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The Seattle Republican. (Seattle, Wash.) 1???-1915, August 31, 1900, Image 3

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025811/1900-08-31/ed-1/seq-3/

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m* Political Pot-Pie. . jf
TheHjTstrgTTff7)f~the Republican
campaign will be fired Saturday
'.night at the Armory hall, when a
joint ratification meeting of both the
state and King county Republican
- tickets will be endorsed. Chairman
Schively in connection with Chair
man Morris has arranged an elabo
rate programme for the evening, and
many notable speakers, as well as
;. candidates, will be heard, on that oc
casion. This promises to be the larg
est meeting that Armory hall has
seen for the past four years, and
every good and loyal citizen is in
vited to be present.
* * *
It is all business and bustle about
the Republican headquarters in the
- Starr-Boyd building, where both the
county, and state headquarters have
■been located. Chairman Schively
has already begun to send out com
munications to outlying lieutenants,
and is receiving all visitors wth open
,v*ns. The campaign of education
hasjilready begun, and many inter
esting as well as valuable documents
are being mailed out by Secretary
L'ysbns and his assistants. Said Mr.
Schively one day this week: "The
presefit campaign will be one of edu
cation like unto the one of 1896,
- which v '11 depend on how well the
voters will. have been instructed, as
ro what ; will -be the final outcome of
the campaign at the polls in Novem
ber next. j W;e" feel certain at this
time of winning the state by not less
than 15,000 majority, and surely by
■a not less majority than the vote we
won it.by.in 1898. The Northwest
is much interested in the expansion
question, and 1 feel certain in say
ing that the farmers in Eastern
Washington will vote almost as a
: unit for expansion. The McKinley
administration has given the coun
try prosperity, and it will be en
dorsed at the polls in November."
* * •
Chairman Morris has begun to
;give his instructions to the various
Republican workers throughout the
county, and many have called to
confer with him as to the best
methods of conducting the coming
campaign. "Under ordinary circum
i stances King county is overwhelm
ingly Republican, and, in my opin
ion, it will- give the Republican
ticket a rousing majority this year.
It will be remembered that the Re
publicans lost a number of their can
didates two years ago, but we believe
;.that we will be able to win the entire
ticket this year. There is no dissen
sion in our ranks at present. What
ever division there may have been
prior to the holding oi the county
convention has been buried into
party oblivion, and each and every
Republican in the county is working
for Republican success. Represen
tatives from both factions of the Re
publicans of this county prior to the
convention have already called on
me and assured me that there would
be no <differences in the campaign,"
said Mr. Morris one day this week.
* * *
_: The opposition papers are making
much*ot a misquoted speech that was
made at Waterville by Congressman
Cushman some days ago, in which it
is said that he spoke derogatory of
the Germans of this country. In
speaking of the matter to Prof.
bmith, who is the editor of The
Staats Zeitung, published in this
city in the interest of the Germans,
he spoke as follows: "The German
vote will be practically solid for Mc-
Kinley and Senator Frink. The
"jiernians are too well posted to be
lieve that Mr. Cushinan would make
any such a political break as is being
reported by the Democratic papers,
in the midst of the campaign. The
German people feel certain that it
was a misquotation, and misquoted
by a Democratic correspondent for
the express purpose of making polit
ical capital out of it. Since the re
port has first been circulated 1 have
talked to many of the leading Ger
mans throughout the Northwest and
they take no stock whatever in it,
but say, on the other hand, that they
will support Mr. Cushman because
Mr. Cusnman will support McKin
ley's policy if re-elected." Prof.
Smith is* a pronounced leader among
the Germans of this city and county,
and he knows whereof he speaks in
using the above language.
;■; ;); ;j;
It would appear that Senator
George Turner, who has been a
member of every party that has ever
existed in this state and who has
been a delegate to every convention
that such party has held, has reached
the zenith of his political power and
is now rapidly declining. Until
1896 Judge Turner was a rabid Re
publican and was considered a leader
in Republican conventions. In 1896
he left the Republican party and was
a delegate to the three-ringed circus
held in Ellensburg and was a Free
Silver Republican delegate. Under
that banner he floated until he suc
ceeded in having himself elected
United States senator of this state.
