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The Washington bee. volume (Washington, D.C.) 1884-1922, June 12, 1886, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025891/1886-06-12/ed-1/seq-1/

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NVAaillNMTONt I). U. PA'l'UKDAV, JUNK 18, 188(1,
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IK-
AAfUSMI3NTS.
Men's Boys' and IVildroi's Clotkiig
i urt W fifcr;d nl Hie 2rmt Sample 1 jllllK0l!f
and fliililreii'tt Clutliln? Opening t 9 I Till St., W. W.
Bet. I St. and Massachusetts Avenue.
Over one thousand Men's Boy's and Children's Suits and Overcoats
t the best goods. Many of them will be sold at less thau the cost of the
VY-Iu s-iv iiothinjr about the making and the trimmings. Actual bar-
?! h S?nm LS. A sample Suit worth S20 can be bought for 812.
(hPreoats very low, and Children and Boy's Suits at little over nalt
II Children's Overcoats at less thau you would have to pay for the
- . i i n.-ii i n A ,.- -k ikj
its, ouiy oue oi a tuuu,
American goods. Prince
it, ouao turn isuiu iui v--i w v u oo
There are no better goods made, many of
thPin sunerior to the best ordered work. Men's Suits start at 5 and 30
iin to 310 Boys' suits $5 to $10 ; Children's Suits $2.50 to $6, and Over
0 its for Men, Bovs' and Children from $2. 50 up. You can secure the
best bargains of your life in any of these goods you can get fitted iu. We
have a lot of Children's Suits 54 in all the price of them was $6.50, $7,
4 M ami $10, ages, 4 to S. Just think of it. You can have your choice
of "this lot for $3.00. Little Overcoats for half price. Men's Pants 75c,
1 1.30 $2 up to $6, We have a lot of Prince Albert Coats, Black Cloth
joniuM-ly sold for $15, iu, fczs your cuoice to uay ior $i.s.
It would be impossible to enumerate the thousands of good things iu
Clotliin0, for Men, Boys' and Children. Come and see for youiself
at the great sale of sample Suits at 924 7th St. N. W., bet. I St. and
Mass Ave. Look for the signs. Sample Suits and all styles of men's
Bon's and Children's Clothing. Sale commences TUESDAY MORN
ING at 10 o'clock.
Albert Coats sold for $1
than two-thirds of the cost.
IN UNION TIIKKB IS STUENOni"
IS N TtiR TA IN M JEN T
AND
COMPETITIVE DRILL
AT
YAHHISS PARK,
Thin Bday, J uly 18U188B,
Under the auspiceB of the WeBt
Washington S A bBATH SCHOOL
UNION.
The Capital City Guard, Cadets,
National Guards, South Washing
ton Rifles and Butler Zouazea will
compete for
A MEDAL.
This handsome Medal ia on exhi
bition at Gait's.
Admission, 25 Cts.
Children, ' - 15 Ota
All returns of tickets must be
made June 30.
R. D. RUFFIN, Chairman,
C.H. TURNER, sec'tt.
JOHN F. ELLIS &H.K,
937 PEKN. AVENUE, WASHINGTON, D. C.
EXTENSIVE DEALERS IN
CD
o
M
vMP
o
divided ugHlimt Itself it will not
amount to anything. Bo it in with
tho Negro. Tho two iB divided;
ita powor iu tho states whoro it
could demand recognition is not
considered. Bo all of this idle talk
about the Negro holding (he baU
ance of power in certain atatea is
but a dog shadow in the water.
OUR PRESS CONVENTION
kv?il meet at AtlaRtic City August ;
drd. A great deal can be done m
the way of promoting the interest
of the race. Of course some will
attempt to turn the convention in
to a political machine shop. It is
'hoped imt-our better thinking ed
itors will endeavor to prevent such.
-We shall be present to do all we
can for the good of the race and
colored journalism. The
COMMISSIONERS
have said that they don't propose
'to have any men on the school
board who are obnoxious to the
people. There is no man on the
school board more obnoxious to
the people than John H. Brooks.
It the commissioners w4ll appoint
another man in the place of Brooks
we are sure that the lady teachers
would stand less iu dread. The
BEEnas been one hundred per
cent more friendly disposed to
wards them than Mr. Brooks. It
there was an election for school
officers to day Mr. Brooks would
not receive many votes. His time
will expire iu July, will the Com-
imisioners re-appoint him? The
rt-ople say no. We have in our
possession the report in the Mat
thews case in Brook's handwriting
which contains the names of sev
eral teachers. This case is famil
iar to the people in this communi
ty. It is an unpubliBqed history
MUSIC,
AMJ MUSICAL MERCILiNDISE OE EVERY DESCRIPTION
Sole agents for the Weber Behring, Vose, Guild, Mason and Hamlin
Behr Bros.
