OCR Interpretation


Staunton spectator. (Staunton, Va.) 1849-1896, July 24, 1883, Image 1

Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84024718/1883-07-24/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

RICHARD M-AsTJ ZY,
3E_-litor and Proprietor.
BATES OF SVBSCBIF.IOB.
The subscription prioe of the Spkctatob Is
1.5.00 A. YEAR,
BTBICTLY IN A.I>V_LIVC__!.
JS_-.Th en payments are not made strictly in
advance Three Dollars will be charged.
OW Any one sending us rrvui new subscribers
and mo, will receive a copy of the paper for one
year, gratis.
PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY.
Tjl F. WATMIS, M- »•. »• D - s -
Formerly ofthe Faculty or the Baltimore Col
lege of Dental Surgery.)
Dental Office.
No. 15 N. Augusta Street.
Sta-Tston, Va.
SPECIALTY:— Correcting irregularities of
the natural teeth; restoring decayed parts of
the teeth with porcelal n and gold ; making ar
tiaclal teeth upon Gold Alloy Cast Plates
Gas Administered. marl4.tr.
MEADS F. WHITE. A. C. GORDON.
WHITE * MOBDOS,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
STAUNTON, VA.
Courts.—Augusta and adjoining counties,
Federal Court at Harrisonburg, Court of Ap.
peals of Virginia, at Staunton. feb2l-tf
•!_ _.. StMKIsTZKR, "
.5. ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
STAUNTON, VA
Office in Stout Building, Court-house Alley
J *,IIS. A. M. -_ 11. H. HESIKEI,
J PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS,
aving entered into co-partnership, tender
their professional services to the public. Spe
cial attention given to Surgery and diseases of
the Eye and Ear.
Tbey may be consulted at ail hours at tbe
office heretolore occupied by A. M. Hskkbl,
M. D., No. 15, Weet Frederick Street. febls
CA. RICHARDSON,
. ATTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Stauntoh, Va.
Special attention given to the collection of
claims, and prompt returns made.
Col-jit.—Augusta and Rockingham.
Office —No. 2 Law Building. oct7
WX. A. HUDSON. WM. PATRICE.
HI'BSO- A PATRICK,
ATTORNE YS-AT-LAW,
STAUNTON, Va.,
Will practice in the Court, of Augusta and
adjoining counties. Special attention paid to
collections. fe bl2-tf
I. R. TUOK-l-, H. ST. OEO. TUCKKR,
Lexington, Va. Staunton, Va.
TUCKER «*. '_ CCKEK,
ATTORNE .S-AT-LA W,
Staunton, Va.,
V, JJlpia;ii,. ' ... ;J. irts of Augusta and the
*s.dji>lain&,'c_... :t:3_. _.so In the Court of Ap
peals _f Virginia, and will attend regularly the,
?%rcsil_ Gourjp of Rockbridge. au22-tf
N. E. TBODT. W. E. CRAIO.
TROUT A ._:._.__;.
ATTORNE .S-AT-LAW,
Stauhton, VA.
.We have entered Into Partnership as
l__vvers, occupying the old Offices of the Senior
member. The Junior member will aid In con
ducting the old business.
OW- Particular attention given to collections.
jels-tf
H. M. MATHEWS. ALEX. F. MATHEWS.
MATHEWS A MATHEWS,
.-'I TORNEYS-AT-LA W,
Lewisburg. West Va.,
f -.elite c-jjuiariy in tha Courts of Greenbrier,
onroe, P ./■-._o_Uis and Nicholas counties, W.
a., the Court « Appeals, and the Federal
£_ urts for the District Cf "-if. Va.
_c_-Farticular attention paid t>> C" 1 lections
.id to special cases anywhere in tUei. -_.___
may 17—fy
fTi EOROE 51. _ .AKKJSON,
IjT stTTORNEY-AT-LAW,
Staunton, Va.,
wiil practice in all the Cci;»-J_ ijojden in Au
gusta county, and in the Circuit CAi. rts of the
adjoining counties.
.Sr-Strict attention given to the collection of
V r.-'ms.
C*_ffß—No. 10 Lawyer's Bow, Court-house
iMle.. " oo 31—tf
rpHon.AH T*. HANSON,
J ATTORN). Y-AT-LA W,
Staunton. Va.
steers nis professional sery_c_a 'ig the County
and Circuit Courts of Augusta, and in the Hus
tings Court and the Court of Appeals held in
Staunton. Will also prosecute claims else
where through legal correspondents in this and
SJher States. may 30—ly.
pre_ _'_>!. a baylor,
a;i'torney-at-law,
- And Solicitor :n Pko.ncery, Staunton, Va.,
practices in all the Courts c*f Vugt&ta aud ad
joining counties.
Office—The same tormeriy tjy his
lather, Col. Geo. Baylor, dec'd, on Augusta St.,
opposite the Court-house. no 21
txrw. M - McAllister,
Y¥ attorney_at-law,
Warm Springs, Va.
Courts—Aitegu . of, Hat. ftnd Highland, Va.,
nd Pocahontas, West Virgin;-.
.«-..pedal attention given to collection oi
eiainis and proceeds promptly accounted for.
(iec 23—tf
DX. J _Jf E_ JOHNSTON,
P E N TlB T,
Main ilii.iiii, .Staunton, Va.
Tamer _ Karmap's Grocery
tore. dec 21—tr
I. U. EIsDER. wm. j. nelson.
Et.BF,g * NELSON,
ATTORNEYS-AT-LAW,
and Real Estate AgeiOs,
may 5 Staunton, Va.
TAILORING.
_■ . .
J A.. H-TCHESOW,
. HEKCHANT TAILOR,
JO. E. Main St., Staunton, Ta.
I desire lo __). the attention of my friends
aud the public to llie fact that 1 have just re
ceived _ most beautiful ljns of—
DR£S. GOODS
FOB FALL AND WINTER WEAR.
1 am prepared to furnish Gentlemen's suits, of
the very best materials, made up In the latest
styles aud in the most workmanlike manner,
at low prices, and satisfaction guaranteed. I
also keep a full line of Gents' Furnishing
Goods, aw Give me a call before making
your purchases. Respectfully,
octl4-tf J. A. H-TTC-. ESON.
-|_> B. Ult AYES,
Fashionable Tailor,
No. 103 E. Main St., Up Stairs, opposite
the Staunton Opera House.
Is prepared to give the same satisfaction In all
work as in former times.
Special Attention Paid to Cutting.
'.York done outside *of shop. Cutting and re
pairing done in best manner and on short no
tice. OW TERMS CASH. "Wl au_7-tf
iTrEBCHALI-rT TAILORING
HE A DQUAR TEES,
M. F. McNAMARA,
No. 10 New St.,
STAUNTON, VA.
