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Chicago eagle. (Chicago, Ill.) 1889-19??, November 09, 1912, Image 1

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ntared as Second Cl.iti Matter October 11, 1889, at the" Pott
Office at .Chicago, Illinois, under Act of March 3rd, 1879,
INDEPENDENT IN ALL THINGS, NEUTRAL IN NONE.
entered at 8econd Clan Matter October 11, 1884, at the Pott
Offlca at Chicago, Illinois, under Act of March 3rd, 1S71.
TWENTYFOUHTII YEAtl.iNO. G.
CHICAGO, SATUHDAY, NOVEMBER J), 1912.
SINtlLS con
HIVE CUNTS
WHOLE NUMBER 1,203
-v4asnBBi
amnWB BBBMje- TL3m
GOVERNOR DUNNE
Chosen by Ninety Thousand Plurality to
Be the Chief Magistrate of the
' Great State of Illinois.
The Chicago Eagle, the First to Mention His
Name for the Place, Congratulates the
People's Choice.
The Popular Democratic Leader Carried Nearly Every
County in the State and Ran Far Ahead of
His Ticket Everywhere.
His Proven Honesty and Consequent Great Popularity with the People
Won the Great Victory which Crowns His Efforts To-day.
Edward F. Dunno ban boen elected
Governor of the great stato of Illinois
by a plurality of one hundred and
twcnty-llvo thousand votes.
His proven honesty, his eminent fit
ncss and his grout popularity aro the
things that contributed most to his
great triumph.
The Chicago Eagle, tho first to Bug
gest Judge Dunne's nnmo for Gover
nor, over eighteen months ago, heart
ily congratulates hlin upon his well do
served success.
Tho Chicago Eaglo has supported
Dunne unfalteringly for Governor
from tho Inclplency of tho battlo to
tho close and It naturally fools elated
over tho outcome
Following aro tho names of the
successful state candidates and of tho
successful candidates In Cook County:
GOVEUNOR.
EDWARD F. DUNNE Democrat
LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR.
BARR ATT O'H ARA Domocrat
SECRETARY OF STATE.
HARRY VOODS Democrat
AUDITOR.
JAMES J. BRADY Democrat
TREASURER.
WILLIAM RYAN, JR Democrat
ATTORNEY GENERAL.
WILLIAM H. STEAD Republican
STATE'S ATTORNEY.
MACLAY HOYNE Democrat
COUNTY RECORDER.
JOSEPH F. CONNERY.... Democrat
BOARD OF ASSESSORS (2)
MICHAEL K. SHERIDAN.. Domocrat
DAVID M. PFAELZER.... Democrat
CORONER.
PETER M. HOFFMAN... Republican
BOARD OF REVIEW.
FREDERICK W. BLOCK!.. Democrat
SURVEYOR.
GEORGE C. WATERMAN.. Domocrat
8UPERI0R COURT CLERK.
RICHARD J. M'ORATH.... Domocrat
CIRCUIT COURT CLERK.
JOHN W. RAINEY Domocrat
SANITARY DISTRICT TRUSTEES 3.
JAMES M. DAI LEY Domocrat
FRED D. BREIT Democrat
CHARLES E. READING.... Democrat
PRESIDENT COUNTY BOARD.
A. A. McCORMICK Republican
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS, CHI
CAGO (10)
PETER BARTZEN Democrat
DANIEL MORIARTY Democrat
JOHN E. MALONEY Democrat
FRANK RAGBNI Domocrat
JOSEPH M. FITZGERALD. Democrat
BARTLEY BURG Democrat
DANIEL J. HARRIS Democrat
STANLEY KUFLBW8KI . . . Democrat
A. A, McCORMICK Republican
ALBERT NOWAK Democrat
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS.
(COUNTRY, 6)
AVERY COONLBY Prog.
HARLEY E. MITCHELL, Prog.
ELLSWORTH M. BOARD Prog.
JOHN J. GARD Prog.
A. N. ANDERSON Prog.
CLERK OF MUNICIPAL COURT.
FRANK P. DANISCH Democrat
BAILIFF MUNICIPAL COURT,
ANTON J. CBRMAK Democrat
CHIEF JUSTICE MUNICIPAL COURT
HARRY OLSON Republican
MUNICIPAL COURT JUDGES.
JOHN K. PRINDIVILLB,.., Democrat
HARRY M. FISHER,, Democrat
JOHN A. MAIIONEY Domocrat
JOHN COURTNEY Domocrat
EDWARD T. WADE Democrat
JOSEPH P. RAFFERTY.... Democrat
JOSEPH S. LA BUY Domocrat
STEPHEN A. MALATO.... Democrat
JOHN J. SULLIVAN. r.. Democrat
MUNICIPAL COURT JUDGES.
