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Bisbee daily review. (Bisbee, Ariz.) 1901-1971, January 23, 1913, Image 1

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THE BISBEE DAILY REVIEW
k
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS.
"fc. w
VOLUME 15.
BISBEE, ARIZONA, THURSDAY MORNING, JNUARY, 23, 1913.
NUMBER 322.
J?
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STEEL POOL
SECRETS HE
ioemou
Corey Discloses the Inside
Workings of Corporation
And is Good Witness for
The Government
ARRANGEMENTS MADE
i AS TO COMPETITION
Roosevelt on Stand Declares
That it Was He Who Saved
.Country in the Days When
Panic Threatened.
NEW YORK, N. Y., Jan. 22. Wil
liam Ellis Corey, former president cf
tlie U. S. Steel corporation was a
witness today ln the federal suit
brought to dissolve tlte corporation
under the Sherman anti-trust jaw aiid
furn'shed the goernment with the
first testimony it has been able to
obtain in support of its allegations
that the corporation participated in
the international steel pool raid. Co
rey followed Theodore Hooseelt on
tho stand after the latter had repent
ed his testimony before tbie Stanley
Steel Investigating committee con
cerning the acquisition of the Ten
nessee coal and Iron company by the
corporation at the tints ot the panic
of iap7.k
Roosevelt, after reiterating: that he
had given his sanction to the deal jo
"save the country from disaster" and
..after he had been asked whether ne
""had heard various reports about the
Tennessee Coal and Iron company. In
cluding 'one that" the I'. S. Steel cor-
lorat'on within a year previous na'i
experts examining the property, de
clared today that "not one thing that
could he known by me about the com
pany that would have altered my ac
tion." Koosevelt was examined at his ed
itorial offlces by Jacob M. Dickinson,
.former secretary of war and chief
counsel for the goernment In th'.s
case.
Admits Agreements.
Corey testlHed from a room In a
down town office building. He sa'd
that as late as 191" an understand
ing existed with foreign rail manu
facturers under which the stoel cor
poration agreed not to compete with
them in their own countries, and the
manufacturers, in turn, agreed not to
seek business in the United States-
"It was1 understood,"" said Corey,
"that competition was restricted 10
neutral markets and to countries that
did not produce steel rails.-" Wheth
er in these markets there was an
understanding with foreign producers
as" to prices and division of tonnages,
the 'witness professed ignorance.
Corey explained that he had little
to do in making tfy arrangements
himself.
but gained knowledge from first progressive republican to coa
. Farreli. when in charge ofjfer with Wilson will be Represcnta-
James A. Farreli,
the coroorat'on's export business, w bo I
has since succeeded Corey as presl-j
dent of thfe corporation. Farreli, ae
slid, made trtps abroad to discuss
the matter with foreign manufactur
ers. Pool Is Admitted.
Corey testified as to the existence
of a steel rail pool by American man
ufacturers as late as 1904, under
which they kept an even keel and
business was divided. In this the
steel corporation participated, be
said, and was represented at nteet
lngs by Charles M. Schwab, Judge
Oary or himself
INDIAN OUTLAW IS
READY FOR TRIAL
Redskin Who Resented Inva
sion of His Home Will
Soon Surrender
VICTORIA.. B. C Jan. 22 Com
munlcatlon has been established be
tween the British Columbia govern
ment of the provinces and the most
noted Indian outlaw, Simon t.una
Noot. tt Is nesarded as virtually cer
tain tha). the Ions hunted Indian will
surrender to the authorities to facc
a trial in the criminal courts, which
it I virtually conceded to end only
In acquittal.
- Gun-a-Noot some years ago shot
and killed French half tbreed named
declare and a boon companion who
were on their return tourney from a
htintinr wcpedltion and were found tn
company with Oun-a-Noot's wife
Ho had warned the Frenchman to
keep away from his home and' espe
cially" not tn give liquor to five woman.