My Merchant Tailoring Establishment has
i ust been fitted up with a new and fine assort
ment of
Suitings, Cloths, Cassimeres, «fee,
FOR FALL AND WINTER,
ofthe latest styles and best manufacture.
OW Perfect fits guaranteed and orders prompt
ly executed.
Call and examine goods and prices. /y2-tf
BARE * SPRINKLE,
FASHIONABLE TAILORS,
New St., next door to Mrs. Scherer's Millinery
Store, and 8 doors from Loeb's Corner,
Staunton, Virginia.
Ail work In our line executed with neatness
and dispatch. Special attention paid to out
ing repairing and cleansing. augS—tf
MARBLE WORKS.
9 -■ — .
VALLEY MARBLE WORKS,
STAUNTON, VA.
To the* People of Augusta and the Valley coun
ties :
Keep your money at Home is to prosper,
Send it away is to become impoverished.
•j Everything Ib at very
/A low prices, and I am sell
; % *0 ing Monuments, Head
_S A Bl and Foot Stones, as low
.1. . /v. I for cash as any local or
-i 'ii ! TfT? I l\ traveling agent, or any
: " iflf-JII I* Marble dealer in the Unl
'.'■ ■'■ ted States. Don't believe
- - } 'K~2-. f W anything to the contrary
'''-"-Ji?_'____t till you come and see. '
to-*-«S-_J__s_____-» J. C. WARQUIS.
p s.—l also call attention to my Catalogue
of Designs of the Wonderful White Bronse
Monuments and Head Stones. au27-tf
LIVERY STABLES.
_- _. ♦
VJI'.WJIER ABBAJTOEMENT.
THE BEST LIVERY IN THE STATE.
sjjßUbv AMERICAS HOTEL
SE___!_i_____. Livery Stables.
8. T. THORNBI7R«. Proprietor.
Having refitted my stables and added a num
ber of fine horses and vehicles to my stock, I
am prepared to accommodate the summer
iravel in the most elegant and handsome style
at reasonable prices.
„ *** Hunting, Fishing and Pleasure Parties
generally will be supplied with any kind ol
venicle desired, at low prices.
I "respectfully invite my former customers
•""the public generally to give me a call.
a fstisfaction guaranteed.
«naylß-tf 8. T. THOBNBUBG.
M__. Staunton, Va., January 15,1883
V brother, D. C. GRAHAM, will have an
Interest In my Grocery and Produce bus
iness, to date from Jan. lst, and the firm name
will be J. E. GRAHAM A BROTHF.B.
J»hl6 J. E. GRAHAM.
S-JtwiWr SUB
VOL. 60.
CLOTinSG.
T ARGE LOT OF
SPRING AND SUMMER
OLOTHDiai
AT
GREATLY REDCtEH PRICES!
Having more stock than I wish to carry, I
will from this day offer my large clock of
SPRING AND SUMMER
CLOTHING
At Reduced Prices.
A good many will be sold for
COST AND LESS.
I have a
A IKE 111 OF MD.
and will
GIVE BARGAINS!
to those who want
TO 1111 Ml!
CALL AT ONCE.
*_- MO TROUBLE TO SHOW GOODS. -JM
All Goods Guaranteed as Represented.
JNO. W. ALBY,
je!2 Old HsUitii), Np. :..•! New Street.
THE iff EffllSli
vi hk Hiu,
OPERA HOUSE BUILDING,
"TAUNTON. VA.
THE OIL- WUli SHE
OIV M-__.II. STItEET.
JAMES A. ARgEtf TROUT.
with an experience of 20 years in the Clothing
Business, has the management of
OUR AEW ESTABLISHMENT,
and would bepleased to see his friends and cus
tomers before buying
CLOTHINGJ
AND
Furnishing Goods
pIsPFI WHERE.
J^JE^MK 7 " «E_^C»«C>JE»«.
WILL, ____* ADDED
Throughout the Scttson.
WB MANUFACTURE
is 01 am
IN PHILADELPHIA,
which enables us to offer
Special Inducements.
*3- GIVE ME A CALL,
AND DON'T FORGET THE PLACE.
JAKES A. AKMXTBIIIT.
JeS Manager for LOEB BROS.
ATTENTION!
GENTLEMEN!!
♦ 93 9)
OW TAKE NOTICE that in con
sequence of the present partnership existing
between—
HILB & RUTHERFORD,
which will expire October lst, we will sell our
present stock
AT COST,
STRICTLY GASH.
THE STOCK
IN QUALITY, QUANTITY, AND MAKE-UP
CANNOT BE BEATEN.
All Goods In the house
Warranted Sound.
No Damaged Stock.
We will sell at this rate from this day utnil
September lst next.
1 TERMS STRICTLY CASH. 1
OW Our friends may examine every stock of
Clothing In the City, and in looking over our
stock they will be convinced we have stated
nothing but facts. Call early, for your own
benefit.
HILB & RUTHERFORD,
Nos.-11 and 16 New Street,
augl STAUNTON, VA.
GROCEKrEsT&cT"
• *
GARRETT B. GOOCH. CHARLES . . HOGE
HENRY HUTCHINSON.
GOOCH, HOGE & CO., .
WHOLESALE GROCERS
AND
ComniiN .ion Merchants,
DEALERS IN
Flour, drain, Seeds, Tobacco A- Se*rars,
STAUNTON, VA.
We sell only to dealers, whom we respectfully
solicit to give us a trial order. Our prices we
promise to make compare favorably with Bal
timore and Richmond. septl9-tf
JT. A. HAMRICK. J. A. FAUVER.
J A. HAMRICK Zfc CO..
• SEALERS IN
GROCERIES hm PRODUCE.
Make a Specialty *>f
Leather and Shoe Findings
Headquarters.for Harness Leather.
Highest Casta Price paid for
1eb15.'83-ly SLAUGHTERED HIDES.
DRUGS AND MEDICINES.
I THE BEST
OF ALL
ILsiiHEIITS
FOB ____I! AMP BEAS._.
I For more than a third of a century the
M Mexican M'l'ii.iiifiLiniment has been
B known to millions ;-.1l over tho world as
■ the crdy oafo reliance for the relief ol
Haocidc.-In .-a. .1 pain. It is a medicine
■ above price unrl praise—tiie best of its
wiiirv.'," I'or-Very joim of external pain
tHMustiingLiiihiieiit is without an equal, §3
I It penetrates fleslt and muscle to gS
HE tli . very bone —making tho . ontinu-MS
Hance of Vat. _nd Inflammation impos-H
m| sibie. Its effects upon Human Flesh and H
Hthe Brute Creation lire equally wonder-■
■ful. The Mexican
MUSTANG
BLiniiacnt Is needed by somebody in 9
H every house. Every day brings news of H
B the agony of an a -vful scald or barn B
B subdued, Of rheumatic martyrs re-B
jM Hit-1 _ d oi" a valuable horse or oxß
B saved, by Tit 6 4&tMx& of this
LINIMENT
If which speedily cures such ailments of
■ the HUMAN FLESH as
j Rheumatism, Swellings, Stiff
■ Joints. Contracted Muscles, Burns
Hand Scalds, Cats, Braise, and
■ Sprains, Poisonous Bites _nd
BStings. Rtiffiless, Lameness. 'Old
■ Sorts, Ulcers, 1 _ osibitcs,' Chilblains,
fH Sore Nipples, Caked Breast, and
■ indeed every form of e_t.r_.al cU*»
■ ease. It heals without seers.
