now
ls rendering more beautiful tbe ap?
proaches to the mines, masking the
unsightly shafts and engine house*
with rose gr.rdens.
Women Travelers Expect Much.
But for an Interesting, discriminat?
ing and all-round exacting proposition
the lady patron ls doirMless the win?
ner. She must always have a parlor
floor room, with bath, fronting the
street; plenty of closet room. The
room must be large enough to accom?
modate a couple of box-cars she calls
trunks. She will use three times as
many towels as a man; keep the bell?
hops in perpetual moiton to answer h*er
calls, and make more rom-plalr.ts
about the temperature, of her room la
one day than a man would In a month.
?Hotel World.
Mexican Plague of Field Mice.
Manzaotllo reports that a plague of
mice han visited the fields In that sec?
tion of Colima and almost destroyed
the corn and rice crops. The rodents
have gnawed away at a rate that
alarmed the farmers and they have
appealed to the authorities for some
means to exterminate them. Whole
fields of corn have been moved down
and the farmers are at a loss how lo
check the advance of the mice to ?*.;*
rent further loss.
g7S* Unique Stor
P>3LAH$ FOR
HtfROMALCO.
*v*C CxamfiCN t*c*
".I uni a countryman? that's ali,"
is the way the grower of this re?
markable ear of corn. Mr. Fred C.
Palin, styles himself. Though be
i i admitted to be one of the leading
corn exports in the country- ont
whose services are greatlv in de?
mand as a judge of corn exhibits,
Mr. Palin asks for no greater bono;
or distinction than to be known as t>
plain Hoo.ier farmer.
The champion ear of corn was not
The World's Great
VARIETY?Pal in's Corn Flake \
the W. K. Kellogg 1*1,000 Trot
A HYBRID?The seventh year ur
PARENT PLANTS-;tIal87ltei,
/ Female?/
DIMENSIONS? Leogtn, 101 incbi
Number of rows, 20. Length
of kernels, about 3-8 of an incl
an inch. Arrangements, ver;
straight rows the entire lengi.
grain, holding their length wt
ing well covered with dente
Estimated proportions?corn 1
an accident. There can he no
greater lesson in the value of care?
ful study and painstaking selection
of seed and breeding than tbe ex?
periences of this same Palin.
Id the first nlace. Palin knows
corn. If there were no more proof
of this fact than the bc re story of
the development and discovery of
the champion ear, it would be
enough. H<?re is the s?ory:
"lt was iu November, 1910, and
we were just harvesting our crop.
We have a sort of corn show ai
my farm a!! the time, and there is
always an award for exceptionally
uood ears ot eorn?ears sufficient Iv
true to type lo permit of their heir.g
exhibited. There is a small hox on
every corn wagoa in which the
most perfect ears are thrown.
These, when properly selected,con?
stitute the seed corn, and among
these more perfect ears we occa?
sionally lind an ear that we are
willing to exhibit io a contest.
"On the duy tha champion ea.
was found. I wns at the house and
at dinner time one of the men
brought it in and laid it. with a
number of other ears, upon tht*
window sill in the well room for mc
to take and put away in the sued
house.
Fred C. Palin
" 'Well,' I said, 'do you think
you've got a good ear there?
" 'It looks to me like a good ear.'
be said. 'What do you think of it?'
"I picked it up and looked it over.
'Well,' 1 said finally. '1 think it is
the most perfect ear of corn I ever
saw. It's gt.od enough to win the
W. K. Kellogg fl,OOO trophy this
year at Omaha.'
"And I was confident the moment
I saw it, and looked it over, that 1
held the trophy winner in my haad.
So much so ttiat when I left for
Omaha to exhinit the ear, J took ii
out of my grip and showed it to the
station agent with the word*,
"That's the ear I'm going to win
the $1,000 trophy with.' "
But that'?* not ail of Patin's story
He tells it willingly,though modest?
ly, for he knows that bis story
w bene var told is a source of great
'?W*a*f*"*'*'*aMaaa'aa^
.TRE -QR^.*.? _
TH* A . ._. . ' .?*.*
encotirpgement ol the thousands of
farmers who never bad a better
chine* than he had himsolf. Palin
was horn and brought up on a farm
near Newtown, Ind. Fie hat never
owned a 'ex t of farm land in his life.
and the 3K0-acre farm on which the
champion car of corn which won the
Kellogg Tropoy was grown is a
rented farm.
Mr. I'alin's real uxonrience as a
funner Megan about tixMaa years
est Ear of Corn
"allow. (Named after winning
>by.)
?oduction.
d's Yellow Dent,
ilexander's Cold Standard.
