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Bisbee daily review. (Bisbee, Ariz.) 1901-1971, January 15, 1913, Image 1

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BISBEE DAILY
IEW
I--:i - r I " l-l l-7
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i iijl;
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS.
NUMBER 215,
VOLUME 15.
BISBEE. ARIZONA, WEDNESDAY MORNING. JANUARY 15, 1913
SEEKING A REMEDY
FOR CURRENCY ILLS
REHL OF
JUDGE HISSED
COLORADO'S TWO WOMAN LU(ilSJ.ATUKS 1U W.Ud riuiii y
DURING PRESENT SESSION FOR PROGRESSIVE LEGISLATION
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3 OFFERED
N ADVANCE
SteeL-Trust Is
Willing
to
Grant Increase Now to
Stop Possible Reductions
j. ' iriTTariff.
4 f
T
WOULD MEAN YEARLY
fGAIN OF $17,500,000
International Trust in Al
uminum Is Admitted by
Witness Before the House
Committee
WASHINGTON. U. i. Jan. 14.
The ex'stence or an International
agreement covering the aluminum in
dustry was revealed at tonight's se--slon
of the house committee on ways
and means. President Arthur V. Dav
is, of the Aluminum Company of Amer
ica, admitted that his company Is -he;
only aluminum manmaciurer hi mc
United States, and is owned by the
Canadian Aluminum company, -which
In turn, would perfect agreements
with all of the six or seven other
aluminum companies.
The agreement, he said, covered all
the world except the United Stated,
which, he admttted to Hepresentative
ltatney of Illinois, is excepted because
of the law here prohibiting it.
Want Same Tariff
The metal schedule tariff law was
again under fire before the home
committee on ways and means today.
..Several steel manufacturing Jnlereste
" contended for the retention of Ihe
present i duties In the schedule.
- -SrP.'Kerr, or Sharon. Pa., president
or the Sharon Steel Hoop Co.. advo
cated changes in the phraseology ot
the law to prevent Importers from
taking advantage of the terms. Ken
told of plans under way by the V S
Steel corporation to advance ihe
wages of common laborers, artisan
and mechanics ten per cent on Pel
1
Representative Kordney. ot Michi
gan, estimated that this would mean
an advance ot J17.S00.000
In answer to Chairman Underwood
"imiulry as to the cause ot the pro
iosed increase In wages by the stce:
corporation. Kerr said that he tbougnt
that the corporation was taking time
br the forelock to hold labor and urs
ed this as a basis for protection from
the Invasion abroad. He added that,
Sf the industry was disturbed, the
companies would reduce the labor to
a point where they could meet com
petition. UN10HIST8 YIELD TO
- THEIR CONSTITUENTS
Memorial Presented Brings
About Desired Change
of Policy
IXJNDON, Jan. 14. Andrew Bonar
low and Lord Lansdowne. decided
today to retain the leadership otine
unionist party In the house of Com
mons and house of Lords, respective
ly and to abandon their stand on iho
subject of food taxation In connec
tion with the scheme of the Imperial
Jn reply to a memorial addressed to
un t.miarv 9 bv a representative
meeting! of unionists. In which the
abandonment of the policy of food
taxes was advocated. Andrew Bonar
Ijxw. who also spoke for Iord Lans-do-ne.
said today: "It womd Cave
.been more ajreeable to ourselves acJ
our views and more for the Interests
of the unionist party that the cbanse
of method should have been accom
panied by a change of leaders.
Law said, as in the opinion of the
memorialists, that a change In the
leadership would be "fatal to the In
terest, of party and country- f
it our duty to comply with the re
quest," WOULD FIGHT JOHNSON.
Al Palier I One Who Does Not Draw
the Color Line.
ST LOUIS. Jan. 14 Tom O'Rourke.
manager of Al Palxer, stopped In St.
I.ouis tonight on bis war. he said,
from Los Anselec to Toronto to
xneet Jack Johnson and represents
tlves of French promoters to come
to terms for tho proposed fight In
T...;- Kot . n Johnson and Palzer.
