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The Commonwealth. (Everett, Wash.) 1911-1914, February 27, 1913, Image 1

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10,000 Circulation and
Twice a week issue
by June i, 1913
.So por ropy. $1 00 per voar.
THE AMERICAN WORKIN6MAN HAS NO QUARREL WITH HIS FELLOW WORKMAN IN MEXICO
If the Capitalists Want War Let Them Go to Mexico Themselves and Do the Bleeding and Dying! Workers,
Don't Slit Your Veins to Serve the Interests of the Financiers!
MEXICO
By Dr. W. S. Keyser.
txzv AviTATRC ny MFYTrn ARF VFRY UNFORTUNATE BUT IF IT IS TRUE AS REPRESENTED. THAT WALL STREET FURNISHED THE ARMS AND MONEY TO START THE REBELLION, IT IS ALSO TRUE THAT
«.v JJi fSfVryDKATH AND ALT THF MISERY THAT HAS OR MAY HEREAFTER COME TO THAT UNHAPPY COUNTRY THROUGH THE PRESENT WAR. NOW, I HEAR THAT TAFT IS PREPAR
?vJ'Tn s^n !k a!MV mTO I^XICO FOR WHAT' IS IT TO PROTECT THE LIVES OF AMERICANS? BOSH! I WILL TELL YOU FOR WHAT-IT IS FOR THE PROTECTION OF CAPITAL-AMERICAN CAPITAL- AND
tMTr^^rmY^oS A PATRIOTIC^PEOPLE WHO ARE FIGHTING FOR THEIR LIBERTY! HOW WOULD WE HAVE FELT AT THE TIME WE WERE IN CIVIL WAR IF MEXICO OR ANY OTHER NATION HAD
TN^lr?eß^ I THINK TI?ERE WOULD HAVE BEFN A^MG HOWL TAFT DON'T SEND OUR BOYS TO MEXICO TO STOP THE BULLETS OF THE MEXICANS, OR TO KILL THOSE WHO HAVE DONE US NO WRONG.
I?YOU DO^OU WILL SET THE LAW OF COMPENSATION' AT WORK. AND IT WILL BRING SUFFERING TO THIS COUNTRY. UNO QUE SABE.
DEMOCRACY AND THE PUB
LIC SCHOOL.
No one can deny that we are be
coming more democratic in OUT poli
tics, our religion, our government, and
■Jur every day affairs, but what of the
public schools? Many public men
university professors, business man.
and others —say that the public school
is a failure. Why? They do not agree
on reasons but they say this: There
is no real education: pupils lack or
iginality, push, and the power to rea
son. Pupils leave school almost total
ly unequipped with the knowledge they
should have to cope successfully with
modern conditions, either industrial or
social.
The causes are to be found in the
pettifogging methods of an old style
pedagogy and in the cramped confines
of the text books. The average teach-,
er is the slave of the text book, and
in nine cases out of ten the texts in
common use were out of date ten
years ago. They are not fitted to de
velop in the child a knowledge of the
real community affairs in which he
must take part, or a sense of his obli
gations to society as a whole, or the
rights that society owes to him as an
individual. The new social spirit is
entirely lacking and the result is a
young man or woman entering life
unprepared and unfitted to take his or
her place in the active life of the com- |
munity.
Above all our educational system is
ultra-conservative and, if anything, it
should be ahead of the times, for the
boys and girls enduring it are to be
come citizens not when they leave
school, but six or eight years after
ward.
Most of the school boards are prac
tically indifferent to the educational
aspect of the school. They generally
devote their energies to determining
whether or not the teacher belongs to
the proper church or that he or she
does not engage in any uplift work
not approved by the W. C. T. U. No
teacher resents a kindly criticism of
actual class room work, but teachers
certainly do resent any interference
with their own private beliefs, politi
cal, religious, or otherwise; and when
some teachers, through fear of losing
their positions, will suppress their
rUtural inclinations and desires the re
s,'Jt is an instructor who lacks in force
oY character. Such a teacher never
gains the respect of children and the
result is disastrous.
