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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, April 28, 1890, Image 2

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STREET GOSSIP.
The End of the World a Good
Many Years Off.
It Will Be About the Year Four
Thousand.
A Chinese Boy Dies While Crossing
the Desert.
He Was With a Party That Was Smuggled
Into the United States From Lower
California.
The recent talk about the end of the
world in Oakland and San Francisco has
brought to the front a number of scien
tists who have theories on the sub
ject and they are apparently en
gaged in theories of their own which
they intend to make public when the
time comes. Yesterday a Herald re
porter met a French gentleman named
Pierre Durand, who is here on a visit
from his present home in San Bafael,
who said he had received a letter from
a scientist in France to the effect that
the end of the world will come for hu
manity in the year 4000. This date had
been decided upon by calculation.
The recorded facts extend over nearly
three centuries. It is found that in 1510
the average height of men in Europe was
1.75 meters, or say 5 feet 9 inches. In
1790 it was 5 feet 5 inches. In 1820 it
was 5 feet 5 inches and a fraction. At
the present time it is 5 feet 3% inches.
It is easy to deduce from these figures a
rate of regular and gradual decline in
human stature, and then to apply this,
working backward and forward, to the
past and to the future.
By this calculation it is determined
that the stature of the first man attained
the surprising average of 16 feet9inches.
Truly there were giants on the earth in
those days. The race had already de
teriorated in the days of Og, and Goliath
was quite a degenerate offspring of the
giants. Coming down to the later times
we find that at the beginning of our era
the average height of man was 9 feet,
and in the time of Charlemagne it was
8 feet 8 inches, a fact quite sufficient to
account for the heroic deeds of the pala- |
dins.
But the most astonishing result of this
scientific study comes from the applica
tion of the same inexorable law of di
minution to the future. The calcula
tion shows that by the year 4000 A. D.
the stature of the average man will be
reduced to 15 inches. At that epoch
there will be only Lilliputians on the
earth. And the conclusion of the learned
statistician is irresistable, that "the end
of the world will certainly arrive, for the
inhabitants will have become so small
that thej r will finally disappear"—"finish
by disappearing," as the French idiom
expresses it—"from the terrestrial
globe."
DIED IN THE DESERT.
The Fate of a Chinese Boy Who Tried
• to Cross.
A little mound of sand, a stick of bam
boo with a fluttering rag tied to it,marks
the desert grave of Ah Sing, as well as a
little tragedy in the workings of the
Chinese Exclusion act. Some time ago
about a hundred Chinamen were landed
at Ensenada, Lower California, intend
ing to cross the Mexican line into Cali
fornia. They divided into three parties,
one of which attempted to enter San
Diego by sea. These were captured, and
on Thursday were brought to the county
jail by Detective A. W. Marsh. Another
party went overland to Tia Juana, where
on Friday evening they were captured
while attempting to cross the bor
der. The third party made the ac
quaintance at Ensenada of an American,
a "desert man" who advised them to
partly cross the peninsula and come into
the United States in the neighborhood
of Campo, ciossing the Colorado desert
to the East of San Diego. He offered
for a consideration to guide them, and
the party started; they were two weeks
covering the distance between Ensen
ada and Temecula, all the time being on
short rations of water, as the "desert
man" proved to be very ignorant of the
location of the wells along the route.
For two entire days the wretched
coolies toiled across the blistering sands
without any water at all. Among
the party was a boy of only 14,
who, attracted by the stories of
easily gained wealth had determined to
come to this country. The heat and ex
ertion of the long marches sapped the
child's strength, and these two days of
suffering caused his death. He became
delirious and ran wildly about, trying to
drink the glittering sand; his tongue
swelled so that it protruded from his
parched mouth, and at last he fell ex
hausted, and died. His companions
covered him as best they could with
sand, and marked the grave with a rod
and a rag. This week a party of Chi
nese will go out after his bones, and
send them back to his relatives in
China.
Detective Marsh gathered these facts
from Chinese of reliability in this city.
He has tried to capture those of tne
party who reached here, but though he
is convinced that he knows who some of
them are, owing to the impossibility of
identifying them no arrests can be
made."
MIXED TYPES.
A Few Errors Noticed Recently in
the Papers.