(UNDER CITY ORDINANCE.)
(TWO YEAR TERM.)
FRANK H. GRAHAM Democrat
(FOUR YEAR TERM.)
DAVflD SULLIVAN Democrat
(SIX YEAR TERM.)
HUGH J. KEARNS Democrat
Tho gontlomon who wero passing
tho word to "Cut Dunno" must feel
like leaving town.
Clayton E. Crafts, tho woll kuawn
attorney and former Speaker of tho
House, shows In a statement mndo
by him that tho culling of a special
session of tho Legislature means that
tho nowly elected members will com
pose tho body.
In tho first place, it Is contended
that to call together a body of Assem
blymen '.vhoso successors have boon
elected would bo an unconstitutional
proceeding, and any acts of such a
body would have no binding forco In
law.
Clayton E. Crafts, who is an au
thority on constitutional law, de
clared that it Is the plain Intent of
tho constitution that members of the
Legislature take ofllco from the date
of their election.
Walter Clyde Jones, a member of
the Stato Senate and a leador of the
Progressive party, -denounced the
proposed plan of calling tho old Leg
islature togothor as an obvious at
tempt to thwart tho will of tho peo
ple as expressed In tho election of a
Democratic Assembly.
The point raised by Mr. Crafts,
though seemingly novel, was accept
ed by Govornor Palmer as far back
as 1871.
"If Governor Doneen should call a
special session of tho Assembly and
distinctly specify that It was tho old
Assembly, then his act would be lllo
gal," said Mr. Crafts, "If ho simply
called the General Assembly together
then it would bo propor for the nowly
elected mombers to respond. It
stands to reason that there cannot bo
two General Assemblies In exlstenco
at the same time.
"The plain Intent of the Constitu
tion ,1s that a member shall hold
office until his successor Is elocted
and then transfer to him tho duties
of office."
This Is a good time to commence
studying up the record of the retiring
aiaerman in your warn.
The people want the aldermen to
"ring-oft" the Telephone Trust
It has had too firm a hold upon the
people of Chicago and they demand
relief from its, elutohes,
Its ear-drum destroying service, ac
companied as It Is by a regular fan
fare of "wrong numbers," inattentive
operators and slow responses to re
quests for telephonic connections are
matters of current comment.
The price of the service If alto
gether too high and the people de
mand a reduction In rates.
At for competition the very thought
of stifling It makes the public indig
nant. Tho publlo knows that with
out competition tho tolophono monop
oly would be unbearable.
Whon the Bon monopoly was work
ing ovortlmo to got tho city council
to knock out tho Illinois Tunnel Tele
phone Company's franclilso Mayor
Harrison expressed hlmsolf as bellov
ing that bettor sorvico could bo ob-
talned from a dual telephone service
than from a single one,
"In every Instance that I have been
personally Informed of," he said, "the
two Bystems have been about as cheap
to the consumer as one. Competition
seeniB to produce better service. I
really believe that better service can
bo expected 'from two companies than
from one,"
Chicago people demand relaetles)
of telephone rates.
A csat call or at the meet
cents a ceil would yield the telephone
company profit aid save money for
tW people.
la big adrertlaemeats aftated la
Chicago dally newspapers April If,
lilt, the eoaeera of eriai 914.MMM
of telephone bonds for sale, quotes a
letter from the president of tho com
pany In which It is stated that tele
phone "Earnings hare shown a steady and
substantial growth, having Increased
from 13,129,238 In 1000 to 112,678,
390.67 In 1911, or an Increase of over
300 per cent In the past eleven years."
Why not give tke public tie beaeit
of this prosperity?
Tho Council judiciary committee
recommended for passage two amend
ments to tho city code. One prohib
its tho building or maintenance of a
livery barn on tho front two-thirds of
a lot on a residence street. The other
amendment Is one introduced by Al
derman John Toman, which requires
that garbago cans be kept on tho rear
of lots Instead of in alleys. Ho be
lieves this action will make for clean
liness. The telophone trust contemplates
another big publlo Improvement It
Is going to' raise lte dividend.
The Chicago Telephone Company,
which Is suffering so much from
want of funds, according to certain
city "experts" that it will have to
ralso telephone rates on the people
In order to exist, paid 8 per cent In
dividends last year.