The remedy? The only remedy lies
in the election of liberal-minded so
cialists on all the school boards in the
state. When I way liberal minded Ij
mean just that. There are socialists
and socialists. When you nominate,
candidates for school boards be sure
of several facts about your nominees—
first, that they are socialists, thorough
ly understanding the principles of so
cialism; second, they should be the
[jest educated persons yon can find;
they should lie possessed of a
fcrge fund of common sense and have
Hie habit of exercising this quality
than once in six months.
y socialists will make progrea
■We school boards: progressive boards
will secure progressive teachers ami
provide up-to-date texts; these will
make for a more liberal education for
our boys and girls, and they will I
life with a wider and bi ■ para
tion for the social and industrial life
that lies before them.
JOHN B i wi.ou.
Sedro WOOlle) W
Attention, Shingle Weavers, Saw
Mill Workers and Woodsmen. Mass
meeting at Liberty Hall, Everett,
March 2, at 2:30.
The Big Business Men Want War in Mexico.
Who Will Go to It and Do the Dying ?
They or the Workingmen ?
$cs»ir the ITUWBiSR OH your LAHIL If 113 your bubboription ufisjes thw WKF.K kini^. renew at once.
THE EDUCATIONAL MACHINE
By Ada C. Baker.
Man's ureatesl achievement in th<
modem ago is tho machine. The won
ilrons creation with it« thi'ws ami sin-j
o»s of iron ami its motive fnnv Ol
■team or tleotrloity, luui it been possi
ble in a more primitive age, would
have been deified. Bven now it ls|
an object of worship. Wo pay homage
in the form of special privileges; we
make human sacrifices to it; we cons
ciously or unconsciously reproduce it
in our institutions; we have govern
mental machinery, cinuvh machinery,
educational machinery.
To our educational forefathers who
thought of the child's mind as a sheet
of white paper upon which the teacher
might write what he wished, or as a
block of marble to be hewn into shape,
education seemed a simple process.
What was more natural then, when
the ever-increasing possibilities of the
machine dawned upon them, than to
apply its principle to education? So
the pedagogical energy of the nine
teenth century was devoted to the de
velopment of a great system with all
sorts of ingenious contrivances and
processes for informing, illuminating,
refining and polishing the material up
on which it -worked.
Individual differences among the pu
pils gave but little concern to those
lovers of uniformity and conformity
who elaborated the system. Is one
pupil especially quick? Hold him back.j
it is not necessary that he exercise
his full powers. Is another slow to
grasp a subject? Drop him along if
he never gains a firm footing.
To the teachers of a hundred years
ago, the modern school with its fine
buildings, its generous equipment, its
numerous text books, its diversified
curriculum, its carefully planned
courses of study and its normal school
and college trained teachers, might
seem almost perfect, the complete
realization of their ideal.
But today we are not satisfied. On
every hand arise complaints against
our public school system, detailing its
injuries to the physical, mental and
moral welfare of "the pupils. But the
most widespread, the most insistent
complaint is that the school dwarfs
and checks the child's individuality.
His intellectual food is so carefully
prepared and so systematically admin
istered that he has neither time nor
opportunity to use his own resources.
The advance in biology and psychol
ogy has given us a new conception of
education. We no longer regard the
child's mind as a sheet of blank paper,
but as a living organism, acting on
the inward impulses from a injured
generations of ancestors and respond
ing to the outward stimuli of a many
sided environment and that well-in
tentioned efforts to instill so much
arithmetic, so much grammar, so much
patriotism, so much morality, eachj
day, eacli month, each year, have be
come out only absurd, but criminal
From every side comes the demand
to break the lockitep, to give more
freedom.
Our conception of education has
changed, why has not our educa
tional system changed? Pint and
most, because it is the chief bulwark
[•ting institution.-, as every prom
inent citizen who addressee
r school children affirms. There
is litth- danger that pupils who tor
so many yt ais have had their em
refull) directed ami their think
irefully done for them, will]
exhibit i much leei
the trodden pathi <m the other
ently and
<Ci)e Commontoealtf)
"When war comes the devil makes hell larger."—German Proverb.
"Oh war, thou son of hell!"— Shakespeare.
"War is hell!"— General W. T. Sherman.
If war is hell, let those who want it go there!
shams, political, religious, moral and
social from the earth ;and that is what
capitalist rulers dread above all things.