Newspaper error, unlike history, never
repeats itself. It always springs up in
some new and totally unexpected place,
and comes with a shock of surprise and
as a revelation of new possibilities in
the line of type freaks. The newspaper
man is continually guarding against an
error of any kind, but there are occa
sions when the types get mixed in spite
of his watchfulness, and often the result
of the mixture makes time pass uneasily
for the author of the article, the editor
of the paper and the proof-reader.
Not long since the following personal
was written for a paper in Los Angeles:
"Mrs. Spring, of Minneapolis, ia occupy
ing a room at the hotel."
The next morning Mrs. Spring was
considerably alarmed when she read in
the paper: "Mrs. Spring and Mr. Na
polionis occupy a room at the
hotel." The editor had a hard time ex
plaining how it happened that after
noon.
A queer account of a lecture delivered
by a prominent speaker on scientific
subjects appeared not long since in one
of tne dailies.. The interesting portion
was as follows:
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, APRIL 28, 1890.
' 'The professor touched upon the at
tractive power of the sun and its rela
tions to the planets, and then darted off
into space after the comets and the
female captain of the Salvation Army,
who appeared in all her war toggery.
She was placed under bonds to keep the
peace, and her pursuer held to await
trial on a charge of battery and dis
orderly conduct."
Two galleys of type were mixed in
making up the paper, and this caused
the trouble that occurred between the
editor and the foreman.
The simple omission of a letter some
times gives an unsought mean
ing to a • sentence. For instance:
A somewhat florid writer in
writing about a lawyer who had been
arrested and thrown into prison, said:
"He was held in duress so vile that he
besought the turnkey to send for his
bail." The sentence appeared: "He
was held in dress so vile that he besought
the turkey to send for his mail."
The substitution of one letter for an
other often makes a sentence ridiculous.
"She was married in haste, as her hus
band desired to take the next train for
the East, and there was no time to
spare," was written for a weekly paper
a short time since. It appeared: "She
was married in paste, as her husband
desired to take the next train for the
East, and there was no time to spare."
A dramatic critic, in noticing a play
not long since, in San Francisco, intro
duced the line, "He called off his co
horts," which he said had not been ren
dered properly. It appeared in type the
next day, "He called off his corsets."
"What did he mean?" in the same arti
cle, was transposed into, "Wasn't he
mean?"
These are only a few instances that
have been noticed of late, but they go to
show that even with the greatest of care
errors will persist in creeping into the
newspapers.
CHURCH SERVICES.
TOPICS DISCUSSED BY THE MINIS
TERS YESTERDAY.
A Large Attendance at the Various Places
of Worship—Notes Gathered in Re
ligious Circles.
The churches were more than ordi
narily well attended yesterday. Owing
to the pleasant weather many were en
ticed out of doors and found their way
to the churches for the first time in
several weeks. There were no especial
attractions offered but, the subjects dis
cussed in the pulpits were all interest
ing.
At the Plymouth Congregational
church Rev. Mr. Wells preached on
"Uttering Ourselves Through Others."
Rev. Mr. Pendleton chose for his sub
jects "Disclaiming the Great Robbery"
and the "Restitution Declared."
At the First Congregational church
Rev. Robert <j. Hutchins preached on
"Benignity" in the morning and "Temp
tation" in the evening.
At the Grace M. E. church, Rev. W.
A. Knighten took for his morning topic,
"Be ye Transformed," and for the even
ing subject, "Witnesses for the Prosecu
tion."
Rev. D. V. Bowen spoke on "The Sec
ond Coming of Christ," at the First New
church, yesterday.
"A Summons to Praise" was the morn
ing subject at the First English Luth
eran church yesterday, and "The Preach
ing of the Times" the evening subject.
Rev. Daniel Read talked on "Sunday
Baseball" at the First Baptist church
yesterday evening.
At the East Los Angeles Baptist
church the morning subject of Rev. W.
\V. Tinker was "The Philosophy of Mis
sions." An illuminated song service
was given in the evening.
Mrs. P. J. Cressey and her very large
and interesting class of some eighty lit
tle ones greatly enjoyed the privilege
yesterday, of entering into the enjoy
ment of the new room just arranged for
their comfort, at the First Baptist Sun
day school. This new room is about
30x40 feet in size, has stained glass
windows, and is furnished with every
convenience and comfort, having an
organ and little chairs, bright carpet,
charts and mottoes, all at a cost of some
$400. At Dcs Moines Mrs. Cressey did
good work as a primary Sunday school
teacher, and since coming to Los An
geles has added greatly to her well
earned reputation in that direction. No
one could well have better success in in
teresting the restless little ones and
making them anxious to come again.