Then he at once announced himself
a Populist. He attended the three
ringed circus again at Ellensburg in
1898, and under a Populist banner
he went as a delegate to that conven
tion. As soon as it adjourned Sena
* tor Turner announced that he was a
Democrat, and since that time he has
been preaching and supporting De
mocracy in its wildest forms in the
senate. As a Democratic delegate
he came to the state convention
which was held in this city this week,
and at once assumed the leadership
of the Rogers faction on the conven
tion floor. He was pitted against C.
G. Heifner for the permanent chair
manship of the meeting and was
turned down with a dull thud, which
Jhust mean that Senator Turner i
4oon to be a political thing of : th«
Jpast.
:■« 0 0 0
The Pie-maker was pleased t(
me.et at the late Democratic stat<
convention ex-Senator E. W. Tay
lor, of Tacoma. For eight year:
Senator Taylor was one of the Re
publicans' most brilliant campaigr
j orators and legislative workers, bul
he flew the political coop in the free
! silver craze, and, owing to continu
ous sickness for the past two years
he has been unable to pull himseli
sufficiently together to return to the
! Republican fold, as have most of the
' Free Silver Republicans who wenl
off in 1896. It is hinted that Mr
Taylor had congressional ideas in his
bonnet while in this city, but the
' circumstances were against any more
| Free Silver Republicans going to the
{ front as did one George Turner oi
Spokane, hence Taylor got left and
went home sore as well as sick.
* * *
A remarkable thing about the late
three-ringed circus convention held
in this city was that each of the per
manent chairmen elected by the re
spective wings of the convention
were men of strong and pronounced
single tax proclivities. Bob Bridges,
who was overwhelmingly elected as
permanent chairman of the Populist
side show, is the most rabid single
taxer in the state. In fact he is prac
tically the head and shoulders of the
movement in the Northwest. He
was not satisfied with being made
the chairman of the Pop convention,
but his single tax friends forced him
on the union convention as its per
manent chairman; and no less pro
nounced in singletaxdom is C. G.
Heifner, who was elected permanent
chairman of the Democratic wing of
the circus, as at present Heifner is
secretary of the State Single Tax
League. Davis, the permanent chair
man of the Free Silver Republican
wing of the show, has also embraced
the single tax theory, and declares it
to be the panacea that will cure all
the political ills, of which he and his
parties declare this country is suffer
ing from at present. It will thus be
seen that the Fusion party is com
pletely under the influence and con
trol of the single tax faction of that
party. How do you farmers like this
for a change?
* * : *.
. The Populist party as a party has
been completely swallowed up by the
Democrats. There is nothing else
for it to do now but to disband and
declare itself Bourbon Demo
crat. Neither on the national ticket
nor on any state ticket has the Pop
ulist as a party been recognized,
though a few of the men, who in the
past have been pleased to call them
selves Populists, have been nomi
nated for office on state tickets. It
seems that those men nominated
finally reached the conclusion that
they were perfectly willing to sacri
fice • all party principles providing
they were given an opportunity to
run for an office. Two years ago the
Populist party forced the Democrats
to give them the name of the party
in this state, and it branded the con
glomeration as the People's Party
Ticket, but the Democrats would not
stand for it a single minute this year
and the ticket took the old Bourbon
name as of yore and is now the Dem
ocratic ticket. Such men as Judge
Winsor, who has fought for the prin
ciples of Populism for so long, must
feel like fools at a frolic as they go
out to the world fighting for the elec
tion of a Bourbon Democratic ticket.