In the second place, we are not
ready to pay the price. The factofy
system is cheap. To be sure, it squan
ders the energy of teachers and pupils,
but it saves dollars. And while the
taxpayer cheerfully contributes hun
dreds of millions annually for army
and navy, and other hundred millions
to capitalist masters, he shudders at
any proposal to increase the school
tax. But when the workers them
selves determine the disposition of the
COMON—FOUR— HANSEN— . . . .
wealth they create, they will demand
for their children the opportunities
that only the favored few new enjoy.
Then the ideal of the educational ma
chine with its factory-like uniformity
of results and its factor-like disregard
of the individual will disappear to be
replaced by Froebel's beautiful con
ception of the school as a garden, with
its freedom, its sunshine, its opportu
nity for growth and development.
STRAINED VOICE DELAYS
TRIAL.
Banana Trust Case Postponed Year
Because Lawyer Injured Vocal
Cords Defending Archbold.
Philadelphia, Feb. 19. —After wit
nesses had been brought from points
of th. United States and South Amer
ica, and a wagon load of documentary
evidence had been gathered, the suit
of the Bluefields Steamship company
for $15,000,000 against the so-called
banana trust was continued today for
a year because Alexander Simpson,
junior counsel for the plaintiff, had
strained his voice.
Mr. Simpson's associates explained
that he had injured his vocal cords in
defending former Judge Archbold in
the latter's impeachment proceedings.
Got it in the neck for protecting a
crooked judge. Well, we all will get
it some way or other when we stand
for evil. The eternal law of compen
station will always work.
Uno que sabe.
Bunnyside, Wash., Feb. 24, 1913.
111.- Commonwealth, Kverett, Wash.
Comrades —I am sending you draft
for <;mis s<)1(1 at tne I.iivermore lec
i,ii. I had hopes to have sold more
cards for the lecture, both for our
and the good of the paper, yet
Comrade l.ivennore said we had a
good average attendance, i must say
you will do a great work with such a
paper as you are printing if it can
be placed in the hands of the people
and read. This lasi issue should be
read by every near socialist in the
state before tin- school election, and
it is certain your paper should be
read by every red card meri
fours truly,
F. E. I.AMI'KI.V
GERMANY.
All over the COUntl ■
meeting! have been held in w
! the
TOR SOCIALIST NKWS AND PROPAGANDA
EVERETT, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1913.
COMMENTS ON WAR
THE SCHOOL ELECTION.
By Edward Engson, Luverne, Minn.
The approach of ;i general election
is always itgniflOAllt to all political
parties. Although the socialist party
j never ceases its political activities, It
usually centers its efforts along the
channels which lead to the White
I House and the state capitals, losing
I sight of the minor elections. How
can the larger citadels be captured if
; the smaller ones be neglected? Why
! not capture the smaller fortifications
! while on the march to the strong
holds? i-
I refer to the school elections.
These are more important than many
realize. The teachers in their various
! stations of activities (as rural teach
! ers, principals or superintendents)
: are placed there by the school boards
or the boards of education.
The educators in their various sta-
I tions owe their positions t(? the pleas
ure or displeasure of the so-called
"boards." Not long ago a teacher in
one of the high schools of Montana
lost her position because of taking an
ATTENTION, VOTERS!
Shall the workers tolerate the practice of capitalistic "sabotage"
and "direct action" upon teachers who have the courage to teach
the truth?
THE WORKING CLASS creates the -wealth that supports the
schools. It furnishes most of the children for the schools. Therefore,
who has a better right to say what shall be taught in the schools—
■than the workers?
The schools are as thoroughly dominated by capitalism as the
!churches are i
ruder a Socialist School Hoard, liberal and progressive teachers
would he free to teach the truth instead of fawning to capitalism
at every turn. I
We have an example of Capitalisi ■■Direct Action" right here in
Puyallup. Mrs. Dora McKee is to loso her position in the schools]
because she is a socialist, and lias stood up for the working class,
although tin' superintendent admitted that she is one of the very
besi teachers in the schools. Let every member of the working class,'
botn men ;md women, who have one drop of red blood left in theirj
I veins resent this dastardly insult to the working class AND COME
OUT'mABCH 1 AM) REGISTER YOUR PROTEST ACAINSTJ
SUCH RUSSIAN METHODS. BY VOTING FOR
MRS. DORA P. McKEE
I For School Director
Passed l>v Puyallup Socialist Local. February -L 1913. R. E.