Think of Itl
Eight per cent on twenty-seven tail
lion dollars 1
This Is tho company that started
with a capital stock of half a million
and now has a capital stock of twenty-seven
millions.
It pays 8 per cent annual dividend
on twenty-seven millions and puts up
a twenty-two story modern offlcr
building besides.
The people of Chicago are such
easy marks that the phone crowd want
to get more out of them and asks for
an increase In rates at the hands of
the City Council. ,
And two "experts" ogroo that this
"poor" company Is losing -money!
In 1911 the Chicago Telephono Com
pany paid 8 per cent, In quarterly divi
dends of 2 per cent, March 81, 2 per
cent, June 30; 2 pe- cent, September
30; 2 per cent, December 30, 1911.
Hero Is a nlco little nest egg of
$2,160,000 divided up among the stock
holders. When to this is added the profits
paid the "parent" Bell Telephone
EDWARD F. DUNNE,
Governor-Elect of Illinois.
Company, the amount grabbed off the
people of Chicago Is simply enormous,
Instead of raising telephone rates,
the City Council should lower them.
The net earnings of the Telephone
Trust Increased from 14,270,109 In
1900 to 123,095,389 In 1910.
And yet the Trust wants to squeese
more money out of Chicago people.
The campaign for cheaper telephone
service has Just begun. All the "ex
perts" la the world cannot stop It
The Chicago Eagle. In common with
all 'users, of the telephone, is anxious
to secure better service and lower
rates and is fighting along that line.
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TOO MUCH PROFIT
Telephone Trust Makes So Much that It
Pays Eight Per Cent Dividends on
Twenty-seven Millions.
1
Some Aldermen Are Fighting to Save the Eight per
Cent Dividends for Bloated Telephone
Stockholders.
The Public Is Only a Secondary Consideration with These
Friends of the Big Telephone Monopoly Now
Squeezing the People.
United States Government Bonds Only Pay Three per Cent, but Tele
, phone Stock Must Be Protected at All Hazards.
A cotiplo of mombors of tho City
Council hhvo aroused tho indignation
of a number of their brothor aldormcn
by declaring that they would Insist
upon fixing telephono rates so that tho
telephono company could contlno to
doclnro dividends of eight per emit,
per annum on tho Imraenso capital
stock of twonty-sevon million dollars.
Every cent of this immenso divi
dend comes from tho pockets of tho
pcoplo of Chicago.
It represents tho net earnings of tho
local Dell Company after it has paid
all of Its expenses, including high
official salaries and Its regular contri
bution to Its owner, the Boll monop
oly, or, as it Is known, the American
Telegraph & Telephone Company,
which, controls tho various big tele
phono systems of tho whole country.
Mr, Demls, the "expert" who has
been employed at $50 a day to find
out the condition of things for the
alderman, has proven to be a disap
pointment. The expert's report reads, to some
people, like a very ablo effort to save
all the monoy It can for tho telephone
company,
The people do not appear to figure
in It very extensively, and the argu
ment appears to bo that any reduc
tion, If any, should bo made so as not
to disturb tho great big annual divi
dend of eight por cent, on twenty
soven millions of capital stock.
This capital stock, by tho way, has
incrensed from 500,000 to $27,000,000,
and tho dhldend of eight per cent. Is
tho lnrgcst paid by any corporation In
tho country.
Tho pcoplo of Chicago evidently are
soft marks and must bo worked for all
there Is In It.
At tho meeting of tho gas, oil and
electric light commlttco, interruptions
of Export llomls by tho nldornicu be
came more frequent, ns they differed
with his conclusions whllo his expla
nations progressed, until when tho
Htibject of tho wnges of the girl opera
tors was reached all tho uldornien
plunged Into tho debate. The report
stated that tho number of girls In
creased from 1,090 at an nvorngo
monthly wngo of $31.17 In 1907, to
S,110 at an nvorago wngo of $30.23 In
1911, nn average pay IncrenBo of 13,
per cent. Aid. Jamos A. Kcnrns
wanted morn details on tho pay ques
tion. Tho report also showed tho total
employes of all classes to havo In
creased from 0,843 at a monthly nvor
ago or $43.97 in 1907, to 8,475 at nn
nvorago of $51.31 in 1911, an incrcaso
of 23.S In number and 44.5 In pay.
"Tho Incrcaso Is probably In tho In
terest of civilization, so tho company
possibly should not bo criticized for
that expenditure," declared Mr. Domls.
"They aro higher than tho usual rato
oast of tho Rockies,"
"Haven't the operators boon mailo
to work so much harder In tho last
live years that thoro Is really no in
crease in wages, while tho efficiency
of tho sorvico has suffered?" demand
ed Aid. Bowler.