"Johnson has no Intention of leaving
tba country I am confidant." O'Eonrka
said. "He was to meoi me m
M. Vlenne at Toronto nd arrange
for the Paris fight"
Hep. Carter Glatx.
Hep. Carter Olars of Virginia
Is
lid
chairman of the Hubcommittee of the'li.dee Weller to snejk
house banking end currency commit-1
lee which has commenced a series of
hearings with the purpose of de
lislns a new currency scheme to be
recommended to congress. Many wit
nesses have been called, all of whom
agree tlm the country needs a more f pleaded that he bad followed '.he cu
elestic currency and a concentration , torn of the police courts in such nmt
of reserve funds. Iteis.
Chairman Glass ias announced that He Ieft ,ne platform amid a fresh
Inasmuch as the democratic plat-1 ortbreak of angry cries. At tho close
rotm declared specifically against the ! ' tbe meeting the first petition for
monetary commission's central bank. I :,'e retaU of a Juage lu L'allfornli wat
the majority members of the com-,mit ln circulation and eag-rU was
mittee feel 1 their duty to seek a , sl8ned b' the women, Present. It lb
-.. ..... . . " cttfitorl that fin nprct'e rami.:cn rlll
substitute for the plan.
Pilfered Letters
Story is Releated
Before Committee
Negro Tells ofTheftand Sale
of Standard Oil
Correspondence
WASHINGTON". D. C. Jan.
"14. William W. Winkfield, col-
ored, 'df Chicago, formerly em-
ployed by the Standard Oil
- company as a messenger, told
the senate campaign fund in-
vestlgating committee today
how he and another employe
named Stump took from the
9 desk of John D. Archbold, ot
the Standard Oil, two letters
4 and disposed of them for a
thousand dollars cash. He told
4- ot selling a copy of a telegram
for a thousand d61Iars and
V loaning two copy hooks of
letters for which $500 were
paid.
He could not Tecall the con-
tents of the two letters or the
telegram to whom they were
addressed, or tbe signatures
attached. He said- that the
V letters were published by the
New York American.
HEAL IN NEEDED
PRESIDENT OF FnANCENe07 cXtreHas
Appeal Is Issued to Voters
to Select Representa
tive of the Best
PARIS, France. Jan. 14. A striking
appeal for the election of a president
to French republic who would truly
represent the greatness of France and
not the Interests or a party or group
of politicians, was made today by
Louis Pass, father of the chamber
of deputies. Passy. who U S3 years
old, has sat as the conservative or
monarchist member of the chamber
ever since the foundation of the re
public He declared that the time
had arrived when tbe president of
the French republic should exercise
real Influence and make his voice be
heard by sending a message to parl
iament on matters of great public
moment
CALIFORNIA DIVIDENDS.
Costs Exceed Profits But Get Rich
Quick Men Make Payment.
NEW YORK, Jan. 14. Although It
cost $63,000 to mine $20,000 worth ot
ere from the Empire Gold,m!ne ln
Sierra county. Cal. A. J Wlsner de
rjaretf a monthly dividend of jne
pe- cent on the stock ror a year,
then he raised the dividend to one
per cent, according to testimony to
day of Jeremlat Courtis, formerly
foreman and superintendent, at the
trial of "Wlsner and John J Meyers.
charged with using the malls to de
fraud In promoiVsS' mining companies.
MAY ABOLISH TITLES
OTTOVv'A. Can. Jan. 14. A bill for
tbe abolition of certain titles In Cat)
ana ana tor aiscouramsK uie oesiowaj
of others wa placed today oo order
.paper tor Introduction In parliament
tomorrow ny J. u. Kuronam.
DM BUB-
Accused Jurist in California
Is Refused Hearing bv
Those Who Would ' i
, Oust Him j
FIRST FOR RECALL!
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal- Jan. 14.
