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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, April 28, 1890, Image 5

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LOCAL MELANGE.
The Game of Ball at the Park
Yesterday.
The Home Team Again Defeats
the Visitors.
Description of the Various Events of
the Contest.
Sunday Travel Out of the City—People
Beginning to Seek Recreation by
the Seaside.
The ball game at the Athletic park
yesterday afternoon was a very one
sided affair, the San Jacintos being
beaten by the reorganized Los Angeles
team to the extent of twelve runs to
nil. There was a very fair attendance,
but the visitors were so completely over
whelmed by the splendid pitching of
Pier, who retired sixteen of their men
and did not send a single man to his
base on balls, that the game ceased to
be interesting at a very early stage.
Only one clean hit was made upon his
delivery, and he was ably assisted by
Catcher Meneffee, who soon showed the
San Jacintos the futility of attempting
to steal bases, and the rest of the team
backed both of them up in excellent
fchape.
Game was called at o'clock, with
ttiv Sim Jacintos in the field, Leonard
and Widner constituting their battery,
as on the previous day. The home team
smashed the ball over the field, Pier,
Ward, Woolley and Brown being cred
ited with two-baggers, and the other
five all making singles.
Brittain opened up the first innings
by planting the sphere between Bridges s
legs, and the San Jacinto players man
aged to make a series of errors with it in
getting it back, until he had made the
circuit in safety. Ward, Meneffee and
Brown did not make much of a stand,
but were retired in short order.
For the visitors, Kreis and Leonard
made strenuous efforts to reach first base,
but failed ignominiously. McCoy man
aged to place the ball past Pier for a
single, the return being too hot for the
nimble pitcher to handle, but before he
bad advanced Widner was struck out,
and the score stood 1 to 0.
The second innings was unproliflc for
both sides, the rival teams playing their
best to shut each other out.
In the third, Ross failed to reach first
base, but Sherrott hit a slow single to
Bridges, stole to second base, and reach
ing third on McKenzie's refusal to accept
a high fly from Brittain's bat, scored on
Ward's sacritice. Meneffee going out on
a fly to Kreis, and the visitors retiring
in short order, the innings closed 2 to 0
in favor of Los Angeles.
Leonard's arm showed signs of weari
ness in the fourth innings and although
he put the ball over the plate, the An
gelenos biffed him all over the field.
Brown trundled a hot grounder to
Mellor who, throwing wildly to first
base, allowed the striker to reach sec
ond. Woolley smashed a two-bagger to
right field and brought Brown home,
following suit on Youngworth's single
to left field. Pier joined the procession
by planting a scorcher past Leonard, on
which Youngworth scored, and came in
himself on Boss's drive to right field and
Brittain's return to Leonard. Sherrott
failed to make connections at first, but
little Ward opened Leonard's eyes by
biffing him for a two-bagger and bring
ing both Ross and Brittain in. Men
effee trundled a slow one to short left
field for a single, and botli he and Ward
advanced a base on a passed ball. Then
Brown lined out a beauty on which both
scored. Woolley made a single, but
both he and Brown under-estimated the
throwing powers of Catcher Widner and
were put out at second base. The San
Jacintos went out in one, two, three
order and the innings closed with the
score 10 to 0, in favor of the Angelefios.
Both teams were shut out in double
quick time in the fifth and sixth innings.
Sherrott made a sensational catch in the
latter, running backwards at right field
and gathering in a high fly from Kerr's
bat with one hand.
In their seventh the home team again
tallied. Brown flew to Bridges, but
Woolley's chance to McCoy was unac
cepted. He did not live long, however,
as he was caught napping at first.
Youngworth hit a single, stole to second
and scored on Pier's two-bagger. Ross
reached first on an error, but was re
tired soon afterwards. Another shut-out
for the visitors; score, 11 to 0.
Neither team tallied in the eighth, but
in the ninth Brown placed the ball in
front of Mellor, who threw so wildly to
first that the striker was on third base
before it was in play again. Woolley
flew out to center field, but Brown scored
on Youngworth's hit to right field. Pier
and McCoy went out on flies, and the
visitors being once more shut out in
speedy order, the game closed as above
stated" witli the score 12 to 0.