I For the Dbutb Creation it cures
I Sprains, Swinny, _ti«* Joints,
n] Founder, Tlarness Sores, Hoof Dis
■ eases, Foot Rot, Screw Worm, Scab,
X Hollow Horn, Scratches, .find*
Sgalls, Spavin, Thru _i, Ringbone,
HOld Sores, Poll Evil, Film upon
gj tbo Sight and .very other ailment
BStss «_.».. t_. ».* isi«nis of the
■ Stable .and _ to.* Yard ar. liable.
I The Mexican mustang _ ..lul-ieht
■ always cures and never disappoints;
■ and H is, positively,
THE BEST
OF ALL
LINIMENTS
f 03 K&H 63 B3 AM
maris 83 ly
DR. FAHRNEY'S
TEETHINPt sire
IT has never failed to give the most perfect satis
faction. Thousands oi mothers are using it all
through the land, and all are pleased with its charm
ing eiiects. It Maintains the Bahy's Health by
KKErIKG IT FREE FROM CI.LIC AND Dl ARR 11 _.*,. D O
not stupefy your Baby with Opium or Morphia Mix
tures, bur use
l>r. I-'alirney's Teething Syrup,
which is mhrstyt safe and reliable. It soothes and
quits theCiin.n, Relieves Pain and Inflammation
and gives Swssx, Natural Sleep to Babes and
Rest to Mothers. All Druggists and Medicine
Dealers Sell it,
TWENTY-FIVE CENTS A BOTTLE.
Prepared By
e__. _-. __ .__:;_:_. __■ J_ X. cSc SOIT,
HAGERSTOWN, MD.
aprlO '83-ly
In the Whole History of
Medicine
No preparation has ever performed suck
marvellous cures, or maintained so
wide a reputation, as Ayek's Cherry
Pectoral, which is recognized as the
world's remedy for all diseases of the
throat and lungs. Its long-continued
series of wonderful cures in all cli-
has made it universally known
as a safe and reliable agent to employ.
Against ordinary colds, which are the
forerunners of more serious disorders,
it acts speedily and surely, always re
lieving suffering, and often saving life.
The protection it affords, by its timely
use }n throat and chest disorders,
makes it an Invaluable remedy to be
kept always on hand in every home.
No person cau afford to be without it,
and those who have once used it never
will. From their knowledge of its
composition and operation, physicians
use the Cherry Pectoral extensively
in their practice, and clergymen recom
mend it. It is absolutely certain in
Its healing effects, and will always
cure where cures are possible.
For sale by all druggists.
feb_7 '83-ly
BOOTS AND SHOES.
C. L. WELLER,
No. 4 .'ol -iiiifi St..
.TAUNTON, VA.
BOOTS, SHOES
Slippers, Sandals, Pumps,
HATS, CAPS,
UMBRELLAS, Kto'
A full line of BROAD BOTTOM, FLAT HEE.
SHOES, for old Ladies and Gents.
BOYS', MISSES', AND CHILDREN'S
SCHOOL SHOES,
*-~ A SPECIALTY OF "B»
REAL FIRST-CUSS SHOES.
Orders Solicited by Mail.
OW Ail Goods warrantedasrepresented.
aprl9
TIItATXHSir
JL pump i
■ BUY THEB EST.
M BLATCHLEY'S
-*'____l$ TRIPLE ENAMEL
**fjr| PORCELAIN-LINED
'II SEAMLESS TUBE
IGi : COPPER-LINED
9 PUMP
■ el's Do not be arg-uert Into
_____■_____* bnyin-: inferior Goods.
WaWl ior eale b 7 tlio ' ,eßt
housea in tne Trade.
C. C_BLATCHLEY,WIanurr, ,
308 MARKET ST., Philad'a.
Wxite to me for name of nearest Agtut.
aprlo-6m
_VEI_SO.V A CrSIIIXCIS.
REAL ESTATE AGENTS,
No. 103 Sontb Anensta Street,
STAUNTON, VA.
BEAL ESTATE bought, sold, and exchanged.
OW Write for description oi properties in our
hands for sale.
18. Money to Loan on Real Estate Security
Jan3-tf
STAXJNTOK, VA., TUESDAY, JULY 24, 1883.
IHIViiS ASD MEDICI-ES.
♦ ■»' |
A }HO%]ED BD'i? UNTITIaBO WOMAN*.
[i. rooi the Boston Qk-bf.)
mttcasrx. BeEtfon .■—
Tiie :iiK-vo i_ a trood likeness of Mrs. LydiaE. Pink-
Law, of Lvnn, iliiss., who above all other human bemifS
ipr.y be t:-ii--ifi-Uy called the ''Dear Friend of Woman,"
*t3_;om.t g" bor rortftHpondftnts lovt-tu caU her- WW
ii zealously devoted to _b__r work, which ia the onteom(j
of' a life-study,' and is obliged to keep six lady
as-ri-itaiita, to help her answerthe large correspondence
which da£; pours in upon "her, each bearing It. special
burden of _*__*erlng, or Joy at release from It. Her
Vegetable Compound is a medicine for go od and TK.J
..ii ywgi-iafr I h-t/vi- ,«.__.__»__,. _.-•.'■ -<!i.-.T-i;it.*.-..'
satisfied of the truth of this.
On ucuount ol it« proven merits, It i** recommendec,
and prescribed by thebest physicians in th© country.
One says: "It works like a charm tad *zve2 much
pain, it will cure entirely iae worst torn* of falling
of the uterus, Leucorrhcea, irregular and painful
Meßstrufttion, all Ovarian Troubles, Inflammation and
tJlceration, Flondingfl, all Displacements and the con
sequent spinal weakness, and is especially adapted to
the Ckango of Life."
