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Staunton spectator. (Staunton, Va.) 1849-1896, July 03, 1883, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024718/1883-07-03/ed-1/seq-1/

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Editor and Proprietor.
BATES OF SUBSCRIPTION.
The subscription prloe of the Brectatob 1»
OS.OO A. YEAR,
BTRICTLY IN ADVANCE.
OW When payments are »ot made strictly In
advance Three Dollars will be charged.
OW Any one sending us five new subscribers
and 810, will receive a copy of the paper for one
year, gratis.
PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY.
■|___ierly of the Faculty of the Baltimore Col
lege of Dental Surgery.)
Dental Offloe.
No. 15 N. Augusta sfreet.
. Staunton, Va.
SPECIALTY:— Correcting irregularities of
the natural teeth; restoring decayed parts of
the teeth with porcelain and gold; making ar
tificial teeth upon Gold Alloy Cast Plate*.
Gas Administered. marl*-u.
MADE F. WHITE. A. C. OOBDON.
WHITE * SOBDON,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
STAUNTON, VA.
Courts— Augusta aud adjoining counties.
Federal Court at Harrisonburg. Court ol Ap.
peals of Virginia, at Staunton. feb.l-tf
v_ S. M-LTUL "ZT7Z,
__.. ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
"-" STAUNTON, VA
Office in Stout Building, Court-house Alley
US. A. M. a h7__T. heskel,
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS,
Having entered Into co-partnership, tender
their prolesaional services to the public. Spe
cial attention given to Surgery and diseases of
the Eye and Ear.
They may be consulted at all hours at the
office heretolore occupied by A. M. Henkel,
M. D., No. 15, West Frederick Street. feblo
CA. BUHiKDSO.,
. ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.
Special attention given to the collection of
c laims, and prompt returns made.
Courts—Augusta and Rockingham.
Office—No. 2 Law Building. oot7
WM. A. HUDSON. WM. PATRICE.
Hl'B-OsV «fc PATRICK,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
STAUNTON, VA.,
Will practice in the Courts of Augusta and
adjoining counties. Special attention paid to
collections. febl2-tf
I. R. TUU ___<, H. BT. GEO. TUCKER,
Lexington, , a Staunton, Va.
TUCKER __ TUCKER,
ATTORNE. S-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.,
Will pre;!.. _. ...... ,_< irts of Augusta and the
adjoin! _ir<v_.__.'!iM. __so in the Court of Ap
peals of Virginia, and will attend regularly the
Circuit Courts of Rockbridge. au2_-tf
N. K. TROUT. W. E. CRAIG.
TROUT A- CRAIG,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.
We have entered Into Partnership as
Lawyers, occupying the old Offices of the Senior
member. The Junior member will aid in con
ducting the old business.
OW Particular attention given to collections.
Jels-tf
H. H. MATHEWS. AI.EX. F. MATHEWS.
MATHEWS -fc XATHEWS,
VITORXEYS-AT-LAW,
Lewisburg. West Va.,
practice reguU_-iy lv the Courts of Greenbrier,
Monroe, Pocahontas and Nicholas counties, W.
Va., the Court of Appeals, and the Federal
Courts for the District of W. Va.
attention paid to Collections
nd to special cases anywhere in their State,
may 17—ly
GEORGE SI. HARRISON,
ATTORNEY-AT-LA W,
Staunton, Va.,
will practice In all the Courts holden in Au
gusta county, and in the Circuit Courts of the
adjoining counties.
.SrStrict attention given to the collection of
Claims.
Office—No. 10 Lawyer's Row, Court-house
Alley. oc 31—tf
T-HOMAS I>. K._.V!M>X.
JL ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Staunton. Va.
•iters his professional services In the County
and Circuit Courts of Augusta, and in the Hus
tings Court and the Court of Appeals held in
Staunton. Will also prosecute claims else
where through legal correspondents In this and
other States. may 30—ly.
£*. RESTO.. A BAYLOR,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW",
And Solicitor in Chancery, Staunton, Va.,
practices in all the Courts of Augusta and ad
'oining counties.
Office—The same formerly occupied by his
lather, Col. Geo. Baylor, dec'd. on Augusta St.,
opposite the Court-house. no 21
WM. x. McAllister,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Warm Springs, Va.
courts—A'llegriany, Bath fend Highland, Va.,
uu Pocahontas, West Virginia.
.(__■-peciai attention given to collection ol
elainis and proceeds promptly accounted for.
dec 23—tf
DR. JAMES JOHNSTON,
DENTIST,
Main street, Staunton, Va.
•'.fice:—Over Turner <_ Harman's Grocery
tore. dec 21—tf
1. 0. ELDER. WM. J. NELSON.
H'LDEK * KELSO A',
i ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
and Real JSstale Agents,
may 5 Staunton, Va.
TA__.o_-I_._..
J__. HUXCMESO-.,
. .-_EI-.-Hs_._-T TAILOR,
109 E. Hum St., Stannton, Va.
I desire to call the attention of my friends
and the public to the fact that I have just re
ceived a most beautiful line of—
DRESS GOODS
FOR FALL AND WINTER WEAR.
1 am prepared to furnish Gentlemen's suits, of
the very best materials, made up in the latest
styles aud in the most workmanlike manner,
at low prices, and satisfaction guaranteed. I
also keep a lull line of Gents' _ urui-liiug
(lood_. aw Give me a call before making
your purchases. Respectfully,
octH-tf J. A. HUTCHESON.
T_> R. 6RAVES,
Fashionable Tailor,
No. 103 E. Main St., Up Stairs, opposite
the Staunton Opera House.
is prepared to give the same satisfaction In all
work as In former times.
Special Atteutlou Paid to Cutting.
Work done outside of shop. CuttiDg and re
pairing done in best manner and on short no
tice. OW TERMS CASH. Sa auZ7-tf
ATERCHANT TAILORIBTG
HE A D Q UAR TEES,
m:. __*. Meisr_%__i_;_4.__t_v,
No. 10 New St.,
STAUNTON. VA.
My Merchant Tailoring Establishment has
I ust been fitted up with a new and fine assort
ment of
Sllllilllf,,. Ileitis., CIIHMIIIIVI- .ft, Ac.
FOR FALL AND WINTER,
of the. latest styles and best manufacture.
«S~ Perfect fits guaranteed and orders prompt
ly executed.
Call and examine goods and prices. Jy2-tf
BARE * SPRINKLE,
FASHIONABLE TAILORS,
New St., next door to Mrß. Scherer's Millinery
Store, and 3 doors from Loeb's Corner,
Staunton, Virginia.
Ail work in our line executed with neatness
and dispatch. Special attention paid to eat
ing repairing and cleansing. aug s—tf
MARBLE WOJ-KS.
• —_> ♦
VALLEY HARRLE WORKS,
STAUNTON, VA.
To the People of Augusta and the Valley coun
ties :
Keep your money at Home Is to prosper,
Send it away is to become impoverished.