MR. HEINTZ'S REPLY.
He Answers Mr. Cass as to Bugs
and Sprays—He Prefers Gas.
Editors Herald —"A short horse is
soon curried." I see by yesterday's
Herald that F. O. Cass, who has been
posing as an entomologist, and claiming
to possess a half dozen different para
sites for different scales, is somewhat
"riled" at the conclusions arrived at by
the members of the Board of Supervis
ors and the experts accompanying them,
concerning his pet hobby and his pet
bugs. Not content with the four or five
investigations condemning his preda-
I cious insect as not being capable of hold-
I ing the red scale in check, he still cries,
like the boodle alderman far more. To
gratify the whims of this man the Board
of Supervisors concluded to visit the
orchard in person, and asked that Prof.
Coquillette, Alexander Craw and C. M.
Heintz accompany them. The result of
their investigations has already been
published. The concensus of opin
ion was that the parasite was
an unknown quantity — indeed,
some called it in plain English a fraud
and a humbug. The difference in orch
ards where the red scale had been kept
in check by artificial means, and where
it was left to the work of the parasite
was so striking that it was the universal
testimony of all present that until a
parasite was discovered that was capable
of holding the red scale in check, it was
imperative to eradicate the scale by
some other means. Touching the other
parasites for black scale, the San Jose
scale, the twice-stabbed lady bug, and
the lace-winged fly Mr. Cass's learned
discourse makes good reading and may
lead some to believe they are doing suffi
cient to make the use of other means
unnecessary ; but such is not the case, as
is amply evidenced by the much better
appearance of orchards that are sprayed
or "gassed" over those that are left to
nature's sweet will.
When our critic conies to personal
matters, we feel like exclaiming with
Congreve, "Ferdinand Mendez Pinto was
but a type of thee, thou liar of the
first magnitude." The report of the
trip made to the Cass orchard, and the
results thereof are substantially correct.
When Mr. Cass says the whole investiga
tion was "worked" in the interests of
spray men, he talks wild, and seems to
intimate that every man who disagrees
with him has either a wash to sell or
wants a job spraying. I have never ad
vocated spraying, believing that the new
hydrocyanic gas when properly applied
the best means for killing insect pests.
Touching Mr. Cass's visit to my office,
his particular mission seemed to be to
get my influence to have the personnel of
the Horticultural Commission changed,
and a new inspector appointed in his
district. We never talked sprays, but I
told him then and there that I had no
faith in his parasite being able to hold
the pests in check. All this trouble
about "threats," "do me (him) up,"
"make it hot for me" (him), ad nauseam
is simply drivel and built out of whole
cloth. His reference to my saying the
San Jose scale and the red "scale are
alike is so insipid and silly that I "pass
it by as the idle wind which I respect
not."
F. O. Cass and his parasite to hold red
scale under control have now been be
fore the public for some months. It has
been investigated by practical fruit
growers, by the Horticultural Commis
sion, the State Board of Horticulture,
the representative of the United States
Department of Agriculture (Division of
Entomology), the County Board of Su
pervisors, accompanied by a number of
people of much experience in lighting
insect pests, and in each and every in
stance his "bug" has been found in
capable of holding the scale in check,
and in every instance Mr. Cass has
thrown up his hands and shouted,"spray
men," to his critics. Like the guilty
wretch who is trying to escape from
justice and imagines every bush a man,
so this bug-crazy individual imagines
every bush a spray-pump. Isn't it
about time to take this man in out of
the wet? C. M. Heintz.
Los Angeles, April 28, 1890.
RAILWAY NOTES.
Various Railway Officials Passing
Through—Orange Trees Imported.
Wm. Hood, chief engineer of the
Southern Pacific, passed through the
city yesterday on his way north.
A car of Union Pacific officials passed
through the city yesterday on train No.
20 of the Southern Pacific.
J. M. Crawley, general freight agent
of the Southern Pacific in this city, says
that 150,000 new orange trees have been
imported by that road into this county
from Cuba this year. They are being
set out in various parts of the county at
the rate of 100 to the acre.
Patronize Home Industry.
Ask your grocer for Hanly'a baking powder,
it is tlie best and cheapest. ' Give it a trial.
Our Home Brew.
Philadelphia Lager, fresh from the brewery,
on draught in all the principal saloons, de
livered promptly in bottles or kegs. Office
and Brewery, 238 Aliso street. Telephone 91.