I Standing alone befoie a bitter!) hoj
Mle mass meetlns of club women, con
.i
"ened for the purpose of planning UU1
, destruction. Police Judge Charles A, '
neuer, againsi wnom a rcan cam
I palgn his been launched by men bers
of the Oceansiile Women's club unc .
' others, attempted to maka a drac-atlc '
, pita for justice at the hand: of bis
accusers this afternoon, but met nni
' a volume of hisses and catcalls (Stat
I almost drove him from the plutfo.m.
I Cries of "throw him out ana
; "down with the rascal" came from all I
I parts of the hall and It was with dit
i Acuity that Chairman .Mrs. A. W. Be.
brought about enough order to allot.
I, rt. Il'.ltn. n adnit-
Weller stands accused because or
his action in reducing the ball nt Al
bert Hendricks, an automobile den'et
charged with assault on a young girl
Hendricks was declared to be a fugi
tive from Justice yesterday. We'Ier
be made to obtain sufficient oies for
j a special recall election.
CLASSIFICATION OF
TMASTERS
House Passes Appropriation
Bill and Defeats
Amendment
WASHINGTON.. D. C.J Jan. 11.
j An attempt to ireioke. Tfaft'&r recent
order placing fourth class postmasters
on mo ciassmeu civil service iisi ir.u
remove from the classiticatlon assist
ant postmaster of tbe first and sec-
j ond class post offices by amendment
' to the post office appropriation bill,
' failed In the house today. The bill.
carrying an appropriation of ?27S.4S.-
7M. was passed.
J .The amendment was offered by Itep-
' resntatlve Cullop. of Indiana, and
twas defeated by a vote of 41 to 10G,
but the amendment proposing the
payment per diem of Inspectors in
vestigating and recommending appli
cants for positions of fourth class
postmasters, was carried.
me bill snows an increase oi seven
millions, due partly to the parcels
post.
IDETECTIVES BATTLE
TO
in
the Open
NEW YORK, N. Y., Jan. 14. De
tectives from police headquarters
fought a pitched battle today with de
tectives of the district attorney's of
fice In an effort to serve George A.
SIpp with a subpoena Issued by police
commissioner Waldo.
Sipp was formerly a keeper of a
disreputable resort, who boasted that
disclosures would Insure tbe dismis
sal from the police force of an Inspect
or and a captain.
He finally made .bis way under a
guard from the district attorney' of
w m th rand tnrv room to testify
In the vice Investigation and whether
the police succeeded In servlna
the
subpoena wlir probably have to te de
cided by the courts. It was shoved
through tbe Iron cage of the elevator
ln which SIpp was riding. Five hun
dred persons witnessed the tattle to
hand SIpp a subpoena as he was con
ducted to the elevator.
After Slpp's testimony before the
grand Jury he was whisked away in
an- automobile. District Attorney
Whitman Announced that he had de -
tailed two men to protect SIpp night Tide some responsible official super
and day. i vision of the whole process of Incot-
The subpoena summoned him to ap-: poration and provide. In addition, sal
pear Friday at the trial of Police-1 utary checks upon unwarranted anu
an Eugene Fox before Commission- fictitious increases ot capital. No
er Waldo, on a charge arising from lp,i,im9i. hminnu will be injured
the graft Investigation.
Fox was indicted Dy me grana jury.
GETS AFTER REPORTERS
Governor of South Carolina Insists
Upon Accuracy In Qustat'ons
COLUMBIA, S. O, Jan. 14. The
eoactme&t ot a law making it a mis
'deBteaoor for a newspaper reporter
to misquote a public speaker was urg
ed by Governor Blease In bis mes
sica today to the South Carolina leg-
llslature.
yyr " p N. Ill I IJIIB f''' JJ lBfK
Mrs.
DENVKIt, Jan. 14 (Special.)
Mrs. H-len Bins Boblnson and Mrs.
Trances S. Leejs the tvo lone women
in the Colorado, legislature. Intend to
wage an active' light for progressive
legislation during the present session
of the legislature. They are backed
up by the women of the state. Here
are some of the thluga they are fight
ing for-
A mother's pension.
