OCR Interpretation


The Seattle Republican. (Seattle, Wash.) 1???-1915, June 21, 1912, Image 5

Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025811/1912-06-21/ed-1/seq-5/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

FRIDAY, .TUNE 21, 1912.
WA SHIJV G TOJSI THE £SD UCA TO*R
Booker T. Washington, the well-known
educator, says: There are 2,000,000 Colored
children in the public schools of this coun
try with .'50,000 Colored teachers instructing
them how to shoot. The parents of those
children have paid $45,000,000 of their earn
ings in the way of taxes toward the school
ing of those children. The illiteracy of the
Colored folk has been reduced below forty
per cent. Negroes own property in the
country, conservatively valued at a thou
sand million dollars. They will have been
emancipated fifty years next January and a
national anniversary has been proposed and
to that end Congress has made an appropria
tion of $250,000. These so-called unfortu
nates own fanning lands whose combined
acreage is greater than the acreage of Eng
land, Ireland, Scotland and Wales combined.
Dr. Frederick Burko, president of the San
Francisco state normal in lecturing to his
school ad vocal ed the students to emulate the
work of Tuskegee and did so in the in the
following language:
"Down in Tuskegee there is a black man's
school. It was established by Booker T.
Washington, a black man, who came up from
slavery so hurriedly that he fortunately did
not have time to familiarize himself with the
white man's pedagogy. All wherewith he
THE COUNTRY EDITOR.
A Kansas university professor makes a
statement that 85 per cent of Kansas country
newspapers are mortgaged. Not a very flat
tering showing after all these years of pros
perity, is it? These figures may not be cor
rect, but it is true that a very large number
of country editors carry with them by night
and by day the haunting nightmare of debt.
Aside from perhaps one or two successful
papers in each county, the situation in coun
try newspaperdom is not as satisfactory as
it was eight years ago.
The country editor, on the other hand,
works on an average fourteen hours per day.
On Saturday, it is true, he knocks off early
in the morning, but it is for the purpose of
hustling money to meet the weekly pay-roll.
After this is accomplished, he must finish the
day, which runs far into the night, making
up the time lost in skirmishing around town
for the elusive dollar. Tie seldom sees much
cash—as a matter of fact, in the political
economy of the country journalist he needs
very little money. "Trading out" his ac
counts at the store has become a fixed habit
with him. Yet the country editor isn't a
bad fellow. He loves his wife and his chil
dren and his wants and his needs are about
the same as other folks.— Exchange. •
The same is true of the average editor of
the city weekly.
NEXT WEEK AT THE EMPRESS.
The greatest bird in the world—Prof. Vic
tor Niblo presents Cuckoo and Laura, the
talking birds—parrots who speak in three
languages.
THE SEATTLE REPUBLICAN
had to clothe his school, pedagogieally, was
home-made common sense.
"After a quarter century this system of
education.has proved successful beyond the
most optimistic hopes, while the Anglo-Sax
on schoolmen, with far simpler problems
booker t Washington.
and with libraries of ancient pedagogy, have
ignominiously failed.
"That Negro school at Tuskegee has
Welcome return of vaudeville's sweetest
singers, Spencer Kelly and Marion Wilder,
in a new repertoire of old melodies.
Leroy Harvey and Company in the West
ern playlet "Rained In."
Hanlon & Hanlon in feats of strength and
daring.
Initial vaudeville tour of the Topsy-Turvy
comedienne, May Elinore, of the famous Eli
nore Sisters.
E. J. Moore, magician.
NEXT WEEK AT THE ORPHEUM.
, The versatile acress, Miss May Sully, in
IMPORTANT TO LAWYERS.
If you are a lawyer, you know what it means to get good service
in your publication notices. You get ready for your day in court and
at the last minute you find your affidavit of publication has not been
made, you rightly lose your temper and say things that would neither
sound well in Sunday School nor look well in print. If you had have
gfiven the notice to The Seattle Republican you would have had no
such worry and would not have to go to confession in order to get
right with your Creator. The Seattle Republican is prompt and
painstaking, which means all of it in legal matters. It takes notices
until Friday noon, which means a whole week over Saturday pub
lications. When you have a notice for publication, call Main 305.
THE SEATTLE REPUBLICAN,
423 Epler Block.
transformed several hundred of helpless,
shiftless Negroes into intelligent, self-sup
porting men and women whose social and
moral habits,and ideals are worthy of re
spect.
"The exercises employed are the pursuits
of life themselves —social, moral, vocational
and industrial. Booker T. Washington did
not use algebraic exercises as a means to
train his scholars to reason clearly concern
ing hog rearing; he used hogs.
"Carpentry was not taught by means of
the twelve scored models of manual training
chit, but by actual carpentry. The school
exercises were identical with life pursuits.
"'Here, by ignorance of pedagogic precon
ceptions, was wrought out the greatest edu
cation experiment of the nineteenth cen
tury, and the only one which the modern
world spirit may call its legitimate offspring.
"It does not follow that the school upon
Fifth Avenue should teach the rearing of
pigs nor the cultivation of cotton, but what
ever it is that the Fifth Avenue child will
be called upon to do in intelligent life, that
let the school teach him.
"The pupils of Tuskegee escape from the
barren exercises in the grammar of dead
tongues and in the school of logic of pedan
tic mathematics because they are black. But
for the pupils of Fifth Avenue there is no
escape—because they are white. They must
bear the white childs burden."
"The Battle Cry of Freedom," a new field
for fun, by Bozeman Bulger and May Tully.
Ch/mko, the youthful juggling genius, di
rect from London music halls.
.lack and Phil Kaufman in tuneful orig
inalities.
The Four Lyric Latins in operatic and
Italian melodies.
Richards and Kyle in a novel comedy
sketch.
BERT TERRELL, Dutch character vocal
ist, completing his world's successful tour.
Minnie Kaufman, grace and skill a-wheel
ing.

xml | txt