?s. Circumference, 7' inches,
of kernels, | of an inch. Width
i. Thickness of kernels. Itt of
jr uniform, kernels running in
b of tiie ear without a misplaced
ill to the ends of the ear, tip be?
ti grains. Weight, 20 ounces.
?2 per cent; cob. H per cent.
alto. He had been un the road mm o
grocery specialty salesman, when
he took a notion thit he wouid rath?
er be an agriculturist, so he took a
few thor! courses at Purdue Uni
veraitf und rented a portion of the
farm he now occupies. Nine years
ugo be began carefully breeding
this new v. rietv of corn For two
vaaVrs bo planted two rows of Reid'*
Yellow Dent, then two of Alexan?
der's (auld Standard, detasseling
the Gold Standard. From the de
tasseled rows he picked for seed
only the ears carrying the charac?
teristics he wanted to reproduce.
planting these in breeding plots.
aud maintaining careful seiection.se
that in nine years' time he had de
veloped a well-settled type.
Thc*- Kellogg trophy was won in
1910 at Columbus. Ohio, by ll. A
James of Charleston, 111., with a
magnificent ear of Reid's Yellow
Dent, but not so perfect an ear as
that which originally won the tro?
phy and which has become known
as "the best ear of corn ever
grown."
/KKELLOGG^
.$1000.00 S
^TIONALCOKIN TROPHY]'
.MADE DY TIFFANY"* ?
T*vice Awarded. To be Com
peted for again at the next
'Som Show at COLUMUIA.S.C^
*3
5--as.
Thai aeXI a?v^i*i ul lb?a tropl ?
trill be made at the next Nationa
Cora F.xposiiion. which will be helc
; in February, 1913. at Columbia, S
; C. It is planned to make this expo
j si tion much broader in scope that
any held in the past, and conse
ci.iently a longer tune will be re
quired for preparation. Speoia
! tntiildings are being erected for thi
! exposition, the main building to bi
?let) hy 167 feet, ground measure
: meats. The abo**' will last ten days
??'?I
STRAIN & PATTON
Clothiers and Gents' Furnishers
LEXINGTON. VIRGINIA
HERE'S WISHING YOTJ
A Happy New Year
AND AS MANY OF THEM AS YCU CARE FOR
I
Here's telling you that you'll be happier in 1012
than ever il you buy your
j CLOTHES
And your other things to wear
FROH THI*. STORE
STRAIN & PATTON
LEXINGTON VIRGINIA
-___
Spring Millinery
NEW
Suits, Skirts, Dresses, Waists
NEW
OXFORDS and SLIPPERS
[IF IT IS NEW IT WILL BE FOUND AT
| WEINBERGS
DEPARTMENT STORES
My Lines of Shapes in All Colors
Now Complete
FLOWERS OF ALL KINDS. ALSO A NICE LINE OF
Trimmed Hats
Fancy Wcrk, Yarrs and Embroidery Cottons
Of All Descriptions
Mrs. B. M* HUTTON
LEXiS<.'lt>\* - - - - *'if:<;IN i \
Summer Furniture
REFRIGERATORS MATTINGS
Water Coolers Ort Cloth
Ice Cream Freezers Baby Carriages
Lawn Swings Anything for the Home
Susy Cash or easy terms
REAHS. JONES & QRAHAn
BUENA VISTA, VA.
^"pS^^^:-' Vwlien Yon Paint j
iWW^f^/ -* -SH*"" Use ?RE Paint and fc
MK V f^ ' I Use Pure LINSEED CIL to ati(i i
?< . . i li_?l_> lo it at one-half the cost of Paint.
PURE PAINT is made witb WHITE LEAD. ZINC and LIN?
SEED OIL? f bat's ibe way the L. & M. PAINT is made.
But ALL thc OIL needful to make the L. & M. PAINT
ready for use is NOT put into the Paint when it's pre?
pared for the Consumer who buys it.
The ADDITIONAL quantity of OIL is put into the Paint
by the CONSUMER, as by so doing he SAVES MONEY.
Therefore?buv 3 gallons ci LiNSEED OIL with every
4 gallons oi L. A M. PAINT
and MIX tbe OIL with Ve PAINT.
If the Paint thus made costs more then $1.70 per gallon?
If the Paint as you use it is not perfectly satistaetorj?
l^im return whSSSmerr sou how m ??!?????./ .*(? ttt**t*tsl*r nnd gm tunk ALI. \,,u
p.ml for thc IV eil it.Pl ut is ; utul mm***)*A, tU*SSSttSSS% >??" Imid 9* th,- Foitu.r.
I . ?.<. VIAN a MARTINI Z? >>_:?] .-.???. . ?.
:
McCRUiT DRUG C01TPANY

xml | txt