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Staunton spectator. (Staunton, Va.) 1849-1896, July 10, 1883, Image 1

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RICHARD M-AXTZY,
Editor and Proprietor.
RATES OF SUBSCRIPTION.
The subscription price of the Spectatob Is
Sa.OO A. YEAR,
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE.
___• When payments are not made strictly In
advance Three Dollars will be charged.
19- Any one sending us five new subscribers
and $10, will receive a copy ofthe paper for one
year, gratis.
PBOPESSIOSAL DIRECTORY.
TT. F. WATKAN, M. »•. •■ *>• B "
Formerly ofthe Faculty ofthe Baltimore Col
lege of Dental Surgery.)
Dental Office.
No. 15 N. Augusta Street.
Stadnton, Va.
SPEClALTY:—Correcting Irregularities of
the natural teeth; restoring decayed parts of
the teeth with porcelal n and gold; making ar
tificial teeth upon Gold Alloy Oast Plates.
Gas Administered. marl_-tf.
MEADE F. WHITE. A. C. GOBDON.
WHITE * GORDON,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
Stadnton, Va.
Courts.—Augusta and adjoining counties.
Federal Court at Harrisonburg, Court or Ap.
peals of Virginia, at Staunton. ' fet>2l-tf
VI H. NHELTZEB,
0. ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
STAUNTON. VA
Office in Stout Building, Court-house Alley
DRS. A. M. A H. H. HE9TKKI.,
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS,
Having entered into co-partnership, tender
their professional services to the public. Spe
cial attention given to Surgery and diseases of
the Eye and Ear.
They may be consulted at all hours at the
office heretolore occupied by A. M. Henkel,
M. D., No. 15, West Frederick Street. febls
CA. RICH AKDSO-i,
. ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
STAUNTON, VA.
Special attention given to the collection of
claims, and prompt returns made.
Codbts—Augusta and Rockingham.
Office—No. 2 Law Building. oct7
WM. A. HDDSON. WM. PATRICE.
HUDSON A PATRICK,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.,
Will practice in the Courts of Augusta and
adjoining counties. Special attention paid to
collections. febl__tf
1. R. TDOEEU, H. ST. QBO. TUCKKB,
Lexington, . a Staunton, va.
TUCKER «* TUCKER,
ATTORNE YS-AT-LA W,
Staunton, Va.,
Will pra. tit :. til _ _-. irts of Augusta and the
adjoining L..,„f:eK. ilisoin the Court of Ap
peals of Virginia, and will attend regularly the
m. Circuit Courts of Rockbridge. au22-tf
N. K. TROUT. W. K. CRAIG.
HIBOIIT A t'Biltt,
A ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.
.We have entered iuto Partnership as
Lawyers, occupying the old Offices of the Senior
member. The Junior member will aid In con
ducting the old business.
OW Particular attention given to collections.
jels-tf
H. M. MATHEWS. ALEX. F. -MATHEWS.
MATHEWS .t KATHEWS,
_ J TOR. EYS- AT-LA W,
Lewisbubg. West Va.,
practice regulaily In thd Courts of Greenbrier,
Monroe, Pocahontas and Nicholas counties, W.
Va., the Court of Appeals, and the Federal
CourU for the District of W. Va.
-3-Partlcular attention paid to Collections
nd to special cases anywhere in their Statu,
may 17—ly
C\ EOB6E M. HARRISON,
\Jf ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
STAUNTON, VA.,
will practice In all the Courts holden in Au
gusta county, and in the Circuit Courts ofthe
adjoining counties.
43-Strict attention given to the collection of
Claims.
Oi-plcK—No. 10 Lawyer's Row, Court-house
4Uev. oc3l—tf
rpHOMAS D, RANSON,
I. ATTORNEY-AT-LA W,
STAUNTON. Va.
.jlli-s his professional services in the County
aud Circuit Courts of Augusta, and In the Hus
tings Court and the Court of Appeals held in
Staunton. Will also prosecute claims else
where through legai correspondents In this and
other States. may 30—ly.
i_»R-_»TON A B.4VLOK,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
_t_a Solicitot in Chancery, Staunton, Va.,
practices in all the Courts of Augusta and ad
loiulng counties.
Office—The same formerly occupied oy his
:ather. Col. Geo. Baylor, dec'd. on Augusta St.,
■pposite the Court-house. no 21
\\r__ w. ii-.i]._i_'_En,
>V ATTORN EY-AI-LAW,
Warm SFUiNua, Va.
\Jouri* —Aiiegiiaiiy, _,_t_ and Highland, Va.,
nd Pocahontas, West Virginia.
-.-Special attention given to _ou_s:tlon ol
cl_iuisand proceeds promptly accounted for.
dec __-_■$_
UR. IAMBS JOHNSTON,
DENTIST,
Main street, Staunton, Va.
s-Ff.pa .--Over Turner A Harman's Grocery
i-p, §. dec 21—tf
-— : r_ — ■ : v
I. C. __D_K. WM. J. NELSON.
J.I.DF.R «fc NELSON,
E_ ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
and Seal Estate Agents,
may 5 Stadnton, Va.
TAII.ORH.ti.
|J „ MERCHANT TAILOR,
109 E. Main St., Staunton, Va.
I desire to call the attention of my friends
and the public to the fact that I have just re
ceived _ most beautiful line of—
dress GOODS
FOR FALL AND WINTER WEAR.
1 am prepared to furnish Gentlemen's suits, of
the very best materials, made up in the latest
styles and in the most workmanlike manner,
at low prices, and satisfaction guaranteed. I
also keep a full line of -tents' Fnrnl-hing
Gouds. OW Give me a call before making
your purchases. Respectfully,
octH-tf J. A. HUTCHESON.
V> B. GRAVES,
Fashionable Tailor,
No. 103 E. Main St., Up Stairs, opposite
the Staunton Opera House.
Is prepared to give the same satisfaction in all
work as in former tiroes.
Special Ati oiuic. Pni .to C_)t'-in_.
iVorl. done outside of shop. Cutting apd re
pairing done in best manner and on short no
tice, aw TERMS CASH. "B» au_7-tf
JfJERCHANT TAILORING
HE A D Q UAR TERS,
IMC. E. Mc_*>.__.__E____fc_-L.,
No. 10 New St.,
• STAUNTON, VA.
My Merchant Tailoring Establishment has
I ust been fitted up with a new and fine assort
ment of
Suitings, Clotli s, Cssslmeres, .c,
' FOR FALL AND WINTER,
of the latest styles and best manufacture.
QW Perfect fits g>iarrante_d and orders prompt
ly executed.
Gall and examine goods aud prices. Jy2-tf
BARE A- Sl-KISKLE,
FASHIONABLE TAILORS,
. 5.7.* St., next door to Mrs. Scherer's Millinery
Bfore, and 3 doors from Loeb's Corner,
Staunton, Virginia.