.TRHNTO-NV N'fcJ Jan. 14. Presi-dtnt-elect
Woodrow Wilson, In his
capacity as governor of New Jersey,
sent his second nnnual message to
tbe legislature which convened today.
It was his last formal appeal to the
legislature for the completion of the
progress ot progressive legislaUoa for
which he declared himself when he
took otflce.
Foremost among the laws' a'dvo
catcd ore a radical revision ot the
ktstutes governing corporations, and
better laws In Uie matter ot draw
ing Juries." The governor recommends
the commission form of government
for cities, and speaks strongly In con
nection with the economics in the
utate administration, in conclusion he
expresses the hop that New Jersey
will ratify the constitutional amend
ments uroviding for a tax on in
proviuing lor a. uii uu i-1
and the election of United
States senators by direct vote of the
!eople. The governor's message was;
written while the president-elect was
in Bermuda and constitutes bis only
political writing since election.
Pays Farewell Complements
A .l.n Anton.- (if .I.A HMmmMII tTlT
is a personal note at regret at leav -
ins New Jersey, and an expression
w W b B& m y w s m w s i&tti w &y
of gratitude and obligation to tnosef"" "'"-'r, , "! "'-'"""-""
who Bitot! by him in carrying outj opeaks for Farmer
-, - i n.ithn..t nr.hr. "e farmer has not; been sei
however, the governor calls attention", he "M" be," continues the gov
to the laxity ot tbe stateV corpora-Upor -We taertw and subs
to the laxity of tbe state? corpora
tion laws. "With the hope that New
Jersev shall never again be called
-.. n!.. f .'... th s-.aff'
is addressed to a
laoUlatirro that Is
lor the first time in his administra
tion democratic In both branches.
Deals With Corporations
The corporation laws ot the state
notoriously stand in need of altera
tion, the governor says. They arc
manifestly inconsistent with the In
terests of the people In the all-lmpor-
tant matter of monopoly, and as they
stand, far from checking monopoly.
- tney actually encourage u. me wuoiw
country has set Its face against thin
method of forming vast combinations
and creating monopoly. Governor
Wilson' declared. "I am sure that the
people ot New Jersey," Le continues,
"do not dissent from the common
judgment that our laws must prevent
these things and prevent them very
electually."
The governor says tbe statutes o:
1 $nn state should be amended to pro
harrafUiy restricted by such ac-
OJJ Toese matters affect the honor
and eood faith of the state, and should
I be acted upon at once and with clear
purpose. '
After declaring that the state should
rnart Inflation to nrotect its peo-
nla from irrcsoonslble persons who
offer for sale securities of every xort,
the governor turned to the question
of jury drawing. "Why ta no legis
lature ever seriously and earnestly
pet Itself to correct this condition?"
he asks. "The drawing ot grand Ju-
Helen Ring Rcbinson and Mrs. Frances
Women Inspectors In factories. ,
Minimum wage
Law requiring health certl'-to to
secure marriage license. I
Mre Robinson has for some years
been ideutilled with the progressive .
movement in Coloiado. Two years
ago she gained a reputation that ex
tended beyond the borders of her
state by the part she took in the
fisht for a pure water supply In Den-
rjes, and 4ven upon, occasion th;
drawing of petit juries b notoriousl
subject to political Influence pud con
trol lu this state, and tills caa,aiMl
should Le remedied."
Taxation Reforms
Continuing the governor points out
reforms ln the str.te's taxation syr
tem, and suggests that the board of
Public utility commissioners be
granted additional powers to ellm!
r.ate dangerous grade rail road-crossings
"lu a thoroughl) practical fasn
lon " The board, he urged, should
also be given power to require rail
roads to man their trains with ndc
rotate crews.
While commending the legislature
of 1911 for passjng the act permitting
cities and towns to adopt tbe com
mission form ot government, the
governor urged a fuller extension of.
;.
"ej system.