Everything is at very
/A low prices, and lan sell
- . *U ing Monuments, Head
?':i _■ A and Foot stones , a s low
'• . -s?V I *" 3r ce&a as any local or
' ' 1 tf n I __ traveling agent, or any
1 '-i'll All I 11 Marble dealer In the Unl
; _k_3fc=__ii*---If ted States. Don't believe
•j'-'-r.-£2- r^ —W anything to the contrary,
|_ — till you come and see.
.. __'.__£______■___-_' J. C. MARQUIS.
P, S.—l also call attention to my Catalogue
of Designs of the Wonderful White Bronze
Monuments and Head Stones. an27-tf
LIVEBT STABLES.
~ _. »
m XWER AICK._-.-I._IE..'J.
THE BEST LIVERY IN THE BTATE.
AMERICAN HOTEI.
P--I_________ Livery Stables.
■•:T. THORNHERG Proprietor.
Havingrefltted my stables and added a num
ber of fine horses and vehicles to my stock, I
••n prepared to accommodate the summer
travel in the most elegant and handsome style
at reasonable prlees.
OW Hunting, Fishing and Pleasure Parties
generally will be supplied with any kind o»
vehicle desired, at low prices.
I -respectfully invite my former customers
.nd the public generally to give me a call.
guaranteed.
mayl.-tf S. T. THO.H.BURG.
M_ Staunton, Va., Januajy 15,1883.
V brother, D. C. GRAHAM, will have an
Interest in my Grocery and Produce bus
iness, to date from Jan. Ist, and tbe firm name
Will be J. E. GRAHAM & BROTHF.B.
JanlS J. E. GRAHAM.
otatt!.t6tt g3M o_l.cctt.for.
VOL. 60.
CLOTHING.
T" ARGE LOT OF
SPRING AND SUMMER
AT
GREATLY 1111(1 PRICE.!
Having more stock than I wish to carry, I
will from this day offer my large stock of
SPRING AND SUMMER
CLOTHING
At Reduced Prices.
A good many will be sold for
COST AND X.ESB.
I have a
a m ihi of wm,
and will
GIVE BARGAINS!
to those who want
.MfKH!
CALL A.T ONCE.
OW -.O TROUBLE TO SHOW GOODS. -£*
All Clootli. Onarnmeed as Represented.
JNO. W_ ALBY,
jel2 Old Stand, No. 31 New Street.
mm ran
MTHII mil,
OPERA HOU .E BUILDI-iS,
STAUNTON, VA.
THE ill HI. STOKE
OIV M-A-IP- STREET.
JAMES A. ARMEI.TROUT,
with an experience of 20 years in the Clothing
Business, has the management of
OUR SEW ESTABLISHMENT,
and would be pleased to see his friends and cus
tomers before buyiDg
CLOTHING!
AND
Furnishing Goods
ELSEWHERE.
iw ibe/wit a _[?. «_>____» a*
WILT- HE -__>__.:___>
Thro-ig.licmt the Season.
WE MANUFACTURE
■ in aim
IN PHILADELPHIA,
which enables us to offer
Special VCrt dueemeixts.
OW GIVE ME A CALL,
AND DON'T FORGET THE PLACE.
JAMES A. ARMENTROET,
Jeo Manager for LOEB BROS.
ATTENTION!
GENTLEMEN! I
.—•—♦ —-—
*W T__.__.__l NOTICE that In con
sequence of the present partnership existing
between—
HILB & RUTHERFORD,
which will expire October Ist, we will sell our
present stock
AT COST,
STRICTLY CASH.
THE stock:
IN QUALITY, QUANTITY, AND MAKE-UP
CANNOT BE BEATEN.
All Goods In the house
Warranted Sound.
Wo Damaged Stock.
We will sell at this rate from this day utnil
September Ist next.
1 TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 1
OW Our friends may examine every stock of
Clothing in the City, and in looking over our
stock they will be convinced we have stated
nothing but facts. Call early, for your own
benefit.
HILB & BUTHEBFOBD,
Nos. 11 and 16 New Street,
angl STAUNTON, VA.
GROCEEEEsT&fo l~
* — 93 -.
OAHKETT Q. GOOCH. CHARLES _. HOOK
HENBY HUTCHINSON.
GOOCH, HOGE I CO.,
WHOLESALE GROCERS
AND
Commis-ioii Merchant-,
DEALERS IN
Flonr, Grain, Seeds, Tobacco __ Began*,
STAUNTON, VA.
We sell only to dealers, whom we respectfully
solicit to give us a trial order. Our prices we
promise to make compare favorably with Bal
timore and Richmond. sept!9-tf
J. A. HAMRICK. j. a. FAUVEB.
J a.. __i.A.M:__ie__. __-. co.,
. DEALERS IN
GROCERIES AND PRODUCE.
Make a of
Leather and Shoe Findings
Headquarters.for Harness 1-eatlier.
Highest Casta Price paid for
le_lfi.'__-]y SLAUGHTERED HIDES.
BARGAIN!
Any person wishing to secure a BARGAIN In
TWO GOOD SECOND-HAND
PLANING MACHINES,
can do so by calling on or addressing the un
dersigned. Will sell both, or separately, as
may be desired. For particulars address—
I.AMBEBT BROtt.,
Je26-2t P. O. Box 99. Waynesboro', Va.
DBUGS AND MEDICINES.
I-TTT 13A_3"5T TXSiWC.
DR. FAHRNEY'S
TEETHIf SYRUP.
IT has never failed to give the most perfect satis
faction. Thousands of mothers are using it all
through the land, and all are pleased with its charm
ing effects. It Maintains the Baby's Health by
Keeping it free from Colic and Diarrhoea. Do
not stupefy your Baby with Opium or Morphia Mix
tures, but use
»r_ Fatarney's Teething: Syrup,
which is always safe and reliable. It soothes and
quiets the Child, Relieves PAmandINFLAMMATioN
and gives Sweet, Natural Sleep to Babes and
Rest to Mothers. All Druggists and Medicine
Dealers Sell'it.
twenty-five' cents a bottle.
Prrpared By
_D_E_.- _D. ._e\_&-__X__a.3sT____Tr _Sa SO3.T
-HACERSTOWN, MD.
Apr 10 '83-ly
A Word to_our Readers.
WHEN you read of a medicine that will
cure all diseases, beware of it, for every
scientific physician on earth knows how falla
cious such statementsare. But wben you read
of a medicine compounded by a regular physi
cian and surgeon of high standing that claims
to cure only a certain disease, and furnishes
high proof that it does this, you can safely try
It, and with the assurance that it will cure you.
DR. V. R. _ TONE, late physician and surgeon
of the U. S. A., has placed beiore the public a
preparation called
APEPSIA.
Which no doubt is the greatest scientific prep,
aratlon yet discovered tor tbe cure of dyspep
sia in all its forms, and refers to thousands of
ladles and gentl e_ien of 'he highest respecta
bility tbat have been cured of cases pronounced
Incurable by tbe best physicians In tbe coun
try. Tbe following references should be suffi
cient to convince the most sceptical :—
Mr. Albert Howard, of tbe Howard Watch
and Clock Co., 11l Tremont street, Boston; Prof.
