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The Washington bee. volume (Washington, D.C.) 1884-1922, July 24, 1886, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84025891/1886-07-24/ed-1/seq-1/

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Terms. $2.00 Per year
5 cents per copy.
Washington, d. a, Saturday, july 24, 1886.
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NEVER SUCH BARGAINS
IN
Men's Boys' and Children's Clothing
t ifFAVAirl sit. tltA ftreitt Siumrie ot iSen.Bojs'
AN are "!:, ,,? fmtfliinir Ooenfnsrat 924YthSt., N.W.
Bet. 1 St. and Massachusetts Avenue.
finfiDnd Mon'sBov's and Children's Snits and Overcoats
, , w iroods. Many of them will be sold at less than the cost of the
oftlitubbbfe , . trimmings. Actual bar-
F cS;pldom come. A sample Suit worth $20 can be bought for $12.
Uusfaeldoni oom. tj at-little over halt
Overcoats - overcoats at less than you would have to pay for the
pnwmr These goods are mostly in single Suits, only one of a kind,
ma,n?' i f th tart English, French and American goods. Prince
Kert Coats sold for $15 now $G, Suits that sold for $12 to $20 at less
IT Y thirds of the cost. There are no better goods made, many of
indu iv -. nwiPTPd work. Men's Suits start, at S5 and
r'tifi "boys' suits $5 to $10 ; Children's Suits $2.50 to $6, and O
T tc Sir Men Bovs and Children from $2. 50 up. You can secure
coats loi j . . ,. tilpsft p-nnns von can ffet fitted in.
ii.j.0 iji wu . w 0 - O
:iceof them was $6.50, $7,
You can have your choice
Men's Pants 75c,
OUR WEEKLY REVIEW.
t hftnrains of your life in any of these goods you can get fitted iu.
r int of Children's Suits oi in an tne price or tnein was 5o.ou,
P'a,u In a 8 .Tnet think nf if.
go
ver
the AVe
the colored press. its influ
ence in the next canvass. why
. republicans have-ignored ne
gro editors. their policy in
'88. how douglass demanded
recognition. the lotus club,
how disbanded. the west
Indian abroad.
fc Maud $10 ages, 4 to s. Just turn ul iu iuu i
Is8' ? . a! L kaSo. Little Overcoats for half price.
K,4 r-1L3 1111. 11)1 -W--"T . - . - .. - -m m
tti "0 2 u) to $6, We have a lot of Prince Albert Coats, Black Cloth
-1 Irivsold for $18, $20, $22 your choice to day for $12.
?Jn hPimDOSsible to enumerate the thousands of good things in
u r.. 1-o nn,l f'hillt'an flnmo nnrl upo -fir 7nnrnalf
T rrpat sale of sample Suits at 924 7th St. N. W., bet. I St. and
K .c avp Look for the signs. Sample buits and all styles ot men's
MasjS. c- nintliino- Ssilflftommftnfifts TUESDAY MORX-
i3i).vs,auu vunuiou. o w.w &.
1sG at iu ociouK.
Evidences every day convince
us that the colored press in this
couutry is fast becoming a power.
Colored editors are being convinc
ed that their salvation is not alone
in the Republican party ayd a very
little less in the democratic party.
Heretofore the republican cam
paign committees have entirely ig
nored Negro newspapers. The
fault has been, that all Negro edi
tors have been considered to be re
publicans and for that reason these
committees presumed tkat color
ed editors .Gould live off of wind
and promises. The more intelli
gent Negro editors have taken a
different view of things and have
concluded to demand payment for
services if their services amount to
anything at all. The
NEXT CANVASS
I
tfkhk S Bli'' """2 "S 3m&r- LmMk
qd m&
5ai
JOHNF. ELLTS Ac X ,
937 PBNN. AVENUE, WASHINGTON, D. C.
EXTENSIVE DEALERS JN
o
-
GO .
MUSIC
AND MUSICAL MERCHANDISE OF EVERY DESCRIPTION"
Soo ageDta for the Weber Behring, Voae, Guild, Mason and Hamlin
Behr Broa.
T I A. IS O S!
MASON AND HAMLIN, SMITH AMERICAN. GEO. WOOD
PACKARD, CHASE :
ORGAN S!
will find many a colored editor sup
porting men and not party. Mr.