3? I Jk. TS O S!
MASON AND HAMLIN, SMITH AMERICAN. GEO. WOODS
PACKARD, CHASE S
O DR G- .A. IS S!
The concert season closes most
auspiciously with a concert by Miss
Lena Miller and Star Co., on the
18th of the present month at the
Metropolitan church. It is the
ambition of the management to
make this entertaiument one ot
the grandest of the season. A
notable feature will be the render
in? of several old time ballads by
Misb Lena Miller, whose primitive
sweetness has never ben surpass
ed and seldom equalled. Such as
" Where are the fiiends of my
youth," 'Oft in the stilly night,";1
&c. By the coterie ot artists par-
fininolinrr if will 1"W OOOn tVlflt.
concert is guaranteed which is cal- and.. wuld . ? . infesting
culated to please and edify any lB t0,al1-. This is the gen
i: r J -fi'tfmau who informs the public
that Mr. Uhase made an ameut
OUR WEEKLY UEVIEVV.
$1.50 DOOBLE STITCHER SHOES. $1.50.
MADE Ol
CALF-SKI NBR0 A DB01 TOM.
$2-50 GUFBUTTBl IAGE &GD1BBESS E1TTEHS ELECTRIC.'
FLEXIBLE Ac SOFT
THE PRESIDENTIAL CAMPAIGN IN '88.
WHS" BLAINE WILL BE DEFEATED
IF NOMINATED. HIS ENMITY TO
WARDS THE NEGRO. CLEVELAND
STANDS A GOOD CHANCE FOR A RE
NOMINATI0N. IS THE NEGRO THE
BALANCE OF POWER? MIGRATION
FROM THE SOUTH A NECESSITY.
GET OUT AND DIFFUSE. NEGRO
JOURNALISM DISCUSSED, &C.
$4.00
HARD SEWED GAITERS for Xadies and Gentlemen.
I,o w Cellar ter
Y
jhoes, IN GREAT VARIETY".
OUNG'S.
m Ttb St., HEILBRraS Old Stand. Look for the old lady in Window
fcfc
THE GIRL I LEFT BEHIND ME
bOfYfii&HTEOIi:
If
s
y"fr nT BSmmimii ' ml "''TiS'rTi inT .KBBBHK?KMrBHsBBr-S
Illustrated by the use of a Buggr made by T. T. Haydock. whicli Is not only the Leading
,Reyinthis picture, but THE LEADING BUGGY OF AOTJEKICA. Has
Hnydock's Safetv King Bolt and Fifth Wheel. Ask vou dealer for .the T. T.
HAYDOCK BUGGY, with the Haydock Safety King Bolt and Fifth WheeL
Life is insecure riding over any other.
(Thii picture will be famished on ft lUc wd, printed In elegant strle, to anyone Trho trill agree to frame It.)
3?- T. KITDOCZ:, o
Cor. Plira and Twelfth Sts., CINCINNATI. O.
WEKT8 WANTED WHEEE WE HAVE SOKE! W IKVEBTMEHT B0 PROFITABLE,
.KSCLOSK STAMP. I
Sr" for Cstatocue and
uuicaie I'rlec ilat.
MIT'T-lnii TTTll
Already the presidential contest
of '88 is being considered by the
politicians. One by one the favor
ed candidates are being presented.
The presumption is that if Mr.
Blaine is nominated the party
may expect defeat. The country
has no faith in Mr. Blaine's sincer
ity or love for the people. We are
of the opinion that his ambition is
to be revenged on certain repub-
licans and party men who have
heretofore opposed hirii. There
was more fear expresBed on the
part of coloi ed republicans in the
south, when it was thought that
Mr. Blaine was going to be presi
dent than on the part of Mr. Cieve
h.nd. the SOUTH
will not forget Mr. Blitine's p fi
ti( n on tie Force Bill. 'Ihe letters
of Hon. G o. C. Goihim are con
vincing the naiioii and Negr es'
e picially ihat Mr. Blaine has ev
er been their friend. Sme say
that they will take Mr. Blaine
rather than to allow the republi
can pii'ty to sufter another defeat.
It ia better that tie party suff.-r
iifty defeats than to allow Mr.