8. Kronberg, 13 Ncyes Place, Boston; Dr. Sam
uel W. Adams. P. O. Box 1613, New York city ;
Mr. H. A. Clark, firm Clark Bros. & Co., Phila
delphia, Pa., case of twenty years' standing;
Matthew Robinson, 203 North 21st Street, Phil
adelphia, case of dyspeptic ver ti.o; William
Gallogher, Kecord office, Philadelphia; Frank
C. Smink, business manager Heading Iron
Works. Reading, Pa.; Moses Thompson, Thur
low, Pa., P. <fe W. B.R. R.: Miss Kate S. Vil
lard, Seminole, c_ C.; Capt. Geo, M. Wey mouth.
Savannah Ga.; Clarence S. Connerat. Savan
nah, Ga. They furnish the best of references
from every State in the Union when required.
Write them at 219 Levant street, Philadelphia,
Pa. For sale by BERKELEY, ALLEN & CO.,
Druggists, Staunton, \ a. July 11 '82-ly*
Price 75 cents per bottle after Jan. 1,1883.
By Universal Accord,
Ayer's Cathartic Pills are the best
of .ill purgatives for family use. Tlu-y
are the product of long, laborious, and
successful chemical investigation, and
their extensive use, by physicians in
their practice, and by all civilized na
tions, proves them the best ..nd most
effectual purgative Pill that medical
science can devise. Being purely veg
etable no harm can arise from their
use, and being sugar-coated, they are
pleasant to take. In intrinsic vtilue
and curative powers no other Pills
can be compared with them; and every
person, knowing their virtues, -will
employ them, when needed. They
keep the system in perfect order, and
maintain in healthy action the whole
machinery of life. Mild, searching and
effectual, they are especially adapted
to the needs of the digestive apparatus,
derangements of which they prevent
and cure, if timely taken. They are
the best and safest physic to employ
for children and weakened constitu
tions, where a mild but effectual
cathartic is required.
For sale by all druggists.
feb27 '83-ly
THE BLATCHLEY
JL PUMP!
■ BUY TJjE_BEST.
IS BLATCHLEY'S
. /JB TRIPLE ENAMEL
~&tW& PORCELAIN-LINED
OB
SEAMLESS TUBE
Jal 11 : COPPER-LINED
WPUMP
"''"'SBfi&k I)o not be argued into
_«£__9 ____E__BS& buying inferior Gooda.
üBM --■Br* For sale by the beet
Bk* bouses in tiie Trade.
cTcTILATCHLEYsNIanuf'r,
308 MARKET ST., Philad'a.
Write to me for name of nearest Agent
aprlo-6m
BOOTS AND SHOES.
c. lTweller,
Ho. 1 Went Main St.,
STAUNTON, VA..
BOOTS, SHOES
Slippers, Sandals, Pumps,
HATS, CAPS,
UMBKELLAB, Etc?,
A. lull line of BROAD BOTTOM, FLAT HEE i
SHOES, for old Ladies and Gents.
BOYS'. MISSES', AND CHILDREN'S
SCHOOL SHOES,
aw a specialty of -ft*
REAL FIRST-CUSS SHOES.
Orders Solicited by Hail.
OW AU Goods warranted as represented.
aprl»
CHARLES C. WHEAT,
DEALER IN
Staple and Fancy Groceries,
Country Produce. &o„
No. 17 East Main Street, Staunton, Va.
1 won Id respectfully state to the citizens of
town and county that I have a nice selection
of STAPLE and FANCY GROCERIES which
lt will do well to see before purbhaslng.
OW My own I'Rij. II AOA-TKD COT FEE
a specialty.
• CALL AT THE RIGHT PLACE, where you
will always find me.
ORDERS Irom a distance promptly filled.
may2_-3m CHARLES C. WHEAT.
YWTWfI _T|P ci 'T 1 c are always on the look
ill 1» ■,°ut for chances to Increase their
■If I % aJearniu- . aud in lime become
mm IJm BTwealthy; those who do not im
■ B their opportunities re-
in poverty. We offer a
great chance to make money, we want many
men, women, boys and girls to work for us right
In their own localities. Auy one can do the
work properly from the first start. The busi
ness will pay more than ten times ordinary
wages. Expensive outfit furnished free. No
one who engages fails to make money rapidly.
You can devote your whole time to the work,
or only your spare moments. Full informa
tion and all that is needed sent free. Address
feb2o-ly Stinbon <_ Co., Portland, Maine.
STAUNTON, VA., TUESDAY, JULY 3, 1883.
DRUGS AND MEDICINES./
» _» »—— .
A KO__-_.Il HOT UNTITLE-* \VOM_UI.
pfrCHB tbe Boston GIoU.)
'•fi ___^oi_Ji_
1 <U\ sf
__-__.;•-., •...'..'-■,-.■;— *
Tl_e „:.-.-. .;_.•: -_j_ likeness of Mrs. Lydia E. Pink
ham, of ..y -... -_..-;., ■■ i.o above all other human beingi
i_u.y U. i
-t._so.i_. ■ . he* CO-TCSganflebts love to call her. Bi-9
L. zf_u.;■•-:.../ devoted to :»er work, -which is the outcome
of a Hf-MsrttttJy.. aud is obliged to keep six lady
assistant j, to _i--.p her n.iswerthe large correspondence
wuth i___"... ;M;i_. iiiuponl-er. each b__u U:g its speciai
burdea o_ mattering, or Joy at relea efi ..in it.. Her ,
Yefe'et&blc Compound is a medicine fo.- grood and not
evil purposes. I have personally i__»»_ -gated ft Mj
•___ satisfied of the truth of tills. _arik<
On account o £ it_-proven merits, it if
antlpi-osuribedby the best physicians in tbe country.
One curs: "It worl:s Hire a. charm a:..! -v.vcj :_iuch
yam. It will cure entirely ;__e worst f. r a ol falling
of the uterus, Leuccrrhcea, Irregular and painful
Menstruation, all Ovarian Troubles, Inflammation and
Ulceration, Hooding'", all Displacement!, anti the con
sequent spinal .vealcne-.;, and is especially adapted to
the Chancre of Life."
It permeates every portion §t the system, and gives
new life and vtgffl, It removes faintno._, flatulency,
dfiftroyß ail craving for stimulants, and relieves weak
nccs oi t'.-■ '• ■ -'.. It cures Bloating, Ileadaches
-.i-rvousl'-. , General Debility, Sk-cplossness,
Depression an.»i..-..;. -.. m. That feeling of bearing
down,causing pain, \.ci;;'.it and backache, ia always
permaiißntly euivd t>y ii.s use. It will at ail times, and
und _r a.l circumstance?, not in harmony with the law
that governs the female system.