AU work in our line executed with neatness
and dispatch. Special attention paid to out
ing repairing and cleansing. aug s—tf
MARBLE WORKS.
•> —•—. 1 —
VAUsKT MARBLE WORKS,
STAUNTON, VA.
To the People of Augusta and the Valley coun
ties : *
Keep your money at Home is to prosper,
Send lt away is to become impoverished.
Everything is at very
sA low prices, and I a_t ceil-
V V} Ing 3_t>nu_Q.'nts, Head
-*-', A S. and Foot Stones, as low
' . ■,- ] .-\ I for cash as any local or
■? ; f',~M I l, traveling agent, or any
- > _11 i Marble dealer In the Uni
• : ";__*___y '■# ted States. Don't believe
_ a anything to the contrary
. - ■* till you come and see.
:'"-.._ _:.__■_» J. C. sMARQUIS.
p S.—l also call attention to my Catalogue
of Designs of the Wonderful White Bronss?
Monuments and Head Stones. au27-tf
» i * .— ■
"TIVEBY STAPLES..
_ ■» —♦ ' —
CtK.EB ARR ..NOEJJ^NT.
THE {JEST LIVERY IN THE STATE.
gßKfc. AMERICAN HOTEI,
Livery Stables.
*• T. TIIiIKMII 111, Proprietor.
Having refitted my stables and added a num
ber of fine horses and vehicles to my stock, I
jj-m prepared to accommodate the summer
Ravel In the most elegant and handsome
.t reasonable price
aw Hunting, Fishing and Pleasure parties
generally will be supplied with any kind of
vehicle desired, at low prices.
I.rjspeetfully invite my former customers
and tbe public generally to give me a call.
Satisfaction; guaranteed.
maylß-tf .. T. THORNBURG.
M„, Staunton, Va., January IS, 1883.
T brother, D. C. GRAHAM, will have an
Interest in my Grocery and Produce bus
_?"• to date from Jan. Ist, and the firm name
will be J. E. GRAHAM A BROTHER.
Janlß j. c. GRAHAM.
otcwiiitott liijt Spectator.
VOL. 60.
CLOTHING.
T" ARGE LOT OF
SPRING AND SUMMER
OLOTHIHOt
AT
6RUTLT MIIIIII PRICES!
Having more stock than I wish to carry. I
will from this day offer my large stock of
SPRING AND SUMMER
CLOTHING
At Reduced Prices.
A good many will be sold for
COST AND LESS.
I have a
A M Ull OF .11.11,
and will
GIVE BARGAINS!
to those who want
TO MI MM!
C_-__l_ A-l" ONCE.
49- NO TROUBLE TO SHOW GOODS. -S3*
All Goods Guaranteed n>* Represented.
JNO. w. alby,
Jel2 Old Stand, No. 21 New Street.
m iew mm
CLOTHING HALL,
OPERA HOUSE BUILDING,
STAUNTON, VA.
THE OILY [H. STORE
OIV M.A.IIV STREET.
JAMES A, ARME-TTROUT,
with an experience of 10 years In the Clothing
Business, has the management of
OUR SEW ESTABLISHMENT,
and would be pleased to see his friends and cus
tomers before buying
CLOTHING!
AND
Furnishing Goods
ELSEWHERE.
_*«_! «*«_-«» -»«_»
Wl__l_ KE __.I>DEI>
Throughout the Season.
WE MANUFACTURE
m_ ii an
IN PHILADELPHIA,
which enables us to offer
Special Induoements.
*»- GIVE ME A CALL,
AND DON'T FORGET THE PLACE.
JAMES A. ARMENTROUT,
Jes Manager for LOEB BROS.
ATTENTION!
GENTLEMEN!!
♦ - .
OW TA.__lE NOTICE that in con
sequence of the present partnership existing
between—
HILB k\ RUTHERFORD,
which will expire October Ist, we will sell our
present stock ' ■
AT COST,
STRICTLY CASH.
THE stock:
IN QUALITY, QUANTITY, AND MAKE-UP
CANNOT BE BEATEN.
All Goods in the house
Warranted Sound,
Wo Damaged Stock.
We will sell at this rate from this day utnll
September Ist next.
: I TEEMS STRICTLY CASH. |
si_F- Our friends may examine every stock of
Clothing in the City, and in looking over our
stock they will be convinced we have stated
nothing but facts. Call early, for your own
' benefit.
HILB & RUTHERFORD,
Nos. 11 and 1C New Street,
. ___£ I STA.XJNT. N, VA.
i
» —•__._
r GARRETT Q. GOOCH. CHARLES E. HOGE
HENRY HUTCHINSON.
! GOOCH, HOGE & CO.,
WHOLESALE GROCERS
I AND
CO-iimi .;_sion Merchants,
eea;._ks iv
Flour, Craiti, Seeds. Tobacco A Be Kara,
STAUNTON, VA.
We sell only to dealers, whom we respectfully
solicit to give us a trial order, Our prices we
promise to make compare favorably with Bal
timore and Richmond. septl9-tf
J. A. HAMRICK. J. A. FAUVER.
J. T A.. HAMRICK _fc CO.,
1 *J . DEALERS IN
> GROCERIES AMD PRODUCE.
i Make a Special." of
Leather and Shoe Findings
i Headquarters.for Harness Leather.
I Highest Casta Price paid for
lebls.'__-ly SLAUGHTERED HIDES.
DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
JULY BABT ÜBIITG.
DR. FAHRNEY'S
TEETHING SYRUP.
IT has never failed to give the most perfect satis
faction. Thousands of mothers are using it all
through the land, and ail are pleased with its charm
ing effects. It Maintains the Baby's Health by
Keeping it free from Colic and Diarrhea. Do
not stupefy your Baby with Opium or Morphia Mix
tures, but use
l»r. Fahraey's Teetltliijj Syrup,
which is always safe and reliable. It soothes and
quiets the Child, Relieves PAiNand Inflammation
and gives Sweet, Natural Sleep to Babes and
Rest to Mothers. All Druggists and Medicin _
Dealers Sell it.
TY/EHTY-FIYE CEIITS A BOTTLE.
Prepared By
SOk 30_ :__a.:____i_-__-_- _. s o__.
HAGERSTOWN, MD.
aprlO '83-ly
A Word to our Readers.
WHEN you read of a medicine that will
cure all diseases, beware of lt, for every
scientific physician on earth knows how falla
cious such statements are. But wheu you read
of a medicine compounded by a regular physi
cian and surgeon of high standing that claims
to cure only a certain disease, and furnishes
high proof that lt does this, you can safely try
lt, and with the assurance that it will cure you.
DR. V. R. STONE, late physician and surgeon
of the U. S. A., has placed beiore the public a
preparation called
APJ3PSIA.
