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The Washington bee. volume (Washington, D.C.) 1884-1922, July 10, 1886, Image 1

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f er.ms. $2.00 Per year
5 cents per copy.
VOL. V.
WASHINGTON, D. 0., SATURDAY, JULY 10, 1886.
NO. 6
jfc; . .
m
WElf
SUCH.
IN
x a-.
Men's Boys' and Children's tlothiag
. offered at Hie Great Sample ot Ueu,IIoss'
AS ""nd Tliilu",s Clotlilbg Openiog at 924L 7tli St., JV.W.
Bet. I St. and Massachusetts Avenue.
p thousand Mod's Boy's and Children's Suits and Overcoats
Over one - of tbm wlU be gol(1 at ess tllJin tlQ coSt of the
"n','itf sn nothing about the making and 'thy trimmiugs. Actual bar-
Tl 1 doii comS. A sample Suit worth S20 can be bought for $12.
n "ts virlow, and Children and Boy's Suits at little over half-
M Viiililrcn's Overcoats at less than you would have to pay for the
""UlS'mnilP of The best English, French and American goods. Prince
ujaaRMndrteonu-wui h Q;feti,-oftM fl. ftif. con loco
.i . n A .. i nvn innv v 111 rtiii.1' ii uuiio. vjui v uuo ui x iviiiii.
Vlbert Coats sold tor &io mioo, U1W1J7 u,u v w v u .
n.ini-tlirdsoflhecost There are no better goods made, many ot
1 em supeiioi to the best ordered work., Men's Suits start at $5 ami go
11) 10 vi ,-,k... .,...1 rM.i'flvuii frnrn
c 1 n . 12 -k'
' cnitc Sn ro S1U : jiiuuieu a ouilo qz.ov uv ?u, tiuu vvm-
! ivirr.dns of your life in any of these goods you can get fitted in. We
Tvo a lot of (Children's Suits 54 in all the price of thorn was $6.50, $7,
5s fM -unl S10, ages, 4 to 8. Just think of it. You can have your choice
vV"ihislotforS33o. Little Overcoats for half price. Meu's Pants 75c,
ci 1 "it) Qk? up to $6, We have a lot of Prince Albert Coats, Black Cloth
?o, meriv'aoW lor SIS, $20, $22-your choice to day for $12.
it would be impossible to enumerate the thousands of good things m
Clothm" Vor Men. Boys' and Children. Come aud see for yourself
it the reat sale oi sample Suits at o24 7th St. N. W., bet. I St. and
ai.,. Jvp Look for the signs. Sample Suits aud all styles of men's
)loysJuu CliiluWs Clothing. Sale commences TUESDAY MOR
ISi; at 10 o'clock.
937 PENN. AVENUE,
EXTENSIVE
r
t
:
o
GO
MUSIC
AND MUSICAL MERCHANDISE OE EVERY DESORIP1IO
Sole agents for the Wber Bthring, Yose, Guild, Mason and Hamlin
15ohr Bros.
PIANOS!
MASON AND HAMLIN, SMITH AMERICAN. GEO. WOODS
PACKARD, CHASE
ORGANS!
$1.50 DOUBLE STITCHED SHOES. $1.50.
MADE OF
CALF-SKIN BROAD B0 i TOM.
$2-50 EMTTIHI USE fiLGQNGHESS GlITEfiS, ELECTRIC,
FI.EX1BI.K Ac SOFT
1 00 liA1STD SEWED GAITERS for Ladies and Gentlemen.
1 i
I-ow x-&a,YteT lioes, IN GREAT VARIETY'.
Y O U N G 'S.
.j02 Til. S'-, HElLBUUys OmI S-aiul. Look for the old lady in Window
6
THE GIRL I LEFT BEHIND
COPYRIGHTED 1077
, BuSSmSwc fe,of a?nBS;S5?eJ)y T T- Haydoct. which is not only the Leidinp
flavdoJv'V r1"-. tatHElBADING BUGGY OF AITIBHICA. Has
H IYdook eKrri5LUBolt, ?nd Fifth WheeL Ask you dealer for the T. T.
Life is icnrftK.UGY' with the Haydock Safety King Bolt and Fifth Wheel.
(tm n,S00Ure ridK over any other.
Ji 'PVtnre WlU UC fnrnUhcd on c Print in e'ceaat strle, to anyone who will agree to frame It.)
a nCwn Tm it. Cor- PlQm nd Twelfth StBM CIXCDfSlTI, O.
auxiH ia WAMjj WHESE WE HAVE KOIfE! NO INVESTMENT B0 PEOFITABLE.
if
iHi&ttra.fviiig
K .1111 !k.- m-T 41 S
BARGAINS
9.. riO nn. "Von ran Rpp.nrfi thft
WASHINGTON, D. C.