It cost's titk\f SI. per loot: ie or six for $5., and is sold by
drage'st-. Ary a_lv*re 1. juiredrj. to tptn i_vl cases, and
th 3 nr.mes o!' mtuiy who jiavc been restored to perfect
health fey the use of tho Vegetable Compound, can be
obtaine.l Ly i-llr«._ji__£ __JH-P.. with st_-.f:pfor reply,
at :-.ur h 'W i:.Lynn, Ma a,
TcrX-.r'sti-. Aict-Wnt .f either sex thij compound is
v." 1 . i.: -is. '1 .< '■ r.liundant .estimonialsrfiow.
".j". ■:. P-.iT Pills," says one ■ _:riter, *'are
tkt '•■: l s. '■•'■' ic •'.':. i.rthe cure of Constipation,
>_i-. .ii-ii-..'-, uud To.-.u's-y of the live:-. Eer Biocd
L\.vU. "• trot. I wciidtra iv its specie! line and bids fair
:i ..-...a U_e -\_iipt-und i:_ its popularity.
''! r.tfut m ..'i -'! U- 7 " aJ " an Anffel of Mercy whose sole
.1:. , tn.n _; to dc-f_i)iUc others.
' J ijb I_is. A.M. D.
sepo '82-ly
Vital -ineslions I !
A> k the most eminent physician
Of «ny school, what is .he beet thing in the'
world for quieting and allaying all irritation
of the nerves and curing all forms of nervous
complaints, gjving natural, childlike refresh
ing sleep always ?
And they will tell you unhesitatingly
"Some form of Hops!"
CHAPTER I.
Ask any or all cf the most eminent physi
cians:—
"What is the best and only remedy that can
be reiied on to cure all diseases of the kidneys
and urinary organs; such as Bright's disease,
diabetes, retention or inability to retain urine,
and all the diseases and ailments "peculiar to
Women"--
"And *hey will tell you explicitly and em
phatically "B-chu."
Ask the same physicians
"What is the most reliable and surest cure for
all liver diseases or dyspepsia; constipation,
indigestion", biliousness, malarial fever, ague,
Ac" and they will tell you :—
"Mandrake! or Dandelion!"
Hence, when these remedies are combined
with others equally valuable
And compounded into Hop Bitters, such a
[Concluded next wtek.)
"THE CURS 2
a i fob I
J —RHEUMATISM— I
0 As it i 3 for all the painful diseaaea cf tie ■?
£ KIDNEYS,LIVER AND BOWELS. =
$ It cloansea tho systen of the acrid _. c-iscn
CQ that causes th© dreadiul BufTeringf -R.uch %
q only tho victims of rilac-omatistn can rea-iss. >
£ THOUSAND:. OF CASES j
£ cf tho worst forms of this terrible dircase •>
gj have been quickly relieved, and in short tine £
m PERFECTLY CURED. fi
O PRICE, $1. LiqtlD OH DHY, SOLD BY DEt.;.;:_.TS. -§
< ii- Dry can,be ac.it by wail. ■«£
*
E!!sBK9iWK---HapO>*'V
-_-B_ <B I__. i § A 1 *•.___* _s& J
septa '82-ly
Health is WeaithT
Db E. C Vi'icst's Kebts and Braix Trkat-
UENT, _» Runraijt-'ed flp-.-ciiio for Hysteria, Dizzi
r»f--;.;, Convulsion.., Fits, Nervous Neuralgia,
Headache, Nervoufl Prostration caused by the use
of alcohol or tobacco, Wakefulness, Mental I>e
pre_r.-jon, Bof.eT.___n of the Brain resulting in in
sanity and l-'p(!!n._r to mi .cry, decay Bad death
rren.nl._re Old A_re, liarrcnnesß, Loss of power
in either sex. Involuntary Losses Bud Hiwmat
orrhrea caused by over-exertion of thebrahi. se'f
abuse or over-indulgence. Each box contains
on« month's treatment. $1.00 a box, or six. boxea
fur $5.00, sent by mail prepaid on receipt of price.
WJK <3_B ARASTEi. SIX HO ,_.;B
To cure any case. With each order received brus
for six boxes, accompanied with $5.00. we \\iii
»«nd the purchaser our written guarantee to re
fund the money if the treatment does not eiiect
b cure. Guarantees issued only by
UO__>__._s__f_.J BROTHERS. l>mffffis_t_.
__.i olx _-_sr>:_ c_, "XTe..
decl2'B2-ly 2qr paid'
WINES. LIQUORS, &c.
•yiill; BERGNER A- ____«__ BREWING
CO., PIIII_AI.F.fsPHI.t, PA.
STAUNTON _>EPOT,
ROBERT HILL, Jr., Manager.
Having completed our lee-honse here, we are
now prepared to turn ish our celebrated
Premium Lager Beer,
In any quantity, not, at the Lowest Price, but
at a price that will enable and justify usto
make a
PUItE ARTICLE.
We do not claim to compete with any one in
price, but for purity and excellence of quality,
we are unsurpassed.
OW All orders sent, to our Depot, SiaunloD,
Va., will be promptly filled.
BOTTLING BEEII-A Specialty.
Jnne2« -_.ly.
____A.IVI> S OF
Augusta County Whiskies.
ALSO IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC
LIQUORS
of all kinds.
»a_ At WHOLESALE and RETAIL.
BXJRICE- «fc BRA.I>I_,I_Y,
masonic Building,
octl2'Bo-tf Staunton. Va.
cheaply and successTutly
should write us for our pamphlet on pure
fertilizers. -ST-A good fertilizer can be made
at homefor about Sl2 a ton by composting
with POWELL'S PR .PAiIED CHEMICALS.
Referancssin Every Stale. ##*_gents wanted
SSSSSSSSSSS— s Ills— SSSSSSSIII ■SI I I __.-■ ■!_!_ — SIISSSSSS. I IS. 1.1
forunoccupiedterritory. A r t . ply with references.
BRO.V_^C_'E^iCAL_CO.
Hant'fact -,;•-<> of
Powell's Tip-Top iione Fertilizer,
fione, Potaah.A wmoafa, &c.
-__J_,!iT-_l_'_ E r.'-L T IMORE, MP.
Je26-3m*
•M n^ft A week made at home by the indus-
II" 111 llrlons. Best business now before the
m Capital not needed. We will
JL I #start you. Men. women, boys and
jjl I gig iris wanted everywhere to work for
Now is the time. You can work
in spare time, or give your whole time to the
business. No other business will pay you near
ly as well. No one can fall to make enormous
pay. by engaging at once. Costly outfit and
terms free. Money made fast, easily, and hon
orably. Address True & Co., Augusta, Maine.
febl_-ly
w
T?OEX R, Y.
"MARSE ROBERT IN ASLEEP."
BY MISS S. B. VALBSTINE.
[A Gray Coat relates to Ulb irleml, a Blue
Cont, the following Incident ol the war: Gen
eral Lee, sorely fatigue- by a hard day's march,
sat down to rest by the roadside, when he soon
fell intoadeep sleep. His soldiers,who observed
him as lie slept, whispered warnings to their
nearsj.t, comrades not to disturb him. The
whisper was then passed from man to man
along the line of march.— .Southern Historical
Papers
Had you heard the distant tramping
On that glowins Summer day!
