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Staunton spectator. (Staunton, Va.) 1849-1896, July 17, 1883, Image 1

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RICHARD MAUZY,
Editor and Proprietor.
BATES OF SUBSCRIPTION.
The subscription price of the Spectator Is
$S.OO _V YEAR,
STRICTLY IN __.!> V-UVOE.
43" When payments are not made strictly in
advance Three Dollars will be charged.
aa- Any one sending us five new subscribers
and 810, will receive a copy ofthe paper for one
year, gratis.
PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY.
_ * _■ 9
TTt T. WATHAN, M. _»., ». ». ».,
Formerly ofthe Faculty ofthe Baltimore Col
lege of Dental Surgery.)
Dental Offloe.
No. 15 N. Augusta Street.
Sta ttnton, Va.
SPEClALTY:—Correcting Irregularities of
the natural teeth; restoring decayed parts of
the teeth with porcelain and gold; making ar
tinolal teeth upon Gold Alloy Cast Plates.
Gas Administered. marl_-tf.
HEADS F. WHITI. A. O. GOBDON.
White * eoßDoar,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.
Courts.—Augusta and adjoining counties,
Federal Court at Harrisonburg, Court of Ap.
peals of Virginia, at Staunton. feb2l-tf
•O S. SXKtsTZsGB,
.__• ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va
Office In Stout Building, Court-house Alley
RS. A. M. _fc H. H. HEXB-L,
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS,
Having entered Into co-partnership, lender
their professional servloes to the public. Spe
olal attention given to Surgery and diseases ol
tbe Eye and Ear.
Tbey may be consulted at all hours at the
office heretolore occupied by A. M. Eikkil,
M. D., No. 15, West Frederick Street. febls
CA. RICHARDSON,
. ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.
Special attention given to the collection ol
claims, and prompt returns made.
Coubts—Augusta and Rockingham.
Oj-fick—No. 2 Law Building. oct7
Wit, A. HUDSON. <VM. PATRICK.
HUDSON A PATRICK,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
StauntQN, Va.,
Will practice in the Courts of Augusta and
adjoining counties. Bpeoial attention paid to
collections. febl2-tf
I. R. TUCKEIi, H. ST. GEO. TUCK KB
Lexington, V i- Staunton, Va.
TUCKER .V 'x'HJCKKR,
-*• ATTOP.NFsirS-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.,
Will pra»_:f: . ,i.s i_ irts of Augusta and the
adjoining-c____ m. iuso in the Court of Ap
peals of Virginia, and will attend regularly the
Circuit Courts of Rockbridge. au22-tf
N. K. TROUT. W. _. CRAIG.
TROUT * CKAHst.
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
STAUNTON, VA.
W* have entered into Partnership as
Ltawyers, occupying the old Offices of the Senior
member. The Junior member will aid iv con
ducting the old business.
OzT- Particular attention given to collections.
Jels-tf
H. Ut. MATHEWS. ALEX. . . MATHEWS.
MATHEWS ._ MATHEWS,
_ TTOR S E YS-AT-LA W,
Lewisburg. West Va.,
Sractlce regularly In ths Courts of Greenbrier,
lonroe, Pocahontas and Nicholas counties, W.
Va., the Court of Appeals, and the Federal
Courts for the District of W. Va.
ss_j-Partlcular attention paid to Collections
nd to special cases anywhere in their State,
may 17—ly
GEORGE M. HARRISON,
ATTORNEY-AT-LA W,
Staunton, Va.,
will practice in all the Courts holden In Au
(usta county, and iv the Circuit Courts of the
adjoining counties.
*»-Btrict attention given to the collection of
Claims.
Office—No. 10 Lawyer's Bow, Court-house
Alley. oc 31—tf
r | .WOMAS I>. HANSON,
I ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Staonton. Va.
.Hers his professional services in the County
and Circuit Courts of Augusta, and In the Hus
tings Court and the Court of Appeals held in
Staunton. Will also prosecute claims else
where through legal correspoudents in this and
other States. may 30—ly.
PBES'SOS A ItAYLOiI,
ATTORNEY-AT-LAW ,
Ana JSmlicitor in Chancery, Staunton, Va.,
practices In all the Courts of Augusta and ad
'oining counties.
Office—Tbe same formerly occupied by bis
lather, Col. Geo. Baylor, dec'd. on Augusta st.,
jpposile the Court-house. no 21
\Tr_l. M. HcALLXSTER,
VV ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
W'a.iim ___p__________i Va.
Courts—Alleghany, Bath and Highland,' Va.,
nd Pocahontas, West Virginia.
__r~Special attention given to collection of
claims and proceeds promptly accounted for.
dec .3—tf
DR. JAMES ,f(>H_.rOi.,
DENTIST,
Main street, Staunton, Va.
vi, fil'k :—-Over Turner A Harman's Grocery
tore. dec 21—tf
T. C. ELDER. sVM. J. NELSON.
ELIIEK * NELSON,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
and Real Estate Agents,
may S Staunton, Va.
TAILORIHtt.
. 0 s>
J A.. HCTCHESOM,
. MERCHANT TAILOR,
109 E. Main St., Staunton, Ta.
I desire to call the attention of my friends
and the public to tbe fact that I have just re
ceived a most beautiful line of—
DRESS GOODS
FOR FALL AND WINTER WEAR.
I am prepared to furnish Gentlemen's suits, of
tbe very best materials, made up in the latest
styles aod in the most workmanlike manner,
at low prices, and satisfaction guaranteed. I
also keep a full line of Gents* Famishing
Goods, aw Give me a call before making
your purchases. Respectfully,
ootH-tf J. A. HUTCHESON.
I_> B. GRAVES,
Fashionable Tailor,
No. 103 E. Main St., Up Stairs, opposite
the Staunton Opera House.
Is prepared to give the same satisfaction In all
work as in former times.
Special Attention Paid to Catting.
Work done outside of shop. Cutting and re
pairing done in best manner and on short no
tice, aw TERMS CASH. -_» an_7-tf
-VJ-EFICJfI-kIVT T__.l__iO_.lNG
HEADQ UARTERS,
M. __. . McNAMABA,
NO. 10 NEW ST.,
STAUNTON, VA.
My Merchant Tailoring Establishment has
lust been fitted up witb a new and fine assort
ment of
Saltings, Cloth., Casslmeres, Ac,
FOR FALL AND WINTER,
ofthe latest styles and best manufacture.
•_»- Perfect fits guaranteed and orders prompt
ly executed.
O-U aod examine goods and prices. Jy 2-tf
BABE .k ..-'RINKEE,
FASHIONABLE TAILORS.