The Opera Restaurant guarantees satisfaction
to everybody. 117 South Main street.
Use "German Family" soap.
Use Siddall's Yeast Cakes.
LUMBER YARDS.
FOR SALE
AT A GREAT SACRIFICE
2000EastlakeBoors
ALL SIZES
Will be sold for the next thirty days at
45 PER CENT.
Off the book price, for cash.
Clark & Humphreys
San Pedro Street, near Seventh.
apls-lm
CLARK I HUMPHREYS
DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF
LUMBER
San Pedro Street,
NEAR SEVENTH,
P. O. Box 1235. Telephone 178.
apls-3m
PERRY, MOT T Sc COS
LUMBER YARDS
AND PLANING MILLS,
No. 76 Commercial Street. al tf
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBER CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Office: LOS ANGELES. Wholesale Yard
at SAN PEDRO.
Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda,
Azusa, Burbank. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes furnished to order.
WESTERN LUMBER CO.
YARD:
Corner Ninth and San Pedro Streets.
LIMBER of all classes can be had at this yard.
fO_tf *
J. M. Griffith, President.
H. G. Stevenson, Vice-Pres. and Treas.
T. E. Nichols, Secy. E. L. Chandler, Supt
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
And Manufacturers of
DOORS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, STAIRS,
Mill work of every description.
934 N. Alameda Street, Los Angeles.
al tf
COCKLE'S
Anti- Bilious Pills!
THE GREAT ENGLISH REMEDY.
For Liver, Bile, Indigestion, etc. Free from
mercury; contains only pure Vegetable In
gredients. Agents, LANGLEY & MICHAELS
CO., San Francisco. d2-d*w-ly
F. HAN I MAN,
Telephone 188. P. O. Box 537.
LOS ANGELES FISHING COMPANY,
Wholesale and retail dealers in
FISH, GAME AND POULTRY
All kinds of OYSTERS always on hand.
Stalls 8,11, 13,16, 18 and 20, Mott Market, Los
Angeles, Cal. aplB-6m
"Hello! HeUoI! neUolIl"
"Well; what is it?"
" How is your mother, this morning ? "
" Very much better; she had a real restful
sleep last night: she is almost rid of her night
sweats, cough and nervousness, and is grow
ing quite cheerful. How grateful we all are
to you for that bottle of medicine."
" Don't speak of gratitude. What does the
doctor say?"
"He says ho never saw so wonderful a
change in such a serious lung trouble. He
still thinks we are giving his medicines. 1
don't like to tell him."
"That's right. He's an old friend, you
know. I'm sure your mother will get well
now; but you won't forget the name ol the
medicine, will you ? "
"Never! Dr. Pierces Golden Medical Dis
covery " are household words already, and it
has come to stay. Do come and see what sun
shine it has brought already, and let us thank
you again for it.
"I will. Good bye."
Tbe foregoing is a fair representation of a
very common occurrence. "Golden Medical
Discovery" has cured severe, lingering coughs
and arrested Consumption, or Lung-Bcrofula,
in thousands of cases after doctors have failed
and other medicines have been tried and aban
doned as useless. The " Discovery "ia guar
anteed to benefit or cure in every case, if
taken in time and given a fair trial, or money
will be refunded.
DR. SAGE'S CATARRH REMEDY
cures the worst cases, no matter of now long
standing. 60 cents, by druggists.
GORDAN
BROS.
THE LEADING TAILORS
118 SOUTH SPRING STREET,
Opposite the Xadcau Hotel,
LOS ANGELES.
BRANCH OF SAN FRANCISCO.
JUST RECEIVED
OUR
Spring and Summer Stock.
WE NOW
MAKE SUITS TO ORDER
At 15 per cent, less than heretofore.
The finest and largest stock of woolens in the
city to select from.
WmT" Perfect fit and best of workmanship
guaranteed. aplS-lm
AUCTION
Tuesday Morning, April 29th, 1800,
AT 10 O'CLOCK, all the
FURNITURE, CARPETS, ETC.