CHAOS IN ILLINOIS LEGISLATURE; NEW GOVERNOR PREVENTED
FROM TAKING OFFICE AND SENATORSII1P FIGHT LOOM AHEAD
vV ( .?fHMfll. St P--fci .fMr jVf IHP7 v jL
y. KHB LLLLgt,?? -"-J? LLLLLwl ssBS '-? ' L
Harmony Is an unknown quantity In
the Illinois legislature, which is now
in session. The inability ot the
house to organize and elect a speakei
has preented Gov. Edward F Dunne.
democrat, from taking office, and ap
R8
II f
II L
FALL ATJHEiR DUTY
the Face ot Cold aiv-i tl
Peril Brsve Men Go
On to the Last
In
"ST. ANTHONY. Idaho, Jan. 22.
Fire originating e&rli today in the
basement ot tlV; Rossh'amer building
completely gutted that and several
other buildings and for a time threat
ened the' destruction ot the ebtue
town. The loss- Is est.irated at ?2il'.
000. At first lrtually no w ef was ob
talnablo because of froiei pipes, but
after five hours the .ip-ead of th"
flames was checked. A h;gJ wii.U
added to th difficulties. Kan.lllei
with household goods fled and tev!ral
narrow escapes resulted from tumb
ling roofs and walls.
Six firemen were oercome bv cold
and exhaustion
PROGRESSIVES TURN
Ti
,r , . -, .
lendencv i bnown lo Look
lo Co-ning Head
the Government
or
TRENTON. N. J Jan. 2J. The
tiva Hent. ot California who has an
engagement with the governor here
tr-inorrow. Kent is the first man d in
side of the ranks of the democrati.'
party to call on the governor sine;
the latter made his speech announc
ing that he intended to "surround
himself with progressives, and -oal
progressives," In his administration.
it is believed that, in view of tu
iriralr expressions that have been
cenrng to the president-elect from
progressive members of consruds.
rnoio visits are likely hereafter irora
itdi' Kuals of the latter class.
In this connection it became known
today that Senator Borah, of n!?lo
das written a letter warmly approv
ing Wilson'3 stand on con'ervatum
a-s expressed In his recent Chicago
SPfcCCil
Wtlron did not make kuor tho
purpose of Representative Keni x call
nor '-ould he discuss the probable
vuiU of other progressive republi
cans. BIG SHOOT AT PINEHURST
PINEHURST, X. C, Jan. 22. Some
o' the most noted shots of the country
faced the traps here today at th
opening of th-j sixth annual midwinter
trap shooting handicap. In the amount
of the prize ottering and the nutnjier.
and prominence of the contestants the
tourmment has never been equalled
In thr South. The program covers four
days and provides events for both
ntnatcuns and professionals.
WILSN'S COUSIN DIBS.
BALTIMORE, Jan. 22. Mrs. Jennie
Wilson Woodbridge. first cousin of
President-elect Wilson and -wife ,nt
Rev. Dr. Samuel I. Woodbridge, of
Shanghai, China, a Presbyterian mis
sionary died la the hospital "here to
day. Mrs. Woodbridge came here
from China a month ago for treatment.
Left to rtcbti J. Hamilton Lrnli. Go Ternor Donne mad Lonreace T. SBrfuaB.
parently there will be plenty of trou
ble when it comes time to choose the
succeisors of Senators Lorlmer and
Cullom. In the primaries last fall the
democrats named J Hamilton Lewis
ond the republicans I-awrcnce Y
FULL DEFESIEO
Oft FIRST VOTE!
Opponents Declare His Al
leged Re-election, to
Be Inv.alid on 2
To 1 Count
TEST OF STRENGTH
sakta m v m :-, Tho
first test of the strength ol the !ls i
l.iture !s between th; Fail at.'! tto
an"lill forces with 'ere -i-j i-j uh
serai, ri election the lira" vote in
whirl, j. be taken ni x ruea lav,
cm'9 today on the ma. ritv a- nl
nor; ' reports ot the 3i9 cnn.nut
ta tn jvdlciary and jn iho llurg i res
olution wh.ch was lrtrjiluce." a week
ago. The resolution .ieclre that a
vacacycy will ex'st in the United
States .o-v i. from N .. Mexico on
Starch 4 and calls an election for
January 24 to Mil the vacancy.