Sew St., next door to Mrs. Scherer's Millinery
store, and 3 doors from Loeb's Corner,
Staunton, Virginia.
Ail work in our line executed with neatness
and dispatch. Special attention paid to out
ing repairing and cleansing. augs—tf
MARBLE WOUK9.
.—*—.
VALLEY MARBLE WORKS,
STAUNTON, VA.
To the Peorle of Augusta and the Valley coun
ties :
Keep your money at Home is to prosper,
Bend It away Is to become impoverished.
Everything Is at very
.-■ ft, low prices, and Ia _. sell
w Ing Monuments, Head
'■-.'«!, A fi. and Foot Stones, as low
;•! _ _\_ I lor cash as any local or
i i.M'r.—yf I |\ traveling agent, or any
: " ■''i'JI/-ll II Marble dealer in the Uni
'*- !ils___3r____l ted States. Don't believe
; »_-"_- 3___j. anything to tbe contrary
• [in you come and see. '
.- '.__.___________» j. C. MARQUIS.
P. S.—l also call attention to my Catalogue
of Designs of the Wonderful White Bron .c
Monuments and Head Stones. au27-tf
LIVERY STABLES.
• —s» >
m'MMEK ARRANGEMENT.
THE BEST LIVERY IN THE STATE.
@jjsfyi%\ AMERICAN HOTEL
■ Islvery Stables.
"•„••, 'HOBNBUBG Proprietor.
ho. _JP- refl tted my stables and added a num
__i _. . hol " s es and vehicles to my stock, I
EivliSPK"™ to accommodate the summer
it _____ 'beraost elegant and handsome style
at reasonable prices.
_e_erall ."-,?,.•- ,Un,n S and Pleasure Parties
▼. hlcfe dP.T.'_ be supplied with any kind ol
t-l« D _r.i red * at low prices,
and the _~_i,l y lnvlte m ? former customers
-£«.__..■. Wlc eenerally to give me a call.
~„ {_.J 0 "' ouaranleed.
J'Wl^ f ______ B. T. THORNBURG.
M-s- 1. . B J alj nton, Va., Januajy 15,1883.
« orother, D. C. GRAHAM, will have an
_-~ 1 _ r ? s V n my Grocery and Produce bus
_i_? __ . st<5 t< U f _ >m Jan * lst - and the firm name
■Will be J. E. GRAHAM * BROTHER.
J anlß J. E. GRAHAM.
otattttton -tfft Bptcttxtox.
• ■*^__»" ?•
VOL. 60.
CLOTHING.
T AB6E LOT OF
SPRING AND SUMMER
CLOTHING
AT
mm mm prices !
Having more stock than I wish to carry, I
will from this day offer my large stock of
SPRING AND SUMMER
CLOTHING
At Reduced Prices.
A good many will bo sold for
COST AND LESS.
I have a
A MICE Ui OF GiDS,
and will
GOT BARGAINS!
to those wiio want
ill II 1MB!
CALL JkT ONCE.
Mm- B O TROUBLE TO SHOW GOODS. -©»
All Goods Guaranteed as Represented.
JNO. W. ALBY,
jel2 Old Stand, No. 21 New Street.
I THE til EHi
CLOTHING UIL
OPERA HOUSE BE ILDIXR,
STAUNTON, VA.
THE till MTU IN ME
ON MAIN STREET.
JAMES A. AEMENTROUT,
with an experience of 20 years in the Clothing
Business, has the management of
OUR :.E .. ESTABLISHHi-NT,
and would bepleased to see his friends and cus
tomers before buying
CLOTHING!
AND
Furnishing Goods
ELSEWHERE.
_5H Jb_%W *-_-€»«__>:»«§
WILL BE ADDED
-Thvougrl-owt the Season.
WE MANUFACTURE
0101 mik
IN PHILADELPHIA,
which enabled us to offer
Special Inducements.
*m- GIVE ME A CALL,
AND DON'T FORGET THE PLACE.
JAMES A. ARMENTUO _ T.
Jes Manager for LOEB BROS.
ATTENTION!
GENTLEMEN!!
mm-.
«-TAK_: IVOTICE that In con
sequence of the present partnership existing
between—
HILB & RUTHERFORD,
Which will expire October lst, we will sell our
present stock
AT COST,
STRICTLY CASH.
THE STOCK
IN QUALITY, QUANTITY, AND MAKE-UP
CANNOT BE BEATEN.
All Goods In the house
Warranted Sound.
No Damaged Stock.
We will Bell at this rate from this day utnll
September lst next.
1 TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 1
OW Our friends may examine every stosk of
Clothing in tbe City, and in looking over our
stock they will be convinced we have stated
nothing but facts. Call early, for your own
benefit.
HILB & RUTHERFORD,
Nos. 11 and 16 New Street,
augl STAUNTON, VA.
GROCERIES, &c.
,—m —♦ *
GARRETT G. GOOCH. CHARLES E. HOGE
HENRY HUTCHINSON.
GOOCH, HOGE 8. CO.,
WHOLESALE GROCERS
AND
Commission Merchants,
DEALERS IN
Flour, Grain, Seeds, Tobacco & Segars,
STAUNTON, VA.
W* sell only to dealers, whom we respectfully
solicit to give us a trial order. Our prices we
promise to make compare favorably with Bal
timore and Richmond. septl9-tf
J. A. HAMBICK. j. a. FAUVER.
J A. HAMBICK _fc CO..
. DEALERS IN
GROCERIES /USD PRODUCE*
Make a Special." or
Leather and Shoe Findings
He_dquar.ers.for Harness leather.
Highest Casta Price paid for
1e_15.'83-ly SLAUGHTERED HIDES.
DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
THE BEST I
OF ALL
LINIMENTS
FOB ____N AND BEAST.
For more than ft third of a century the
M exlcau Mv _ir.i_;: _r, in;-_ac_.it has been
known to millions all over the world as
the only safe reliance for the relief of
M accidents ami pain, it Is a medicine
B above j.rice nnd praiso—the best of its
H k in-i. Jfar every focra of external pain
9 Mustang* Liniment is without an equal.
j It penetrates HcsK and muscle to
Hthe -very bone—making the con tin v-
Hance of pain and inflammation lmpos-
Bslble. Ite effects upon Human Flesh and
■ the Brute Creation are equally wonder*
■ ful. The Mexican
MUSTANG
■ Liniment is needed by somebody In
■ every house. Every day brings news of
H the agony of an awful scald or burn
■ subdued, of rheumatic martyrs re
■ stored, or a valuable horse or ox
B saved by the healing power of this
LINIMENT
B which speedily cures sueli ailments of
Rtlie HUMAN FLESH as
I Bb.cmitUra, Swellings, Stiff
3Joints, Contracted . lusclca. Burns
Mund Scalds, Cuts, Bruises and
gj-pr-ins, Poisonous Bites and
JHStings. 6ti__kess, Isumeness, Old
■ Sores, Ulcers, Frostbites, Chilblains,
■ Sore Nipples, Caked Breast, and
■ Indeed every form of external _i»-
Scase. Itheals wl l tiou t scars.
| For tbo Beote Creation it cures
I Sprains, Swinny, Stiff Joints,
■ Foaader, Hsrncss Sores, Hoof J. is-
Met-ses, Foot Hot, .crew _ Von_, Scab,
B Hollow Horn, Scratches, Wlnd-
M talis, Spavin, Thrush, Kingbone,
Hold Sores, Poll J-Vil, Film npon
Htlio _■ __t and every otlier ailment
to .v.1.-si tne occupants of tiie
S_&bl o and Stoelc Yard are liable.