Fortunes' mistake was, after declar
ing himself an independent, in sup
porting the republican party in '8L
He, no doubt, found that he was los
ing quite a number of his subscrib
ers which forced him to ally himself
with the fc-sinkiugr ship." He was
educating the Negroes to be inde
pendent iu politics, but, when his
readers saw that their leader had
changed basis, nothing was left for
them to do but to follow suit.
They lost confidence in Mr. For
tune, although we believed him to
be sincere. The action of the re
publican party towards colored ed
itors have compelled several of
them to change their
POLICY.
the head of them. . No one has any
idea how Senators and representa
tives are cheated, "Where a democrat
ic" Congressman is convinced that a
paper edited by aNegroisan inde
pendent or democratic, he will
readily subscribe. They have been
and are more liberal toward color
ed newspapers than many republi
cans. THE DENVER SUN
edited by Isiaah Mitch el, is doing
good work in the West. Mr. Mitch
el is from this city aud is known to
I be onergetic and an industrious
man. ub opponent, an indepen
dent paper, recently started in the
same city doesn't seem to do him
any harm, Mr. Mitchel has the
confidence of the people and there
is no doubt of his success. The
1 SOUTHERN LEADER
is fast gaining its way in the hearts
of the people. We yet hope to see
the South send forth the leading
Negro jouruals in the country. The
PEOPLES' ADVOCATE
of this city, edited by J. W. Crom
well, has not made much headway.
The Advocate has been in existance
eleven years. The editor has en
deavored to serve the public by
catering to a certain faction. The
editor is charged with being very
narrow and conceited in his views.
Mr. Cromwell has had many op
portunities to make the Advocate
the leading journal. He is a good
writer but others are not williug to
conceede that. One mistake the
editor made when he transferred
the Advocate to others to prevent
his discharge from office. Notwith
standing this transfer he was dis
charged and is still editing his pa
per. We will admit that Mr. Crom
well - has done more for the race,
than what he is credited with.
He has had more aid than any oth
er journal that has been published
in this city and has made less head
way. ' THE NATIONAL itONITOR
AM U S E M E NT.S.
TWO
AM U 8 E M E N T S.
BY
W a s li' i P-'g ton
T
RICHMOND, Va. &
TUESDAY AUGUST 3D, 1886.
(o) f (o)
To accomodate our many friends
from that section of the country,
and in response to numerous re
quests we have made arrangements
for the present excursion, and
hope to have the patronage of the
Public, as it is the Eirst and will
be the Best of the season.
THE
O a d e t Co
O
rp s.
2.50 ftODBLE STITCHED SHOES. $1.50'
-MADE OF
B01T0M.
CALF-SKIN BROAD
$1-50 OUNnnUtElHinQSGVIElS, ELECTRIC,
FLEXIBLE Sc SOFT
)lL00 ND SEWED GAITERS fr ladies and Gentlemen.
Low nartei? Shoes. IN GREAT VARIETY
. YOUNG'S.
02 7tl. St. , HBILBBUyS Old Staml. Look for tlie old lady in Wind ow
THE GIRL I LEFT BEHIND ME."
ftl
COMBOTEOI177
"cd by the use of
Mm'm thi?3LeH, 8?uraS?e1rbZTvaydoct- h'eh is not only the Leading
HvSJ.:h,oSB.I?'u!5! buHPHE fcfeABIKG BUGGY OF AOTE&ICA. Hm
WfDocOffviwJT T1 , Ask vou denier for the T. T.
Ufei insert Safety King Bolt and Fifth Wheel.
' oWJ?" bC rnUhed 8B Jwe" W in deiMt Btjle, to anyone h0 will agm to tnrxt IL)
ABEHtV5iSSS Ut" Mmm Bd Twelfth StBM CINCIKS1TI, O.
WTB WANTED WHEKB WE HIVE K0HE1 NO INVESTMENT SO PBOHTAELR
gpn
,
The change will ultimately tend
to elevate the Negro press in the
eyes of the American people. We
predict that there will be one third
of the colored editors in this coun
try supporting the democratic par
ty in '88. Mr. Douglass with his
North Star know that the salvation
of the Negro was the success of the
republican party. He knew thar.
the National Era could demand
recognition for the race after the
success of that party. The strength
of Douglass' papers was his influ
ence and standing iu the country.