Had you s .en our comrades running
To meet us ou the way!
Oh! the wondrous, sudden silence,
Tn' unmilitary creep,
as down the line that cautl in ran,
"Marse Bobert is Asleep I"
|Jlv« me your hand, t oat,
_ Let's i«ilk of this awhil..
"For the prettiest march of all the war
. Was tbls of rank aud file!—
Was the passing of tbat army
When 'twas hard, I ween, to keep
Tnose men from crying out, "Hurrah!
Marse Robert Is asleep!"
i'bere lay that knightly figure,
Oue hand upon his sword,
The other p.essed above his heart,
A vow without a word !
Tbe laurel leaves had flutter'd down.
For flowers their vigils keep,
And crowned him, though I think they luiew
'Marse Robert was asleep!"
In glorious Old Westminster,
No monument of war,
No marble story, half so grand
As this, our army Baw !
Our leafy Old Westminster-
Virginia's woods—now keep
Immortal that low whisper,
"Marse RobeAls asleep!"
As we clasp our hands. Old Blue Coat,
.List, brother of the North,
Had Foreign foe assail'd your homes
You then had known his worth !
Unbroken vigil o'er those homes
It had been his to keep;
Step lightly o'er the border then,
"Marse Robert is asleep!"
He's yours and mine, is Robert Lee,
He's yours and mine, Hurrah !
These tears you shed have seal'd the past,
And clo?ed the wounds of war !
Thus, clasping hands, Old Blue Coat,
We'll swear by th* tears you weep,
The sounds of war shall be muffled—
"Marse Robert is asleep!"
Richmond, Va , May, 18_0.
A Bird.-Eye View or Staunton. Vs.
A PEW BRIEF ITEMS TICKED UP HERE
AND THERE OF ITS FAMOUS CITIZENS.
[Written for the Spectator by a Strangei.]
lam a cosmopolitan. lam at home any
where. I live everywhere—in hotels, on
the cars, on the streets, and I live iv Mur
freesboro, Term. Selah.
I arrived at Staunton iv the night. As
the train pulled up through the Blue Ridge
a sceue of illimitable beauty presented it
self. The white moonlight lay in solemn,
shadowy grandeur over the everlasting
mountains that have lifted their peaks to
ward the sky since all time began. The
Shenandoah Valley! What a host of mem
ories come thronging back/with the namel
But t'_e mountains that are outlined against
the blue Virginia sky looked down on a dif
ferent scene twenty years ago. Then they
saw a handful of patriots fighting against
great odds for freedom, and bravely, to the
"bitter end." Ask the sun and the moou
and the stars to tell you what they saw
years later. Dusky hands clutched at the
throat of Virginia and tried to strangle
her. Again she fought a hard battle and
came out the conqueror. Can the past ever
be forgotten ?
"Are they cone? My pulses beat.
What was it? A lying trick of the bran, ?
Yet I thought I saw them stand,
A shadow then at my feet,
High over the shadowy land."
If I could I would build a monument
that would reach to the moon and stars,
as high as all heaven itself to the Confed
erate Dead everywhere, and honor the liv
ing, too ! So you see lam a Rebel as well,
to the "manor born," and nnreconstructetl,
too! I had the pleasure of writing up
Montgomery, Ala,, in 1880. Temporarily,
from the Clerk of the Supreme Court, I
had in my possession the Bible upon which
Mr. Davis swore the oath of allegiance as
President of the Confederate States of
America. This Bible contains the follow
ing inscription: "The oath of office as first
President of the Provisional Government
of the Confederate States of America was
administered to Jefferson Davis upon this
Bible by Howell Cobb, President of the
Provisional Congress, at the front Portico
of the Capitol at Montgomery on the 18th
day of February, A. D. 1861."
The heroes and statesmen who made tbe
history of that day are passing rapidly
away; but it is a pleasure to know that
the old leaders of the Confederacy bave
prospered in their various callings in life.
Judah P. Benjamin is regarded as one of
the shredest lawyers in the Kingdom, prac
ticing at tbe Royal Bar of England, with
an immense revenue from his profession.
Alex. Stephens died as Governor of Geor
gia. Ben. Hill died with the Georgians
kneeling around him with their hearts full
of sympathy. Basil Duke, Morgan's right
hand man, has achieved great distinction in
law at Louisville. Gen. John C. Brown,
of Tennessee, manages the Gould syndi
cate, with headquarters at St. Louis, with
a salary of $25,000 a year. Gen. Echols,
of your own city, forever famous in history
with the army of Northern Virginia, is
Vice President and General Manager of
the Southwestern Extension of tbe Chesa
peake and Ohio-Railway. God bless the
Confederates everywhere!
But we might write on forever, and yet
the half could not be told.
Having a reverential love for Virginia, it
is quite natural that we should like Staun
ton, where we have sojourned pleasantly
for a day or two. Seen in the strong, bril
liant morning light, a high-colored, hetero
geneous mass of architecture presents it
self, for Staunton is quite an old town, laid
off, I believe, in 1748, and in 1871 a new
charter was granted as the "City of Staun
ton." It is quite useless to go over the
beaten ground of "writing up" a town, as
that has already been done by one of your
noted citizens, whom I regret not to have
met —Maj. Hotchkiss, in a handsome pam
phlet of Staunton, The people interest me
more than a location of a city or its com
mercial advantages. Abroad, Staunton is
quite celebrated as an educational point—
about four hundred young ladies from a
distance being in yearly attendance on the
several Seminaries of this city.
\ftsiting that abode of human misery,
the Western Lunatic Asylum of Virginia—
established in 1828, with a present capacity
of six hundred patients—l found the
grounds to be very lovely and the whole
building admirably arranged and exquis
itely clean. I have gone through a good
many asylums in the last three years, and
if I go crazy myself, I .will know all the
best places and where to be sent.
The Deaf and Dumb Institution is beau
tifully located and the spacious grounds
attractively laid out. The climate of Staun
ton is delightful, especially at night, the
altitude being somewhat over thirteen hun
dred feet above the level of the sea. The
population of Staunton is estimated in the
neighborhood of ten thousand; the popu
lation of Augusta county, of which Staun
ton is the county-seat, is about thirty .five
thousand; voting population some five
thousand.
The assessed value of real estate for the
city is $1,827,000; personal property, $961,-
000. There is a general air of thrift and
progress that gives S tannton quite a city
air; a groat deal of noise on the streets;
busy people, hurrying to and fro; people
walking very fast; a great many trains
rushing through, being directly on the line
of the Chesapeake and Ohio Railway, which
does an immense business throughout the
entire year. There is a splendid road-bed
from here to Richmond and they make ex
cellent' time. The officials at the Chesa
peake and Ohio offices in Richmond are
exceedingly courteous an 4 polite; and
through the columns of this paper, the
writer takes this opportunity to return
thanks to Mr. C. TV. Smith, the prince of
railroad officials, for "courtesies" extended
from Richmond to Lexington, Ky.