The Fall foces supiorted the ma
ioritv renort which held n valW
(Fairs so-called second .election in
June C 1912. for the term beginning
'March 4.
I The anti-Fall faction defeated the ! ,- , ,.
majority report by a ote of 32 to'runstons Report
IC, after which the Burg resolution
which, in effect, declares Fall's sec
ond election invalid, was adopted by
a vote of 33 to 15.
ARIZONA WOMAN IS
S
LU 1
Mrs. Dumids Official Dele
. gate from This Country
International Allianc6
PHOENIX. Jan. 22. Mrs. Frances
V.'iilard Munds. who took such an ac
the parj in the campaign for "votes
for women" n this state as head o
the organization .by her appointment
as the official delegate Trom Arizona
to the International Woman's Suf
frage Alliance which will hold Its con-j
gress Jn Budapest Austria, en June
15-21. 1913.
This congress Is composed of twen-1
ty-9een national organizations rer
resenting twenty-seven different coun
tries. The United States is entitled
tt twelve delegates and Arizona has
!ecn allowed one because she has en
franchised her wompn. Governor Hunt
wrs asked by the national officers to
formally appoint her, wnich he has
done, and she expects to attend the
conference.
Mrs. Munds has also been ap
pointed by the officers ot tbo National
Council of Women Voter, whose!
membership !s limited to women of
the suffrage states, as president for
Arizona, and will organize as ooi: as
literature can be prepared. Thlf i
k non-political organization but wilt
undoubtedly Le a powerful factor In
politics a few jears hence.
NEBRASKA CHOOSES SENATOR
LINCOLN. Neb Jan. 22: The clec
lion of George V. Norris as United
States senator to succeed N'orW'
Brown was confirmed today .at a
joint session of the legislature. '
-,
the
Sherman for the term. TJut as
. ...... J
ITngrewIvcs hold the balance ot pow
tf '" 'M Jes,Saiur' there. ! a ',ues" ! iutluding to steel water tanks. $12,
tlon whether cither one of these men!cfl0. , al)t ,131.400: Provided. Tha
vili be selected to represent the state
I
In the upper branch of congress.
REALISTIC OREAM IS
GROUND FOR DIRGE
Invstigaii-Ji: of Vision of
Sleep Produces Tangi
ble hH'idence
NBW YOltK. N, Y Jan. 22. A
dream so vivid tisA.tn truth of It
; could not bu doubted caused Charles
Grellet to sue today for the annul
ment of his marriage which occurred
seven years ago. On the witness
stand Gi'ellet sa'd be dreamed that
'he met his wife in Paris, with anoth-
?r ,inan; who. sne introduced as her
husband. When he awoke he rues-
tloned his wife: her replies aroused
his susplc'ons and he wentabroad to
see If the vision was true. The rec
ords of Paris. Grellet testified, show
ed that his wife had been married
there in 1900 to Vleto.- Counant. who
's living. The case was undefended.
Justice Erlanger reserved decision
T
EOF
L
Discloses
the
Incapacity of
Islanders
WASHINGTON. D. C, Jan. 22.-
Worn' out cavalry horses and ine'.H-
cient Filipp'no teamsters would prove
a menace to the United .States sue
cess in the event of a campaign !n
China or the Philllplnes, Is the opin
ion of Brig. Gen. Frederick Funston,
commanding the department ol Lu
zon, Philippine d'vision of the army
Discussing the questions of his an
nual report Funston says. "The re
cent substitution of many United
States teamsters by Filippmos on thi
score of economy from the stand
point of efficiency is most reg-V:tajIe.-
rie points out that even where Fil
ipino drivers have courage tbey lack
self confidence and strength. Intn
ai.'e stilt o that they plunge down i
tknk Into a stream with the fatal
ism characteristic of the race, trust
ing tht more nruletr will get through
some way than where their own ef
forts to control them."
OUT ON BONOS.
Convicted Cabor Leader Has
Tern-
porary Freedom.
LEAVEN-WORTH. Kan.. Jan. 22.-
W'lllam C. Bernhardt, of Cincinnati,
who entered 'the federal prison hen
with t!- other labor leaders con
victed in Connecticut with the "dj
namlte conspiracy was freed todi
on bonds of ten thousand dollars.