Tho Mexican Mustang Xsiniment
always cures and never Ui.appoints;
and it is, positively,
THE BEST
OP ALL
fO3 _____1T OB BEAST,
maris 83 ly
XK-T SABY XT SIST C_
DR. FAHRNEY'S
TEETHII SYRUP.
IT has never failed to give the most perfect satis
faction. Thousands of mothers arc using it all
through the land, and all are pleased with its charm
ing effects. It Maintains the Baey's Health by
Keeping it fkeh from Colic and Diarrikea. Do
not stupefy your Baby with Opium or Morphia Mix
tures, but use
Br. Falirne. •_ Tee.lii.iis- Syrup,
which is always safe and reliable. It soothes and
quijts the Cim.n, Relieves PAi_a_d Inflammation
and gives Sv.-eet, Natural Sleep to Baues and
Rest to Mothers. All Druggists and Medicine
Dealers Sell it.
TWEI.7Y-FIYE CENTS A BOTTLE.
. Prepared By
1521. ___ _. ___3__._T___r ets SO_T,
HAGERSTOWN, MD.
aprlO '83-ly
Hall's Vegetable Sicilian Hair
Rexewer is a scientific combination
of some of the most powerful restora
tive agents in the vegetable kingdom.
It restores gray hair to its original
color. It makes the scalp white and
clean. It cures dandruff and humors,
and falling-out of the hair. It furnishes
the nutritive principle by which the
hair is nourished and supported. It
makes the hair moist, soft and glossy,
and is unsurpassed as a hair dressing.
It is the most economical preparation
ever offered to the public, as its effects
remain a long time, making only an
occasional application necessary. It is
recommended and used by eminent
medical men, and officially endorsed by
the State Assayer of Massachusetts.
The popularity of Hall's Hair Renewer
has increased with the test of mauy
years, both in this country and in
foreign lands, aud it is now known and
used in all the civilized countries of
the world.
For sale by all dealers.
feb27 '83-ly
BOOTS AND SHOES.
c. lT^^ller,
No. 4 W_l Maiu St.,
BTAIINTO.-, V_k..
BOOTS, SHOES
Slippers, Sandals, Pump.,
HATS, CAPS,
UMBKELLAS, Etc.
A full line of BROAD BOTTOM, FLAT HEE.
SHOES, for old Ladies and Gents.
BOYS', MISSES', AND CHILDREN'S
SCHOOL SHOES,
W A SPECIALTY OF "®»
REAL FIRST-CUSS SHOES*
Orders Solicited by Hall.
OW All Goods warranted as represented.
aprl9
TIpLATILEF
*£. PIMP l
||BUYTHE_BEST.
If BLATCHLEY'S
- _^'______ TRIPLE ENAMEL
"as®! porcelain-lined
_• OB
SEAMLESS TUBE
MS : copper-lined
WPUMP
"- ______ D° not be argued into
_£__H|D£_K. buying: inferior Goods.
_H__ * __ __M_! For Bale by tbe best
--_■'■ hou.os in the Trade.
<rcrgLATCHLEY,Nlan_irr,
. 308 MARKET ST., Philad'a.
Write to me for name ot nearest Agent.
aprlo-6m

Tj-Isl>Eß, NELSON «. CISHISKS,
REAL ESTATE AGENTS,
No. 103 Sontta Augusta Street,
STAUNTON, VA.
REAL ESTATE bought, sold, and excbansed.
OW Write for description of properties lv our
hands for sale.
tJB. Money to Loan on Real Estate Security,
Jan3-tf
STAUNTON, VA., TUESDAY, JULY 17, 1883.
DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
LYDIA E. PINKHAM'S
VEGETABLE OOMPOUm
la a Popitlve Core
For all those P____l (':.:_ plaints awl Weaknesses
so eemmon to our best female population.
A Medicine for Woman. Invented by a Wonian.
Prepared by a Woman.
The Ors_t_t _e_:_ Dbeav. / Sine, lis* Btwn of History.
S_rltrevivestbe dro opinp spirits, invigorates and
harmonises the organic functions, gives elasticity and
firmness to the step, restores the natural lustre to tho
eye, and plants on tbe pale cheek of woman the fresh
roses of life's spring and early summer time.
Use li and Prescribe It Freely.-S*
It removes t alntness, flat uloney, destroys all craving
for stimulant, and relieves weakness of tbe stomach.
That feeling: of bearing: down, causing pain, weight
and backache, Is always permanently cured by Its use.
For the cure or Kidney Complaints of either sex
this Compound Is unsurpassed.
I.TDIA E. PINKHA_Fi BLOOD PURIFIEK
will eradicate ©very vestige of Humors from the
Blood, and give ton© and strength^to the system, of
man woman or child. Insist on having it.
Both the Compound and Blood Purifier are prepared
at 233 and 235 Western Avenue, Lynn, Alas, .rice of
either, t- Sl* bottles for $5. Bent by mail In the form
of pills, or of lozenges, on receipt of price, $1 per box
for either. Mrs. Pinkham freely answers all letters of
Inquiry. Enclose Set. stamp. Send for pamphlet.
Ro family should be without LTD IA E. P_J____TS
LIVEU PIIX3. They cure constipation, biliousness,
and torpidity of the liver. 85 cents per box.
ZS- .old by nllDrujrgists.-. ■» 0)
seps '82-ly
Did _lie Die?
"No!
"She lingered and suffered along, pining
away ail the time for years,"
"The doctors doing licr no good;"
"And at last was cured by this Hop Bllters
the papers s_y s » much about."
"Indeed! Indeed!"
"How thankful we (should be for that medi
cine."
A Daughter's Misery.
"Eleven years our daughter suffered on a bp9
of misery,
"From a complication of kidney, liver,rheu
matic trouble and Nervous debility.