Whicli no doubt is the greatest scientific prep
aration yet discovered for tbe cure of dyspep
sia in all its forms, and refers to thousands of
ladies and gentlemen of tbe highest respecta
bility that have been cured of cases pronounced
Incurable by the best physicians in the coun
try. The following references should be suffi
cient to convince the most sceptical:—
Mr. Albert Howard, of the Howard Watch
aud Cloc . Co., lllTremontstreet, Boston; Prof.
S. Kronberg, 13 Noyes Place, Boston ; Dr. Sam
uel W. sdamß. P. O. Box 1613, New York city :
Mr. H. A. Clark, firm Clark Bros. * Co., Phila
delphia, Pa., case of twenty years,' standing;
Matthew Robinson, 203 North 21st street, Phil
adelphia, case of dyspeptic vertigo; William
Gallogber, Record office. Philadelphla; Frank
C. Smink, business manager Reading Iron
Works. Residing, Pa.; Moees Thompson, Thnr
low, Pa ,P._W. B. R. R. ; Miss Kate S. Vll
lard, Seminole, B. C.J Capt. Geo.M. Weymouth,
Savannah. Ga.; Clarence S. Connerat, Savan
nah, Ga. They furnish the best of references
from every state In the Union wheu required.
Write them at 210 Levant street, Philadelphia,
Pa. For sale by BERKELEY, ALLEN <_ CO.,
Druggists, Staunton, Va. julyll '82-ly*
Price 75 cents per bottle after Jan. 1,1883.
Yftrious Causes-
Advancing years, care, sickness, disap
pointment, and hereditary predisposi
tion —all operate to turn the hair gray,
and either of them inclines it to shed
prematurely. Ayer's Hair Vigor ..ill
restore faded or gray, light or red hair
to a rich brown or deep black, as may
be desired. It softens aud cleanses the
scalp, giving it a healthy action. It
removes and cures dandruff and humors.
By its use falling hair is checked, and
a new growth will be produced iv all
cases where the follicles are not de
stroyed or the glands decayed. Its
effects are beautifully shown on brashy,
weak, or sickly hair, on which a few
applications will produce the gloss aud
freshness of youth. Harmless aud sure
in its results, it is incomparable as
a dressing, and is especially valued
for the sot_ lustre and richness of tone
it imparts.
Ayer's Hair Vigor is colorless;
contains neither oil nor dye; and will
not soil or color white cambric; yet
it lasts long on the hair, and keeps
it fresh and vigorous, imparting aa
agreeable perftime,
For sale by all druggists.
feb27 '83-ly
Tl^blatchleT
JL PUMP!
■ BUY THEBEST.
MM BLATCHLEY'S
./■ ii TRIPLE ENAMEL
Temkm PORCELAIN-LINED
or.
SEAMLESS TUBE
II : COPPER-LIMED
WPUMP
_____________ D° not be arcned into
_Hm___& br.yiii-T inferior Goods.
•Wm . Hr- For sale by tbe best
houses in the Trade.
cTcTBLATCHLEY-Nlanufr,
308 MARKET ST., Philad'a.
Write to me for name oi nearest Agent
aprlO 6m
BOOTS AND SHOES.
JO. t;: WELXEBi
.- -. 4 West Main St..
STAUNTON, VA,
BOOTS, SHOES
Slippers, Sandals, Pumps,
HATS, CAPS,
UMBHELLAB,Eto:
A full line of BROAD BOTTOM, FLAT HEE.
SB.OES, for old Lajle, and Gents.
BOY .*. i's .3ES'-, A. TD CHILEREN'S
SCHOOL SHOES,
*_T A SPECIALTY OF "SS
REAL FIBST-CLASS SHOES.
Orders Solicited by Mail.
*»- All Goods warranted as represented,
aprlil
BUT- ALL GOODS DELIVE___ED.
CHARLEST WHEAT,
DEALER IN
Staple and Fancy Groceries,
Cpvuvtry Produce, «fco.,
No. 17 East Main Street, Staunton, Va.
1 wonld respectfully state to-the citizens of
town and county that f have a nice selection
of STAPLE and FANCY GROCERIES which
it will do well to see before purchasing.
OW My own FRESH ROASTED COFFEE
a specialty.
CALL AT THE RIGHT PLACE, where you
will always find me.
f ORDERS irom a distance promptly filled.
i_ay2--3ni CHARLES C. WHEAT.
W. C. T. U.
; COFFEE-HOUSE,
. IN THE BRANDEBURG BUILDING
on New Court-House St., near the Court-house.
Open dally from O A. M. to O P. M.,
aprlQ-tf
"NIEW STOREf
At which bargains will be sold is to be opened
, at the OLD AUGUSTA NATIONAL BANK
BUILDING.
A variety of Groceries and alineof Hardware
will be ready for sale in a few days. Call and
see them hefore you buy elsewhere.
Jan 2.] GEO. P. BAKER A CO.
'" T. _2 A T T. Any one desir-
Jj ■>_/.__. k. /_.JLjJ_-_ ous of procuring
an excellent MERCANTILE STAND, in a
good, healthy se .tion of country, convenient
r to churches, and a good school, can get full
particulars, by applying to—
sep6 '81-tf SPECTATOR OF Fl CE.
STAUNTON, VA., TUESDAY, JULY 10, 1883.
DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
>?-_s WOMAN tm JJ HEALTH * >V-_iAN\
JDIZ YWPATHI2E THE HOPE !~W
E.ACE-U
LYDIA E. PINKHAM'S i
VESETABLsS COMPOUND. \f
A Sure Cure for all FEMAIE WEAK
NESSES, Including Lcucon h«, Ir
regular and Painful menstruation,
Inflammation and Ulceration of
the Womb, Flooding, PRO
LAPSUS UTERI, sic
CF"Pleasant to the taste, efficacious and immediate
in Its effect. It Is a great help In pregnancy, and re
lieves pain during labor and at regular periods.
riiTsici-SS tse it ish rhi scribe it jt.eely.
I-TFgb all Wea_-_33i_ of the generative organs
of either sex, lt is second to no remedy that has ever
been before the public; and for all disease* of the
Kid j __ slt is the Greatest Remedy in the World.
{_r*KIDN_!Y COMPLAINTS of Either Sex
Find Great Rolief In Its Use.
LYDIA E. PINKHAia'. BLOOD PURIFIER
will eradicate every vestige of Humors from the
Blood, at the same time svil_ give tone and strength to
the system. As marvellous In results as the Compound.
t-TBoth the Compound and Blood Purifier are pre
pared at 533 and 235 Western Avenue, Lynn, ___.