"The path ot reform lu that field," .
he added, 'Is unquestionably the path
of greater freedom. The question ot
municipal government Is perhaps the
most serious question concerning the
organization of methods ot govern
ment that now confronts us as a na-
j tion. I covet lor New Jersey the
Mor of showing the way of-liberty
dized
agricultural schools.
hortlcul-
tuial
schools, schools ot
lioultry
breeding and the rest, and they have
uone excejiein worts, iwv u mvro tnj
fectlve way still has been found b
which the farmer can be served. Lec
turers and schools and exj-erlmeiital
farms attached to schools- like labor
atories arc excellent Luc"'tl;ey cannot
of themselves push their, work home.
Some states have gone' far beyond
this and should follow them with
zest.
Economy is Advised.
On the qntlon of economy Gov.
Wilson says
"The business of the state is con
ducted with a wastefulness, a duplica
tion of effort, contusion and conflict
of function which ro .busfness enter
prise could purvitc for sis months.
There Is an extraordinary multiplic
ity ot hoards, commissions, depart
ments and miscellaneous olllce?. over
lapping, connected without being eo-
oruinaicu. iiiucpenueui oi oae auour-. :. . . .,.. .s.A ...if,'!
er and yet naturally belonging UlJ'jg
single systematic whole, whlcn ought , ar" them goo. Tne gtrikers de.
to b drawn together simplified j"1 ra . tneir rtle.
brought into proper relations, pruned L.a e and ganluiry
and put upon a footing or efficltncy i !l"VIn .-.
which also be a footing of economy , working quarters.
and qnlck responsibility. We are wast
ing the public moneys- and are not t amendment conferring upon the con
getting the results which good bus! gross of the United States in unmls
ness methods would net." ,takable terms the power to levy taxes
. Comtitutlnn Need. Chanaes
The governor dwells at length' or.
the "need and demand" for a con -
stltutlonal convention in .New jersey,
and rnncludes liitirmessace with an'ly urge upon the legislature the rail
appeal for the ratification of thfr'two
proposed amendments lo the national
constitution. He says:
"Two great amendments lo the con
stitution of the United States await
tbe ratification of New Jersey, th
S. J.ee.
'.n. She is a Denver lawyer
and
newspaper woman.
Mrs. Robinson Is a member of the
state senate. Mrs. Lee is a member
of the house of representatives. Thus
Colorado women are rerresentcd !n
both branches o fthe legislature.
Colorado women l-ave had the bal
lot since 1892. Only in recent years
however have they taken an activu
part In the' btate's political affairs.
Gov. Wilson Makes
Denial Statement
Attributed to Him
President-elect Never Said
He Preferred Progress-
ive to a Democrat
TRENTON. N. J., Jan. 14.
President elect Wilson said to
day that his interest in the
Maine senatorial situation was
confined knly to the re-election
of -Senator Obediah Gardner.
The governor read his pub
lished reports and ed'toruls
stating that he sent word indi
rectly to Maine that in case
Senator Gardner could not be
re-elected he favored the elec
tion of a progressive republi
can rather than a "stand pat"
democrat
' I sent no mdssage of any
kind, directly or Indirectly,"
said Wilson.
-
SUGGESTS HEGEPT10N
INSTEAD OF OANGE
Inaueural Ball Should Be
Abandoned Says Sec
retary Fisher
WASHINGTON, D. C. Jan. II.
Wilson's inauguration, according to
Secretary of the Interior Fisher,
should be celebrated by "a popular
recc'ption fn the rotunda of the cap-
jtol, with- fto cna,rpe for admission,
rather than by'an inaugural ball In
the Pension building, to which admis
sion is charged. Fisher expressed his
views today Ip a letter to Senator
Sutherland and Representative Sbat
pard, chairman respectively of the
senate and house committees on pu
lie buildings and grounds.
Fisher suggested that congress take
charge ot the inauguration celebration
and make the 'necessary appropria
tions. CLERGY SUPPORTS STRIKE.
Ministers Tell New York .Garment
Workers They Have Public
? Support.