"Under tbe care of the best physicians,
"Who gave her disease various names,
"But no relief,
"And now sbe is restored to us In good health
by aa simple a remedy as Hop Bitters, that we
had snnnned for years beiore using it."—The
Parents.
Father is <*- .tiugr Well.
"My daughters say: —
"How much better f. iber is since he used
Hop Bitters."
"He 1» getting well after his long suffering
from a disease declared incurable,"
"And we are so glad that he used your Bit
ters."-A Lady ol Utica, N. Y.
g H_\BBEEN PROVED -,•
- The SUREST CURE for .
i KIDNEY DISEASES. .
Doesalame bade or disordered Turf.c int-i- a
®oate that you are a victim P THEN" DO HOT J
C H_£SITA_7E; use .Kidney-Wort at ones, (drug- _;
Agists recommend It) and It will speedily ovejs fc
** come tiie disease and restore healthy action, o
0 a SkfWt/BkC -For complaints iK.culiar >
£ ■■d-Ul'CC'a to your sex, such c r jpain_J
_.
g as it will act promptly and safely.
EitfcierSex. Incontinence,retention of-uKae, -5
* briefcdnst or ropy deposits, sjnd dull drags-big C
C pains, all apeedily yield to its curative power. 2
* _3- SOLD BY AHi DB.TPGOISTS. _Prios jfl.* *
sept-5 '82-ly
Keafih is Wealth!
Lut E. (*. West's H_-TO and Bbain Tkkat
me.-s-t, a guaranteed (ceeific for Hysteria, Dizzi.
ros_ Convulsions, Fit-, Nervous Neuralgia,
Heartache, Nervous Prostration caused by the use
of alcohol.or tobacco, Wakefulness, Mental De
pression, Softening of the Brain resulting in in
sanity and leading to misery, decay and death
Prcmalure Old Age, Barrenness, Lose of ;.—.ver
in either sex. Involuntary Losses anil Bp'jnnat.
orr].i_a caused by over-exertion of the bin in, self
ahnse or over-indulgence. Each bor contains
one month's treatment. $1.00 a box, or six boxen
lor $5.00, sentby mail prepaid on receipt of pries.
WIS tt_.___-A-.Tl__- SIX BOXES
To cure any case. With each order received 'or n«
for six boxes, accompanied with $5.0. i. v.-c will
•end the pnrchaser our written guarantee to re
fund th, money if the treatment does not e_*_.t
a cure. Guarantees issued only by
BO_.EliL_.i_ BROTHERS, PlU*Cl_,._,
I.iolsmcs-d, "-<.«».
dec!2'S2-ly 2qr paid'
WINES, LIQUORS, &c.~
9% —o* -'-» ■ . —■
rj.__E _r.i;tiM:n a- engel. brewing
co., I'niisAnr.i.PHiA, pa.
.TAUNTON DKPOT,
ROBERT HILL, Jr., Manager.
Having completed our Ice-house here, we are
now prepared to lurnish our celebrated
Premium Lager Beer.
In any quantity, not at the Lowest Price, but
at a price that will enable and justify us to
make a
PURE _V__tTlC_Lli_.
We do not claim to compete with any one In
price, but for purity and excellence of quality,
we are unsurpassed.
OW All orders sent lo our Depot, Slaunton,
Va,, will be prompliy tilled.
_M.TTI.U_S BEER-A Specialty.
June 26 '. ..-ly.
Tj-11-EST ____.)_ I.l> S. OF
Augusta County Whiskies.
ALSO IMPOETED AND DOMESTIC
LIQUORS
of all kinds,
ta- At WHOLESALE and RETAIL.
BURKE «fc _3R,-_.T>_L,__.7i",
Masonic Building,
oct!2 '80-tf Staunton. Va.
__A._ 1 11. T. M v; '' oareintcrcstsil ' n
cheaply and successfully
should write us for our pamphlet on pure
fertilizers. _g*A flood fertilizer can be made
at hornet or about $12 a ton by composting
with_POWELL'S PR__ ftREQ CHEMICALS.
Referencesin EverySia'a. siKg-Agentswanfed
forunoccupiedterritory. Apply with references.
BROWN CHEMICAL CO."
Manufacturers of
Powell's Tip-Top Bone Fertilizer,
Bone, Potash. Ar.imonia, &c.
16 LIGHT STREET, BALTIMORE, MP.
D. L. SNYDER, agent, StribllngSprlngs, Va.
je26-3m»
M nfl A week made at home by the indus
■ ■ 111 Itrious. Best business now before the
% Capital not. needed. We will
JL I _r start you. Men, women, boys and
.Jl fl £■ .1 rls wanted everywhere to work for
us. Now Is the time. You can work
In spare time, or give j our whole time to tha
business. No other business will pay you near
ly as well. No one can fall to make cnormou B
pay, by engaging at once. Costly outfit and
terms free. Money made fast, easily, and hon
orably. Address True A Co., Augusta, Maine.
feb_o-ly
I ■ .1
t»OET X, V .
THE DATS IsONO AGO.
The grain was cut and bound
In waiting sheaves.
We paced the harvest-ground,
'Mid drifted leaves,
And watched the sun's last glow-
Just you and I—
In the days long ago—
The days gone by.
We talked, as lovers will,
Of hope and bliss.
And made our pauses thrill
With kiss for kiss-
How should our young hearts know
That love can diet
In the days loiig ago—
The days gone by.
Ah, me! I watched the grain
Bound yesterday,
Aud saw, along the lane,
Two lovers stray—
With whispers soft and loiv,
As you and I
Strayed, In days long ago—
Tbe days gone by !
I blesßed them, as I stood,
The happy pair-
To whom Love seemed all good,
And life all fair.
My tears—tbey could but flow—
Ask me not why !
For the days long ago—
Tbe days gone by !
ON THE BEACH.
I drank Tyith her tlio wine of life
Beside the ocean beach;
The merry thronp pressed slowly on
Along the sandy reach ;
White specks of sails, far out at se ■>,
Swept down the distance dim,
And ocean's ceaseless monotone
Chantod a vesper hymn.
The sky was blue; the air was filled
Wlta life's ambrosial wine;
And sweet blue eyes 'neatb drooping lids
Looked lovingly in mine.
A beauty rested on the sea,
A glory on the shore,
And softened by the distance, came
The music of the oar.
Far out at sea, a little cloud,
No larger than the hand,
Came up, and gathered strength and grew,
And darkened all the land.
The crowd dispersed ; we followed not
The terror-stricken Hock;
But close I drew her to my side
Beneath a sl.elteriug rock.
And then, the lightning flashing past,
The thunder in our ears,
I told her all my love for her—
My hopes, my doubts, my fears.