WIRELE&S TREATY SAFE.
Senate R3f'fie Result of Negotiation.
Held in oLndon.
WASHINGTON. D. C, Jan. 22.-
f After telng In executive session to
almost an hour today, the senate fall
.ed. to confirm any nom'naUons e
cepi that or Ueut, CoL Edwin H
Brewer to te colonel In the army.
Tho treaty for the regulation o
wireless telegraphy, negotiated i
compliance with the general Interna
tlonal conference held In London laz
.summer was ratified, ,
TURKEY
NATIONAL 1 FOR
PROVIDED BY HDUSt
Liberal Amount Granted For
. Civilization and Fducation
of Our Red Men; Schools
i And Irrigation Provided.
MEASURE ISNOW
BEFORE SENATE
1 The Indian appropriation blli which
'recently passed the lower bouse oi
j congrefs.and is cow in the senate
carries tho following Items for the
' tianflf nt fho Vaptnun Iplhua nt In.
Idiamt in Arizona:
For support and civilization of In
dians in Arizona and New Mexico.
$380,000.
For support and education of two
hundred Indian pupils at the Indian
school at Fort Mojave. and lor pay ol
superintendent. J3...100: for general
jreialrs and Improvements, 3,300, in
I all. $3S.400. '
! For support and education of seven
j hundred Indian pupils at the Indian
I fcchool at Phopnlx, Arizona, and for
i,r fif tti:iwrfnt0nrifnt 11l4l1ft- fnr
i vv o ui-rnueiiieni, iiv.ii'v; lur
I F).neraI repairs an,i improvemeuU
Thai
I su nf ihiK .nnmnriitinn. nr n m..ci,
thereof as may be necessary, bliall be
Uhort In making survey and an estl
irate of the cost of connecting tht
server system ot the Phoenix Indian
ftbool with the sewer system of the
city of Phoenix. Arizona, and subml'
a report thereon to congress on the
hrst Monday In December, nineteen
hundred and thirteen.
For support and education of one
hundred pupils at the Indian school at
Truxton Canyon, Arizona, and for pay
of superintendent, $1S.2'iO; for gen
cral repairs and improvements. $3,
'W; in all. $1,200.
For maintenance, care, ana protec
tlon, of machinery and Irrigation welU
already completed. In connection with
(he irrigation-of the lands of the Pima
Indians In the vicinity of Sncaton.
in the Gila River Indian Revervation,
5C.OO0.
For the development of a water sup
"ly for domestic and stock purposes
and for Irrigation for nomadic Papago
Indians In Pima County. Arizona.
J.-..000.
For continuing and completing the
construction of the Ganado Irrigation
project oq the Navajo Indiar Reserva
tion in Arizona, In accordance with
tbe plans bUbmitted by the enter en
gineer of the Indian service and ap
! roved by the Commissioner, of In
lum Affairs and the Secretary of the
Interior, in conlormity with section
one of the Act approved April fourth,
nineteen hundred and ten, ?23.000:
Provided. That the total cost of tho
project shall not exceed $60,100.
The Secretary of the Interior is
hereby authorized and directed to
make an investigation of the condi
t'ons on the western Navajo Indian
RcvervaUon in Ari7ona. with respect
o the necessity ol constructing a
ridge across the Moencopl Wash, on
aid reservation, and also to cause
urveys, plans and reports to be made,
together with an estimated limit cost
lor the construction of a suitable,
bridge at that place, and submit his
reiort thereon to congress on th3
hrtt Monday In December, nineteen
"lundrcd and thirteen, and the sum o
1,000. or so much thereof as may
be ncce?sary, is hereby appropriated
for the purpose herein authorized.
For completion of the construction
it necessary channels and laterals for
'he utllizaUon of water In co"hnec
inn with the pumping plant for Irrt--atlon
purposes on the Colorado
liver Indian Reservation, rlzona.
is provided in the Act of April fourth,
alneteen hunderd and ten (Thirty
ixth Statutes! at Large, page two
.nndred and seventy-three), for the
purpose of securing an appropriation
it water for the irrigation of approx-
.mately one hundred and fifty thou
sand acres of land and for maintain'
ng and operating the pumping plant,
"25,000, reimbursable as provided In
aid Act and to remain available un
it expended.
