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The Seattle Republican. (Seattle, Wash.) 1???-1915, June 14, 1912, Image 1

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025811/1912-06-14/ed-1/seq-1/

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The Seattle Republican
Single Copies, 10 Cents.
THE SEATTLE REPUBLICAN
is published every Friday by Cayton Publishing
Company.
Subscriptions, $3 per year; six months, $1.50;
postage prepaid.
Entered as second-class matter at the postoffice
at Seattle.
CAYTON PUBLISHING COMPANY, Inc.
Main 305 427 Epler Block
Seattle, Washington
HORACE ROSCOE CAYTON, • - • Publisher
BUBIE REVELS CAYTON, • • - Associate
It is said of a corporation lawyer that
he neither inherits nor makes his money,
and yet he always has plenty of it. Ec)
repeat. J
Judging from the human diseharg i t
the depots and docks, Seattle has been
the dumping grounds for the other sections
of the country for the past week. We
object.
Of course the "shipping business for Se
attle shows increase," and largely because
the weather is warm enough to ship the
hoboes, accumuated in the city during the
winter, out to grass.
With both Gil and Cotterill alleging
fraud in the late election and the guar
dianship of the ballot boxes it begins to
look as if the election in Seattle for mayor
has to be all gone over again.
Our natal day is to see another life and
death struggle of a "white hope" of the
land to wrest the championship of the
fistic ring from the black hold, and with
no hope of accomplishing the undertak
ing.
Licking a "white hope" a week is going
some, Mistah Johnsing, and we suggest
you slow up and perhaps you will get more
coin. Do not talk so much lest wise men
whisper as you pass, "there goes that self
conceited ass."
We have our suspicions that Will E.
Humphrey is a candidate for re-election
as he recently sent this office a copy of
one of his speeches in congress, which is
the first time he has thus remembered it
since he was a candidate two years ago.
"America for Americans," is a time
worn hobby, on which politicians with itch
ing palms ride into office. It is not Amer
ica for Americans that they want, but the
offices in America for fellows who want
to rob the taxpayers by unjust taxation.
For a candidate it occurs to us Albert
Johnson of Hoquiam is doing a whole lot
of talking through his mouth. There is
such a thing as talking too much Johnson,
Albert, and you had better jar loose from
Col. A^en J- Times.
SEATTLE, WASHINGTON, FRIDAY, JUNE 14, 1912.
According to a Times story Detective
Burns got another "long black mark"
down in Lewis county. If Burns had have
gotten a bluffing black mark in Seattle
last year justice would not have hit in
spots as it did and Wappenstein would be
less lonesome at the state prison.
Neighboring property owners are asking
the superior court to make an undertaking
firm find another place to introduce its
subjects to the inhabitants of the Great
Beyond. Not that the subjects are unduly
noisy, but because they smell bad. Per
haps hot baths would improve the situa
tion.
With Johnny Perry hurrying to Wash
ington City to personally see that congress
makes no ist.ake in the Hanford investiga
tion and Howard Cosgrove rushing to Chi
cago to personally see that the National
Republican Central Committee makes no
mistake in passing on the Washington dele
gation, the destiny of the Northwest seems
to be in the hands of "Young America."
That Chicago man that was relieved of
$1,800 by the money multiplying machine
operator, which he handed over with the
hope that he would get in return $5,400 —
three times what he gaye —is as much and
more of a criminal than the "operator" and
the government should have him arrested
on the charge of aiding and abetting the
manufacture of counterfeit money.
No sooner than had Howard Cosgrove
of Seattle arrived in Chicago the political
atmosphere became clarified and the bit
ter contest was settled in Taft's favor, the
Roosevelt contingent resignedly accepted
the situation and quietly returned home
declaring before leaving, undying loyalty
to the party nominee. In Howard Cos
grove Seattle has a political wonder, but
does not know it.
Leaving the country in a demoralized
state over questions of both national and
international importance and concern, the
United States Supreme Court quietly ad
journed one day this week until next Oc
tober. It will then be January before it
gets down to business. Is there any wonder
that there is a disposition to recall high
salaried judges who do little or nothing
except look wise?
"If I am successful in unseating Mayor
Cotterill I will resign at once and let the
council elect a mayor to their liking," H. C.
Gill is reported as having said. Perhaps he
will, but in our opinion he will not. Gill
needs the money.
Alaska even boasts of the most magnificent
as well as awe-inspiring earth quakes in the
world.
VOLUME XIV, NUMBER 10.
PERSONS IN PUBLIC EYE.
HANFORD.
If John H. Perry has spoken falsely of
Judge Hanford there ought to be a law
whereby he can be punished a® severely
as one who holds up a train or robs a bank.
If there is no law through which he can
be punished and the sons of Judge Han
ford know that he has spoken falsely of
their aged parent, then they should not be
blamed if they armed themselves and on
sight shot the life out of their father's
maligner. The charges made by Mr. Perry
are too grave to go unchallenged by those
who honor and respect the man who has
directed their destinies for lo these many
years. They are either true or they are
the most damnable lies ever told against
one standing as high in a community as
does Judge Hanford in this. If true, then
the sooner he is driven from the honored
position he now holds the better for the
whole country. If false, then the sooner
the community is rid of such character as
sassins as Mr. Perry the better for the
whole country. This community should be
made too hot for either Judge Hanford or
Attorney Perry. It can hardly be said that
the community is divided as to Judge Han
ford's guilt or innocence, for search as
you will or may, you can not find any
one even among those who dislike him, who
believe a word of the charges, with the
exception of a few who, like Mr. Perry,
have a personal grievance against the
veteran jurist. There is no comment to
make on the Perry charges until he has
produced his evidence and this the friends
and relations of the Judge should force
him to do or make him pay the penalty
for such a slanderous attack with his life
blood. No one will deny but that Judge
Hanford ha® always been an enthusiastic
as well as patriotic advocate of the Uni
ted States government; that he has always
freely given his time, talent and his money
to better the conditions of unfortunate hu
manity, and to have his past and the few
days more he has to live blackened beyond
recognition for political and selfish motives
should be resented by every true lover of
fair play and square deal.
Joshua Wiestling, a G. A. R. member,
who was recently made the head of a com
mittee to look into the Olson ease, which
has given Judge Hanford more or less un
pleasant notoriety, after thoroughly look
ing into every phase of the case, has
reached the conclusion that Judge Hanford
could not have done other than what he
did—cancel Olsson's citizenship—the same
having been obtained by misrepresenta
tions. As to the Perry charges he was non
committal, although he did venture the
opinion that, it looked like personal pique
on the part of Perry for having been in
dicted for the part he played in the meet
ing which hung Hanford in effigy.

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