THE BAR OF STAUNTON.
It is the professional pien everywhere
that give tono to society. Take away from
England her orators, poets, aud states
men—let her commerce remain—and she
would be shorn of half her glory. To
whom are you indebted for the formation
of your minds, your tastes—the great de
sir? to be up and doing? It is the writers
of books, the contributors to magazines, to
newspapers, tto/_e_rcher after new discov
eries in medi<rifi#_.nd scieuce. These are
the peopie to w>ho_i you are indebted for
the formation of your minds and desires
for "much learning.''
There is a class of men whom the masses
of people affect to believe are hired to lie
and cheat and steal, yet it is a class that
the people are afraid of, though they
concede them to be the smartest people af
ter all—the lawyers. Now, I say, and
mean what I say, that I would take a law
yer's word for any thing sooner than I
would any one else. I really think that
lawyers, as a rule, are the most honest peo
ple that live. Again: they are the most
unselfish people that live, and the most
generous ou all occasions; and if I had to
build a church, or bury a pauper, or found
an institution of any kind, I would call on
them in preference to any one else—sure
always of sympathy and aid. They are
bound to be the smartest men everywhere.
It is the price of their position. A doctor
buries his mistakes and secrets in the
ground. A lawyer stands up before the
world, and if he makes • a mistake, there
are fifty others standing by ready to tell
him of it, equally as smart as he. They
arc not like the self-righteous Pharisee on
the street-corners, but their familiar inter
course with wickedness and crime in its
every phase incline them to be generous,
and io look kindly on other people's faults.
There is something in the cool, calm, col
lected demeanor of the lawyer that quite
sets him apart, and a professional etiquette
among them that he preserves inviolate.
Lawyers do not traduce each other.
During my short stay in this charming
old city, J had the pleasure of meeting one
of her most distinguished citizons, the—
HON. ALEX. H. H. STUART.
Augusta county bas the honor of having
been the birthplace of Mr. Stuart. He
belongs to the old race of Virginia gentle
men, when the name meant more than it
does now; for a new regime has usurped
the place of the old one, and they have
been merged into a race of money-getters,
and the new race hss less time for the
cultivation of the graceful courtesies of life.
Mr. Stuart is the only surviving member
of Mr. Fillmore's Cabinet, and is, at the
age of seventy-six, in the full vigor and
preservation of his intellect. For fifty-five
years he has been identified with the people
of this and the adjoining counties iv tbe
practice of law. His father before him was
Judge of the Circuit Court for thirty years,
with whom he read law and was admitted
to the Bar in 1828.
_ilr. Stuart was Secretary of the Interior
under Mr. Fillm .re's administrattou bom
1850 to 1853. He is thi- most prominent
member of the Staunton Bar, and an own
cousin to the father of Gen. J. E. B. Stuart.
Mr. Stuart is Presideut of the Valley Mu
tual Life Association, formed here four
years ago. The insurance of this Associa
tion amounts to over twelve million dollars.
They occupy a beautiful new building on
Main street.
The Court-house of Stauuton stands in a
beautifully shaded grove or square, and
was built away back yonder in the year
. The walls are thick aud the rooms
are delightfully cool and pleasant—the
front shaded from the glare of the sun. In
the course of my rambles around Staun
ton, I met—
MR. WILLIAM A. BURNETT,
Clerk of the County Court, who has spent
a large portion of his life in the service of
the county. His popularity is well estab
lished, he having been in the County Court
Clerk's office as Deputy aud Clerk since
1554. I suppose if he had done anything
wrong in that time somebody would have
found it out, and as h,e still keeps his place,
it is presumable he has not.
Tho City Clerk,—
MR. NEWTON ARGENBRIGHT,
we found comfortably domiciled in a pleas
ant office on the first floor of the Opera
House, where he sits and writes, writes all
day long, until the sun goes down, all the
days in the week except Sunday, (and he
writes a beautiful band, too,) and may l>e
he writes on Sunday, but hardly, I think.
From him we learned that the finances were
never in a more prosperous condition—the
interest on the bonded debt having at all
times been promptly paid and the market
value of the bonds steadily increasing,
while "all hands" have entered into a mu
tual admiration of the general prosperity
of Staunton. It was a real pleasure to talk
to Mr. Argenbright.
There is not a more popular man at the
Staunton Bar than—
CAI*T. ALEX. H. FULTZ.
His many friends speak in warm praise
of his talents as a lawyer, his high charac
ter and many attractive personal traits..
Capt. Fultz is a native of Bath county, Va.:
was edncated at the Washington and Lee
and the University of Virginia. He began
the practice here in 1870. As a lawyer, he
stanfis in the front rank. As a whole
souled, kind-hearted, gracious Virginia
gentleman, there are none better. He be
longed to the celebrated Staunton Artillery
with the army of Northern Virginia: was
in Jackson's Corps when he was wounded
at ( hancelloi-sville.
I MS E TO EXPLAIN.
I lived for four years in Atlanta, Ga.,
which city, for progress and enterprise, has
no equal anywhere, and it was down there
that I first ever thought of "writing up"
cities and towns, and the "dear five hun
dred" people. My various wanderings have
led me into many oities and among many
charming people, for it is only those who
wear the "purple and tine linen that I
care to know, and if there is any bad about
people I never want to know it. lam only
seeking tho ''colettr de rose." __y recol
lections of the Staunton people will always
be pleasant, and none more agreeable than
the short acquaintance I made with a prom
inent member ot the Bar here, —
MAJ. T. D. HANSON.
He struck the writer as being an exceed
ingly polished and elegaat gentleman, with
something of the grand air of the old Vir
ginian about him. State pride is a good
thing. It fosters a race of great men,
scholars, and statesmen, and to deify one's
dead heroes and statesmen incites the living
to emulate their virtues. And for this rea
son alone I have always admired Virginia.
The Virginians and the South Carlinians
(my acquaintance with the two extends
only through the cities) have the most dis
tinguished manners and are the politest
people in the world. The mind that can
individualize itself in a professien in which
learned men are so numerous must have a
deep intellectual root. Maj. Ranson's
many friends declare that no lawyer at the
Bar here has a better reputation than Maj.
Ranson. The most unquestionable talents
have won for him the high position he oc
cupies. •
JUDGE J. M. QUABLES
Resigned his position as Judge of Augusta
County Court, a little over two weeks ago,
NO. 42.
wliicli position he occupied for two and a
half years. Hj s duties there interfered so
much with his practice as an Attorney that
he gave it up and returned to Law. (Wo
have in Clarksville, Tennessee, a Judge ,T.
M. Quar.es and Gen. Quarles an ex-Con
federate, who are Virginians, and distin
guished, too, hi our section.)