LOS ANGELES.
AB. R. BH. TO. A. E.
Brittain, 3b 5 2 2 2 1 0
Ward, s. 8 5 1110 1
Meneffee. c 5 1 1 11 5 0
Brown, 2b 4 2 2 O 2 2
Moody, cf 4 11100
Youngworth, lb 5 2 3 11 O 1
Pier, p 5 1 3 0 2 0
Koss, If 5 1 1 0 0 0
Sherrott, rf 4 1110 0
Totals 42 12 15 27 10 4
SAN JACINTO.
AB. R. BH. TO. A. E.
Kreis, s. s 4 0 0 5 0 0
Leonard, p . 4 0 110 1
c. McCoy, lb 4 0 0 0 1 1
Widner, c 4 0 0 3 1 1
Mellor, 3b 4 0 0 1 0 3
Bridges, 2b 3 0 0 4 1 2
G. McCov, If 3 0 0 3 0 1
McKcnzie, ef 3 0 0 1 0 0
Ken-, rf 3 0 0 0 0 1
Totals .32 0 1 27 9 10
Earned runs—Los Angeles, 7.
Two-base hits—Pier, 2; Ward, Woolley, Brown.
Stolen bases—Los Angeles, 0; San Jacinto, 2.
Struck out—By Pier, 10; Leonard, 3.
Wild pitches—Leonard.
Umpire—Ramsey.
Scorer—Russell.
Time of game, 1 h. 35 m.
SCORE BY INNINGS.
123450789
Los Angeles 1 0 1 8 0 0 1 0 1-12
San Jacinto 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 o—o
SUNDAY TRAVEL.
The Summer Season About to
Begin.
The summer Sunday travel to the sea
ib about to commence and in the course
of a few weeks the trains running to
Santa Monica, San Pedro and Long
Beach will be crowded. Already a num
ber of residents are beginning to talk of
going to the seashore or of trips to the
mountains, and vacations are being
planned in all quarters. Yesterday the
travel 'Wa.s rcainly to Santa Monica
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: MONDAY MORNING, APRIL 28, 1890.
and Redondo Beach, and at
both places quite a crowd of bath
ers took advantage of the pleasant
weather and went into the water. There
was also quite a large travel to the Sev
enth-street park, which promises to be
come a favorite resort when it is prop
erly arranged and a few trees grown
around the lake.
Pasadena travel was also large yester
day, and not a few went to Alhambra
and vicinity. The excursion to Catalina
on Saturday took quite a number of peo
ple out for a day's vacation, and as
weekly trips are to be made after the Ist,
the island will soon be largely
inhabited. Altogether, the summer
season promises to be very lively.
USES OF PAPER.
How Modern Science Works Up This
Convenient Article.
The Boston Transcript states that
"paper is now made to serve for steel
and iron. When strong liber is used it
can be made into a substance so hard
that it can scarcely be scratched. Rail
road car-wheels are made of it more
durable than iron. A store in Atlanta,
Ga., has been built entirely of paper.
The rafters, weather-boards, roof and
flooring are all made of thick compressed
paper boards, impervious to water. On
account of the surface of tbe paper
being smooth and hard it cannot catch
on lire as easily as a wooden building.
It is found warm in cold and cool in hot
weather. The Breslau fireproof chimney
has demonstrated that cooking and heat
ing stoves, bath-tubs and pots, when
annealed by a process that renders it
fireproof, become more lasting than iron
and will not burn out. Cracks in floors
around the skirting-board, or other parts
of a room, may be neatly filled by
thoroughly soaking newspaper into
a paste as thick as putty and
forced into _ the cracks with a
paste-knife, itwill soon harden and can
be painted. Black wrthmt frames are
made of paper and so colored that no
one can tell thfem from the original
wood. A paper piano has lately been
exhibited in Paris. Tbe entire case is
made of compressed paper, to which is
given a hard surface —a cream-white
brilliant polish. The legs and sides are
ornamented with arabesques and floral
designs. The exterior, and as much of
the interior as can be seen when the
instrument is open, are covered with
wreaths and medallions painted in min
iature. An Italian monk has succeeded
in constructing an organ where the
pipes are made of paper pulp. It has
1,400 pipes of various sizes. The Ameri
can Cottonseed fSI trust is now con
struting a mill for making paper from
the hulls remaining after all the oil has
been squeezed out of the cottonseed.