Of the 27-Roomed Private Boarding House, 220
S. Hill St., Bet. Second and Third Sts.
Consisting of Parlor Suits, elegant walnut
Hall Tree, body Brussels, tapestry and ingrain
Carpets, oak, antique, Cherry anil walnut Bed
room Suits, Chetl'onieres, Wardrobes, 3 very fine
Folding Beds, Bed Lounges, oak and walnut
Chairs, Mattrasses Pillows, Blankets, Quilts,
Sheets, Pillow Slips, Lace Curtains, Window
Shades, large hotel Range, Kitchen Utensils,
6 ash Extension Tables, Silverware, Dishes,
Glassware, etc., etc.
Mrs. J. B. Cook having made up her mind to
retire from business, tlie entire goods will be
sold without reserve.
ap24-0t THOS. B. CLARK, Auctioneer.
PRICES TO SUIT THE TIMES.
No. 6 Bertha (a 5-holc) Range % 9.00
No. 7 Bertha (a 5-hole 1 Range 10.00
No. 8 Bertha (a 5-hole) Range 13.00
I am overstocked with Gasoline Stoves and am
selling them at
$4 Less Than Eastern Prices.
EVERY STOVE GUARANTEED !
A fine line of Dry Air Refrigerators at very low
prices. A full line of Medallion Ranges.
Stoves sold on the installment plan at
F. E. BROWNE'S
apl2-3m 130 S. Main St., opp. Mott Market.
M. HOPKINS & CO., \
Undertakers & Embalmers. I
OPEN DAY AND NIGHT. |
Telephone No. 209. (j
a7-tf 139 South Main Street. |
GEO. W. COOKE & CO.,
WHOLESALE
PAPER DEALERS AND BOOKBINDERS,
209 North Los Angeles Street,
LOS ANGELES, CAL. al-tf
STOCKHOLDERS' MEETING-.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT THE
annual meeting of the stockholders in the
San Luis Obispo Bituminous Rock Company will
be held at the office of the company, No. 214
North Spring street, Los Angeles City, Los An
geles County, CaL, on the 7th day of May, 1890,
at the hour of 3 p. m. of that day.
ap27-td T. E. ROWAN, Secretary.
BANKING HOUSES.
JgROABWAY BANK,
Broadway and Sixth street.
PAID DP CAPITAL ?50,000
General Banking and Exchange
Business Transacted.
H. SINSABAUGH President
GEORG SINSABAUGH Cashier
mar27-lm
BANKING HOUSES.
* MAIN STREET #
Savings Bank and Trust Co.,
426 South Main St., Los Angeles, Cal.
CAPITAL, * * * $200,000.
DEPOSITS RECEIVED FROM SI.OO CP.
FIVE PER CENT. INTEREST PAID ON DEPOSITS.
J. B. LANKERSHIM, President. CHARLES FORMAN, Vice-President
F. W. DeVAN, Cashier.
X° tober ? 8 'i 889 ' in response to a demand for a pregressive
An 8 ele »" "*»«*6Bivad over one thousand dollars per day on deposits
The design of this institution is to afford a safe depository for the earnings of all persons
who are desirous of placing their money where it will be free from accident, a idl at theTsame Urn!
be earning for them a fair rate of interest. ."»«mi»M»iim
Encouragement is thus given to the industrious and prudent, and an Inducement furnished
to those who wish to save and lay by something to begin business or build a home.
"THE STOCKHOLDERS
are composed of the following well-known citizens:
Chas. Forman. J. J. Schallert. I. W. Hellman. A. W. Scholle.
J. B. Lankershim. Pierre Nicholas. R. B. Young. A. Haas.
J.H.Jones. Geo. H. Pike. M. Weiler. S.Haas.
Wm. S. Devan. O. T. Johnson. Wm. Haas L. Winter.
Daniel Meyer. H. W. Stoll. S. C. Hubbell. H. Newmark.
I. N. Van Nuys. Mrs. Mary B. Mansfield. Kaspare Cohn. E. Germain.
A. H. Denker. G.J.Griffith. Richard Altschul. C. Gamier.
H. W. O'Melveny. Wm. G. Kerckhoff. R. Cohn. H. Wilson.
E ' Cohn - E - E - Hewitt. F. W. DeVan. Mrs. A. L.' Lankershim
mr3o-lm
THE NATIONAL BANK of CALIFORNIA,
Corner of Spring and Second Sts., Los Angeles, Cal.
CAPITAL, * * $250,000.
Is fully equipped for every kind of LEGITIMATE BANKING, and solicits the accounts o
tiiose needing a banker.