Price of either, Jl. Six bottles for $5. The Compound
is sent by mall In the form of puis, or of lozenges, on
receipt of price, $1 per bc_ for either. Mrs. Pinkham
freely answer, all letters of inquiry. Unclose 3 cent
stamp. Send for pamphlet. Mention this Paper.
tyisTMA E. PiifXßAM's Lmnt Pnxs cure Constlpa
tlon, Biliousness and Torpidity of the Liver. 25 cents.
.3-Sold by all Drncslata.- iZ» (3)
sepo '82-ly
[Continued]
CHAI'TSE li. i
wonderful and niyst?:!ou3 curative power is
developed which Is so varied in its operations '
that no disease or ili-ht-alth c<in possibly exist
or resist its power, ami yet it is
Harmless for the most frail woman, weakest
lnvaiid, or smallest chill to use.
"Patients
'■Almost dead or nearly dying"
Pqr years, and given up by physicians of
Bright's and other kidney diseases, liver com
plaints, severe cough.-, called consumption
have been cured.
Women gone nearly crazy!
From agony of neuralgia, nervousness,
waUef-h.es . and various diseases peculiar to
women.
People drawn outof shape from excruciating
pangs of Rheumatism.
Inflammatory and chronic, or sun. ring from
scrofula I
Er.valpe.as!
Salt Rheum, blood poisoning, dyspepsia, in- i
dige.tlon, and In fact almost all diseases frail
Nature is heir to
Have been cure! by Hod Bitters, proof ol
which can be fouud In every neighborhood lv
the known world.
[' _*T~"; i~ r I ii i iiiimi-i __ ■ ■11 l r
Mj&T'jZ. -itei 2 am __.-.
v i i i iiMiimissf _rr_____niinfcgn'Ti
JFOR THE CURE 0?C
| CQiMSTIPAtIOW. 1 ;
•A -Tootherdiseacoifißopi-cvaleiitinthiscoa.- &j I
t*itry 03 Constipatioa, and r.o remedy haa evtt-S_
J einailed tho csltbratcrt Kidney-Wort cr. r. J
_ cure. Whatevertlie<___--,_oweverobsli .ate „
.Itho case, tlii3 remedy v.-ill overcome it. _ i
B r-> . I '"-3 diatressing com- «
• rihßOi plaint ia very apt to bo -
g oomp_t_,ted--it_.eo_s_patio_. Kidney.-sVort J
~ tho weakened parts and quickly ©
«J meres all Mnda of Klea even when ?-
_ sr-d irodioines have before filled. .
yi> 6_rlf you have either of these trouble 3
'* USE j Druggist."-,?.
septs'B2-ly
Health is Wealth!
Dfi E. CW_Efir*a Ne;.'.;- and Braih Treat-
KZ-TT, a _nuurstateed spec-lie for Hysteria, Dizzi-
< , <;:ivr..sion., Pits, Nervous Neuralgia,
Headache, Nervous Prostration caused by the use
of alcohol or tobacco. Wr_ Kef ul ness, Mental De
pressiou, Bofteniag of the Brain resultii.g in in
sanity and leading to misery, decay an I death,
Premature Old Ago, Harrc-nness, Loss of power
in either sex. Involuntary Losses and Kportnat
orrha-a caused by over-exertion of the br._iu, self
abaeo or over-indulgence. Each box contains
one month's treatment. £'.00 a box, or six boxes
for $5.00, sent by mail prepaid on receipt of price.
' \.'S_. «__r___L-_6AHT______ SIX BOXY-;
To cure any case. With each order recehu! oyue
for nix boxes, accompanied -with $5.00, v. \;i\[
•end tho purchaser our written guarantee to re
fund the money if the treatment doescot ._l-_ot
c cure. Guarantees issued only by
BOOI_.KI.EC BKOTS?fi"RS, Brassis.*,
3_iul,_s- .. d, "V" s%.
deal2'B2-ly 2qr paid'
~wi_ies7liqucßs, &cT
rptlE BEBG- ER * BSCOD. BREWING
CO., PHIIsAII-K. .PHIA, PA.
STAUNTON DEPOT,
ROBERT HILL, Jr.. Manager.
Having completed our Ica-house here, we are
now prepared to furnish our celebrated
Premium laager Beer,
in aay quantity, not ut the Lowest I'rice, but
ata price tti,at will enable and justify usto
make a
PtJitJE -A_lt-riC__.__..
We do not claim to compete with any one in
price, but for purity and excellence of quality,
we are unsurpassed.
OW All orders sent lo our Depol, Sl.aun--.on,
Va., will be promptly filled.
BOTTLING BEER—A Specialty.
june26 '83 ly.
■pi_.__i_.-r BRAND. OF
Augusta County Whiskies.
ALSO IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC
LIQUORS
cf all kinds.
*a- At -WHOLESALE and RETAIL.
BTJ________ _te .BRA-I. !__-.-.-,
Masonic Bnllding,
octl2'Bo-tf Staunton. Va.
Pll NIIH(i_ who are interested:-
Fiß__l t is_= r
cheaply and successfully
snould write us tor O'jr pamphlet on pure
fertilizers. Q-A good fertilizer can be made
at hornet or about S j 2 a ion by composting
with -OVVELL'S~PREFARED CHEMICALS.
■-_*■*■-—B—_—ll —111 l I .'imttm-m *_■______■—^—J»^3
References... EvgryStaia. ■ijg'Agents wanted
forunoccup.edterri-ory. Applyw:threterenoos,
BROWN CHEMICAL CO.
Manufacturers ot
Powell's Tip-Top Bone Fertilizer,
Bone, Potash,A.^onia^jic.
16 LIGHT STREET, BALTIMORE, MD.
I —-—-—.si——-—
je26-3m*
s
ft fin A week made at home by the indus
i ■■ 111 Itrious. Best business now before the
1 % Capitalnotneeded. Wewlll
I #start you. Men, women, boy» and
111 I #lglrls wanted everywhere to work for
"** Now Is the time. You can work
- in spare time, or give your whole time to the
5 business. No other business will payyounear
i ly as well. No one can fail to make enormous
t pay, by engaging at once. Costly outrft and
1 terms free. Money made fast, easily,an. hon
orably. Address True A Co., Augusta, Maine.
_e__o-ly j
I __•_____
"POETRY.
"THE SWORD OF LEE."
BY FATHER RYAN.
Forth from Its scabbard, pure and bright,
Flashed the sword of Lee;
Far In the front of the deadly fight,
High o'er the brave in the cause of right,
Its stainless sheen, like a beacon-light,
Led us to victory.
Out of its scabbard, where full long,
It slumbered peacefully-
Roused from Its rest by the battle-song.
Shielding the feeble, smiting the strong.
Guarding the right, and avenging the wrong-
Gleamed the sword of Lee!
Forth from its scabbard, high in air,
Beneath Virginia's sky—
And they who saw it gleaming there,
And knew who bore lt, knelt to swear
."hat where that sword led they would dare
To follow and to die.