It permeates every portion of the system, and givea
(ifV V.T- 07 \ T f remove? f. Intnt.cc. flatulency,
fk.-i.rcyi. aii craving to r*w_tmuiants, ana reiiev'es wesif,*
ncs cf th: ' ■■- •.■ h. It cures Bloating, Headaches,
jfervo-ui i'_-._ ~ General Debility, Sleeplessness,
Depression au J _-._._£-..stion. That feeling of bearing
down, cau_dng pain, weight and backache, is always
permanently cured by its use. It will at all times, and
under all circumstances, act In harmony with the law
that governs tbe feuuilo system.
it i.'_> _i„ oify V-fX-i
drugget s. ad*nce required as to special cases, and"
the guuries of iufruy who have been restored to perfecf
heal.h by v.o of tha Vegetable Compound, c«n be
._>.■,■.;.,_.; iy g !:'i ■&«-!._£ ft-ft P., "ffitJi .t'-cipfoy fepf.
at iw '.v :.••'- _3 _4*_B, Vom_
_?«r I_idii>-*y Cuir.;.lalnt of ci.'J-^ . se3: thy compound ii
'. ■. Viuniiant testimonials show.
"ii* i'i-i':u;n's Livfr Fills," says oiiots-riter, w are
_.__■_♦__* -:. _'.c teortit forthe euro of Constipation,
li_;ku.i:*_; uid Torpidity of the liver. Her Blood
V.; ■ - *,v oi _ s 7.cadcid In its special line and bids fair
1 * j'i -. ii tl-s. Compound It its popularity
AH Bias* :e v t '~_;;■ at- aIV Angel of Bcvcy whpaesj*e
;. ..iVtieii::-«t'jjo3oo3 toethera
i V_u .1. U. P.
seps 'HZ-lj
Did Sbe Die ?
"No!
"She lingered and suffered along, pining
away all the time for years,"
"The doctors doing her no good;"
"And at last was cured by this Hop Bitters
the papers say s > much about."
"Indeed! Indeed'"
:!_fow ihanUful we should he for tbat medi
cine,"
A Daughter's Misery.
"Eleven years our daughter suffered on a bpa
of misery,
"From a compiles!tion of kidney, iiver, rheu
matic trouble and Nervous debility.
"Under the care 61 the best physicians,
"Who gave her disease various n_mes,
"But no relief,
"And now she Is restored to us In good health
by as simple a remedy as Hop Bitters, that we
had shunned for years beiore using it."—The
Parents.
Father is Getting Well.
"My daughters cay ,—
"Hnwn'iuch bettor father Is sipce he used
Hop Bitters."
"He is getting well after his long suffeiing
from adlsease declared Incurable."
"And we are so glad that he used your Bit
ters."- A Lady o! Utica, N. Y. j
I IS A SURECURE 1
I 1 for all iliscf.ses ofthe Kidneys and 1
j; " — LIVER™ I
3! I, has specific actio:. ou t__i_. moss important L
d] organ, enabling it to ____row off torpidity and. k
1*! faction., stin_.iln.t__ig the healthy secretica cf r
jj the Bile, and by keeping tho bowels in freo it
3: condition, effecting its regular discharge. jj?
__1 ____lm_ssfs ,J > If you are suffering from jt
| 8V2.G8C2- -4.-a malaria,havethe chills,.-i
31 arobiliouE, dyspeptic, orconetipatcd,3vidT\«y"- «
2 1 Wort will surely reliefs and 6urc. "| R
Si In the Spring to cleanse the Systepa, eveiy jj.
J j one should talte a thorough course of it. f
g: v- SOLD BY DRUGGISTS. Price ■$..'{.
&^S^l^^^^^E_^S
septa'B2-ly
Health is Wealth!
Dk E. <_ West's Nerve and Brain Treit
me.t, a icuaranteed spic-iiic for Hysteria, Dizzi
mws, Convulsions, Vim, Nervous Neuralgia,
Headache, Nervous Prostration caused by the use
of alcohol or tobacco. Wakefulness, Mental De
pression, Softening of tho Brain resulting in in
sanity and leading to misery, decay an i death
Prematura Oid Aae, Barrenness, Loss of power
in either sex, involuntary Losses and _p_rmat
orrJi.ea caused by over-exertion of thebrain ne'.i
abuso or over-indulgence. Each box contains
one month's treatment. SI.OO a box, or si:: boxes
for 15.00, sent by mail prepaid on receipt ,>,' price,
WIS «. 17AKA ST FIX SIX BOXII.
To cure any case. With each order received byes
for six boxes, uccy .ipanied with $5.0 C, we ~_
- sand the purchaser our written guarantee to re
fund the money if the treatment does not effect
a cure. Guarantees issued only by
BOOEKER BROTHERS. I>rr.g*_is's.
_rt icliß*_ _d, -_r_s.
decl2'B2-ly 2qr paid*
WINEYrLIQUORS, &cT
rpslE li-KViiER «_ ESOELRRE WING
CO., PHILADELPHIA, PA.
BTAUNTO. T> El* OT,
ROBERT HILL, Jr.,., Manager.
Having completed our Ice-house here, we are
now prepared to furnish our celebrated
Premium lager Beer,
in any quantity, not at the Lowest Price, but
at a price that will enable and justify us to
make a
PURE ARTICLE.
We do not claim to compete with $ny one in
price, but lor.purity and excellence ol quality,
we are unsurpassed.
OW All orders sent lo our Depot, Staunton,
Va., will be promptly filled.
BOTTLING IIE-B-A Specialty.
jnne-8 *f3-ly.
TIINEST BRAH*D_ 01.
Augusta Couuty Whiskies.
ALSO IMPORTED AND DOMESTIC
LIQUORS
of all kinds.
«»_ At WHOLESALE and RETAIL.
BUBKB _fc BKADLEY,
Masonic Bit-tiding,
octl2'Bo-tf Staunton. Va.
PABlUffll-fl a _______-____r
cheaply and successfully
should write us for our pamphlet on pure
fertilizers. &ir~A good fertilizer can be made
al ho mefora_out $ | 2 a ton by composting
with POWELL'S PREPARED CHEMICALS.
References! n Every Slate. -3~Agentswanled
forunoccupiedterritory. Applywithreferences.
BROWN CHEMICAL CO.
Manufacturers of
I ■ 1 ssss.
Powell'. Tip-Top Bone Fertilizer,
Bone, Potash, Ammonia, &c.
16 LIGHT STREEL __LTiMORE, MP.
D. L. SNYDER, agent, StiiblingSprings, Va.
je26-Sm*
nn^k A week made at home by theindug
■■ ■II Itrlous. Best business now before the
m fl Capital not needed. We will
Jk fl m start you. Men. women, boys and
$M M #Hi,'irls wanied everywhere to work for
mm Now U the time. Yon can work
in spare time, or give your whole time to the
business. No other business will pay you near
ly as well. No one can tail to make enormous
pay, by engaging at once. Costly outfit and
terms free. Money made fast, easily, and hon
orably. Address True & Co., Augusta, Maine,
re .20-1.
T»0 EX R Y.
TWO.
In the bitter -_loom of a Wiuter's morn
A babe was corn.
The snow piled high against wail and door.
On the mighty oak boughs the fiost lay hoar;
But warmth and light shrined the happy face,
So softly pillowed mid down and lace.
The bells clashed out from the reeling spire.