They are contemplating the erection of
a 100-ton mill for the same purpose.
These hulls have heretofore been con
sidered worthless. It has so far proved
so successful that the trust pro
poses erecting mills at different
points in the cotton-raising country.
Of course this will somewhat
revolutionize the paper trade. A new
mill for the manufacture of paper from
moss has been recently established in
Sweden. Paper of different thickness ,
and pasteboard made of it have already
been shown, the latter even in sheets
three-quarters of an inch thick. It is as
bard as wood, and can be easily painted
and polished. It has all the good quali
ties, but none of the defects, of wood.
The pasteboard can be used for door and
window frames, architectural ornaments
and all kinds of ornaments. The ceiling
of the Assembly chamber at Albany, N.
V., is made of papier-mache. It is a
model of its kind, and appears so like
marble as to deceive the most expert
eye. The latest idea is to use paper in
stead of wood for lead pencils, by using
a patent preparation by which it can be
cut as easily as the softest wood."
ROYAL LUNATICS.
Princes and Princesses Confined in the
Gratz Private Asylum.
The Gratz private asylum will soon
deserve the name of "Rendezvous dcs
Princes et dcs Princesses," says Mrs.
Crawford in the London Truth. Poor
Prince Pedro of Saxe-Coburg has just
been sent there from Cannes. His mania
was the fear of poison. He thought the
Republicans and the D'Eudists were
equally anxious to cut him off. Prince
Charles of Lichtenstein will meet him
probably in a few days.
The Duehesse d'Alencon was at this
asylum, of which, I hear, Adelaide of
Hohenlohe, Duchess of Augustenburg,
is still an inmate. She went out of her
mind through brooding over her disap
pointments, which have remained ever
present to her mind. One was the
failure of her husband to obtain the
Danish duchies; another was the mar
riage of her wealthy uncle, Frederick,
the only rich member of the family, to
Mary Lee, and the third was having
missed the imperial crown of France.
She does not realize the compensa
tions, one of which is the rise of her
daughter Augusta to the imperial Ger
man throne, and the other the match
between his sister-in-law, Caroline Ma
tilda, and the wealthiest of the Hohen
zoilerns, Prince Frederick Leopold,
brother to the Duchess of Connaught.
Princess Amelia of Bavaria, nee Borbon
y Borbon, is also at this "Rendezvous
dcs Princes et de Princesses."
Prince Charles Lichtenstein was driven
out of his mind by disappointment in
never meeting in real life the women
that he dreamt of. He was not exactly
a Lovelace, but he had a passion for
white blackbirds, and sought for them
industriously among black blackbirds,
who plucked him unmercifully.
The Klse of Kiley.
Every irow and then I encounter
James Whitcomb Riley, the Hoosier
poet. He is of medium height, but
strong and stockily built. What is
usually called a sandy complexion be
longs to him. From his appearance be
would be taken for a farmer, a railroad
man or anything excepting a poet. He
is a highly nervous organization, and
seems to find a deep pleasure in constant
travel. Riley is a good illustration
of the hard times that literary people
undergo. He was a clever writer and
versifier for many years, but did not
make any great hit until a few years
ago, when his composition, "When the
Frost is on the Pumpkin," took a firm
hold on the popular heart. Before that
time he experienced trouble in selling
his short poems at such ridiculous prices
as $3 and $4 each. Now he commands
from $25 to $50 for the same work, and
is unable to supply the demand. More
notable still, he can sell pieces to pub
lishers as a favor that were refused by
them before he attained his present
position.—[New York Star.
Equivalent Terms.
Whipper—Have you noticed how much
a great many Italians look like Irish
men ?
Hnapwr—Vps: they areerettinp Amer
j i< anized.—[Puck.
| Use SiddaiTs Yeast Cakes.
MY LOVE HAS GONE AWAY,
I used to love the forest green,
Each shady nook and dell,
Where birds were twittering overhead,
Intent their love to tell;
But now it is a haunted spot,
Where I no longer stray.