Blaine to be elected president of
the United States. If nominated
he will be defeated, we have no
faith in him. If Mr. O.eveland
acts with any liberality to the Jo
gro he can win their support. So
fair as he is com enud helms ms.de
a good president. As a mat
ter ot fact he is a long way in ad-
i 1 j .-
vunce 01 iin puty. we rami t
trust the parlv he rcoru.-enis and
aliou d l.e he nominated iu '88
1 against Blai ie he will 1 e ele ltd
There is a great deal of talk ib ut
the Negroes holding the
I balance op power.
, Whi.e they are an important fac
tor in the body-politic they have
to unite before they can claim
anything. If an organization is
apology; this is the man that we
defended and stood between the
trustees of the public schools and
the people who demanded an ex
posure of the circumstances of De
cember 31,82. We have Mr.
Brooks' owilreport, made in the
case and an editorial written by
hir. defendiug his report, but we
declined to publish it. Doe3 this
in us seem abject? It was in Mr.
Brooks' power to remove the
teachers, he knew who they vere;
he knew the circumstances in the
case; he was present and heard the
housekeeper s statement, yet he re
tuined the teachers. We have it
in Mr. Brooks' own handwriting
and we defy him to deny it. If
any of these teachers had bpen
guilty of th ashing his children he
would have been active. He
kuows that he has been with us
for hoarB and discussed the school
question; the fitness of teacher?;
the success of the schools &c. To
our surprise we are informed that
the e school trustees and certain
teachers whom we have served,
informed the government that the
Bee was a terror to the trusteed
and teactiers. And when it was
P'e,3iim d that we were to b : sent
to a place that we knew nothing
of, this moral reformer Mr Mat
thews writes in ui questionable
language that the editor of the
Bee made an abjec: apol gy. For
the cons-ideraiiou of this gentle
man, we desire to prop a id a few
questions
Ques.: Is trustee Brooks' report
correct? lias he ever pushed the
libel suit he inaugurated against
Messrs Jo ndOn and Brooks on
amount of this exposure? Was the
Bee au abject journal in the esti
mation of Mr. Matthews at that
time? Did the editor of the Bee
make uu abject apology to the
puiif'c at that timv? Did not ihe
public or certain people stop tak
ing the Beb because the Bek de
clined to make an abject exposure?
lias the Ble ever ditectly or indi
rectly wrong, d Mr. Matthews?
Would it not be a degree of he
datener-s on the rart of Mr. Mat
thews to re ire fn in the social!
world? Is it not the duty of a
j journal to upolog'ze when : n edi
tor is between u lion and a ugei?
Did n t justice s ep in and say
t o.u shah bjm ire careful the next
lime and requested us to p.iyr a line
ot $50? Did not tho con esp ndent
of the Freeman appeal to justice
and 1h not justice ready to aiiHWur
as hood uh Mr, MmLLIiow Hpuaktif1
Until this iH done plonHu remain
quiet.
We don't writo this with any
fooling against the correspondent
of the Freeman, but when a man
like Mr. Matthews attempts to
charge us with having made a
mean, low, servile, base and worth
It ss apology, m our libel suite,
when it is to the reverse we ask
to be delivered What is the con
dition of our societj' to day. Does
not the correspondent of the Free
man talk about every man and
woman of soc'al distinction? Has
he not wished the discharge of
every man of color with whom he
associated? Does he not crave so
ciety? Is uot that his ambition?
Has he any more right to be con
sidered than any one else?
NEGRO EMIGRATION
is the question now. In a letter
from a distinguished gentleman
from the south we have been in-
iormeu tuaL nortnern men are
more inimical to the Nesrro than
the southern men. But, that
southern men are bad enough and
the only salvation for the Negro
is to
GET OUT.
Montana, Dakota and other
states in the west are better for
colored people. We favor western
emigration for the JNegro. Let
him leave the south. There is no
salvation for him there. The reb
els say that the south belong to
them. The better class of demo
crats are powerless. They are
like the republicans, a nonenity
in politics. Let them get out.
Diffusion is the question. There
fiilMtiTimt. &, ttuf lu ruga Ml t
other siiptilldH I propoHti that thfo
man (hall hike nu Inventory of all
property on hand unci record every
hing that b received nnd issued.
This is one item in the appropria
tion hill that lam deeply iuterest
td in ai.d which I hope the House
conferees will agree to."
"Do j'ou think the number of.
school trustees will be increased?"
asked The Capital.
"That I cannot say. I do not
think it will be done in the appro
priation bill. We have taken the
proper ground as to the extent of
the duties of the trustees and the
trouble is that this stand was not
taken lo igago."