Oh, blessed hour! her lips met mine!
We heard no wailing blast;
The sun broke forth with light divine;
Tbe storm was over—past!
A glory shone on land and sea,
A light unseen before,
As slowly we retraced our way
Along the golden shore.
Ah, well! lam an old man vow.
Yet, with affection proud,
sSafe in each other's love we hide
From every threat'ning cloud !
Froai the Rockingham Register, July sth.
History of Mc(.aheysville.
BY THE PUPILS OP THE MCGAHEYSVILLE
SCHOOL.
[We are indebted to our valued corres
pondent at McGaheysville for the interest
ing history of that ancient village which we
lay before onr readers to-day. The histo
ry was compiled by the pupils of McGah
eysville school and rt ad at the recent Com
mencement exercises. This enterprise
should be imitated by all country towns.—
Editor Register.']
We have partially traced the settlement
of McGaheysville as far back as 1740. For
a space of 23 years after that time we have
been unablo to find anything of the prog
ress of the settlement. A patent for the
lands in and around McGaheysville was
granted by George 111 to Peter Miller and
Jacob Harman, in 1763. The portion of
land granted to Miller afterward passed
from him to John Long, grandfather of our
well-known patriarchal citizen, Mr. J. C.
Wetzel. The portion granted to Harman—
a family now extinct passed from him to
Mr. Conrad. This was then called West
Augusta, afterward changed to Rocking
ham. This village was first called Ursulas
burg in honor Mrs. John Long, a highly
and accomplsshed lady, and grandmother
of Mr. Wetzel. She had a most excellent
library, was a swiss by birth and educated
in that country, and was connected to a
Lord of considerable note. After her fath
er's death she came to this country—date
not known—and married John Long, a
minister.
The first McGahey of whom wo have any
account was Wm. McGahey, who was born
in Glasgow, Scotland, Oct. 26th 1741. When
he was 9 years old his paronts moved to
Antrim, Poland. At the age of twenty,
he left his home for America, where ho
landed iv 1761. He married Ann Kincade,
Aug. 7lh 1864, and their son Tobias Ran
dolph McGahey, was born in, Dover, Del.,
March 24th, 1766. He came to Rocking
ham county in 1801, and married Mrs. Ma
ry Eve Conrad, the widow of the Conrad
spoken of in the first part of the sketch.
She was known afar for her wealth, and
her residence was the corner house—at one
time a blacksmith shop—now owned by
Mrs. Wetzel. After his marriage he re
built the property now occupied by Mr. Ber
ry. This house had been built at an earli
er date by a Mr. Patran. Mr. McGahey
established a postoffice in 1802 and called it
MsGaheysville—the room that was used for
the postoffice is still to be seen. It is the
small attachment on the west corner of the
same building. At the expiration of 19
years his wife departed this life, Nov. lst,
1819. May 21st, 1821, he married Elizabeth
Anderson, of Woodstock, Shenandoah Co.,
Va., and three years after his marriage he
sold his home to Solomon Pirkey who held
the office of postmaster until his death. In
the Spring of 1827 Mr. McGahey moved to
his farm, "Bonny Brook," one mile cast of
this village, where he lived the life of an
independent farmer, and the landlord of a
hotel that was noted throughout the Valley
for the urbanity and hospitality of its pro
prietor. In 1831 he entered the mercantile
business which he continued until his death,
December, 1843. He has one daughter and
two sons who are still living. lie was
known by many as "Uncle Toby."
Another of the first settlers was Peter
Bolinger, of Cumberland, Maryland, who
married Rebecca, sister of T. R. McGahey.
They moved to this village about the year
1802, purchased the home now owned by
his daughter, Rebecca Bader, and estab
lished a brewery —making an article of beer
that was noted throughout the Valley for
its superior quality. The site of the brew
ery was where the new dwelling of A. J.
Bader now stands. He was lst Lieutenant
of the Rockingham volunteer company,
which went by order of the government to
.ho defensive protection of Norfolk, in the
war of 1812. He died in 1835, and his re
mains were interred in the Lutheran and
Reformed graveyard. The first mill was
built by Layman, and was situated where
the remains of the woolen factory is now
to be seen. It was bought by Jacob Pir
key. His brother Solomon then bought
the McGahey property and kept entertain
ment and a wagon yard, and frequently
twelve or fifteen wagons on their way to or
from Richmond or Fredericksburg, would
put up the same night. He also had a
sawmill on the lot now occupied by Mrs.
Bonds. The first store house was built by
Jos. Mauzy in 1805, near where the dwell
ing of J. Baugher now stands ; soon after
he built the frame building attached to the
brick house now owned by Richard Mauzy,
and in 1825 he built the brick house. At
that time he rode to Baltimore on horse
back for his goods. The old store was torn
down about one year ago and the shingles
composing the roof were found to be solid,
after remaining on the roof nearly a centu
ry. The first hatter shop was opened by
Mr. Liggett, grandfather of the present
lawyer Liggett of Harrisonburg, on the lot
now owned by Z. D. Gilmore. This after
wards passed into the bonds of Gilmore in
1828. The first tannery was opened by a
Mr. Propst; later it went into possession
of David Irick, who was the father of the
late A. B. Irick, President of the first Na
tional Bank of Harrisonburg. The first
schoolhouse stood just in the rear of Dr.
Hammen's office. The first teacher was a
Mr. Bernhardt. His home was where the
Rev. I. Conder now lives. Afterwards
George Mauzy taught up-stairs for a num
ber of years, while he occupied the lower
part as a dwelling. Miss .Tennetta Conrad
was teacher about the year 1832. Nezt
Harrison Jeffries and Joseph Mauzy, son of
Michael Mauzy. This old building was al
so used for warrant trials, elections, and
even preaching. The land upon which it
stood was given to the ''Old Church" by
Mr. Burner, who owned all the land which
had belonged to McGahey southeast of the
pike, about the year 1810. Dr. Bashau
was the first physician. He located where
Wm. Bering now lives. Next was Dr.
Thrasher, who located in 1830 on a lot
known as the Samuel Lindamood property.
The first merchant mill was owned by Ma
thias Snyder. The farm is now owned by
.lessie Bowcock. The store now occupied
by C. E. Hammen was built in 1845 by a
Mr. Abbott for a tailor-shop. The first
church, thought by some to have stood
where the "Old Church" now stands,
and by others to have stood where Mt. Oli
vet Cemettfry is now situated. It was own
ed'by no particular sect or denomination,
but people came ten or fifteen miles with
thcii- guns and would stack them near the
door, ready for a surprise from the Indians.