"If tho girls aro compelled to do
moro work tho report of a 13 por cent,
increnso Is a misstatement tho com
pany is gottlng moro for Its monoy,"
suggested Aid, Stanley S. Walkowlak.
"Isn't It n fact that tho domands nre
so much greater that tho company has
to give tho girls rest rooms?" asked
I Aid. Kearns,
"If thoro wero no rost rooniB a girl
oporatlng 150 keys would bo killed In
twenty-four hours," Insisted Aid. Wal
kowlak. "Possibly It Is woll for tho profes
sor to bo sympathetic with tho com
pany In soma portions of his report,"
suggested Aid. Cermak with a smllo.
"I'm not taking tho ground that
wages should not bo Increased or that
efllclency should bo Impaired," pro
tested Mr. Bomls.
"You say the cost of these rest
rooms and restaurants averages 73
cents a year for each telephone," con
tinued Aid. Cermak, referring to tho
roport. "That would bo moro than
$200,000 a year."
The discussion again became fast
and furious when tho subject of tho
charge exacted for moving telephones
was reached. Aldermen Insisted that
$5 was charged when no wiring is
done, and even when a now tenant
finds an Instrument already In the
apartment.
"There Is some Justification In It,
as the company does not give the
same number to anybody else In six
months," declared Mr. Bemls.
"Did you find the charge is $5 for
moving nn Instrument from ono sido
of tho room to another?" asked Aid.
Walkowlak.
"I didn't look Into that," replied Mr.
Bomls, again Jotting in his notebook.
Reduction of rates on the two nml
four party, nickel prepaid rosldenco
telophonco, comnrlsinir moro Ihnn hnlf
of tho 300,000 subscribers of tho Chi
cago Tolophono Company, was sug
gested. Aldermen Ccrmnk and Bow
ler secured tho nnsslnir of n mollnn
that K. W. Bomls, tho oxport for tho
commlttco, securo llgurcs to show how
such a reduction would affect tho com.
pany's service.
Aid, Kearns iitigRcstcd such n rciluc.
tlon nt a nrovioiis session of tlm mm.
mltteo. Tho llgufcs suggested by Aid.
Cermak wore to cut tho $1.50 monthly
guaranty of tho four party lino drawn
down to $1 nml tho $3 guaranty of tho
two parly lino to $2,
Such n reduction, snv tlin nlilnrmnn.
would bo moro Impressive than renl.
They contend that most rosldonco to!-
epnones now nccumulnto moro than
$1.50 worth of iilckols In n month, so
that oven If tho guaranty woro re
duced to $1 tho company would con-
unuo nearly mo samo rovenuo from
calls at 5 cents each.
Figures which Mr. Bemls mado pub
lic at tho closo of tho mooting showod
t tint In Alirll. when tho rnmimnv liml
275,000 telephones In Chicago, thoro
woro 117,118 four pnrty linos and 20,
500 two nnrtv subscribers. Tlin ernn.
pany now has closo to 300,000 and
mesa iwo most popular classes or
servlco havo Increased proportion
ately.
Tho public Is watching tho tolo
phono situation closely. It has been
milked so long to keep up big divi
dends, that a reduction of rates all
along tho lino Is demanded.
Aldermen who wunt to soil out their
constituents to tho tolophono trust
will havo to fnco tho Indignation of a
groat number of tholr constituents.
Election night mado many enemies
for tho tolophono company. It ad
vertised far and wido that It would
glvo tho election roturns to all of Its
subscribers freo of charge Peoplo
who had nlckol-In-the-Blot phones, and
they aro In tho great majority, woro
astonished when they asked for tho
returns to lenrn that thoy could hoar
a bulletin by dropping a nickel In tho
slot every ten minutes. As over fifty
bulletins wero Issuod during the night,
tho majority of phono subscribers
would havo to pay at least two dol
lars and a hnlf to got tho roturns.
Tho nlckol-ln-the-slot subscribers aro
watching their aldermen, and mo nl
dermon who favor the tolophono trust
will hear from them later on,
Aldermen may rest assured of one
thing and that Is that the Automatic
telephone operated by tho Chicago
Tunnel Company Is far more popular
than the Trust phone,
Tho figures prove It.
The figures of tho Boll Company nro
misleading as to the number of tele
phones. Whllo their count of phonos
Is no doubt corroct, it Is misleading
because moBt people think that this
refors to subscribers. As a matter of
I fact, the number of telephones Is less
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