DEALERS JN
O
99
T -C 'A., iB.IBtlBB.BI
ii.i ii ititTTrHn
PRESS COMMENTS.
SECOND THE MOTION.
We hope that the meeting of
the Press Convention will be
harmonious and peaceful and ail
will "pull together." -Sister Car
rie's Lancet.
EIG-HTYOUAEE.
The Commissioners are level
headed on the puclic school quest
ion. No new legislation on the sub
ject is needed. The Republic.
HE HAS WON THE CAKE.
J. W. Cromwell, one of
Washington's able lawyers, is
meeting with success in this city.
He is an able defender of his race
Correspondent Boston Advocate.
TUEY BETTER NOT.
The Jacksonville letter carriers
are compelled to walk from ten to
twelve hours; and it is rumored
that they are going to hold a little
meeting, and notify Uncle Sam
that they have only two legs each,
People's Journal.
A LITTLE OFF.
The removal of Peter H. Clark
from the PnncipaLhip.of the Col
ored High School at Cincinnati, is
a public disgrace to the Republi
cans, black or white, who caused
it. This is a free country, and
any man, black or white, has a
uedect right to enjoy and express
his political opinions. Southern
Leader.
WHAT IS SAID OB1 IT.
The above review of the "Wash
ington Bee on Negro Journalism,
while it makes a little shaking
among the dry bones, shows that
the writer has given the subject
some study. We make no com
ment, being one of the victims of
thu shake, but leave it to our read
ers whether we have or have not
been justly dealt with. Chicago
Conset valor.
A BOMBSHELL.
A correspondent of the Cleve
land G-ezette nominates James C.
Matthews for Attorney General to
succeed Garland. Matthews is stain
d by no Pau-Eiectric jobbery,
is an honest man, and while the
suggestion may be made in a hu
morous way, stranger things have
happeued. And, Cleveland is ad
dtcted to doing strange things.
Indianapolis World.
WHICH "WAS FIRST?
We simply wish to remind our
readers that The Capital was the
only paper that last Sunday an
nounced the fact that the com
misioners had requested Major
Dye's rt'S gnation. During the
wiek his successor has been ap
puinted, and Major S. H. Walker
is now the superintendent of the
police iorce of the Distric. We
learn that the new chief is a man
f rorce and vior and we h pe for
him a succe?sful admin's 'ration.
CapiVd
As announced in Tub Republic
of June 13, jut two eeks ahead
of any other paper. W. McE. Dye
h is i ten removed. His successor
Mr. Samuel H. Walker, isa nitive
of the District of Columbia. Wu
have not the pleasure of a perso
ual acquaintance with the gentle
mm, but judging from the opin
ions expressed of him by those who
know lrm well, we are under the
impres ion that the selection is a
roo 1 oiih and we sincerely trust
that The Republic.
WE AGREE WITH YOU.
The o)o ed p-esa is raising a
resit hubbub b 'cause tiie demo-
c-ii jire disrha gmg republican
tictnls i-monsr ulmmnrea sprink-
n-.ir o: c!ir;d clerks Th -ir
ta k s pue.i'e, not to say erratic
Viuii rig'ir has a re'jubl.can ofii
vit iv i-AjjcuL -t limn uuiv;c uiiuci
.n administration that he is bit-
ii.il I, .iv-nnnt- , 1-.,.1.1 ,.!?.-... ,....!....
terly opposed to, and whose prin
ciples and policy is antagonistic
to his welfare? As politics goes,
the idea now obtains that to the
victors belong the spoils, the civil
service enactment, commission, etc.
to the contrary notwithstanding.
And, that the democrats are vic
torious, they are clearly entitled
tj! the spoils, and aU republicans
should graciously concede to them
this, rights nor is it becoming ui
tjjem to whine like a whipped cur
wnen called upon to vacate; but
to go forth with manly courage
and redoubled energy to sicure
victory for their party and cause
in ,'88. Indianapolis World.
A NEW INSTITUTION OE
LEARNING-.
THE TERGUSON ACADEMY AT ABBE
VILLE, S. C
For a hundred years the white
'people of Abbeville country have
been distinguisned tor their
schools and their love of letters,
and i, seems that the Negroes of
the same section are to he noted
for the same commendable spirit.
In all parts of the county the
negroes have paid more or less at
tention to the securing of school
houses, and to the education of
their children. Especially is this
true at Aboeville. in 1868 the
negro Methodists built a good
school house, erected a large and
commodious house of worship, and
put up a comfortable parsonage.