Judge Quarles of this place is a native of
Caroline county, and educated at the Uni
varsity of Virginia ; was admitted to the
"Elect' in the Fall of '74, and elected Judge
of the County Court, Dec. 1879, which of
fice he filled to the entire satisfaction of the
people, who regret to give him up. He is
so quiet in his manner and so gentlemanly,
too, that one could hardly resist liking him
personally.
The brightest, smartest, and one of the
best educated young gentleman at the
Staunton Bar, is the elegant
CITY ATTORNEY, EDWARD ECHOLS,
a young gentleman with acute perceptive
powers—a quick aud fluent tongue, and a
ready adaptability to the exigencies of tke
occasion. Mr. Echols graduated at the
University of ."irginia in 187;\ and was ad
m i 11ed. t_> the Bar in 1874. For three- years
he has+een tho YtTorney for the Common
weal, fc. afdVity Attorney. The son of so
distinguished a gentleman as (.en. Echols
could hardly fail to succsed in anything he
undertook and the writer wishes him all the
good fortune that could come to anyone.
CAPT. Q. M. COCHRAN
is one of the most eminent lawyers iv the
State of Virginia. He has practiced law
for twenty some odd years, and has won
considerable distinction in the law. Capt.
Cochran is a graduate of the University of
Va. His reputation in the Court of Ap
peals is second to none in the country.
Success is an infallible test of aman's char
acter. Keen, shrewd, practical, his subtle
elucidation of principles, and analysis of
authorities prove his to be a mind eminent
ly analytical iv its tendency. Capt. Coch
ran is brother-in-law of Y. Howe Peyton of
Texas—lawyer, poet, aud orator—and be
longs to a family noted for its wealth and
social distinction.
DR. S. H. HENKEL.
One of the most successful Dentists and el
egant gentleman that it has been my good
fortune to meet in Staunton, is the above
gentleman, who has practiced dentistry for
fourteen years. Dr. Henkel received his
Dental education at the Baltimore Dental
College—graduated in 18G7. In the pres
ent family there arc seven physicians. His
ancestor away back yonder was a Court
preacher of a German Province, who came
to Philadelphia as one of the first of the
Lutheran ministers. Dr. Henkel's native
place is New Market in the Shenandoah
Valley. Dr. Henkel has in his handsome
office quite a collection of curiosities—a
cabinet of minerals, stuffed birds, __. He
is something of a genius himself, having
some excellent specimens of modeling in
clay. Dr. Henkel was a courier for Ashby
during the -tar.
Staunton, I believe, has four or five Den
tists.
DR. E. F. WAYMAN
was especially interesting to me on account
of his having belonged to Mosby's celebra
ted cavalry. It used to send a thrill through
me to read of the "border frays" and raids
and romances of Mosby's men—whom John
Esten Cooke has forever made famous. I
was introduced to Gen. Mosby at Richmond
several years ago. I think I looked at him
with more curiosity than any one I ever
saw. He had a keen, resolute blue eye,
and I could well believe him capable of do
ing the "blue bonnets from over the bor
der" all the harm attributed to him.
Dr. Waymau is a native of Culpeper—
was educated at Philadelphia—graduated
both in iiifcuic'ii« __.d Dentisty. The cV_
cellencc of his work has won for ______ fa
splendid reputation. At the same time his
location is both popular aud accessible.
THE VIRGINIA HOTEL.
If there is one thing that the way-faring
traveler feels devoutly grateful to tho god's
for, it is for the comfort of stopping at a de
cent Hotel.
My stay in Staunton has been exceeding
ly pleasant for several reasons—one of
which is that I have been domiciled in the
Virginia Hotel, with the prince of Hotel
men for a landlord, Mr. Crowle, and a
smiling, handsome clerk, Mr. Feller, to
"make things pleasant" for you. The Vir
ginia House, easily accessible from the De
pot, was built nearly forty years ago. The
walls are very thick, and the rooms de
lightfully cool and comfortable. Elegant
moss mattresses and exquisitely clean beds
add greatly to the traveler's comfort. The
Hotel has a capacity of a trifle over two
hundred guests, and is well patronized.—
During the last week two hundred and
seventy-six guests have been registered.—
Scrupulously clean napkins and table cloths,
and every variety of food is palatably
coi iked aud elegautly served.
Mr. Crowle has had charge of the Virgin
ia Hotel for eleven years and has become a
U'ted Hotel keeper. For his elegant cour
tesies to myself, and also to Mr. Mauzy,
the clever editor of the Spectator, I am
"yours, devotedly,"
Mus. L. D. Whitson.
Virtjinitt Hotel, Juue, 188:1.
Invasion of 111. Holy Laud.
The Latest proposition is to build a mar
itime canal through Palestine, and an En
glish company, with the Duke of Marlbo
rough at its head, has been formed for the
purpose of making investigations and pre
liminary surveys. So far as at present pro
posed, the work will include, in the first
instance, a canal twenty-five miles in length,
from Haifa, in the Bay of Acre, through
the plain of Asdracion to the valley of the
river Jordan. The depth of the proposed
canal is to be forty feet and its width two
hundred feet. This will bring the Mediter
ranean into the heart of Palestine, and go
far towards making a seaport of Jerusalem.
It is further proposed to construct a canal
twenty-five miles in length from the head
of the Gulf of Akabo.ih to tho Dead Sea,
and thus unite the waters of the latter with
the Red Sea. If these things were suc
cessfully performed it is expected that an
inland sea about 300 miles long, varying in
width from three to ten miles, and deep
enough to float vessels of largest size, would
extend from the Mediterranean to the Red
Sea. There are some matters besides
engineering difficulties which may hin
der the execution of this project. The
consent of the Porte is indispensable, and
certain European powers would undoubt
edly oppose the granting of a firman con
ferring upon England the exclusive right of
way by water through Palestine. The holy
land also has sacred associations for Chris
tians throughout the world, and a wide
spread sentiment among all churches and
sects would doubtless be raised in opposi
tion to the innovation. Speaking of this
particular subject, the London Times says :
"It is possible that the new enterprise may
be proved to the satisfaction of many de
vout men and women to be the effect that
there is to be a broad sea in the desert, and
that 'the fishers shall stand upon it from
En-dedi even unto En-eglaim.'"— London
Railway News.
.—. . ..
If you are a frequenter or a resident of a
miasmatic district, barricade your system
against the scourge of all new countries—
ague, bilious and intermittent fevers—by
the use of Hop Bitters.
Luddikgton, Mich., Feb. 2, 1880.
I have sold Hop Bitters for four years
and there is no medicine that surpasses
them for bilious attacks, kidney complaints,
and many diseases incident to this malarial
climate. H. T. ALEXANDER.
. -m —.
A philosopher informs us that a bonnet
is no longer a bonnet when it becomes a
pretty woman. And the inference is that a
woman is no longer a woman when she
becomes a "poke."'
. _■ »
"It is the little bits ov things that fret
and worry us," says Josh Billings; "we
kan dodge an elephant, but wekan'tafly."
SATES OF Al> V-__TISI-M..
ADVEBTisrorESTS will be inserted at the rat*
of 81.00 per square of eightliresor less, forth*
first insertion, and 50 cents for each subsequent
Insertion.