* * *
Heifner's reference to the im
mortal Lincoln in a Democratic
meeting did not meet with a very
hearty approval, in fact, it fell on
deaf ears. It was a desecration of
the worst type to refer to so good a
man in a Democratic convention,
and the Democratic delegates recog
nizing that fact failed to respond
with a single applause. Lincoln's
name in a Republican convention al
ways brings forth the wildest cheers,
because Republicans recognize the
greatness as well as goodness of the
man.
0 0 *
William Jennings Bryan may still
be a very popular politician and
presidential candidate, but the men
tion of his name fails to elicit that
wild enthusiasm it did four years
ago even in a Democratic conven
tion. The Democratic spell binders
in the late Democratic convention
who expected to make a great hit for
themselves by making their peorat
ing of their speeches with a Bryan
eulogy failed to accomplish their
purpose.
* * *
As permanent chairman of the
union convention Bob Bridges look
ed just as he was ready to lead the
entire delegation, 2,200 strong, to
Franklin and Newcastle and kill ev
ery "nigger at work there, even if
they had to blow up the entire mines
to accomplish it." Are there any
colored men in this state who want
to support a man of that stripe?
0 0 0
Pierce and King counties got to
tickling each other under the chin
in the convention, and it was so
good that they did not know when
to stop. Pierce wanted a governor
and King wanted a congressman.
* * *
That delegate from Walla Walla
who was such an enthusiasaic Ron
ald man should learn to stop mur
dering Mother English before he
goes to another convention. It is
more than likely that he and Ronald
had been "practicing at that pri
j vate bar" too long before he got up
to make his speech.
* * *
i
E. H. Holmes, the colored Demo
: crat from Spokane, who some years
b i ago left Vicksburg, Mississippi, be
b i cause he and his relatives could noi
i vote as they desired, in fact could
not vote at all, owing to Democratic
shotguns being in the way, musi
) have had queer feelings come ovei
2 him while participating in a Demo
- cratic meeting in this state. What
» would his Vicksburg f rends think of
- him if they should hear of this epi
i sode?
t* * *
The Populist party has been sold
, out bag and breeches to the Demo
i cratic party by a few men hungry
i for political honors. No more name
i and no more party principles. How
t do you like it, Mr. Populist?
* * *
i
> Here is an offer for you: Send
; fifty cents to this office and receive
> The Seattle Republican until next
[ January. Do not miss this oppor
l tunity if you desire to keep posted
on the campaign.
* * *
[ "I have traveled over most of the
• wheat belt in this state as well as the
■ farming section in general and, I be
i lieve, 1 make no mistake when I say
that the farmers are almost unani
mous for expansion as enunciated in
the Republican platform," said a
prominent politician one day this
week. "Unless Western Washington
gets a hump onto itself," continued
lie, "Eastern Washington is going to
roll up much larger majorities for
the Republican ticket than it does."
0 0 0
Said another prominent Repub
lican: "It has been my pleasant
duty to hear the Republican ticket
most favorably spoken of wherever
I have been in the state, and that has
been almost all over the state.
Thinking I would learn the true
feeling of the people as to the ticket
named by the Republicans, I would
let it be understood by innuendoes
on arriving in a community that I
was not a Republican and then draw
my audiences into a political discus
sion, and to my surprise I found a
warm feeling for the Republican
ticket everywhere I went. 1 believe
the ticket will be elected by an over
whelming majority."
* * *
This paper woudl be very much
pleased if you would enclose a fifty
cent piece in a letter and order the
paper sent to your address until next
January. If you appreciate good
work you will do this.
* * *
The success of Governor Rogers in
the union convention after he had
been turned down by overwhelming
majorities in both the Democratic
and the Populist conventions in the
permanent organization, is the real
wonder of the conventions. That
astute politician, Senator George
Turner, who plucked one legislative
man after another until he had
plucked enough to elect himself Uni
ted States senator in 1897, managed
the Rogers campaign, and delegation
after delegation climbed into the
Rogers band wagon under his seduc
tive Le Roi influence. It was
charged on the floor of the conven
tion by both Democratis and Popu
lists that Senator Turner bought
delegations enough on the conven
tion floor to nominate his man.