In after years the negro Presbyte
rians, namely: Shedrick Lesly,
George M. Ricbey, George W
Smith, Lewis P. Ricbey, William
Pope, George Barr, Alfred Foster,
and others, under the lead of Rev.
E. W. Williams in 1881 sought to
establish a form of worship, which
woma more nearly conform to
their religious belief, and this
step induced the iurther step of
establishing a separate school.
Mr. Williams went iNorth in De
cember of the same year, and after
three mouths of labor anions the
white Presbyterians of the iforth,
succeeded in securing the sum of
1,500 which was supplemented
by 500 from the Board of Church
Ereciion in the city of New York.
This sum was further supplement
ed by sums received from white
and colored people at home.
With this money a handsome
church and school house combined
was built on a suitable lot in town.
Tue building was finished aud
opened one year after the organi
zation of the congregation. The
school was opened in January,
1882, by Mrs. Williams, the wife
ofti e pastor, who before her mar
riage had a large and extended
experience as teacher in the pub
lic schools of Washington, D. C.
The school has been thoroughly
graded, aud this year quite a num
ber of the scholars pa s&ed excellent
examinations in grammar, history,
geography, arithmetic, and other
branches usually taught in the
common schools. The daily aver
age attending at ihe school is
ab ut sixry-tive scholars. The
teacher is pnid by the parents of
the children who supplement the
amount which is received from
from the Presbyterian B'ard of
Missions for Fruedmen. This
school receives no benefit whaN
ever from the public fund, except,
at such times when the attendance
is so large that un assistant teach
er is necessary.
The obiect at first was simolv
to su-tain a small parochial school
as an auxiliary to their church,
but the sutcess of the school under
Mrs. Williams' most excellent
management has been so great
that the McClellau Presbytery,
comprising twelve counties in the
upper part of this State, has decid
ed to make Abbeville an educa
tional centre for negro children of
both sexes. To further thi3 end,
Mr. Wilhams went north again in
1885, to raise money to assist iu
erecting a school building of
larger and m re exten-ive dimen
sions which would letter supply
the demand f.r the proposed insti
tuti u. About 81,000 was, sub
scribed in the North, and it is
"U ...- .rv . I ll.t- l. ..:! -,
nupcvi IUU.L me reiLuujjiiii uecta?a-i
ry money may be secured as the '
work progresses! The building
which they contemplate will be
brick 45 x 60 feet, and will be lo
cated on the church iot. While
it is not expected to finish the
nuilding this winter, it is hoped
however that sufficient money will
be secured to cover it in, and
that by auother year the whole
building will be finished. The
foundation has been dug. A hun
dred thousand bricks have already
beeu burnt for the work.
It is proposed to accommodate
at least three hundred children of
both sexes. In the Academy there
will be a boarding and industrial
department, where children may
do something to earn their way in
the institution. Press and Banner.
---
ORGANIZING SABBATH
SCHOOLS.
Poplar Grove, Md., June 30, '86.
Mr. Editor;
I take pleasure in
announcing thrown your journal
that on last Sabbath, the 27th
inst., we organized a Sunday
School in our neighborhood
known as the "Poplar Grove Bap
tist Sunday School." Messrs. Al
exander Ham'lton and A. A.
Latt, both of Washington D. C,
were pieaent with us on the occa
sion. Mr. Hamilton is one of the
most energetic and thorough going
Sunday School workers we have.
We trust the L u:d will make him
an instrument iu helping to raise
fallen humanity from moral dark
ness to the glorious light of the
gospel.
Poplar Grove village is very
beautifully located. The sceuery,
for miles around, as far as the
eye cair behold, is pleasiug to the
sight. The people on an average,
are in a prosperous condition, and
are not lacidng in that magna
nimity of heart which character
izes all lovers of humanity and
especially the humble disciples of
the Lord Jesus.
Poplar Grove S. S. was voted
in as a full member of the Baptist
Sunday School Union, of wuich
Mr. Hamilton is now president.
Very respectfully,
Vindex.
o o
PROGRAM OF THE NATION
AL PRESS CONVEN1TON,
AUAUST 3, 1886, 2 P. M.,
ATLANTIC CITY, NEW
JERSEY
Afternoon.,,
1. Opening Exercises.
2. Appointment of Committee
on Credentials.
3. Short Addresses,
4. Report of Committee on Cre
dials. 5. Election of Officers.
Night
1. Opening Exercises.
2. Installation of Officers.
3 Discission. "The Future Re
lation of the Negro to Existing
Parties."
symposium.