The next church was built and the congre
gation was organized in 1769, and was
known as the Peaked Mountain Church.-
The church now standing was built in 1800
by Nicholas Leap. The pastor at that
time was a man by the name of Brown who
traveled horseback over Frederick, Shen
andoah, Page, Pendleton, and Rockingham
counties, preaching once a month at each
place. The Methodist church was built in
1835 by a Mr. Bader. This brings us to
within the present age, and we will simply
add the census as taken by Master C. C.
Hering. It includes the census of a limit
regarded as belonging to the village. It
is as follows : Total number of inhabitants,
311 ; number under five, 40 ; overlive, 271;
number able to read and write, 180; of il
literate 91—most of whom are colored ;
number that attend school 66; number of
property owners 55 ; total number of color
ed inhabitants, 81.
OLD TEOPLE.
Our vallagc can boast of some of the old
est people in the country and we can lay
undisputed claim to several, one of whom
is Mr. John C. Wetzel who was born at
McGaheysville, in 1802, and has made it
his home ever since. He is a living model
of temperance, and is well and hearty at
the present time. Mrs. Wetzel is only a
year or two younger than her husband. An
other very old man is Mr. Himler, an old
bachelor, 80 years of age, and a native of
Germany.
A traditional fact of the village is that at
an early date in its history the surrounding
country was nothing more thau a treeless
prairie, and one could see for miles. The
first stock raisers at evening, when they
wished to know the whereabouts of their
cattle, had only to go to the high grounds
now occupied by Mt. Olivet Cemetery, and
there they could see for miles over a wav
ing mass of tall grass and undergrowth,
with here and there a tree standing erect
like watchers over the stock. What a dif
ference between then and now! Then
nothing more thau a silent prairie roamed
by the wild boasts and the almost equally
wiid Indians, the stilness only broken by
the murmuring of some brooh as it mean
dered toward the sea, or the warwhoop of
the red man in his battles against a rival
tribe, or attacking some hardy pioneer set
tlement, where the white mail's axe and
hoe had pointed him out to their vengeance.
Now there are no signs of tho Indian ; he
is gone toward tho setting sun and his war
song is hoard no more, his former presence
hardly known of by the child of the white
man, his hunting ground occupied by farms
and villages, and the game he sought either
killed by the white man or driven away by
tho whistle of the locomotive as it rushes
along at amost lightning speed.
For the Spectator.
All Unit Remains of Fort Dearborn.
Mr. Editor: —Although I had crossed
and re-crossed the Chicago River at tho
"Bush" street bridge repeatedly, it was by
accident my eye caught sight of a marhlo
tablet inserted in the end of a building,
built on the site of Fort Dearborn, that
contained this inscription, and which a
pile of lumber temporarily concealed:
"This building occupies the site of Old
Fort Dearborn, which extended a little
across Michigau Avenue aud somewhat into
the river as it vow is. The Fort was built
in 1803-4, forming our outmost defences.
By order of Oen. Hull, it was evacuated
ou August loth, 1812, after its stores and
provisions had been distributed among the
Indians. Very soon after the Indians at
tacked and massacred about -0 of the
troops, and a number of citizens, in
cluding women and children, and next day
burned the Fort. January, 1810, it was re
built, but after the Black Hawk war, it
went into gradual disuse, and in .lay,
1837, was abandoned by the army, but was
occupied by various Government officers
until 1857, when it was toru down, except
a single buildinir, which stood upon this
site till the great fire of October 9th, 1871.
At the suggestion of the Chicago Histori
cal Society this tablet was erected by W.
M. Hoyt, November, 1880." J. H. An
derson, Rose-hill, fecit.
. Mr. Hoyt is the occupant of the build
ing, and the Rush-street bridge is the first
from the Lake, and perhaps 200 yards dis
tant, of the movable ones crossing the
river. Occasional.
If disease has entered the system the only
way to drive it out is to purify and enrich
the blood. To this end, as is acknowledged
by all medical men, nothing is better adapt
ed than iron. The faith hitherto has been
that iron could not be so prepared as to fee
absolutely harmless to the teeth. This dif
ficulty has been overcome by the Brown
Chemical Company of Baltimore, Md.. who
offer their Brown's Iron Bitters as a fault
less iron preparation, a positive cure for
dyspepsia, indigestion, kidney troubles, etc.
♦ —♦—.
Preserving Eggs.—Mrs. True of Ne
braska, sajs she preserves eggs in cleau,
fresh, sweet oats ; a layer of oats, then a
layer of eggs, small end down. She begins
the lst of September, and continues till she
h._s "oated" down thirty tofifty dozen, and
finds them always fresh and good.
'V''*A doubtful friend is worse thau a
certain enemy,'' and rice versa a certain
friend is infinitely better than a doubtful
enemy. Thus Kidney-"Wort is an incom
parably better friend to the human race
than whole catalogues full of doubtful nos
trums. It is an unfailing remedy for that
tormenting disease, piles. It moves the
bowels gently and freely, and thus removes
the cause. Do not fail to try it faithfully
either in dry or liquid form.
. _ ♦
"Tour siu will surely find you out," said
the good man to his wayward sou. "Don't
care, dad," replied the young reprobate,
"so long as nobody don't find out my sin."
. _i ♦
One voice all over the land goes up from
mothers, that says, "My daughters are so
feeble and sad, with no strength, all out of
breath and life at the least exertion. What
can we do for them ?" The answer is sim
ple and full of hope. One to four weeks'
use of Hop Bitters will make them healthy,
rosy, sprightly, and cheerful.
NO. 44.
Tho Old and the Xew.
HE WANTED A NOVEL WITH THE OID
HEALTHY TONE.
"Since my eyes gave out," remarked the
old man sadly, as he scrutinized the bookg
on the reviewer's table, "since my eyes gave
out I haven't been able to do any readh_
and I've lost the run of the present style of
novel. Are there much different than they
were when I was a boy V
"They haven't changed any,'* replied the
reviewer kindly. "I should say they were
the same now they were twenty years ago."
"Does the pretty girl say 'Alphonze, I
love but thee!' and fall on her knees and
pray high heaven to spare him when he
jumps overboard to rescue her hated rival
from a shark? I used to get right up and
turn ..round when I came to that part.
Have they altered it in any way?"
"That is the point on which the last novel
turned," murmured the reviewer. "Only
it wasn't a shark. He saves the hated ri
val when she is threatened by an alligator.
They go mostly on Indians lately."
"That's it!" exclaimed the old man, with
glistening eye?. "The same old business.
The brave trapper says, 'Back to thy wig
wam, savage, or by the settin' sun I had
slew theo with these hands, ere thou hadst
laid impious touch upon the pale daughter
of the white face!' and then the Indian
skedaddles out and setsjupljobs on the girl's
young lover. Oh, I'm onto all that style.