The night was reddened by many a fire;
The cottage smiled lor the joy at the hall,
As the poor man answered the rich man's call.
And his lot for a day was less forlorn.
Because a little child was born.
In the bitter g) oom of a Winter's morn,
A babe was born.
The snow piled high iv the narrow street,
Trodden and stained by hurrying feet;
On the hearth the embers lay cold and dead.
And the woman who crcuched on the damp
straw bed
Muttered a cyrse, aj th"i drunken ipori,
Swelled OP, to l-.er lair from the crowded court.
Riot without aud squalor within,
To _.!&o me a waif to a world of sin,
And a pitiful life was the more forlorn,
Because a little child was born.
In a smiling home amid suu and flowers,
A child grew up.
Calm, and beauty, and culture and wealth,
To give power to life and grace to health:
Gentle inflnenc, , thought, and qa, _
To train ;he darling o. love and prayer,
The stately heirlooms of place and blood,
To crown the flower of maidenhood,
With C-lldhood's pearly Innocence kept,
On the folded leaves where the sunshine slept.
So sweetly and richly foamed the cup
Life held, where the b_-.ppy girl Qpewsp.
Where "home" was a and empty word,
A child grew up.
Where oath aad blow were tne only law,
And ugly misery all she saw;
Where want and sin drew hand In hand.
Round the haunts tnat disgrace our Christian
land ;
A loveless, hopeless, joyless life,
Of crime and wretcheduess, struggle and strife;
Never a glimpse ol the sweet Spring skies.
To soften the flash iiu the wlid young eyes;
No drop of peace in the pauoned enp
Life held, where reckless girl grew up.
On a Summer eve as the alow sun set,
A woman died.
At the close of a long and tranquil life.
Honored and guarded, mother and wife,
V/ith gentle hands whose work was done.
And gentle head whose crown was won,
With children's chlldreu at her knee,
And friends who watched her reverently;
Knowing hc-.r memory would remain.
Treasured by grief, that scarce was pain,
With her heart's dearest at her side,
Blessing and blessed, the woman died.
On a Summer's eve as the slow ma sel^
A woman diptl.
She hau; fought the failing light so long !
But time was cruel, and hard, and strong.
Without a faith, without _ prayer,
With none to aid, and none to care;
With not a trace upon the page.
From desperate youth to loathsome age,
But sin and sorrow, wrong anil ciianc.,
And bitter _lt.nss. of ignorance;
With not a hand to help or save,
With not a hope beyond the grave,
Tossed in the black stream's rushing tide,
Untnourned, unmissed, the woman died.
And we are f all akin, rircs the irlndly creed '
s\h, the riddle of life is har.l to read I
—All the I'ear Round.
[From tbe Estiitville Banner.]
All Open letter.
HON. A. FULKERSON EXPRESSES HIS VIEWS
ON THE VARIOUS POINTS TOUCHING THE
SITUATION IN VIRGINIA.
The following open letter h_s ueen sent
us by the writer for publication. As we
fully endorse the views set forth by Mr.
Fulkerson, we surrender it our editorial
space this week:
Bristol, June 27, 1883.
Major 11. W. Holdway, Estilhille, Va.:
Dear Sir, —Yonr favor of 21st instant
duly received, and I am obliged for the in
formation it contains. I note your refer
ence to politics, and I beg to say a few
words in reply.
You refer to the Colonade caucus, "do
not regret that you were there, see no rea
son to abandon the good and wholesome
views on readjustment you taught me,"'
,src. I was in that caucus, am proud of it.
I entertain the same views on the debt
question I did then. I profited by the sen
sible and wise suggestions made by you at
that time. My recollection is that we pro
posed then to fight the debt question inside
the Democratic party. This was not my
notion. I never thought the debt question
could be settled inside the Democratic par
ty. I always thought it would require a
separate organization to settle tliat ques
tion. Hence the origin and purpose of the
Readjuster organization. If the Demo
crats ever divided on any other question I
am not aware of it.
I always held that a man might be a
Democrat and a Readjuster at the same
time; that he could be a Funder and a
Democrat at the same time, and that he
could be a Republican and Readjuster at
the same time. Kow that we have settled
the debt, and removed the only difterence
there was between Democrats, we find that
the Funders stick to the Democratic party,
aud the Republican Readjusters and Re
publican Funders all adhere to Ihe Repub
lican party. But, strange to say, Mahone
and his set and kind of Readjusters now
say that they are not Democrats, and they
are ashamed to say they are Republicans,
while, in fact, they are the meanest kind of
Republicans, because sneaking.
You Jcuow very well that Mahone has
goije into the Republican party, and gone
to stay, provided they will pay him to stay.
You know as well as any one that he seized
the Readjuster organization, and without
the shadow of authority from tho party
united and consolidated it with the Repub
lican organization last year. You know
that the Readjuster paity is not in exist
ence as a separate organization; that it has
effected the object of its formation, aud
now that the debt is settled, that it could
not be maintained as an organized party
separate from the Democratic or Republi
can party. Why, therefore, do you talk to
me about the Readjuster party and my loss
to it?
I stood by readjustment from its origin
to its final consummation, the passage of
the Riddleberger bill last winter, and I
shall oppose any effort to distnrb that set
tlement, come from whatever source it
may.
The only Convention of the Readjuster
party ever held to fix its relations to na
tional politics was the July Convention of
1880. That declared for Democracy, and
said the election of Hancock and English
would promote the best interests of every
man in Virginia, and especially the Read
justers. Was that a fraud and a deception,
or was it tho honest expression of honest
men ? We never had another Convention
of the party. How, theu, can Mahone and
his followers be Republicans and escape
the charge ot desertion from both the Dem
ocratic and Readjuster parties ?
I canvassed this district in 18S0 as a
Democratic Readjuster, and I declared
from every stump that the Readjusters
were better Democrats than the Funders.
You endorsed me then. I was honest then.
I meant what I said, and I have not
changed my position, nor has our party by
convention changed its position. Surely
then, as I claim to be an honest man, honest
people will not expect me to desert my
principles and my party and follow Ma
hone into the Republican party.
Now that we have whipped out all oppo
sition to the settlement of the debt, passed
the bill which we declared would settle the
debt, aud our settlement having been sus
tained by two Funder courts, it is our duty
to secure the acquiescence of the opposi
tion. This done, as it will be done in the
Lynchburg Convention of the united De
mocracy, there will be no one to complain
of the settlement, and tho settlement will
then be had.
If we can accomplish all this -without
layiug ourselves liable to the chargo that
to settle the debt we have to sell ourselves
and the State to the Radicals, we will be
held in high esteem by posterity; but if \vc
follow -lahone, posterity will condemn the
Readjuster party for betraying our people
and selling out to the Republicans, and re
adjustment will be a stench in the nostrils
of honest men.