What kind of "reform" is that? •
*'•'*,_♦
You Populists who were most
shamefully turned down by George
Turner in the 1897 legislature can
now console yourselves on being fool
enough to get a second dose of the
same kind of medicine from the very
same man. You have not only lost
your party name under his seduc
tive Le Roi influence, but you have
likewise lost all of your party pres
tige, and now you are as naked as a
redbird in blackberry time.
>',' * *
Robertson and Ronald, the two
Democratic nominees, are lifelong
Democrats and spurn Populism like
they would the hiss of an adder. If
such be Demo-Pop fusionism, where
in the devil does the Pops get in on
the fusion part.
* * 0
As governor of the state with its
great public patronage in his hands,
John R. Rogers used it all to aid in
the election of George Turner, at
that time a pronounced Silver Re
publican, and that, too, despite the
fact that there were two Populist
candidates for the place, and also
despite the fact that it was the per
sistency of the Populist party in his
behalf that gave him the high pub
lic position he was then filling and
using as a club to beat the very men
to death, politically speaking, that
elevated him. In turn Senator Tur
ner seems to have let loose the latch
strings of Le Roi to renominate Gov
ernor Rogers, and Rogers will, in
turn, two years from now, give Tur
ner" his second favorable attention
should he be re-elected. How does
that catch you, Mr. Populist?
* * *
Will Judge Winsor rise and ex
plain how he can support a Demo
cratic platform which is doing all in
its power to disfranchise the Negroes
of this country, the very men he, as
I black abolitionist, fought to en
franchise? What has come over you,
Judge Winsor?
0 0 0
Hon. J. E. Hawkins, the well
known Afro-American attorney-at
law of this city, who was selected a
member of the Republican county
central committee from at large,
understands ell his business and
will prove one of the most useful, as
well as tireless workers on the com
mittee. He has served on the city
central committee in a similar ca
pacity through two campaigns.
Special Correspondence. 1
| The payment of nine million dol
[ lars a year to build up American
• ships in the foreign trade, says Sen-
I ator Irye, will, through the keen
: competition that will be engendered,
" effect a reduction in ocean freights
; on American imports and exports
equal to about twenty-live million
dollars a year.
The Democratic managers have
rigged up an emperor scarecrow, but
it will not stampede the American
' voters.
; It is a good thing that the Demo
cratic party has no reputation to lose
for accuracy of statement. Facts are
stubbornly against them. They are
wrong on silver. They are wrong in
predicting distress in Porto Rico.
I'hey are wrong in predicting the
doom of the republic m the event of
McKinley's re-election, and they are
wrong by about a million and a half
votes in their forecasts as to the elec
tion of their candidate in November.
Protection for American citizens
abroad may always be relied upon
under a .Republican administration.
The reception given to the Demo
cratic national platform's utterance
on the shipping bill by the patriotic
press of the country has been one of
ridicule and disgust. Nothing more
partisan and untrue was written in
the Democratic platform than what
it said in opposition to that bill.
In their change of mind concern
ing the Uoe'bel kw the Kentucky
Democrats are moved by expediency
and not by morality.
The Kansas City ticket and plat
form is calculated to make things
lively at the exits instead of the en
trances of the Democratic party.
It might be well for Bryan to ar
range with his publishers to get out
a limited edition of "The Second
Liattle," and begin to prepare matter
or explaining how it happened.
Senator Bacon lias been pounding
away at the Philadelphia platform.
Senator Bacon is the gentleman who
recently distinguished himself by
not being able to tell the difference
between toadstools and mushrooms.
If American ships carried Ameri
can foreign commerce, about $200,
--000,000 that is now annually paid to
foreign ships would be kept in the
United States.
The Tammany Ice Trust is coin
ing fever and thirst into such hand
some profits that their mayor is re
ceiving an annual dividend of $35,
--000 on his stock. This is no politi
cal canard, for the Democratc mayor
confessed it under oath on the wit
ness stand.