Out of Its scabbard! Never hand
Waved sword from stain as free,
iNor purer sword led braver band,
Nor braver bled for a brighter land,
Nor brighter land had a cause as grand,
Nor cause a chief like Lee!
Forth frotu Its scabbard! how we prayed
That sword might victor be !
And when our triumph was delayed,
And many a heart grew sore afraid.
We still hoped on, while gleamed the blade
Of noble Robert Lee !
Forth from Its scabbard ! all In vain !
Forth flashed the sword of Lee! ■
'Tis shrouded now in its sheath again,
It sleeps the sleep of our noble slain,
Defeated, yet without a stain.
Proudly and peacefully.
Laurel's Strawberries.
BY E. MURRAY TOWERS.
"Where's Laurel? Laurel will have to
pick the strawberries for lunch."
"Where is she, indeed ? I'm sure I don't
know now, but she has been crying in the
corner all the morning because papa has
discharged old Donald."
And Miss Martha Sinclair dusted plaques
and shook up things vigorously.
So provoking to have t!ie housemaid
sick, and young Vivian Winters coming to
Finchwood! Just now she regretted the
absence of old Donald, too, who had been
Squire Sinclair's gardener and man-of-all
work for fifteen years; he was so good-na
tured and accomodating in an emergency—
would turn his hand to anything, aud put
everybody in a good humor with h's droll*
cry.
But Donald was growing old, and the
squire needed a young man ou the placo.
Old Donald would remain only to instruct
•John Jenkins in his duties, aud foolish Lau
rel, the young sister, was crying because
her old friend and comrade was going away
from Finchwood.
"Well, she must pick the strawberries,"
said Grace, the beauty. "There's no one
else. I'm sure I can't go out in the sun
with my complexion, and I've only time to
dress aud do my hair before Mr. Winters
gets here. Is there plenty of jelly for the
cold chicken? And did you make the mac
aroons, Martha?,'
"Don't you worry about my part," said
Martha, flourishing her feather duster.
' See that you do yours as well,"-with a
significant look.
Grace blushed a little. Of course she
was going together cap for Vivian Winters.
He was agreeable and rich; she had already
had a bit of flirtation wirh him in New York
the previous winter. He had promised the
squire to pay a visit to Finchwood in Sum
mer, and now he was coming. She knew
he thought her pretty; she meant to be as
charming as possible. If anything came of
it, everybody would be delighted.
Ten minutes afterward, a young girl
walked rapidly down the garden path with
a tin-pail in.herhand. Itwaseleveno'clock
a. m., and a fervid heat was pouring down
on her pretty, white sun-bonnet.
' 'Excused from my lessons to pick straw
berries for Grace's beau, under such a sun
asthis!" I'd quiteas lief be reading French
with Miss Meek in the school-room. So
much for being the youngest! Why can't
Grace pick her own strawberries, I'd like
to know? Oh, dear? I don't mean to be
cross, but everything goes wrong lately.
Dear old Donald, who taught me to wal_,
and who has always made me swings, and
fixed my garden beds, and cheered me up
when I was in trouble—he must ba sent off
for hateful old John Jenkins! I know he's
young, but I shall call him old! And now
this other strange man—Grace's beau—will
be here, aud I'm told to 'keep out of tho
way," and Miss Meek and I must skulk
away to the school-room, while he and Grace
take up the whole of the house! I suppose
he's nice, though. I should like to see him.
My! how fine the straw berries are!"
Laurel had reached the strawberry-bed,
which lay unshelterd by bush or tree, its
great, crimson berries ripening sweelly in
the glowing heat.
Pushing back her sun-bonnet, she knelt
down among them. The tendrils of her
chestnut hair clung moist about her young
forehead. Her cheeks were flushed by the
great warmth; her round lips as red as the
beautiful fruit over which she bent.
She worked with energy for awhile, but
at last paused and surveyed h.r pail 3 which
was but a third ftill.
"Oh. dear, what slow work!—and how
hot it isS I shall never get this pail full!"
She took off her sun-bonnet and fanned
her red cheoks.
Just then she espied a young man, lying
under a tree near the roadside.
"There's that old .John Jenkins now! and
I'm going to set him to work. Comohere!''
she called, authoritatively.
The young man rose quickly from the
green grass and approached the imperious
young lady.
"You may help me pick these strawber
ries. You will have to work if you come
here, I can tell you!"
The young man bowed, and went down
obediently v. on his knees in the strawberry
bed.
Papa don't allow any shirhinc/l You
can't dress like that here, cither," added
Mis Laurel, surveying the attire of the new
gardener, which seemed to be of too good
cut and fine quality for a person in John
Jenkins' station of life.
"Indeed!"
' 'No. Old Donald was in his shirt-plee yes
and overalls, early and late, ever since I
can remember. He's been with us fifteen
years, ever since I was a baby, and he's
been faithful!" sa : d Laurel, with some
thing very like a sob in her voice. "Do
you know anything about gardening 7"
"Something."
"Well, you'll have to know everything.
Papa is very particular, especially about his
young trees. He'll be sorry for sending
Donald off—see if he isn't!" concluded Lau
rel, talking to herself, as she wandered to
tbe other side of the bed.
Whatever else John Jenkins might fail in
he could pick strawberries very rapidly and
nicely, and surveying the fast-filling pail,
Miss Laurel condescended to be more gra
cious.
"Thank you! I guess I'll let you finish;
you get along so nicely. Perhaps you will
please pa. I think very likely,'' she added,
with a sigh.
Retreating a short distance to tbe shade
of an apple tree, she fanned herself with
her white bonnet, and surveyed the pros
pect.
John Jenkins, looking toward the apple
tree, saw a patch ot lapis lazuli sky, boughs
of emerald hung with pale green spheres,
and beneath them, a graceful, weary little
figure, in a dress of gray linen, with abun
dant chestnut hair shading a pretty face.
In a few minutes he came up with the
pail.
"Have you done?" asked Laurel, arous
ing herself. '<Oh, dear! I'm so gla.d that's
finished! I don't often have such disagree
able tasks to do," she continued, more
confidentially; "but my sister is expecting
company—a gentleman from the city—and
she's very particular to have a nice lunch.
Grace wouldn't burn her complexion,
though, if Vivian Winters never had a
strawberry in his life!" she added, more to
herself. "And I hope ho won't want any
more while he stays here, if 1 have to pick
them! Heigh-ho! You'd better not let papa
see you lying on the grass; you might not
make a very good impression on him," she
said, as she nodded good-bye, and started for
the house.
For her companion, looking quite warm,
and with moist curls of dark hair twining
almost as tightly as her own about the fore
head, retrealed to the roadside-tree and
threw himself down again, good-humoredly
smiling, and apparently not in the least of
fended by the candor of this frank young
lady.
"I don't believe he'll suit pa!" she solilo
quized. "Ho's too nice; he'll never get
right down to hard work like poor Donald.