Danner, Secy. *'. \V. Garrett, Chairman of Session.
REMEMBER THE DATE—MARCH 1, 1913.
active part in the socialist movement.
These bodies of men to a great ex
tent have the power directly or indi
rectly to shape the ideas of the class
room. This spells importance, for the
schoolboy of the formation period of
today becomes the man and the voter
of the morrow.
I The last decade or so has seen a
change sweep over our public schools.
The trend ill education has been to
ward the "practical" lines of work.
It is well that the patrons of our
(schools take pride in the courses now
offered their sons and daughter!. Hut
under present economical conditions,
I a student today, a wage-slave ere long,
his superiority over preceding gener
ations in efficiency and skill are only
the means to wring gold from a toil
ing world to fill the newly made cof
jfers of the future exploiter of human
I mind and brawn.
I am not opposed to a practical edu
! cation, far from that. Dut, unless the
"bread and butter" problem is to be
| solved under the great co-operative
commonwealth, it will not aid in the
[happiness and comfort of the toiler.
Besides training fur service, our
schools must also offer opportunities
j In'training for the correct Interpreta
tion of existing economical conditions.
|In this connection history and eco-
nomicß may be mentioned. Usually a
biased (unconsciously or by choice)
teacher and a text-book of perverted
or omitted facts gives the student In
adequate Ideas of the real struggles
of tho workers. For example, how
many students In our public schools
are taught that the famous "Boston
Tea Party" occurred because the
profits of some sugglers (among them
John Hancock of historic fame) were
at stake.
Why educate the voter in the class
struggle and not make an attempt to
place our schools where they should
be? But a few years, and this child
is an elector, his ballot counteracting
your own in the great struggle for
economic freedom! To accomplish
this attempt, a few things must be
heeded. Fill the stations in our pub
lic schools with class conscious teach
ers; men and women who are willing
to interpret the class struggle in the
right light.
To realize this it becomes necessary
to elect class-conscious men and wom
en to membership on the boards of
education and school boards.
As a result the schools will have
the proper text booki and reference
works, and Indifferent or biased teach
ers catering to the ideas of the old
philosophy of Wealth will sec ;i new
light, .md govern themaelvei accord
ingly.
II you hope n> ice future genera*
tloni tree From the bondage of wealth,
hop.' io tee a race of emancipated
■alves, then go to the polls at
tehool elections and out a ballot for
the i
What advani d edueat
rown ups" if you allow the
to Instill doctrinei
.if capitalistic phlloeonh) into Hi.
nihiils oi youi
! help t"
a unll will
ITA i
j An Efficient and Powerful Soc- \
\ ialist Press Must be Developed <
i for Stirring Campaign of 1916 \
IN " HILLMAN '' PACIFIC
CITY.
The old man was standing with
drooping mouth and rounded shoul
ders, on the little depot platform at
Pacific City. Upon being asked if C.
D. Hillman, one of President Taft's
most valued friends, had not been the
original booster for the blossoming
burg, he straightened up, his eye light-]
ing up with a responsive glow, and
spoke as follows:
"Yes this here town is Hillman's
great Pacific City. Great, ain't it?
Look at them swamps and mud holes
and steep hills. Purty sight fur the
eyes of the "unsight unseen" inves
tor. Them swamps is covered with
water half the time and the rest of
the time they ain't fit fur a respec
table hog-waller. Hogs, you know, are
particular how durned fur they stick
in the mud.. Now, then, look at them}
bluffs with the two shacks.-over yon
der. Three fellers from Seattle bought
the identicle same piece of dirt fur
$750.00 a piece. Stung ain't no word
fur it."
The question was then asked if
Taft's pardon of Hillman was popular
in Pacific City and the man replied:
"Say mister, if all them folks as
bought here was invited to Taft's fu
neral in Washington, with fare paid
both ways, you couldn't get enough to
go fur pall bearers. I'm beginning to
think that them socialists ain't so far
off when they say that this system is
rotten to the core.".