When I used to read these things I wanted
to cover myself over with red paint and
tear the hair out ofthe plaster on the walls.
"And the Indians catch the girl, aud the
young lover crawls up thenightbefore they
aro going to burn her at the stake a_d cuts
the ropes aud puta her on the neck of a po
ny, spriugs np behind her and, with a de
moniac laugh, speeds away to his mountain
fastness. That's the idea!" and the review
er, who had imbibed the old man's enthn
siaui, rubbed his hand 3 aud forgot his debts.
"I don't see how them writers think of
all these things;" pondered the old man.
"Then there was the fellow who used to
defy the millionaire father and run away
with the girl and get married in his overalls.
Do you ever hear how he made out to get
another job ?"
"He's just tho same he was when you were
a boy. The only difference is ho makes a
fortune in Wall street now, and then takes
the father as junior partner i_ some scheme
that lands them both in a jail, and the girl
elopes with an actor."
"Of course, you've got to expect some
improvement as you grow older," conceded
the old man, with a sigh. "The world
don't stand still. How about the murderer,
nowadays ? Does the younger man with
the broad shoulders take him by the neck
and say, 'Hound, thou hast forfeited thy
dastardly life, but in the light of the happi
ness that dawned upon me through the
miscarriage of thy machination, I let thee
go!' And then, does the murderer slink
away and fall into the water as he crosses
the canal? That's another thing that used
to trip me every rattle. I've seen the time
I have bored a hole in the cellar floor with
the top of my head over that business."
"He's the same old murderer," replied
the reviewer. "Thoro hasn't been any
change in him, except that once in a while
he turns out to bo an Irish informer, is paid
for his testimony, gets drunk on the profits,
and dies of delirium tremens."
"That's a new death for him," remarked
the old man. "But I suppose they got
stuck for .onlething fresh once ia a while
and have to keep up with the dewands of
the times. How about the bank president
who woulden't forgive his daughter when
she rau away with the honest young pirate ?"
"By the way, there is something new
about him!" exclaimed the reviewer.
"They used to make him die of apoplexy,
but under the new laws ihc-y have the cashier
default and take away ail the old man's
property to pay tho depositors. Then the
pirate brings out a lot of gold cups and
starts the old man i:i another bank, and
they all get rich together."
"I dent think that's as good as the other,"
complained the old man, shaking his head,
"Apoplexy was more shure, and it didn't
give him a chance to default on the unsus
pectin' pirate.
"That's so," admitted the reviower.
"Then there was tho young girl what
took in sewin' rather'ii marry the old gen
tleman with the gout. Is she gittin' pretty
stiddy work all the time now or does she
marry the objec' of her choice ?"
"Oh, that's all been calcirained and white
washed," retorted the interviewer. "Now,
she is taken with diphtheria and dies in the
young man's arms.
"Thank God I've hist my eyesight!" ejac
ulated the old man, fervently. "Not any
of that onto my plate, please. Why, sir,
I've enjoyed that young girl's making shirts,
for a cent apiece, until my haudkerchiefs
gave out. And then her bein' insulted by
her employer's son until sho had to give up
that store and peg shoes, where she was
found by the distracted lover and married
by a justice of the peace and taken to his
elegant brown stone mansion. Have they
busted all that np ?
"I havn't seen anything of it lately," re
plied the reviewer.
"Then I don't want any more novels in
my soup!" growled the old man, outraged
beyond description. "They've spoiled the
whole business! I jest hanked on that girl,
and if what you tell me is .all _o, none of
my children read any more novels until
they get back to the oid healthy tone!" and
the old man stalked out to raise a row at
home and put down novel reading until
the heroine should get back to the shirt
trade.— llrooklipi Eagle.
' .—♦ —ss
A Bird's Appetite.—Tho appetite of
the bird is wonderful. A thrush will eat at
a meal the largest snail that England pro
duces. If a man could cat in proportion
he would consume a whole round of beef
for his dinner. The redbreast, again, is a
most voracious bird. It has beeu calculated
that to keep a redbreast up to his normal
weight au amount of animal food is re
quired daily equal to an earth worm four
teen feet in length. Taking a man of av
erage weight, and measuring bulk for bulk
with the redbreast, I tried to calculate how
much food he wonld consume in twenty
four hours if he ate as much in proportion
as the bird. Assuming a sausage nine
inches in circumference a3 a fair equivalent
of the earth worm, I find that the man
would have to eat sixty-seven feet of such
sausage to every twent-four hours. I men
tion this in order to illustrate the amount
of work which is done by insect-eating
birds.— Good Words.
Miko Ginnigan (to postoffice clerk) —
"Sure, is there ary lether for me ?" Clerk—
"What name ?" Mike—, 'Oh, nivir mind the
name. Don't ye be too inquasitive. Oi
ownly wants me lether." Clerk —"Yes;
but I cannot give you a letter unless I know
your name." Mike—"Well, thin, me name
is Pat O'Donnell." The clerk could find
no letter for that name, and MikeJ went
off muttering: "The inquasitive spalpeen
thought as how he was schmart; but Oi'ra
arter pullin' the wool over his oiyes, for
Oi guv him the wrong name!"
•« r ......;: on rats."
Clears out rats, mice, roaches, flies, ants,
bed-bugs, skunks, chipmunks, gophers. 15
cents. Druggists.
"Women aro so contrary," said Blobbs.
—"I thought when I got married my wife
would daru my socks, and let me alone ; in
stead of that she lets my socks alone and
darns me."
. — em—.
"BUCIICPAI-A."
Quick, complete cure, all annoying Kid
ney, Bladder and Urinary Diseases. $1.
Druggists.
An Irishman, watching a game of base
ball, was sent to the grass by ■ foul, which
struck him under the fifth rib. "A fowl,
was it? Och, sure, I thought it was a
mule!"
. _ .
"MOTHEB SWAN'S WORDS STRUP."
Infallible, tasteless, harmless, cathartic ;
for feverishness, restlessness, "worms, con
stipation. 35c.
f ttumtott %vtthim
"IbXmTrmiof^Oy^mTs^aiti.
Ad vektisem-e. ts will be 1 nserted at the ra •
of 81.00 per square of eight lines or less, for tha
first Insertion, and 50 cents for each subsequent
Insertion.
aw A liberal discount will be made on ad
vertisements published lor 3,6, or 12 months.
aw Special Notices will be Inserted a
double the advertising rates.
OW Obituaries. Announcements of Candi
dates for office, and all communications of •
personal or private character, will be charged
for as advertisements.
Address—"Staunton Spectator," Staunton, Ta.
MT JIM.