He did pick the strawberries nice, though.
Glad I met him."
And Laurel entered the house, and glad
ly delivered up her fragrant burden.
"You and Miss Meek had better take
your lunch in the school-room; then you
needn't dress."
' 'Martha,'' cried Laurel, "can'll see him ?"
"I am willing, but Grace says"—
"I don't care what Grace says! I shall
comedown. Can't I papa? can't I have
lunch with you?"
"Certainly, certainly ! You will do ; you
look very well," answered the squire, with
whom Laurel was a favorite.
And so, wheu Laurel had hurriedly bath
ed her forehead aud hands in cool water,
and braided and tied with a fresh ribbon
her abundant chestnut hair, she came qui
etly into the dining room a little later : but
her father called her cheerfully to a place
beside him.
"Hy youngest daughter, Laurel, Mr.
Winters."
A frank, pleasant face, with dark hair
curling tightly about a broad, white fore
head, and a very good-natured smile. Lau
rel lifted her broad lids, and gave a little
gasp.
"The young lady and I have already met.
Let me give you some of my strawberries,
Miss Laurel. They are very nice."
And so as the n_eal was quite without
formality, ".Tohn Jenkins" heaped Laurel's
saucer with strawberries, and began talking
to her in the most charming manner. But
poorLaurc', from turning scarlet to the
tips of her fingers, turned so pitifully p.ale,
realizing her dreadful mistake, that it was
almost evident that the meal was almost a
blank to her.
She got away as soon as .he could, ran
down into the garden, crept ttuder a syrin
ga-bush aud cried.
Pretty soon -Mr. Winters was on his knees
beside jier.
"Pray—pray, don't t .ke your little mis
take so much to heart! It did no harm, and
I was very much amused."
"You—you are very gocd !" sobbed Lau
rel ; "but I never cau gat over it ; aud
Grace will never foririve me when she
knows—"
"Then we won't tell her," said Vivian
Winters, cheerfully, and Laurel was sure,
theu, that he was nico. "It is our secret.
Only when I say 'strawberries,' you are to
be very, very good to me.''
So he won the child out of her fears and
tears, and leading her down the shady lo
cust paths, fanned her with a huge leaf, and
chatting charmingly, made her smile ti 1
her tears were dried.
"Why, Laurel, child, where did you see
Mr. Winters before?" asked Grace, coming
up, and looking a Utile peculiar.
"Oh, just by the roadside yonder, "an
swered Vivian, so carelessly, that Grace
thought nothing more of the matter.
But she observed that he was very atten
tive to Laurel, and she contiuued to observe
it during the three days of the gentleman's
stay.
And Oust was not all, for Vivian Winters
came agaiu and again to Ficchwoodduring
the Summer, aud when Laurel's sixteenth
birthday came, iv the Autumn, he asked
her hand of her father in marriage.
There was ouly a year's deity after the
engagement. Then the weddiug tooU
place. And there were strawberries at the"
wedding breakfast. And let me add that
old Donald entered the happy service of
Mr. and Mrs. Winters.
V Sltigui ar Hhovf, Story.
A special dispatch to the l'hiladelphia
Timet from Snytlertown, Penu., says that
Monday night, Mrs. Moore, a widow, who
lives with her young son at Brush valley,
near here, was startled by hearing a shriek,
followed by agonizing yells, in the room
next to her own, which was occupied by
her sod, a youth 10 years old. In a fright
she ran int.) tho room and found the boy
almost dead with fear, and trembling in
every limb. Sbe quieted jhis fears and
questioned him, aud, after considerable do
lay, be told her that at about midnight,
while listening to tho furiously ragiug
storm, he was startled by seeing through
the dim light of a lamp which burned in
the room a mau raising the window. Al
most paralyzed with fear, he sat up in bed
unable to move uut il by the aid of a vivid
flash of lightning he perceived the features
of the man to be similar to those of his
father, who was killed in the mines iive
years ago. - With the shriek that had so
startled his mother he sauk ou the bed, aud
the intruder fled hastily. When the moth
er bad heard his story she turned her gaze
toward the window and beheld the inden
tical face pressed agaiust tbejpane. With
a loud yell she sprang to tho window, and
-raising the sash jumped through, and,
striking the ground 25 feet below with ter
rible force, injured herself fatally. The
shrieks and moans of the young man Moore
brought a few neighbors to the spot, aDd
they carried the limp body of the woman
into the house, and after a few hours labor
succeeded in bringing hsr to sensibility.
As soon as she fixed her eyes on her son
she burst into a violent fit of laughter, in
which tbe son joined, aud which lasted un
til they both fell to the floor exhausted.
On tho part of young Mooro the fit of
laughing was followed by violent spasmodic
attacks. Ho foamed at tho mouth, barked
like a dog, and made vicious snaps at those
who attempted to quiet him. A young
farmer named Harriets, went up to him, and
while attempting to quiet him caught hold
of his baud. No sooner had he done so
than he, too, was seized with fearful spasms
and writhed on the floor in iutense agony,
exhibiting the peculiar symptoms manifest
ed by the others. The other neighboi-s
fled, but some returning to the house, se
cured the raving young meD. No hopes
are entertained for Mrs. Moon'a recovery.
The young men will bo taken to au asylum.
ss—* «*>
One voice all over the land goesstup from
mothers, that says, "My daughters are so
feeble and sad, with no strength, all out of
breath and life at the least exertion. What
can we do for them ?" The answer is sim
ple and full of hope. One to four weeks'
use of llop Bitters will make them healthy,
rosy, sprightly, and cheerful.
- .. s
It is about time for ministers and editors
to commence thinking about taking their
summer vacation, and "thinking is about
as far from home as the editors will get."
.—«_« __
*_*"Great haste is not always good
speed." Yet you must not dilly-dally in
caring for your health. Liver, kidneys, and
bowels must be kept healthy by the use of
that prince of medicines, Kidney-Wort,
which comes in liquid form or dry—both
thoroughly efficacious. Have it always
ready.
Our city editor is under bond for shoot
ing at the man who came into the offloe and
asked if he "was in the write place,"
i •—1» . —
tW A pint of the finest ink for families
or schools can be made from a ten-cent
i package of Diamond Dye. Try them.
NO. 43.
Vanished Tears. .
Who can look upon the vanished years
without a sigh of regret for the many
beautiful remembered joys that tho years
now vanished brought to us, but can never
return to us ?
To one, it is the memory of the child's
caressing fingers straying over the face and
hands, of clinging arms about the neck
and tho pattering of tiny, slippered feet
over the stairs or down the hall. It is the
music of a sweet, innocent voice, floating
in rippling laughter, or precious baby
words irom the past along the vanished
years into the tide of the present.