For the construction of a bridge
.cross the Gila River on tjie San Car
'os. Apache Indian Reservation, Ari
zona, $45,500; and for the construction
nf a hrirlze arrnss thn San CarloS
River on said reservation In said!
state, $19,800. to be Immediately avail
able said bridges to be constructed
across laid streams in the places and
nnnner recommended by the Sccre-
ary of the Interior In House Docu
aent Numbered One thousand and
hirteen. Sixty-second congress, third
esslon; In all, $w,300, which said
am of iGJ.300, with Interest thereon
it the rate of three per centum per
nnum, shall be reimbursed to the
'nlted States by the Apache Indlani
laving tribal rignU on the Fort
pache and San Carlos Indian Reser
at ions, and shall be and remain a
charge and lien upon tbe lands, prop-
r-rty ar.d runds belonging
Apache Indians until paid
irinclpal and Interest. K
to said
In
full.
i
YIELDS TO
lit ERE.
RtADY TO MftKE PEAGE AT
TERMS TIB ME OFFERED
Adrianople is Surrendered and the Question of Aegean
Islands is Left to Powers for Their Adjudication. Pov
erty of the Treasury and Threats of Russia to Sever
Relations Help .'to Hasten Final Decision.
ONLY QUESTION LEFT OPEN IS INDEMNITY
CONSTANTINOPLE. Turkey. Jan -i dunshlun Ettendl. the foreign minister.
22. Turkey submitted today to the
will of powers. Th? grand council ot
the Ottoman empire decided in favor
of accenting the proposals of Europe
for the peace settlement between Tut
l.ey and the Balkan allies. As ofiii
clally announced the grand council
appro ed the government's point ot
lew and declared lt confidence In
the sentiments of equltj avowed by
the great powers, and expressed the
wish to see the promises proposed
for Its assistance effectively realized.
It also asked the government to exert
all Its efforts to Insure the future safe
ty to the countrj. and the develop
nient of its economic Interests.
The question was submitted by the
Turkish government to Grand council
today was "'Should the recommen
datloob contained -in the note of th
powers be accepted or rejected."
The government frankly confessed
its favor of agreeing to the sufigestlon
of the powers
Surrender Serms Complete
Marquis joltinn de PelUvtcinai, the
Aut&o Hungarian ambassador ail
dean of &e diplomatic oorpe at Con
stantraoplbv will be hanflletl tomorrow
a note In which the Ottoman got em
ment agrees to the cession of the
fortress of Adrianople, the future de
position of the Aegean island t anu
places Itself In the hands of the pow
ers. A meeting of the council of minis
ters will be held tomorrow' morning
before the final step is taken.
A joint note to the powers advised
that Turkey would cede Adrianople
and leave the fate of the Aegean isl
ands to the power's future determina
tion. in return the powers promised their
benevolent support so long as Turkey
deferred to their council.
Conditions are Explained'
The sultan gave an audience to tho
f.rand council together with the granu
izler and Sheik Ul Islam Nazini
Pasha, minister of war. wno dcciareu, condition of the country has lurnish
tbe armv eager to continue the war. jf,i a potent argument In their appeal
1 urkey might even hope for a meas t the powers.
lire of success, he said, but there was
little chance of relieving Adrianople.
Tht finance minister explained that
the dependence of the treasury was
on foreign markets. The most rh"rou
task, however detoHrv! : k n Nora
THREE ARRESTED IN
MUiJSON PLOI
Two Prominent Business
Men Brought to Count
On Uglv Charges
GLOBE. Ariz., Jan, 22. MarUn Des
pot, Samuel Wuylch and Mike IeH
govlch the Jlrst two prominent busi
ness men of Miami were arrested to
day on warrants charging them with
arson, it Is alleged that they started
the fire which more than two years
ago nearly destroyed the town, iledl
govlch signed to statemnet in which
he swore that he was h'red to fire
a .business block.