OFFICERS: BOARD OF DIRECTORS:
J. M. C. Marble President Owen H. Churchill. Thos. R. Bard.
Owen 11. Churchill Vice-President Gen'l M. H. Sherman. Dr. W. L. Graves.
W.G.Hughes Cashier < ; apt. George E. Lemon. E. F. C. Klokke.
Perry Wildman Assistant Cashier W?Ghughes
J. M. C. Marble.
SECURITY SAVINGS BANK AND TRUST
Company.
Capital $200,000
No. 148 S. Main St., Los Angeles, Cal.
F. N. Myers, S. A. Fleming,
President. Vice-President.
J. F. Sartori, Cashier.
DIRECTORS.
Isaias W. Hellman, O. W. Childs,
J. A. Graves, S. A. Fleming
T. L. Duque. James Rawson,
M. B. Shaw, A. C. Rogers, M. D„
A. J. Browne, J. F. Sartori,
Maurice Hellman, F. N. Myers.
Five Per Cent. Interest Paid on De
posits.
The notice of the public is called to the fact
that this bank only loans money on approved
real estate security; that it does not loan money
to its stockholders, officers or clerks; thatamong
its stockholders are some of the oldest and most
responsible citizens of the community; that un
der the State laws, the private estates of its
stockholders are pro rata liable for the total in
debtedness of the bank.
These facts, with care exercised in making
loans, insure a safe depository for saving ac
counts. School teachers, clerks, mechanics, em
ployees in factories and shops, laborers, etc.,
will find it convenient to make deposits in
small amounts.
Financial agents for Eastern and San Fran
cisco capital. Money to loan on ranches and
city property. Bonds and mortgages bought.
Remittances may be sent by draft or Wells-
Fargo Express. al-tf
rpHE UNIVERSITY BANK OF LOS ANGELES,
No. 119 New High street.
Capital stock paid up $100,000
Surplus 20,000
R. M. WIDNEY President
GEO. L. ARNOLD Cashier
DIRECTORS.
R. M. Widney, C. A. Warner,
D. O. Miltimore, C. M. Wells,
S. W. Little, L. J. P. Morrill,
L. H. Titus.
Eight per cent, bonds secured by first mort
gage on real estate, with interest payable semi
annually, are offered to investors o*f $250 and
upwards.
ANGELES COUNTY BANK,
Temple Block, Los Angeles, CaL
Capital Stock Paid Up, $100,000.
Reserve Fund, $100,000.
JOHN E. PLATER President
R. S. BAKER Vice-President
GEO. H. STEWART Cashier
directors:
H. L. Macneil, Jotham Bixby,
John E. Plater, Robert S. Baker,
John A. Paxton, Geo. W. Prescott,
Geo. H. Stewart.
Buy and Sell Exchange on San Francisco,
New York, London, Paris, Berlin and Frank
fort.
Buy Exchange on all parts of the United States
and Europe.
Receive Money on open account and certifi
cate of deposit, and do a general banking and
exchange business. al
TOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK,
> Cor. First and Spring streets.
Capital $500,000 00
Surplus 75,000 00
Total $575,000 00
GEO. H. BONEBRAKE President
JOHN BRYSON, SR Vice-President
J < HOWES Cashto
E. W. COE Assistant Cashier
DIRECTORS.
Dr. W. G. Cochran, If. H. Markham,
Perry M. Green, John Bryson, Sr.,
Dr. H. Sinsabaugh, F. C. Howes,
George H. Bonebrake. Warren Gillelen.
Exchange for sale on all the principal cities
of the United States and Europe. j8
JjMRST NATIONAL BANK OF LOS ANGELES.
CAPITAL STOCK $200,000
RESERVE $205)000
UNITED STATES DEPOSITORY.
E. F. SPENCE President
J. D. BICKNELL Vice-President
J.M.ELLIOTT Cashier
G. B. SHAFFER Assistant Cashier
Directors—E. F. Spence, J. D. Bicknell, S. H.
Mott, Wm. Lacy, J. F. Crank, H. Mabury, J. M.
Elliott. al
\J 03 ANGELES SAVINGS BANK,
130 North Main street.
Capital $100,000
L. C. GOODWIN President
W. M. CASWELL Secretary
DIRECTORS.
I. W. Hellmßn, John E. Plater
Robert S. Baker, J. B. Lankershim,
L. C. Goodwin.
Term deposits will be received in sums of
$100 and over. Ordinary deposits in sums of
$10 and over.
Money to loan on first-class real estate.