You say you have heard the cry of negro
equality, social and political, too long to be
scared by it now, &c. You must recollect
that the negro has nsver been in the as
cendpn.y ln this State. We fought the
Dat'tle of tbe races in 1809, and the white
men of Virginia asserted their supremacy
and right to rule then, and they have main
tained that right to this day. Suppose
Wells had been elected Governor theu, and
iiarris, tho negro, Lieutenant-Governor,
don't you know that we would have had
negro equality forced upon us In Its worst
forms ? In that light lam glad to be able
to testify to the fact that you threw the
weight of your influence on the side of
your own race and color.
We are again threatened with negro su
premacy, in a more dangerous form tha;.
we were in 1869, as the negro vote of the
State is solid, ?,nd tha negroes are now led
_,ahone, who is a more corrupt, un
scrupulous and dangerous leader than was
Henry Happy Wells, backed as he was by
Underwood and that class of advent-, ars.
Mahone is an ambitious adventurer, and
he is capable of subordinating, and will
not he .itase to subordinate, the white peo
ple of Virginia to the negro, if necessary
to maintain bis present relations with the
Republican Administration at Washington.
Republicanism in the North and Repub
licanism in tho South are two different
things. The Republicans North are white
people—intelligent and capable of manag
ing their own affairs and of administering
the affairs of Government. The great ma
jority of the Republicans South ni-e ne
groes, who hkvstf had no opportunity to
.jualiiy themselves for citiienship, much
less to control the affairs of State—they are
ignorant and vicious, and incapable of
ruling wisely or well. Republican ascen
dency in the South means, therefore, negro
rule, as that race constitutes in Virginia,
and indeed all the southern States, three
fourths of the Republican party. All par
ties hsve solicited negro votes, but there is
a vast difference between their voting aud
ruling.
Already _Jahone has been compelled to
recognise the negro's demand for office,
lie has elected them clerks, magistrates,
school trustees, Sec, in Eastern Virginia,
and in Washington county tl*,e Ma hone
party have placed oa their county ticket
eight scgicas. Now if the fathers consent
to associate with negroes as equals on
school boards, committees, i_c , will it be
considered improper for their children to
attend the same schools? And mixed
schools is certain to lead to mixed car
riages.
You £**.?ik of the Democrats as Bour-
V.ous, and by Bourbon I understand you to
mean people who are opposed to progress
and development. Now the Democrats ? v re
white people; you are a white ;__u. How
does it happen th£,t you and thoso who
think with you are more progressive than
Others of your own race ? Have you so far
outstripped your own race and color a. to
have lost confidence in tho capacity of your
own kind to develop tho resources of the
country and to rule it. Are you willing to
say, or bave it said, that the white race in
Virginia is a failure, and that there is no
hope for the development of the resources of
the State except by placing the negro race
in power ?
jf you expect to j»o into the Republican
party, of winch, in Virginia, 128,000 voters
lire negroes, with a more handful of white?,
and avert negro rule and negro equality,
you will find, when too late jverhaps, that
yon are wofully mistaken.
But if you have lost all confidence in the
white rn'yS, and feel that the negro is more
capable of ruling the country, and do not
object to mixed schools, mixed races, s_c.,
you should join the Republican party, and
do all in your power to place that party in
power in the State.
For my part, while 1 fought the Demo
cratic Funders ou the debt question, now
that the debt is settled there is no differ
ence between us. They are my own race,
nnd I had rather trust them and the white
Readjusters to rule the State than the ne
groes, led as they are by a renegade Demo
crat, who is under the control of an un
friendly foreign influence.
Having a very high regard for you per
sonally is my apology for the views herein
expressed at snch great length.
Your friend, A. Fulkerson.
Ihe Freri.h Un of Womi-u
Women have no worse enemies than wo
men.
Ono must be a woman to know how to
revenge.
Woman conceals only what she does not
know,
Woman is a creature between man and
the angels.
Woman is more constant in hatred than
in love.
Most women curse siu before embracing
patience.
Women who have not fine teeth only
laugh with their eyes.
Friendship between women is only a sus
pension of hostilities.
Women ask if a man is discreet, as men
ask if a woman is pretty.
When a woman is no longer attractive
she ceases to bo inconstant.
"Women never weep moro bitterly than
when they weep with spite.
The most chaste women may be tho most
voluptuous, if she loves.
When women cannot be revenged, they
do as children; they cry.
A woman and her servant, acting in ac
cord, would outwit a dozen devils.
. A woman forgives the audacity which
her beauty prompts us to be guilty of.
W omen like balls and assemblies as a
hunter likes a place where game abounds.
AYo»an is a charming creature who
changes her heart as easily as her gloves.
Why suffer longer from dyspepsia, indi
gestion, want of appetite, loss of strength,
lack of energy, malaria, intermittent fevers,
etc. ? Brown's iron Bitters never fail to
cure these diseases. They act like a charm
on the digestive organs, removing all dys
peptic symptoms, such as belching, heart
burn, biliousness, etc. Remember it is the
only iron preparation that will not blacken
tho teeth or give headache. Ask your
druggists conoeruing its merit.
Professor to a young lady student—
"Your mark is very low, and you have on
ly just passed." Young lady—"Oh, lam
so glad."—Professor surprised—"Why?''
l-Dunglady—"l do so love a tight squeeze."
m- c. • 1
I had severe attacks of gravel and kid
ney trouble ; was unable to get a medicine
or doclor to cure me until I used Hop Bit
ters, and they cured me iv a short time.—
A Distinguished Lawyer of Wayne
Co., N. Y.
> »—•—
"Over the crystal waters she leans in
careless grace," says a recent poem. An
other case of sea-sickness. •
♦ _■ _
(FELLS' "ROUGH ON CORNS."
Ask for Wells' "Rough on Corns." 15c.
Quick, complete, pormanent cure. Corns,
warts, bunious.
''I guess yon will stand another siege of
Troy!" said Smithers, as he placed a dilapi
dated-looking collar in the laundry Samper.
NO. 45.
HARRY LEE'S TEJLPTATIOJ..
,"P° n ° t dismiss him without another
trial, iredenc; remember it is his first of
fense.
"I am not sure of that. A lad who would
stoop to such a dishonest act would not
hesitate to tell a falsehood to shield him
self from punishment. I think I've treated
him better than he descrvs by not punish
ing msi guilt, thereby shielding others from
a like deception."
•'But ho will find it difficult to obtain an
other situation without a recommendation
from you. 0
"That is not my lookout. I discovered
the laa m . dishonest act, committed with
perteet intrepidity and coolness. I bad no
other alternative but to dismiss him from
my employ and I am aware it was done in
no gentle language. Of course, his plea
had ail the seeming innocence and simplic
ity oi. which his class are capable, though
he was too much overwhelmed with sur
prise and confusion—at being detected in
his guiit—to have many words."