The National republican committe
with a small degree of pretense of
love for the Jfegro offered but little
assistance to tue iira Tne com
taittue did not care so much for the
paper, but it was Mr. Douglass' iu
tiuence with the Negro, that was
wanted. The
EMANCIPATION
of the Negro elevated him to
such a degree that he forgot him
self. Social organizations of a dis
criminating character were organ
ized, rings of all kinds were estab
lished. One class of Negroes
thought themselves better than an
other class. The colored press was
then in its iufaucy. The colored
editors did not know how to hau
dle this class of wild social rene
gades. The Freedmau's saving
bauk was established, which em
ployed a lot of Negro clerks. The
majority of these clerks were grad
uates of the Philadelphia high
school. A cast organization sprung
up from the bauk ring known as
the "Lotus Club" or educated Ne
groes. Respectable people were
prohibited from joining the organi
zation, notwithstanding what
their social standing was. The
broker on eight street was Captain
General or Lord dictator. This
fastidious gentlemen always set in
judgement on applicants for social
recognition. If he thought that
the applicant would become more
popular than himself, he would be
rejected. The Colored Citizen, a
paper edited by Prof. J. P. Samp
sou, was the cause of the disband
meut of this social fraud.
During the existance of the Lo
tus club, visitors on their art ival
in the city would catch the distem
per. This has been a great city
for social cliq es and corruption
ists. Newspapers have been estab
lished by these sharks merely for
speculation and social influence.
It is very hard to convince a
CONGRESSMAN
that Negro newspapers are resppii-
is a-jsurual-of-great merrit, and the
editor Mr. Cris Perry kuows how to
deal with questions of the day. The
PROGRESSIVE AMERICAN
edited by Mr. Freeman has been in
existance sometime. Mr. Freeman,
would make a first class editor if
he were not so jealous of his city
colored contemporaries. Freeman
is very narrow in his views at
times There is no class of men
that has the opposition aud disap
pointments as the colored editors.
There is too much jealousy among
the race to succeed. That grim
monster must die out before the
race will amount to anything. The
leaders themselves are becoming
disgusted with the masses. Social
discrimination is doing: the race
more hai m than the opposition of
the democratic party.
EAOE DISCRIMINATION
is what is doing the colored people
harm. There are a few Negroes in
this community, after the ostracism
of Matthews, who. are now attempt
ing to establish cast in the com
munity. It is not only in the social
circle but in our public schools.
Bastardy is trying to reign supreme
over legitimacy. Not that we are
prejudiced to the former, but when
we are confronted with the decla
ration, that bastardy would rather
be the mistress of a white man than
a colored man's lawful wife, it is
time for society to stop aud consid
er. This is the class that is now
endeavoring to rule in the socitjr of
Washington. A class ot dema
gogues. THE WEST INDIAN ABROAD
published in New York was
thought by everyone to have
been a success. It was republican
in politics and did good serviee for
L that party.
Train leaves Balto. and Poto.
Depot, 6th and B Sts., N". W.,
Tuesday night, August 3rd, 1886,
at l o'clock. Returning leaves
Richmond Va , "Wednesday night
August 11th, 1886, at 11 o'clock.
"Train stops at Alexandria and
Fredericksburg Va., both going
and returniug.
Fare For the Round Trip, 2.00
Tickets for sale at the Depot the
night of -the excursion, and can be
had at any time between now and
then from
Major C. A. Fleetwood, Major
Geo. H. Boston, Adjutant Judson
Malvin, Capt. Arthur Brooks.
FREDERICK, Md.
THURSDAY, AUG., 11th. 1886.
(o) 1 (o)
The people of Frederick, Md.,
will celebrate the Emancipation ot
the state on the above date, assist
ed by the Baltimore Rifles, the
Monumental Guard, the Baltimore
City Guard, and the Garfield Me
morial Guard of Baltimore City,
Md.; and the Butler Zouaves, Cap
ital City Guard and ourselves
from "Washington D. C, together
with local organizations and from
the adjacent county. Street pa
rade, Orations, Mu-jic, Dres3 pa
rades, Exhibition Drill, Fireworks
and various amusements.
Train leaves Balto. & Ohio de
pot, New Jersey Ave., & C Sts.,
N". W., Thursday morning August
11, 1886, at 10 o'clock. Returning
leaves Frederick, on Thursday
night, August 11, 1886, at eleven
-."
WHAT THE NEGRO O WN"S IN
TEXAS.
Out of a population of 400,000
negroes there is over 115,000 chil
dren with'n the scholastic age.