The Tammany ice box will cut
somewhat of a figure at the ballot
box. So will the ice trust in Chi
cago.
The shortage in the country's
stock of lumber simply means that
the lumbermen underestimated the
extent of the building operations.
Building activity always accompa
nies prosperity.
The Democratic leaders are un
able to point out one act of the Re
publican Congress that is inimical
to public interests. Unlike its Dem
ocrtac predecessors, it didn't take
orders from the Havemeyers and
other trust magnates.
Wheat, corn, oats, barley, rye,
hogs, beef, eggs, pork, bacon, rice
and cotton all advanced in price dur
ing June. These are McKinley
prosperity facts. Cash in hand is
better than Bryan's theories.
Boss Croker snarls and makes a
cheap bid for votes by declaring his
objection to American troops tight
ing under an English admiral. He
would probably prefer to witness the
murder of American citizens.
Mr. Towne now realizes just why
he was nominated.
Commissioner of Navigation
Chamberlain estimates that the
building up of American shipping
will cost the United States about
$250,000,000 in thirty years. That
is the sum Great Britain has paid to
British ships n the past sxty years.
It is the sum, moreover, that the
American people pay to foreign
ships for doing our import and ex
port carrying each fifteen months.
Exports of mineral oils were over
$18,000,000 more in the last fiscal
year than in 1899, and $33,000,000
more than in the Democratic year of
1894.
Mr. Sulzer has been telling of the
many things Mr. Bryan will do when
he is President. Mr. Sulzer is con
tinually exercising his imaginaton.
The Phladelphia platform is such
an acceptable document that there is
naturally a little good-natured rival
ry over its authorship.
The value of the raw cotton ex
ported in the fiscal year just ended
was $241,666,165. It has never
been so much since 1892, when it
reached $258,461,241. Southern
cotton growers will appreciate this
return to the good old Republican
times.
President McKinley describes Re
publican Imperialism as follows:
"To the party of Lincoln has come
another supreme opportunity which
it has bravely met in the liberation
of 10,000,000 of the human fainil}
from the yoke of imperialism."
fPK rhen Mr. Croker shook hands
i with ".Chairman Jones at Kansas
j City the Tammany Ice Trust and
j the Round Bale Trust were on very
| good terms with eachother..
.
Happily for the ice consumers of
New York, all of the judges of that
state are not Tammany tainted po
litical hacks.
The Kansas City platform appears
best under the "A Glance Into
Gloom" headline.
The American people, being de
termined to have a merchant marine
equal to the needs of American for
eign commerce, naturally look to
the Republican party —the party of
construction —to pass an effective
measure. The Democrats, on the
other hand, being the party of de
struction, are only able to oppose
such a measure—they are apparently
as incompetent as they are indis- j
posed to put American ships upon
the seas.
Our exports of breadstuff's com
pare as follows:
Fiscal Year— Values.
1890 $154,925,927
1891 < 128,121,656
1892 299,363,117 |
1893 200,312,654
1894 166,777,229
1895 114,604,780
1896 141,356,993
1897 191,090,341
1898 324,706,060
1899 263,655,106
1900 253,223,525
Fanners will notice how the ex
ports steadily declined during the
last Democratic Free Trade Admin
istration, and how much larger our
exports of breadstuff's have been un
der the Republican Administrations
and protective tariffs.
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:-
• i
I Washington will send a Missouri
Democrat to congress this year—nit
, j Most Northern states have gone oui
I of that kind of business.
I JOHN H. McGRAW j
| ~~~~ GEO. B. KITTIMER I
I ' '
£ ROOM B, BAII/EY BUILDING o
£ TELEPHONE. MAIN 695 $
REAL ESTATE!