T. T. Fortune, New lork Free
man. A. F. Bradley, Chicago Observ
er. Juo. W. Cromwell, "People's
Advocate.
J. A. Arneaux, New York En
ten .rise
L. A. Martinet, Louisian Stand
ard. J. H: Keeble, Free Lance.
R. R. Wright, Weekly Sentinel.
Papers, fifteen minutes each.
SECOND DAY.
Homing.
1 Repor's of Committees. Dis
cussions thereon.
2 Other Business.
Afternoon. -.
1. Reports of Committees con
tinued. Discussion thereon.
2, Routine Business.
Night.
1. Public Meeting. Iuvited
guests to speak on any top:c of in
terest. COMMITTEES:
"On the Religious, Educational
and Social Status of the colored
People:"
Southwestern Advocate, Louisi
ana, Chairman Georgia Baptist
Georgia; Christian Recorder,
Pennsylvania; Gold Eagle, Tennes
see; - Alumnus, Pennsylvania;
Western Baptist Herald, Iowa;
Christian Star, -Texas; Christian
Index, Mississippi, Star of Zion,
North Carolina; Afr -American
Churchman, Virginia? Pioneer,
Texas; People's Journal, Florida.
"Southern Outrages:"
Washington Bee, District Co
lumbia, Chairman; Flanet, Virgin
ia; Sun, Arkansas; Atlanta Defi
ance, Georgia; Gate City Pres,
Missouri; Boston Advocate,, Mas
sachusetts; Baptist Advocate,
Louisiana; Baptist Standard,
North Carolina; Virginia Critic,
Virginia; Enights of Wise Men,
Tenuessee; Ohio Falls Express,
Kentucky.
"Industrial Education:"
Western Appeal, Minnesota,
Chairman; St. Louis Advance,
MiBsourif Memphis Watchman,
Tennessee; Arkansas Review, Ar
kansas; American Biptist, Ken
tucky;. Phoenix, Georgia; St. Ma
ry's Herald, Louisiana;. Southern
Independence, Alabama; Mary
land Director, Maryland.
"Labor:"
Detroit Plaindealer, Michicau,
Chairman; Light House, Texas;
Cleveland Globe, Ohio; Living
Way, Tennessee; Baptist Pioneery
Alabama; Southern Leader, Flor-
11. flin t nnn.rv..n ntl-. fTt
nessee; Baptist Beacon, Ohio;
Golden Epoch, Arkansas; Lynch
burgh Laborer, Virginia; Baptist
Monitor, Kentuckv.
"Journalism:"
A. M.E. Review, Pen naylvania,
Chairman; Cleveland Gazette,
Ohio; Denver Sun, Colorado; In
dianapolis World, Indiana; Bap
tist Companion, Virginia; Journal
of the Lodge, Lonisana; Elevator,
California; Cairo Gazette, Illinois;
Progressive American, New York;
Baptist Preacher, Texas.
"Resolutions and Business:"
National Monitor, New York.
Chairman; Arkansas Mansion, Ar
kansas; Virginia lancet, Virginia;
Chicago Conservator, Illinois;
Chattanooga Times, Teunessf;
The Soldier's Re-Onion, Kentucky;
Texas Press, Texas.
From personal correspondence
with the speakers, chairmen and
other members, and the sanction
of all concerned, the program is
sent forth and the convention will
meet ar the time and place men
tioued
Let the chairmen communicate
with the members of their com
mittees, and let the reports be ful
ly e -mpded, considerately digested
so that they will be of permanent
value as the expression of the
colored editors of the
United S'ates. Thus prepared
before hand by correspondence,
there will be little to do in the
preparation of reports, and more
time can be given to the disona
sions, without depleting the meet
ings of frequent adjournments.
The chairmen will be expected to
make 15 minute speeches in the
presentation of the report.
Should anything occur in the
change or time or place, the pro
gram will remain the-ia'me.
Co operation on tb6 part of the
members at the press baa been
promifed and further co-operation
is solicited. Let every paper copy
this announcement and exchange
with the AMEaicA'N Baptist.
Done by order of the Executive
Committee of the Colored Na
tional Press Convention.
Wm. J. Simmons,
Chairman.
SUMMER HESORT.
Mrs; Delia Howard, Wilhsville,
Va., is prepared td" receive Sum-
infer Boarders. Scenery And health
ful ness unsurpassed. Mineral wa
ter, fine table, pure milk and
cream. Terms reason ble. For
terms apply to Mrs Delia Howard
Welbourn Post officdJLoBdon Co
Virginia,
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