To another, sweet, loved faces that float
suddenly from the mist of vanished years,
as if the daisies grew not between the
closed eyes and our own, they meet us
again with the same never-forgotten glance
of tenderness, and we ask of the vanished
years if they have given back to us our
own, or whether the spirits of the air take
from, sometimes, only to vanish again,
leaving us only our memories. Half-for
gotten songs float dreamily back to us, and
the memory of a woman's smile, or a man
ly voice, has thrilled many a heart with an
intensity of emotion that only a presence
from the vanished years could bring.
Voutb, beauty, love, and happiness, all
belong to the beautiful vanished years, and
looking forward brings not the satisfaction
that we find in silent, sweet communion
with tho past.
The joys, the happiness that has been
ours is ours ;still, for faithful memory is
ever going backward to the vanished years,
and bringing to us our treasures that have
been.
But in looking forward we see only what
may bo, and past experience tells us that
hopes fail. Perhaps there is nothing in
the past of a person who has reached the
quiet middle years of life, that so brings
mingled sadness and smiles, as *the recol
lection of youth's first love.
How real it all seemed then, and how
the vision changed.
The girl that seemed an angel then is
only an ordinary mortal now, faded and
world-weary, like the boy who thought
himself a man. and claimed the manly
right of worshiping every angel in maidenly
guise.
And from among the relics of the de
parted years is drawn the curl of shining
hair that was such a tailisman.
It is just as bright, jus. as golden now,
and it coils itself about your fingers just as
prettily, reminding us in its almost ani
mated curling of :he coquettish gr- j co of its
wearer.
But, alas! the years iv vanishing have
stolen from it its talismanie powers, and
to-day it is only a lock of woman's hair,
shorn before the silver threads began to
linger in sad, silent token of the ea-es and
weariness of earth-life.
And a thonght of silver hair brings _■
back to the present, and glancing in the
mirror we find them plentifully be3towed
upon ourselves, and smile as we wonder if
the girl to whom that curl belonged has
kept that shining lock of bright chestnut
hair we gave her in exchange.
Only the vanished years can tell.
Why then did not that golden hair rest
forever in happy security against the breast
whereon it leaned when a lover's hand sev
ered the shining cuil ?
Ah ! we gather only tho beautiful mem
ories from the vanished years. Our treach
eries and deceitfulness we consign to the
past, and say, "let the dead past bury its
dead," aud c ! asp more closely the sweet,
cherished meinuries that were so exquisite
in tho reality.
How sacredly we cherish them! How we
linger with tuem! But lingering with the
vanished years brings us to silent, grass
grown graves and mossy tombstones, and
thence to tears.
So fold away the treasured memories,
and we know that, though the straying baby
lingers may never more stray over our faces,
and hands, and hair —nor the tiny feet
make music over the stairs and down the
hall—nor white-haired ago grow young
again—nor broken vows be renewed —nor
anything belonging to tho vanished years
return lo us—we are hastening on to them.
Earth-life is only a shadow of the sub
stance that the second life affords.
Eternity is before us, aud who shall say
that in the eternal .•__■ all shall not be re
stored to us.
.. . ___ .
J«-ff_rso._. a Political Mix!m..
I. Legal equalities of human beings.
.. The people the only sourca of legiti
mate power.
_. Absolute and lasting severance of
church and State.
4. Freedom, sovereignty and independ
ence ofthe respective States.
5. Tiie Union a compact—Neither a con
solidation nor a centralization.
G. The constitution of the Union a spec
ial written grant of powers, limits-Hl and def
iinito.
7. No hereditary office, nor order nor ti
tle.
8. No taxation beyond the public want.
0. No national debt, if possible.
10. No costly splendor of administration.
11. Xo proscription of opinion, nor of
public discussion.
12. No unnecessary interference with in
dividual property or speech.
13. The civil paramount to the military
authority.
14. The representative to obey the in
structions of his constituents.
15. No favored classes, no monopolies.
16. Elections free, and suffrage universal.
17. No public moneys expended except
by warrant of specific appropriation.
18. No mysteries in government inacces
sible to the public eye.
19. Public compensation for public ser
vices, moderate salaries, and pervading
economy, and accountability.
Evils of Gos-mp.— Can the evil wrought
by gossip be estimated ? We think not.
A wise woman cau scarcely say too little in
company if tho conversation trenches in
the least on scandal. Many a social,noble
minded woman bas been obliged to with
draw herself Irom a neighborhood intimacy
which would have been pleasant otherwise
because ber retnarks are returned by some
idla tale-bearer, so perverted as to make
her doubt the existence of a genuine friend
ship, and accept loneliness for the sake of
tbe safety it brought. You say we must talk
"about s.omething." Yes, and through
that very fact we see a remedy for the evil,
to so thoroughly interest ourselves in
other and better things that we find
no space to spare for our neighbor's
affairs. Let us talk of our work, our
homes, our house-plants, our books, or our
babies. Let us teach our eyes to find beau
ty everywhere, while we blind them by
constant watchfulness to blemishes Nev
er, under any circumstances, cast the first
stone. Then if any erring neighbor goes
down, you cannot blame yourself for as
sisting the downfall.
When you suffer from dyspepsia, heart
buru, malarial affections, kidney disease,
liver complaint and other wastin.f diseases.
When you wish to enrich the blood and pu
rify the system generally. When you wish
to remove all feeling of weakness, weari
ness, lack of energy, try a bottle of Brown's
Iron Bitters and see how greatly it will bene
fit you. It surpasses all known remedies
as an enricher of the blood and a perfect
regulator of the various bodily functions.
Ask your druggist.
_♦ 93 . '
The editor of the Waco Texas Sentinel,
having been blown up by the explosion of a
sawmill boiler, we snppose it will now be
in order to allude to him as our highly
steamed contemporary.
-—-—-■ .
FLIES AND HUGS.
Flies, roaches, ants, bed-bugs, rats, mice,
gophers, chipmunks, cleared out "by "Rough
on Rats." 15c.
BATES OF ADTEBTISISG.
Adv_rtise___sts will be Inserted at the rata
of $1.00 per square of eight lines or less, far tha
first insertion, and 50 cents for each subseq,_e_f
Insertion.
aw A liberal discount will be made on ad
vertisements published lor 3,6, or 12 months.
aw Speciais Notices will be Inserted al
double the advertising rates.
OW Obituaries, Announcements of Candi
dates for office, and all communications ol a
personal or private character, will be charged
for as advertisements.
Address—"SUantoa Spectator," Stiaatoa, Ta,
THE LORDS OF LABOR.
They conio, they come, in a glorious march
You can hear their steam-steeds neigh,
As they dash through Skill's triumphal arch
Or plunge 'mid the dancing spray.
Their bale-tires blaze In the mighty forge,
Their life-pulse throbs in the mill.
Their lightnings shiver the gaping gorge.