OW A liberal discount will be made on ad
vertisements published lor 3, 6, or 12 months.
aw Special Notices will be Inserted at
double the advertising rates.
OW Obituaries, Announcements of Candi
dates for office, and all communications of a
personal or private character, will be charged
for as advertisements.
Address—"Stannlon . poctitor," SUnatOl, Ta,
For the s pectatob.
A Letter from Illinois.
Eureka, 111., June 20th, 1883.
Dear Editor:—
As it hag been some time since you heard
from me, I may state something of interest
to your readers. I have been living in Hli
nois for nine years and am now a full
fledged "sucker." Eureka, the Greek-label
ed city of my residence, is situated in "Wood
ford county, a* the intersection of the Wa
bash, St. Louis & Pacific, and the Chicago,
Pekin <_ South-western Bailroads. It is
within from twenty to twenty-live miles
from Peoria, Pekin, and Hloomington, and
is therefore the center of a population ot one
hundred thousand. The town is moat
beautifully located and is one of the health
iest and most moral of the state. It now
has a population of two thousand, and is
destined to be the town of Wocdford county.
Woodford county is always Democratic from
three to six hundred, though at the last elec
tion a "Maho neish" action on the part of
some of the party resulted in the election
of two "half-breeds."' The nomination of
solid Democrats is almost equivalent to their
election and of course that state of affairs is
satisfactory ao me, and we.nre hopeful $hat
the i>olitieal character of the State can be im
proved upon, and wo bave good reasons for
expecting it, also a general United-States
"house-cleaning," since the clearing of the
Star-route robbers.
There is now being made a determined
effort by our citizens, to secure the county
seat of this county. The election will take
place this fall and we have every assurance
that we will be successful. Our town is
nearer the center of the county than is Met
amora, the present capitol of tbe county,
and is far more accessible. Metamora is
on one side of the county, has but one rail
road and that a branch road, and is a small
er and less important town. The present
county buildings are inadequate, and as we
must have new ones, the feeling is almost
general that they should be located at this
place.
Iv this city is located the Eureka College
and School of Music. They are conjonc
tively operated and are popular institutions.
The college has an average attendance of
about two hundred and fifty students. The
commencement exercises were held here
last week and the town was crowded with
relatives and friends of the participants.
There are nine members of the faculty, not
including the assistant professors. The
School of Music is under the direction of
Professor Metcalf, a graduate of Leipsic,
and one of the finest musicians in this
country. Professor Blitz, the instructor on
the violin, is also a fine performer, and has
a violin that cost him $800. The latter has
gone to visit relatives in Europe, but will be
present at the commencement of the next
term, about the first of next Seinptember.
Just North of our town is located the
Normal District Camp-meeting grounds.
This is one of the finest parks in the state.
There is now in progress of erection on
their grounds a large hotel, and a taberna
cle will be built for services. Many other
costly and permanent improvements will
be made. The grounds embrace about
thirty-three acres, and last year on one day
there were ten thousand people there. Har
rison, the "boy preacher,'' has been engag
ed to conduct the meetings this summer,
which will commeuco about the first week
in August.
The natural advantages of this town are
abundant, a never-failing spring furnishing
water for all animals, being conducted by
pipes to troughs. The public park located
iv the center of the town is on the summit
of a hill around which the principal busi
ness houses are located. There, we think,
wo will locate the court-house.
Business here at present is rather quiet,
the farmers all being busy at present. They
have been delayed considerably of late by
excessive rains, but indications are that
they will have good crops this season. I
am still in the boot- and shoe-business and
am doing a good business, as the time I
have remained here will indicate. I have
come to consider this home, and although
Virginia is a great old State, still I think
Illinois will "go it one better." To all
my old friends I send my kiudest regards
and would be pleased to see any of them if
they should ever be in this vicinity, espec
ially the Stout young Blackstone wrestler
of Staunton. With wishes that the Spec
tator will continue to flourish and con
tinue in the commendable course of the
past, I am, respectfully, yours,
*W. H. Fisher.
Make Home Attractive.
It is practicable to make home so delight
ful that children shall have no disposition
to wander from it or prefer any other place;
it is possible to make it so attractively that
it shall not only firmly hold its own loved
oues, but shall draw others into its cheerful
cirsle. Let the house, all day long, be tho
scene of pleasant looks, pleasant words,
kind and affectionate acts; let tho table ba
the happy meeting place of a merry group,
and not a dull board where a silent, if not
a sullen, company of .animals come to feed ;
let the meal be the time when a cheerful
laugh is heard and good things are said ;
let the sitting room, at evening, be the
placo whore a smiling company settle them
selves to books or games, till the round of
good-night kisses is in order ; let there bo
some music in tho household—music not
kopt like silk and satin to show company,
but music in which father and sister and
brother join; let young companions be
welcomed and made for the time part of
the group, so that daughters shall not deem
it necessary to seek the obscurity of back
parlors with intimate friends, or to drivo
father and mother to distant apartments.
In a word, let the home be surrounded by
an air of cosy and cheerful good-will; then
children need not be exhorted to love it—
you will not be able to tempt them away
from it.— William Aikman, D. D.
*** "A fair outside is but a poor substi
tute for inward worth." Good health in
wardly, of the bowels, liver, and kidney >
is sure to secure a fair outside, the glow of
health on the cheek, and vigor in the frame.
For this, use Kidney-Wort and nothing else.
SS—.» s*
Arrow-root is recommended as the thick
ening for custards and sauces of all kinds,
both for puddings and for meat. It is pre
ferred to corn starch by many, on account
of tho llavor.
•— ,. .
An old lady was asked her opinion about
Mrs. Smith, her next-door neighbor.
"Well," said she, "I am not the one to
speak ill of anyone, but I feel sorry for
Mr. Smith."
. _ ♦
A little boy who sat beside a man who
had been eating Limburger cheese, turned
to ,fcis mother and exclaimed : "Mamma,
how I wish I was deaf and dumb in my
nose."
. _ ♦
THAT HUSBAND OF MINE
Is three times the man he was before he be
gan using "Wells' Health Renewer. $I.—
Druggists.
—t me..
A little chloride of lime dissolved in
warm water, and left in a lamp or can which
has held kerosene, will deodorize it very
soon.
♦ _■ ♦
CATARRH Or THE BLADDER,
STiNftiNO irritation, inflammation, al!
Kidney and Urinary Complaints, cured by
"Buchu-paiba." fl.
. » - .
The gratification which wealth can bestow
is not in mere possession, nor in lavishing
it with prodigality, but in wise application
Of it.
_ . ♦ .
FI.IEB AND HIT CIS.
Flies, roaches, ants, bed-bugs, rats, mice,
gophers, chipmunks, cleared out by "Rough
on Rats." fl.
9 93 9
The most dangerous of all flattery is the
very common kind that we bestow upon
ourselves.
. . _s — .
Three things to contend for—honor,
country, and friends.

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