The old man proceeded to express
I his disgust for Bull Moose reform,
and showed glimmerings of awaken
ing class consciousness. Upon being
j presented with a simple pamphlet on
socialism, he promised to read it and
i uhowed a further promise of future
! intelligence by saying:
"I'm one of them three fellers what
' bought that bluff and shack. It's worth i
about $25.00 instead of $750.00. I'm
getting so as I don't blame Hillman
Iso much. He only done what he
I thought he could get away with and
got caught with the goods. It's us
fools that don't know enough to come
in when it rains as makes it possible
fur the country to have its Hillmans
and its Tafts. Gene Debs got my vote
last year, and I'm going to study so
as to be able to explain why to other 1
, working men as is as big fools as I
used to be."
The car whirled into Pacific City
and the old man was left standing on
the platform with a smile on his face,
with shoulders erect, and with the
glimmering of ■ dawning hope In his
steadfast eye.
+++++++++ + + + + + + + +
+ ♦
+ NOTICE TO STOCKHOLDERS. ♦
+ Notice is hereby given to all ♦
♦ stockholders of the Common- ♦
+ wealth Publishing Co. that the ♦
+ second quarterly meeting of +
+ stockholders for the year 1913 ♦
+ will be held at 1612 California +
j + street, Kverett, Wash., on the ♦
+ second Wednesday M April, at +
+ 7:30 p. m., April 9, 1913. ♦
+ (Signedl A. B. DAVEY, +
+ Secy. Board of Trustees. ♦
Kverett, Wash., Feb. 28, 1913. ♦
+ ♦
In this issue' of the Commonwealth
wr publish several articles by
teachers for which we had no space
in the School Edition.
TEACHERS AND SOCIAL CON
DITIONS.
By Teresa M. Wood.
Whether it be willed or not, the pub
i lie school must remain, as it ever has
been, the greatest worker for the cause
of labor. Born and nurtured amidst
fierce opposition from the exploiting
class, itself has been the truest ex
' ample of applied socialism. For where
! . else can we find less graft and more
of the milk of human kindness? A
part of this system, the teachers more
than any other class of exploited
. workers, are true to themselves and
; their ideals. Their efforts can be
, most successful accordingly as they
; | exalt equality. Incompetency they
, j must overcome, for not one of these
; I little ones is to be lost or to escape
. j being made useful. Building up of
i mind and body, hand work going side
by side with brain work —useful and
: productive labor taught to all—what
1 can these produce but a race com
i mitted to the ideal principles of so
i cialism?
Years ago the public school talked
, education of the brain largely as an
■I easy path for its students to avoid
. physical laboj. Now the efforts are
i directed along educational lines that
;| the student may be better fitted for
i | social service and to exalt and enjoy
. his own productivity, whether of hand
; or brain. Even now does the school
■I realize that its pale children often lack
. j food and is providing it for them.
Naturally this need is followed by the
: inquiry as to why this lack in this
• teeming land, and educators every
where are reaching out and beyond
, j the mere school room to a quickened
. ! understanding of life and its problems.
In this hour we need teachers who
are students of social institutions —
i whose knowledge is greater than mere
. pedagogy, whose eyes reach into the
i homes of the students and who study
the terrible conditions that so often ex
ist there. We need teachers who are
not afraid to face these facts and
study their causes. True teachers
( love their children — they wear out
' mind and body in a constant effort to
uplift those committed to their care.
To what kind of conditions will they
send these same children when school
days are over?
May we not direct their minds to a
study of social conditions — to the
science of production and distribution
1 and their inequalities— in short, in
commemorating Lincoln may we not
impress upon them his words, "Labor
is entitled to all it produces?"
Thus will their minds be quickened
so that they will commence life with
a determination to alter and improve
these same conditions so that no one
willing to labor will ever be cold or
hungry or in fear of losing his job, or
in dread of oncoming honorable old
age, and so that every one able to
labor must do so If he would avoid
these same problems.
THOUSANDS STARVING.
Crop Failure In Austria and War
Cause Suffering.
Vienna, Feb. 21. —Thousands of per
sons in Galicla, the poorest of Aus
tria's provinces, are threatened with
starvation. The bad harvest has
brought trade and Industry to a Btand-
Btill. Factories are closed and thou
-1 nands of persons are without employ
' ment.
■ Thin is what war brings. Tell Tart
' to keep his army out of Mexico. We
1 do not want war. Thing* are bad
' enough now, "God knows."
1 Uno que Babe.
NO. 113.

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