I care not a fig for your brag, you girls,
And dames of high degree;
Or for all yonr silks and satins and pearls,
As fine as flue may be;
For I'll be as rich as dukes and carls
When my Jim comes home from sea.
It's in Portsmouth town that I know a lane,
And a small house jolly and free.
That's sheltered well from the wind and rain.
And as snug as snug can be;
And it's there that we'll be sitting again
When my Jim comes home from sea.
'Twas a tine brave sight when the yards were
manned,
Though my eyes could scarcely see;
it's a long, long sail to the Rio Qrande,
And a long, long waiting for me;.
But I'll envy not anyone In the land
sVben my Jim comes home from sea.
So here's to your health, you high-born girls.
And ladles of great degree.
And I hope you'll all be married to earls,
As proud as proud may be;
But I wouldn't give fourpence for all of your
pearls
When my Jim comes home from sea.
For the Spectator.
Boston Letter.
Boston, Mass., July sth, 1883.
Mr. Editor: —To-day seems unusually
quiet after the booming racket we had yes
terday. All the New England cities gen
erally go to some experse and trouble in
celebrating tho Glorious Fourth, but Bos
ton takes tbe lead. For several weeks the
boys have been saving their money to get
fireworks, and early in the evening of
Tuesday the noise began, and continued
during that night until a late hour yester
day evening. There were a number of in
teresting boat-races at different places
around the city, besides many other attrac
tions in suburban places, but tho great
mass of the crowd gathered on the Com
mon, which presented the gayest and most
complete holiday appearance of any place I
ever saw. Oh, the venders, organ-grinders,
&c, that were there by hundreds, or even
thousands. It was something like the
show-grounds in Staunton, but on a much
larger scale. A great variety of cooling
drinks and confectionery was offered for
sale, together with fans, canes, flowers,
fireworks, ice, but nothing intoxicating
was sold on or near the grounds, and con
sequently the crowd, of 50,000 or more, was
very orderly, not one person being arrested
that I saw. That noble, earnest society,
The woman's Christian Temperance Union,
erected their tent and established them
selves near the centre of the Common early
in the morning, which is their custom every
year on the Fourth. Circulars were dis
tributed inviting all to their tent, where
speeches, songs, and recitations were given
with scarcely any intermission during the
day. They furnished the people with free
ice-water from stands arranged so that
forty or fifty could drink at once, and tho
hot wcathor caused these places to be well
patronized. The tent was filled all the
time, and though the efforts of the tem
perance workers are derided by many, they
have the sympathy of nearly all tho good
people. Iv tho afternoon some extiting
bicyclo races took place, but the balloon
ascension, which is a regular annual occur
rence ou this day, proved a failure, the air
ship becoming disabled iv some way. The
oration was delivered in Tremont Temple
by one of the best speakers among the
city ministers. Mayor Palmer presided
over the meeting, and the audieuce was
rather more select and of deeper patriotism
than the noisy crowd on the Common. No
procession or military display was made,
for memorial day is the time here when
the Grand Army Posts and military com
paniei have their principal parade. The
streets down iv the business portion of the
city were deserted, the stores being closed
and all as quiet as on Sunday. Our short
New EDglaud Summer is growing very
warm, and yesterday the mercury reached
ninety-two in the shade, the highest so far
this season.
Excursions to the country and neighbor
ing beaches are now very popular, and the
railroad and steamboat companies have
about as much as they can do to accommo
date tho largo crowds who are driven out
of town by the hot weather. On Bunker
Hill Day, June 18th, the Grand Army Post
of Lynu had a sham light down at Re
vere Beach, a representation of one of the
battles fought in the late war. It was the
most extensive affair of the kind ever at
tempted in this country. Most of the the
atres are closed for the Summer, and those
which are still open have reduced their
prices, as amusements of this kind are un
popular in the hot season.
Mr. D. L. Moody preached in Music Hall
last Sunday night. In seven minutes after
the doors were opened that immense build
ing was packed, and large numbers coming
later were turned away. He has not
preached here for some time, but the people
still remember him, and the enthusiastic
reception he received this time shows the
grc_t respect they have for him. This
meeting was the beginning of a two months'
revival to be held by the Young Men's
Christian Association in Windsor Theatre,
but Mr. Moody himself will not be here
regularly during that time.
Boston is not quite so brisk and lively aa
it was in the Winter and Spring. Those
who are wealthy enough have gone to tha
country or seaside for the Summer, and
many of those who remain are absent on
excursions nearly half tho time. Most of
the largo stores close at five P. M., except
Saturday, when they close at two.
I won't write jany more, for I know how
the printers grumble when a long letter
comes late in the week. G. L. B.
S.)METHiNG About Sharks.—They have
a great deal of fun on the coast of Florida
with sharks. A shark will swallow anything
that is thrown to him, like a politician.
People go out on excursions, armed with
small alarm clocks as bi gas a base ball, and
throw them to the sharks which sport about
the boat, looking for somethingto eat. The
shark swallows the alarm clock, which is
set to go off a few minutes later. Pretty
soon the alarm strikes, and as it gets in its
work the shark begins to flounder around,
looking scared, trying to throw up the clock,
and he turns pale and says his "now I lay
me," all tbe time jumping out of the water
and begging to be forgiven, the people on
the boat laugh until their sides ache. It is
rough on the shark at first, but we under
stand some of tho sharks get to like it, and
many have been known to tlop out on the
shore and go to a jewelry store and ask for
a key to wind up the ciock that is in them.
This last may seem like a fish story, but we
got it from a witness in tho Star-route trial,
and it seems as though it ought to be true.
— Peck's Sun.
. , — e>-.
Flies wnicn Injure Tomatoes.—The
small flea beetle and also several transpar
ent-winged flies injure the foliage of toma
toes. There is also a very small grub,
which is believed to be the larva of some
of these flies, which devour the roots. The
remedy for these is to sprinkle tobacco
water-upon the leaves and also plentifully
upon the ground near the stems of tho
plants. Fine air-slacked lime spread about
the roots is also a remedy against these lit
tle pests. Strong tobacco-water or infusion
of red pepper wiil drive off the large green
tomato worm; strong alum solution or so
lution of saltpetre have also been used as
remedies,
. ♦ *
Turnips.—Swedish turnips may be sown
until the middle of July. They require a
rich, deep mellow soil. Ground that has
been cleared of early potatoes or peas may
be used for this purpose.
SS SS> » ■
Mr. YT. J. Jones, Manchester, Va.,
says : "I took Brown's Iron Bitters for
poor appetite and general weakness and
found it a good tonic."
• — m> —•
The average school boy does not resem
ble presidents—he never hankers after the
third term.

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