I Fire and Marine Insurance |
I FOR SALE I
? A modern 9-room house, with bath, f
I lighted by gas and electricity; every 5
I convenience; splendid repair; cellar *
1 under rvhole house. House alone •
g cost $5,000. Property stands owner J
1 over $6,000. Beautifully located, be- jj
* tween two car lines, eight minutes *
J from Pioneer Square. Lawn, beauti- §
b ful flowers and shrubs, cement walks, 2
I sewered, very sightly, fine view. •
i Will sell for ' • |
$4,000
j One-Half Cash, Balance 6 Per Ct, I
,^^^>>^>>>>>>>>>>^>^>^s^^>> <*;<^<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<«<<-^
: W offices ;;
J ARE 27*28 'BAILEY BUILDING
: AGENTS ™one MAIN 337 ;;
I i ■ !!
: N FRED A. WING \l
: q FRANK M. GUION \>
i (Wing-Guion Agency) | \
\ U jj
: V ;■•■■' Maryland Casualty
I /\ Continental .
> j^j GirardFire \\
I Massachusetts Mutual Life \\
i Standard Accident Jj\
I E !
Seattle & International Railway
Short Lin* to All Points n
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Train No. 1. for Snohomish. Arlington. Sedro-
Woolleyand Vancouver leaves Seattle 9:00 a. m.;
arrives Sumas 2:05 p. m., connecting with
Canadian Pacific railway for all points east;
arrives at Vancouver 4.50 p. m.
Train No. 2 leaves Vancouver daily at 9.20 a.
m.; leaves Sumas at 12.05 p. m.; arrives Seattle
.10 p. in .
Train No. 3, "Daily, except Sunday," leaves
Seattle 4.05 p, m.: arrives Sumas !i!45 p. m.,
connecting with Snoqnalmie and Everett
branches.
Train ? o. 4, daily, leaves Sumas 5.20 a. m. ;
arrives Seattle 10.55 a. m., connecting with
i-verett and $no<iualmie branches*. "Daily,
except Sunday "
Train No, 5, "Suiiiays only," for Sumas and
intermediate points leaves Seattle 5.30 p. m.;
arrives Sumas 10.45 p. m ; arrives Sumas 10.45 p.
m. Service on Snoquh'mie brarch to and from
Preston. R. W I'rick, Agent, Seattle
11. E. Bretz.G. P. A.. Seattle
WM. H. FiNCK
Pioneer Jeweler, Established 18S2. Watches
Jewelry, Silverware, Clo ks and Optical
Goods, ScientiOe Optician, Watch Repairs
816 Second Avenue, Seattle, Wash.
THE
NORTHWESTERN'S
FAST MAII,
i THE
j NORTHWESTERN
i LINE
Have added two more trains (the
Fast Mail) to their St. Paul-Chi
cago service, making eight trains
daily.
BETWEEN
MINNEAPOLIS
ST. PAUL and
CHICAGO
This assures passengers from the
west making connections.
The 20th Century train, "the tinest
in the world,'" leaves St. Paul every
day in the year at s.lO p. m.
• I F. \V. PARKER,
t General Agent,
606 First Avenue.,£eattle Wash
I WEST |
j SEATTLE j
• PROPERTY
2 Will never be as low in price ?
2 as now. This is the golden 2
i 2 opportunity to secure a beau- £
2 tiful home site on your own 2
2 terms. Eemember, the elec- 2
2 trie road will be in operation 2
2 by July 15, with regular ser- 2
2 vice from 6 a. m. to 12 mid- 2
2 night. We build homes for 2
2 you on easy payment plan 2
2 also. Call for price list and 2
2 map.
!j WHALLEY & STURTEVAHT 2
2 5 AIM D 6 COLMAN BLDG.
Washington Uental and
Photographic Supply Company
Kodaks and High Grade Cameras, 211
Columbia street, Seattle
Kindly remember our advertisers when
you buy. Also speak a good word for
The Republican.
Graham & Moore
Fine Jewelry at Moderate Prim, 7()r>
Second Arenae. Seattle. Wash.
D. B. SPELLMAN

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