Los Angeles.'July 1, 1889. a 1-tf
State Loan and Trust Co.
Subscribed Capital 51,000,000.
Capital I»aid Up 8450,000.
BANKING ROOM, N. W. CORNER SPRING
AND SECOND STREETS, BRYSON
BONEBRAKE BLOCK.
DIRECTORS.
GEORGE H. BONEBRAKE, President.
JOHN BRYSON, SR. ( ~,„ „ ~ ,
E. F. SPENCE. j Vice-Presidents.
SAMUEL B. HUNT, Cashier.
W. G. Cochran. P. M. Green.
W. H. Perry. j. F. Towell.
H. J. Woollacott. L. N. Breed.
We act as trustees for corporations and estates.
Loan money on first-class real estate and
collaterals. Keep choice securities for sale.
Pay interest on savings deposits. Five per
cent, paid on time deposits. Safe deposit boxes
for rent. Best lire insurance companies
represented. mar!9-tf
AND MERCHANTS BANK OF
LOS ANGELEB, CAL.
Isaias W. Hellman President
b °:, G ° eDWtN Vice-President
H. W. Hellman Second Vice-President
John Milner Cashier
H. J. Fleishman Assistant' Cashier
Capital (paid up) $500,000
Surplus and Reserve Fund 800,000
Total $1,300,000
DIRECTORS.
O. W. Childs, C. E. Thorn, Jose Mascarel, J. B.
Lankershim, C. Ducommun, Philippe Gamier,
L. C. Goodwin, L. L. Bradbury, Isaias W. Hell
man, H. W. Hellman.
STOCKHOLDERS.
O. W. Childs, L. L. Bradbury, Philippe Gam
ier, James B. Lankershim, T. L. Duque, Jose
Mascarel, Charles Ducommun, Andrew Glassell,
Cameron E. Thorn, Domingo Amestoy, Louis
Polaski, L. 0. Goodwin, Prestley C. Baker,
Frank Lecouvreur, Oliver H. Bliss, Sarah J. Lee
Estate D. Solomon, Chris. Henne, Jacob Kuhrts.
Isaias W. Hellman, H. W. Hellman. al
rpHE NEVADA BANK OF SAN FRANCISCO.
CAPITAL PAID UP $3,000,000
Agency in New York 62 Wall street
Agency at.., Virginia, Nev.
London Bankers, Union Bank of London.
Limited.
Letters of Credit Issued, Available in All Parts
of the World.
ISAIAS w. HELLMAN™ President
WWIIMSBS" Vice-PrSiS
rpn n» Y3BP o*Cashier0*Cashier
GEO. GRANT Assistant Cashier
DIRECTORS.
John W. Mackay, James L. Flood,
Lewis Gkrstle, Isaias W. Hellman,
Henry F. Allen, c. De Guigne,
Robert Watt, - Levi Strauss,
D. N, Walter, H. L. Dodge,
apB-lm John F. Bigelow.
gOUTIIERN CALIFORNIA NATIONAL BANK
NADEAU BLOCK.
L. N. BREED President
WM F BOSBYSHELL Vice President
C. N. FLINT Cashier
Paid-in Capital $200,000
Surplus 20,000
Authorized Capital 500,000
Directors—L. N. Breed, H. T. Newell, H A
Barclay, Charles E. Day, A. W. Richards, E C
Bosbyshell, M. Ilagan, Frank Kader, D. Remick,
Thos. Go.ss, William F. Bosbyshell.
altf
THE CITY BANK,
37 South Spring street.
Capital Stock $300,000
A. D. CHILDRESS President
JOHNS. PARK Cashier
directors.
W. T. Childress, Poindexter Dunn,
J. J. Schallert, E. E. Crandall,
John S. Park, R. G. L >nt,
A. D. Childress.
General banking. Fire and burglar proof safe
deposit boxes rented at from $3 to $20 per an
num. a 4 12m
QALIFORNIA BANK,
Cor. Broadway and Second Sts., Los Angeles.
Subscribed Capital $500 000
Paid up Capital $30o|oQO
Surplus $ 20,000
directors:
Hervey Lindley, J. C. Kays, E. W. Jones,
G. W. Huges, Sam. Lewis.
H. C. Witmer President
J. Frankentield Vice-President
T. J. Weldon, Cashier.
J. M. Witmer, Assistant Cashier.
General am i Exel.umv: business,
transacted. a 4 im

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