"'-Veil, Frederic, I cannot be deceived in
vi:,. fact—that honest, noble, manly face
If you had only gained his confidence he
might have made it plain. He is so young
to be left to make his way alone, and this
very act may bo the turning point in his
life, and you may be the means of his ruin
or salvation, just whichever way your de
cision happens to turn. Think, what if it
was our boy, Frederic?"
Mr. Joy looked down into the bright
beautiful face of his only child, and, draw
ing h lm dose to his heart, held him there.
"ies, papa, forgive poor Harry for mv
sake." '
"I will try him again, Mary. You must cro
and see mm in the morn ng, and gain his
oonrtd.nce, if you can. Perhaps L have not
dono my duty."
Mr, Joy was awakened to a sense of his
responsibility, and his next words sent a
thrill of happiness to the heart of his true
and faithful wife.
"Mary, if it is not too m._l, trouble for
you, I will invite all my clerks up to tea to
morrow evonmg. You must ask your sis
ters to happen in, and we will try and grv.
them a pleasent evening. Then we canas
certaiu if they have any religious interests,
and porhapa gather them into our Bible'
class and church. Strange, Mary, that I
never foil this duty keenly before. So
many of the lads are without tho restrain
ing influence of home, subject to a multi
tude of temptations, and I, who am lv a
mesure responsible for their souls —just as
I am for this little ohild whom God has
given ma ■_ have left them to run into all
kinds of danger and vice, it may be, with
out a friendly word of warning or oounsel."
And while the earnest resolves were fill
ing the little household with a new peace
and happiness, Harry Lee sat by the back
window of his attic chamber—alone and in
darkness. Mrs. Joy had said there was
nothing bad in that young face, and she
would have realized it all the more could
she have looked into it then; pale, sad and
despairing, the black curls pushed away
from the full, fair forehead, the frank, boy
ish c . piession changed to one of agonizing
despair.
There was little sleep in the dingy back
attic that night; but towards morning Har
ry threw him.elf upon his bed and fell
into a light, uneasy slumber, the weight of
his heavy pain mingling with redoubled
force as he awakened, to the consciousness
of his own misery in the light of another
day.
Ho had set himself resolutely to devise,
some way of obtaining employment, and
casting aside one place after another as
worthless, when Mrs. Joy tapped lightly
upon his door.
Harry Lee, you know .Mrs. Joy—this is
little Willie come to make you a visit and
bring yon good news,'' opening the door in
answer to his feeble response.
The lad springs to his feet, aud tho hot
blood leaped into his pale cheeks, his lips
quivered, but he cou'd not niter a word.
•'Papa says 'Come back to tho store,' "
pleaded tbe child's voice. "He said I must
teil you, because I did it, though I don't
know now.'
"Yes, Harry, Mr. Joy has forgiven you,
and desires you should c-me back to yo;r
old place. And, my dear boy, I cannot
think you really meant to be dishonest; now
did you?" going up to him and laying her
hand upon his, with the tenderness of a
mother.
"Oh, no madam! Indeed I did not. I
inteudedto replace every cent. I did wrong,
but I was not a willful thief."
'•Wii you tell me just how it happened,
Harry, and how you came to be alone in
this great city, with such forlorn surround
ings?"
"I came here six months ago from Wood
land, a pleasant little country town where
I lived all my days: my father's health had
failed, and with only tho income of the
small farm, it was hard to mane both ends
meet. I could not bear my dear sister
should wear herself out wit'i teaching, while
I, a strong lad, was going to school by her
earnings, so I determined to start out for
myself .and see whtlt I could do to help—
hard as it was to give up my books and
leave the old home and all behind.
"No one can imagine what I suffered
from homesickness for the first few weeks
after I entered Mr. Joy's store; aud this
cheerless room—the best I could afford,
seemed such a dreary place in which to
spend my evenings, that I grew so very
wretched I was glad to fall into the com
panionship of almost any one, and I was
led iuto places I ought never to have enter
ed; but my associates were kind and atten
tive, and better company than my own
gloomy thoughts, and I was only too glad
to have somewhere to go. I always sent a
certain amount home every week, but I
was tempted to spend a part of my money
in tickets for the theatre, for I felt it was
not honorable to accept favors without ev
er returning them; and so I had not tbe
requisite amount. . I tried to get the cour
age to ask Air. Joy for tho §2.00 which I
ncedeo to mako the usual sum, and then
the thought came to me that I could keep
that amount from my daily sales and re
place it next week, never stopping to think
how easily it could be deteced, or that it
was possible I could be considered a thief.
But I see now how wrong it was, and I am
afraid I can never regain Mr. Joy's respect
and confidence, and all my fellow-clerks
will look upon me with pity and contempt.
No, Mrs. Joy, and dear little Willie, though
my heart blesses you for lifting a part of
the load, I do not feel as if I could go back.
I believe I will go to sea."
"And leave that dear father and mother
to grieve for you ? Why, it would break
their hearts. They need not know about
your temptation until you can go to them
and tell them all your trouble; but if you
lun away like a criminal or a coward, they
will have reason to believe their son has
fallen into guilt and crime. No, my dear
boy; stay and prove to your employer, by
your future honesty, that you did not intend
to defraud him, and let this severe lesson
prove a saving blessing. We will try aud
make your home life more cheerful, and in
pleasant, iuuocent recreation you shall fos
get your home sickness and desolation, and
have no desire to join in vain, unprofitable
amusements, or seek the companionship of
any but the wise and good." *
"God bless and reward you, dear lady.
You have saved me. I was feeling so reck
less just now, I did not care what became
of met I will try and serve Mr. Joy so
faithfully that you may never regret, your
kindness.
And Mrs. Joy # had saved him. Years
after, when he was a noble, upright man
with wealth and honors, he would turn to
the still-happy fireside of his benefactress
with a grateful heart, and bless her for all
he had become in thir world and tho hope
for the life which is to come.
Mr. J. T. McDonald, Roxbubg, Va.,
says: "My mother and I used Brown's
Iron Bitters for dyspepsia and it gave al
most instant relief."
How natural it will be for Jay Gould to
sing out on his new yacht: "Bear down on
the bull works!"
jl tauttton $pttklot
BATE. OF ADTEBTISIII6.
ADVKKTisramn. will be Inserted at the im •
of 51.00 per square of eight lines or less, for tha
first insertion, and 50 cents for each subsequent
Insertion.
-_- A liberal discount will he made on ad.
vertlsements published lor 3, 6, or 12 months.
. *». SpeciAL Notice, will be Inserted a
double the advertising rates.
i Obituaries, Announcements of Candl
dates for office, and all communications of a
personal or private character, will be chanced
for as advertisements. uwu______
Address—".Staunton Spectator," Stsunton.Ta,
THE TWO GLAS.SES.
There sat two glasses,_lled lo Ihe brim,
On a rich man's table, rim to rim;
One was ruddy and red as bl- il.