They own a stare Normal echool
,vorch 50,000 where five'hundred
students have been taught in the
last sevn years. In the state we
have thirteen negro d- cors, three
leg-slutors. one artist, several 1-iw-yt
rs and three real good colleges
"We h.iVe at least six among us
who are worth $50 000, a like
number worth $25,000, and Fcores
who have from 5,000 to 10,000.
Still we are trying to accumulate
and make ourselves known and
felt among 'other races. Baptist
THE KIND OF HUSBAND SHE
WOULD LIKE TO HAVE.
First of all to be a very good
christian, of the Baptist faith, so
ber and not afraid of work, if he
cannot get one kind try another,
to have some knowledge of books,
not a hotel waiter because they
are often out of Work for months at
a time. I would like him to belong
to some lodge that did'nt meet two
or three nights in a week. Come
home, dress nicely, and on leaving,
if I should ask where he was going,
I would not like this answer j to
the lodge my dear, when in stead
meet some other girl on the corner.
I would like him to take pleasure
in escorting me to church or to
places ot amusement, if (I wished
to go) paying calls or any where
else I cared to go, willing to rise
early winter mornings, "make the
fire, sweep up the hearth and put
the kettle on." Not given to jeal
ousy to allow myfriendB to call and
dine occasionally without fear of
being mistreated. I would not like
my husband to tell me he was
working for 18 or 20 dollars when
he wasgettiug 25, to think like the
poet u there is no place like his
Home," to be of medium height,
very light brown skin, pretty black
hair and eyes, not very stout nor
slim, aud teeth of snowy white,
very neat in person and apparel,
betweeu the ages of 25 and 32, to
have a cottage of his own, and not
take me to live with his "sisters,
his aunts or cousins," of very few
faults, lastly to be "very loyal to
his wife until death do them part."
"Anuete."
Washington, July 2 th, 1886.
sible or have responsible men at I JPreacher. Dallas, Texas.
SLANDER.
Judge : What is this suit abojit,
Mr. Plaintiff, against the editor ot
theKeutucky Scorcher? J)
Plaintiff : Slander, Judge ; vile,
low-flung slander. Iu his issue' ot
the 21st is an editorial saying that
I have only killed four men in terj
time, and questions whether such a
person is suitable to be elected.
Judge: Then you deny the charge ?
Plaintiff : Deny nothing Judge;
it's the vilest piece oi slander, and
my opponent is working it for all
its worth up in the mountains. Why
Judge, you know yourself that I've
killed more'n any four men. Tid
Bits.
o'clock.
Tickets For Round Trip 1.50.
For sale at the depot on morn
ing of the excursion.
Major O. A. Fleetwood and Adjt.
Judson Malvin, Managers.
MIooii 1 ig'lit Excur
sion!!! -SEASON OF 1886.
THE 0-RP HE0 S
GLEE CLUB To
M ARSH AL L
HALL
VIA STEAMER
-W- W. COBCOEAHI-
TIITJRSDAYErG., JULY 29.
Boat leaves wharf,, foot of 7th St., at
5:30 P. M. Returning, leaves Marshall
Hall at 10:30 P. M., arriving in Washing
ton in time for connections with the sev
eral lines of streeD cars.
MUSIC BY KRAUSE.
Tickets - - SO cts,
JligFor sale only at the boat on
the day of the excursion.
EJxcel sioif !
THE AN.WAL Picnic
To be given by the Baptist S. S.
Union at the Ancient and Pictur
esque, Vaaness Psirk,
17th & B Sts. n. w., WEDNESDAY
JULY 28th, 1886. At 4 olock 40
children will build a monument to
be dedicated to Christianity; which
will be quite interesting. Good
music will be furnished. Refresh
ments at moderate prices. Gates
open at 9 A. M.. close at 11 :30-p.
m. ADMISSION 15 Cents.
LADIES SOCIAL CIRCLE.
The Ladies Social Circle of Isra
el C. M. E. church and the Pio
neer Sabbath school association of
Hillsdale, will give an excursion to
Harper8 Ferry W. Va.. August 6th.
The train will leave the Baltimore &
Ohio R. R. depot at 8 o'clock.
Round trip, $1.25, children under
12 years 65 cts.
j. 242 t.
Take your old gold and silverto
J. P. Waddleton's and have i'r.
manufactured into any style of
iewlery you wish. All work to or
I der at shortest notice.
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