And their thunders shake the billr
Ho! these are Titans of toil and trade,
The heroes who wield no sabre ;
But mightier conquests reapeth the blade
That is borna by the Lords of Labor.
Brave hearts, like Jewels light the sod.
Through the mists of commerce shine.
And souls flash out like stars of God
From the midnight of the mine.
No palace Is theirs, no castle great.
No princely pillared hall,
And they well may at the roofs of state
'Neath the heaven whlca Is over all.
Ho! these are the Titans of toil and trade.
The heroes who wield no sabre;
But mightier conquests reapeth the blade
Which Is borne by the Lords of Labor.
Bach bears his arm for the ringing strife.
That marshals the sons of the soil.
And the sweat-drops shed in the battle of life
Are gems in the crown of Toil.
And better tl'.elr well-won wreaths, I trow,
Than laurels with life-blood wet;
And nobler the arch of a bare, hold brow,
Than the clasp of a coronet.
Then hurrah for each hero, although hii deed
Be unknown by the trump or tabor.
For holier, happier far is the meed
That cr. wnetn tha Lords ol Labor.
Reviving Fr.uiT Trees.—S. D. Pratt,
of Perm Van, ... V., writes the Farmers'
Club ot the American Institute, concerning
the care of fruit tree 3, as follows:—
"Remembering Professor Liebig'l theory
that when a vegetable is burned the part
which came from the air in the process of
its growth returns to tho atmosphere, and
the part which ctrae from the ground is re
duced to ashes, I came to the conclusion
that ashes would bo beneficial when ap
plied to tho roots of trees. They were
standing in soil strongly ii.clined to clay,
•vith a turf around them which had not
been removed for several years. After
pruning them properly, removing every in
dication of worms, sic, and washing the
body and branches with soap suds, I began
operatious below—first removing the turf
about two feet around the tree, then with
a gardon pick the ground was loosened from
six tutwelve inches in depth, taking care not
to injure the larger roots. Twonty or thirty
quarts of loose dirt were removed, leaving
a large cavity, shaped like a saucer, with
the tree standing in the centre. About one
pint of unleached ashes was sprinkled
about the trees and upon this chip manure
was placed, nearly filling the cavity. An
other piut of ashes was sprinkled upon the
fertilize, which was gently pressed down
and the whole covered with the loose dirt
taken from tho cavity, leaving the surface
nearly as it was, excepting the turf. A
young orchard was treated in a similar
way. The effect was wonderful. Plum
trees that were 'going to the bad,' revived.
Peach trees that had presented small and
shriveled leaves threw out a luxuriant foli
age, and cherry tress gave fruit larger and
fairer than ever before."
Young s>lan, —
Stop and think! What you are to be will
depend upon what you do. Your words,
and thoughts are not fragile and perishable,
but permanent aud enduring. Do no
wrong. Battle for right. Help and bless
humanity. Honor and obey the Author of
your toeing auslyonr lslesainn-s
Be not an idler. Work and win. It is
not genius but toil that is Ihe creator of
utilities. Great characters in history are
always miracles of industry. Butler put
twenty years on his analogy, and tho work
is immortal. Rittenhouse, who began to
calculate eclipses on his plow handles, could
not fail of eminence. To-morrow is the
day in which idle men work and fools re
form. Let your theatre and time of action
be to-day.
Seek to be an intelligent worker. Read
books and papers. Cultivate and discipline
the mind. Seek the society of thinkers.
Aim at eminence in the arts and sciences.
Tho paths along which Frankliu walked,
or Webster, or Henry Clay, are still open
to willing feet. Enter and walk therein.
Advance to the front. Be an intelligent
toiler in the world's great workshops. You
are in life's springtime. If you do not sow
and plant now, you cannot expect a rich
harvest by-and-by. Up and be patient. Sow
good seed. Keep the weeds down. Be pa
tient and watchful, and the future will not
be without hope and blessedness.
. _, ♦
Adam's First Wife.—The old Hebrew
cabalistic legend of Lilith, the first wife of
Adam, is told by M. D. Conway in his lec
ture on the devil, iv language which is as
b.-autiiul as a finished poem. She was a
cold p.-Ssionless, splendid beauty, with won
drous golden hair. She was created Adam's
equal in every retpect, and therefore, prop
erly enough refused to obey him. For this
she was driven from the garden of I _den
and Eve was created, made to order, so to
speak, of one of Adam's ribs. Then the
golden-haired Lilith, jealous, enraged, pin
ing for her first home in Paradise, entered
iv the form of a serpent, crept into the Gar
den of Eden and tempted Adam and Eve
to their destruction. Anu from that day to
this, Lilith, a cold, passionlessbeauty, with
g lden hair, has roamed up and down the
the earth snaring the sons of Adam and de
stroying them. You may always know her
dead victims, for whenever a man has been
destroyed by the bands of Lilith, you will
always find a single golden hair wrapped
tight around his lifeless To this day
many and many a son of Adam is still lured
to death and ruin from having the golden
hair of a w<. man wrapped too tightly around
his heart. This is the moral. Has not
Lilith been revenged ?
———, ♦ ♦ ♦
Mr. C. O. Edwards, Petersburg, Va.,
says: "Brown's Iron Bitters greatly bene
fited my wife, who was suffering from gen
eral debility and weakness.''
— .—*—•
Toilet Soap.—Drippings which accu
mulate, iv almost every household, can be
used for the grease. They should first be
boiled in water, and then left to cool; after
ward they should be removed from the wa
ter and boiled alone until the water is ex
pelled, The whiter the gwase can be made
the better tho soap will be. The ingredi
ents of the soap are six pounds of sal soda,
seven pounds of grease, three pounds of un
slackened lime, four gallons of soft water,
and one-half pound of borax. Boil the so
da and lime in the water until they are dis
solved ; let the mixture stand over night to
settle; pour off the clear lye, to which add
the grease and pulverized borax, and boil
to the consistency of honey. Take the
mixture from the stove, stir in one ounce
of sassafras or lavender, and pour it into a
tub, or what is still better, a tight, shallow
box, to cool, and when cold, cut into bars
and put on boards to dry,
WELLS' "BOUGH ON CO HNS."
Ask for Wells' "Rough on Corns.- 1 ' ISo.
Quick, complete, permanent cure. Corns,
warts, bunions.
, 1 .—ss>_-»
But one thing is certain: The people of
Virginia are not going to submit to the ne
gro being foisted to places of honor and
trust by the traitorous Mahoneites over the
white race. The negro in his place is all
of his place he is all wrong.
Virginians know where he belongs, and
they will see to it that he is kept there, de
spite Mahone, Cameron, etc.— Lynchburg
News.
. _s~•
DECLINE OF HAN.
Nervous Weakness, Dyspepsia, Impo
tence, Sexual Debility, cured by "Wells'
Health Renewer." fl.

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