NEW YORK. Jar.. 14. A group of
prominent clergymen told hundreds
of strikihz garment workers ar a
on incomes, and tho amendment pro-
vidlnc for the election of senators of
, tho United States by. the direct vote
oi mo peopie. can imi iw i.i..r-
I ficatlon- of both these amendments.
' we cannot Keep our piace anions, iuc
i-progrcsslve' states-of -'the union and
felcct them. Indeed, we shall be In
a very small -minority If we do re
ject them."
WARAPPEAR!
INEVITABLE
Allies Are Convinced That
Note of Powers 'Will Not
Have the Desired Effect
Upon the Turks.
EXPECT RESUMPTION
HOSTILITIES IN WEEK
Prospects of Peace Grow
Dimmer Instead of;Bright
er While Soldiers Suffer in
Cold of Winter.
LONDON. England. Jan. 14 Lnless
unforeseen events change tbe iurrtnt
of affairs, war In the near ca.it will
be resumed within a week.
The allies, convinced that the Turks
are merely drifting without fle-l pol
icy, have determined to end tho yeem
Icgly fruitless debates and wire pull
lug by resuming military operations
where they left off more than a
month ago. The Balkan kingdoms are
moreover anxious to obtain relief
from the heavy burden of maintain
ing their armies on a war footing in
definitely. Wishing, however, lo olw
sere all d'plomatlc courtesies they
have given the iwwers a reasonable
time to agree on the note regarding
Adrianople. frame It, and present It
to Turkey.
One More Chance
If Turkey, as seems probable, falls
to yield to the demands ot the note,
the" Balkan kingdoms hae agreeil.W
call another sitting conference through
,wbo, according to the rotation rae'l -
od followed, will be tne next prejia
ing officer, and announce definitely
their decision to break off nesota
tlons. Immediately afterwards, the
Servian, IJulganan and Montenegrin
commanders will notify the Turkirti
headquarters that hostilities will le
resumed within ninety-six hourj
The allies hae no faith in t'i3 ef
ficacy of the note the powers will
present at Constantinople. The Olio
man goernment faded today to con
vene a grand council and apparertiv
hrs no Intention of meeting the al'ies
ultimatum on Adrianople. The allies
feel that the note of the power isr
couched in too mild terms to b ef
fective and that Turkey will know t
means nothing because the powers
will be unable to agree on coercive
measures.
ATTROCITIES REPORTED
Germany Reports That Allies and
Turks Are Alike to Blame
BERLIN. Germany. Jan. 14. The
attrocltles committed by the allies
against the Mohammedan Inhabitants
of European Turkey during the Hain
an war was the subject of a 'question
addressed to the government in the
'mperial parliament today by Matt
heas Erzberger, leader of the clerL-sl
center.
Privy Councillor Lehlmm. or the
imperial foreign office, said that both
parties to the war had lodged similar
complaints wltn tue governinem.
which bad communicaieu much tuiu
ni.i.. in ihn imintrv Involved an. I
had otherwise exerted its Influence to
prevent a repition of tne mciuenis
TO
BE GIVEN HEARING
Department of Justice Makes
Recommendation Rela
tive of the Crows
WASHINGTON. Ii. C. Jan. 14
Invt-stlgation of the affairs of tho
Crow Indians in Montana by the de
partment of justice will be recom
mended In tho tomorrow by the sen
ate committee on Indians affairs. Tho
committee recommended today the
adoption of the Townsend resolution,
directing the attorney general to call
on the secretary of the interior for
all information necessary for an In
vestigation, bHt decided later to moll
ify the resolutions by eliminating
reference to the secretary of the In
terior The action of the committee grew
oat of charges made by Mrs. Helen
Pierce Gray, who alleged that the
Crow records had lieen concealed or
destroyed and property of the In
dians hsd been wrongfully taken.
WEATHER FORECAST
FOR ARIZONA Cloudy Wednes
day, local snows, somewhat colder at
night or on Thursday. I ,
,'S.r n --$& '
ifis-a imp
iFTS" ii Mott
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