The revelation was the outcome,
according to the police, of a realty
deal In which Despot and Wuylch out
hid Mike Price and another business
man. Price reported the matter to
the authorities, stating, according to
District Attorney Johnson that he re
ceived advance notice of a fire and
protected his building with water
soaked blankets. A statement was
made also by J. N. Cort that, whn
he attempted to put out the blaze as
soon as It was discovered, but Des
pot drove him away at the point ot
a revolver.
IS PLEDGED TO LABOR
Kenyon
Says Workingman
Particular Protege
Is His
DES MOINES. Iowa, Jan. 22.' 1
t hare a course mapped out to fight a
battle In congress during the noxt
i two jeara for human rights, moral
laws, decency In politics, and loglsUv
tlon," declared Senator W. S. Kenyon,
in a speech today before the Iowa
legislature In accepting the re-election
tendered him by Joint ballot by a
-vote of 98 against 57 for D. W, Ham
ilton, democrat. "The lime baa come."
contilued the senator, "when the la
boring man will be given a large!
snare of tbe wealth be helps to cre
ate."
POWER:
MBLED,
who set forth the International slttia.
tlon. He dwelt especially on the at.
tltuue of Russia, which, he said. warn.
d the Porte on two recent occasion
that the continuation ot hostilities
might oblige Russia to depart from
it attitude of neutrality. Scarcely a
dissenting voice was raised and it Is
said, that the Pasha and late grand
izier. fully concurred In the govern
ment's view.
ALLIES WELL PLEASED.
Only Question of Financial Indemni
ty Now Remains .to Be Fixed.
LONDON, England, Jan. 22. The
plenipotentiaries of the Balkan king
doms are immensely pleased at the
decision of the grand council at Con
stantinople to acceptt he- aid ot the
powers. ,
While it has become mofe evident
during the last forty-eight hours tint
other Turkish statement were pre
pared for the bitter fate which ends"
t(ie history of a European nation It
was hardly expected" that they would
register their decision so quickly or
so definitely. The action is so unlike
the cubtomary Turkish policy that
some suspicion was entertained that
Turkey may have cards up its sleees.
Thfe porte's reply to the recent note
of the powers will b handed tpmor
row to the ambassadors, ho-everTand
the remainder of the negotiations
leading "fo the signing or'the peace
treaty will N. an antt-cllmax.
Money Question Open
One crucial iolnt of difference re
mains to be settled the question of
indemnity. The al'les propose io
fevy a heay payment on the defeat
ed nation. They speak of $200,000,tmo
as an adequate sum and their mini
mum amount is equal to the Turkish,
debts attached to the territories wh'ch
they will annex under the treaty. The
Turks will probably fight strongly
i n rain i:t indemnity and thn bankrunt
Negotiations for the settlement ot
m.nor questions and the arrangements
for taking oer the conquered prov
inces will occupy some time and It
will be some weeks before the treaty
s signed '
ONE CANVAS WILL
Gdynia ALIKE
United States Government Is
to Shelter Soldiers of
Blue and Gray
WASHINGTON, D. C, Jan. 22.
Secretary of War Stimson has ap
proved the plans formulated by Maj
or James E. Normoyle apd Captain P.
F. Dalton for a mammoth camp to
shelter the surviving union and con
federate vefjsrans, who meet at Get
tysburg battlefield next July to com
memorate the fiftieth anniversary of
the battle. The camp will constat
of 51,000 tents affording accommoda
tions for betwfTtv fipJVW and "O.OOO
veterans. ' ') "', '
LEAP FIVE SfOBlES
BUI LI0JN SAFETY
Girls Throw Themselves Out
Of Windows But Fall
Into River
COLUMBUS, 0 Jan. 22. Three
girls jumped from the fifth floor oi
the burning factory building ot the
Rurdcll Sweat Pad company Into tbo
Scioto river today and then swam to
shoile In safety. Scores of girls were
employed in the factory and when the
three were seen to jump from the
fifth floor w'ndows the report bo-
came current that several 'had
death which proved untrurv
met
WEATHER FORECAST.
FOR ARIZONA Snow and colder
in the north; fair In thefSbath.
jm

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