Commissioner Wheatley said:
'The commissioners have just di
vided the duties in regard to the
schools into two parts," and he
illustrate 1 his meaning by draw
ing a straight line on a piece of pa
perl ying before him." On one hand
are those relating to educational
matters, on the other are the busi
ness affairs. Now we think that
the trustees should only consider
those matters relating to eduation
and that the commissioners should
lo;k after all the buigness and
tinancial affairs. There isone'thiog
we don't propose to have aud that
is any more disturbance and dis
sension in the b.ard such as there
has been. If it is found thatone or
more men are disturbing elements
we have the remedy in our own
hands and it will be exercised.
don't think any man has a right
to remain & member of any body
unless he can bow to the will of
the majority. Yon can be sure we
have a harmonious board." The
Capital.
POINTS.
is a great deal of difference be
tween colored and white
JOURNALISM.
There are a few Negroes in this
country who know how to e lit a
paper. We have some very high
toned colored journal iu the coun
try that are a credit to the race.
There are others that are a dis
grace. The Cleveland Globe is no
doubt one of the best papers pub
lished by Negro men. It is con
ducted more on the order of a
white journal than any other pa
per published by colored people.
Mr. Fortune is a good editorial
writer and conducts a good paper.
The Detroit Plaindealer, National
Monitor, Memphis Watchman,
Louisville Baptist, Denver Sun,
and a few others are among the
reliable journals of the race. In
our next review we shall take up
colored journalism.
DISTRICT SCHOOLS.
"Yes," said Podger's wife, "the
devil has a cloven feat, and the
man who has cloven breath is on
the way to him."
"When Bloogins preseuted his
bill in the Legislature I settled it in
short order."
" That certainly was a very re
markable thing.''
"Why so?"
"Because it was the first, bill
ever presented that you did settle."
"What did your father leave
you when he died
Pat?"
''Faith he left me au orphan."
Jones: Look here, Mr. Yawcobs,
that clock I bought of you lately
stopped on the eight day and won't
run any more.
Yawcobs: Yust so, Mr. Youes, you
vanted an eight-day glock. I var
rants dot glock to run eight days.
He run eight days- Vy didn't you
puy a sixteen-day glock? Sixteen
day glock he cost only one tollar
more as dot. Tid Bits.
-Ther are some items in the Dis
tnct appropriat'on,bill which were
inserted by the Senate," said Com-mi-sioner
Webb to The Capital
man the other day, "which I hope
the conference committee will not
cut out. For instance, I have asked
for an apj ropriutinn for a man
who shall have charge of all
school tuppl es and property. This
I deem a necessity. Heretotore no
one has been responsible for the
receipt of supplies. Take the mat
ter of coal. A certain number of
tanB is wanted for a school, and
the requudt on is m td by thf prin
cipal, countersign-d by the trustee
for that district aud comes to us
for approval We approve it, and
it goes to the contractor to furnish
the amount asked lor. When the
coal is delhertd at ihe school
house no one is the.e to receive it
but he fam tor, and he does not
1 know whether the c rrect quantity
is rumsneu or nor. jn-vv, l propo e
that the cleik I ask for shall be
a mau competent to know whether
i en tons or lift e'en tons are delier
ed; that when a requisition for
coal is approved by us it shall he
given to him, and he shall bj
on the spot when it is deliveied
and he responsible for its proper
IT WON'T WORK.
If you have a good short poem,
sketch or esay in your scrap book
hit you desire published, it is just
as welcome as an original effort,
probtbly mo re so. Dont attempt,
howeve , to c py an already print
ed article aud attemp to palm it
off'oii lis as original, for we are old
buds, who have read somewhat
and, while we may not be able to
re .'ognize a sham on sight, we don't
h ive to kep it long brefore our
indices plue it properly. The per
son who attempted to palm "Cover
Tt em Over"' ou us as original, fail,
ed to see it last week, we thiuk.
lie can see a quotation from the
original poem, however, inJSena' or
Macfarlane's s-peech on fist page,
and can have his original poem
on application. G.;rmant)iun tn a
dpedent.
iwfr a- I.. .
MOST CORKECT.
There are times when the judge
should have discretion t 'exceed
the l:w. The time when Most the
iiiwchist, was sentf-nced was one
of the. iif. Tlujulge was alright,
hut the I iw was all wrong. Most
ijot one year in j nl and $500 tine.
Phejude, untrammelled by law
would have caged the scamp for a
decade and c ntisctted any prop
erty he might have had. And he
ought to have b.eu able to do if.
The RepubCic.
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