And one ns clear as the crystal flood.
Said thagliisiof wine to the paler brother —
'I. _s iell the tales of the past to each other.
I aan tell of banquet and rev 1 and mirth.
And some of the proudest and grandest eouli
on earth
Fell under my touch, as though struck by
blight.
Whore I was a klug, for I ruled In might,
From the heads of kings I have torn the crown.
From the heights of fame I have hurled men
down;
I have blasted many an honored name;
I have taken virtue and given shame;
I have tempted the youth with a sip, a taste.
That has made his future a barren waste;
Far greater than a king am I,
Or than au army beneath the sky ;
I have roado the arm ofthe driver fall.
And tent the train from tho iron rail;
!i - made good ships go down at sea.
Ana the shriek, cf the lo*_ were _weet to me,
For they said, 'Behold haw great you be;
Fame, strength, wealth, genius before you fall.
For your might and pcweraie over all.'
Ho! ho! pale brother," laughed the wine.
"Can you boast of deeds as great as mine?"
Said the water glass : "I cannot boast
Of a king dethroned or a murdered host;
But I can tell of a heart, once sad,
By my crystal drops made light and glad ;
Of thirsts I've quenched, of brows I've laved.
Of hands I have cooled and of souls I have
saved; *
I have leaped through the valley, dashed down
the mountain.
Flowed In the river and playe.l in ilieloun
tai ~
Slept in the sunshiue nnd dropped from the
sky,
And everywhere gladdened Ihe landscape and
eye;
I bave eased the lint forehead ol' fever andpaln,
I have made the parched meadows grow fe.tile
with Miain ;
I can tell of the powerful wheel of the mill
Thai ground out Hour and turned at my will;
I can tell of manhood debased by yon
That I lifted up and crowned anew,
I cheer, I help, I strengthen and aid ;
I gladden the heart of man and maid ;
I set the wine-chained captive free,
And all are better for knowing me."
These are the tales they told each other.
The glass of wine and its paler brother.
As th'-y sat together, fllled to the brim
On the rich m .n's table, rim to rim.
Sunshiny Husbands.
BY -MRS. MARGARET E. SANGSTER.
We read so much about the obligation
laid upon the wife to be a perpetual sun
beam in the house that a word to husbands
on tho topic may not be amiss.
A cheerful atmosphere is important to
happy homo life. It is very hard for chil
dren to be good when they are exposed to
au incessant hailstorm of fault-finding from
their parents. It is very difficult for a wife
to maintain a calm and charmingly sweet
demeanor when her husband is critical,
or sullen, and takes all her tender efforts
with indifferent appreciation.
I kuow fui well the air of polite amaze
ment, or amiablo incredulity, with which
men receive the statement of a woman's
opinion that in tho home partu .rship wife,
and not husband, pulls the laboring oar.
Still it is tru . that, let a man's business be
ever so engrossing, ever so w-arisorae, ever
so laborious, the more fact thai he goes to
it in the morning and returns from it at
night sets him abovo his wife in ease and
comfort. For Mm tho slavery of routine
has iis breaks. He gets a breath of the
world outside: he has change of scene dai
!v - sees people and hears them talk, and
his home is distinctly his refuge and shel
ter.
Let a wife aud mother love her homo and
her children with the most absolute, un
swerving devotion, aud serve them with the
most unselfish fidelity, there are, neverthe
less, times when she is very weary.
She knows, better thau any one else, the
steps and the stitches, the same things
done over and over, and the pettiness of
the trials that come to nursery and kitchen.
They are so insignificant that she is
ashamed to talk about them, and I fear she
sometimes forgets to tell her Saviour how
hard they press her, and so, bearing her
cross all alone, its weight becomes crush
ing.
A suushiny husband makes a merry,
beautiful home, worth having, worth work
ing in and for. If the irnin is breezy,
cheery,'considerate, and sympathetic, his
wife sings In her heart over puddings and
her mendiDg-basket, counts the hours till
he returns at night, and renews her youth
in the security she feels of his approbation
and admiration.
You may think it weak or childish if you
please, but it is the admired wife, the wife
who hears words of praise and receives
smiles of commendation, who is capable,
discreet, and exccuiive. I have seen a
timid, meek, self-distrusting little body
fairly bloom into strong, self-reliant wo
manhood, under the tonic and tho cordial
companionship with a husband who really
went out of his way to find occasions for
showing her how fully he trusted her judg
ment, and how tenderly he deferred to her
opinion.
Iv home there should be no jar, no striv
ing for place, no insisting on prerogatives,
or division of interest. Tho husband and
the wife are each the complement 'of the
other. And it is just as much his duty to
be cheerful as it is hers to be patj_nt: his
right to bring joy into the door, a* it is hers
to sweep and garnish tho pleasanl interior.
A family where the daily walk of? the fath
er . mkes life a festival is filled «ith heav
enly benediction.— Contjregalioiiidist.
_ lII.XI . _~—lf your cows -9--UJ their milk
it will be well to milk them three times a
day while they are in full flow. Care
should tie taken in handling an animal
whose udder is distended by an unusually
large How of milk, lest some of the milk
glands be ruptured. Bo gentle and do not
milk too rapidly.
***-'The best advice may come too late."'
Said a sufferer from Kiduey troubles, when
asked to try Kidney-Wort. "I'll try it but
it will be my last dose.*' The man got well
and is now recommending the remedy to
all sufferers. Inthiscase good advice came
just in time to save man.
■ _—•
Unanswerable. Two sons ofthe Emerald
Isle, discussing a certain colored man, one
remarked: "But he was mighty smart,
d'ye mind.'' "Phut are yetalkiu' about?"
replied the other. ' 'If he was so smart, how
did he come to be a colored man?"
—, _—_-■_* —•
Mr. Hugh L. Kidd, Manchester, Va.,
says: "I received great benefit by using
Brown's Iron Bitters for dyspepsia and loss
of appetite."'
Onions Foil Poultry.— Mix chopped
onions with the food once a d-y for several
days and ground ginger two oi three times
a week ami yon may check early symptoms
of cholera. Afterward give both once a
week.
_ _ _•
SKINNY HEN.
"Wells' Health Rene wer" restores health
aud vigor, cures Dyspepsia, Impotence,
Sexual Debility, fl.
sj _. 9
Caution in the premises: "Hadn't I bet
ter pray for rain to day, deacon ?" said a
Binghampton minister, Sunday. "Not to
day, Dominie, I think,'' was the prudent
reply; "the wind isn't right.''
_. 9, .
DON'T DIE IN THE HOUSE.
"Rough on Rats." Clears out rats, mice,
roaches, bed-bugs, flies, ants, moles, chip
monks, gophers. 15c.
_ .—___•
Marriage is a lottery, but we have not
heard that love letters are denied the privi
lege of the mails.

xml | txt