For every thing reminds me that
My love has gone away.
I used to linger on the beach
To hear old ocean's roar.
And watch the summer tides come in
And dash along the shore;
But now I cannot bear to hear
The dirge the billows play,
For they have lost their charm, because
My love has gone away.
The country lane was, I confess,
Unless the arm was round my waist
And thus we wandered through;
But now it is a noxious place,«
Where not asingle ray
Of light appears, and art because
My love lias gone away.
The universe is dark and dull;
Around, above, below,
There is nothing quite so beautiful
As 'twas awhile ago;
The birds no longer sing so sweet,
Tin' skies are cold and gray,
And nature mourns with me, because
My love has gone away.
—Josephine Pollard, in N. Y. Ledger.
The Worklngtnan and His Beer.
There is no show for an ordinary cus
tomer at any beer saloon near a railroad
yard or a large factory in this city at the
noon hour. Five minutes after noon
there is a rank two deep of men with tin
pails lined up before the bar in every
such saloon, and likely enough a tail of
men reaching out of the door and into
the street waiting their turn. The
foreign element in the working class al
most unanimously demands its beer
with its lunch.—[New York Sun.
A lair trial of Hood's Sarsaparilla for scrofula,
salt rheum or any affection caused by impure
blood or low state of the system,will be sufficient
to convince any one of the superior and peculiar
curative powers of this medicine. Buy it of
your druggist. 100 Doses One Dollar,
WHY WILL YOU cough when Shiloh's Cure
will give immediate relief. Price 10 cents, 50
cents and If 1. For sale by U. F. Heinzeman, 122
North Main street.
THAT HACKING COUGH can be so quickly
cured by Shiloh's Cure. We guarantee it. For
sale by C. P. Helnzeman, 122 North Main street.
When Baby was sick, we cive Castoria,
When she nos a Child, she cried for Castoria,
When she became Miss, she clung to Castoria,
When she bad Children, she gave tuem Castoria.
WANTED—AGENTS.
SALESMEN WANTED AT ONI :E—A FEW
good men to sell our poods l.v sample to the
wholesale and retail trade; we are the largest
manufacturers in our line; liberal salary paid;
permanent position; money advanced for wages,
advertising, etc. For terms address CENTEN
NIAL M'FG CO., Chicago, 111.
nmrll-t tA-s-:t(lt
How Lost! How Regained,
THE SCIENCE OF LIFE
A Scientific and Standard Popular Medical Treatise
on the Errors of Youth, Premature Decline, Nervous
and Physical Debility, Impurities of the Blood.
Resulting from Folly, Vice, Ignorance, Excesses or
Overtaxation, Enervating and unfitting the .victim
for Work, Business, the Married or Social Relation.
Avoid unskillful pretenders. Possess this great
work. It contains S>o 'pages, royal Svo. Beautiful
binding, embossed, full gilt. Trice only $1.00 by
mail, postpaid, concealed in plain wrapper. Illus
trative Prospectus Free, if you apply now. The
distinsruishcil author, Wm. H. Parker, M. D., re
ceived the GOLD AND JEWELLED MEDAL
from the National Medical Association for
this PRIZE ESSAY on NERVOUS and
PHYSICAL DKBILIT V.Dr. Parker and acorps
of Assistant Physicians may be consulted, confi
dentially, by mail or in person, at the office of
THE PEABODY MEDICAL INSTITUTE,
No. 4 Bulnnch St., Boston. Mums., to whom ah
orders for books or letters for advice should be
directed as above.
Warranted Purely Vegetable.
This wonderful remedy never fails to
jure Diabetes, Bright's Disease, Inflam
mation of Kidneys and Bladder, Catarrh
of Stomach and Bladder, Pains in the
Small of Back, and all diseases these or
gans are heir to. For Leucorrhcea, Sup
pressed menses attended by excessive
pains, and all female complaints, this
valuable remedy has has no equal.
Price $1; 6 for $5. For sale by all
drmggists.
TAKE NO OTHER.
F. W. BRAUN & CO., Wholesale Agents,
ocls-eod-6m LOS ANGELES.
WEAK isS^^
<rtJ -f^" 1 "' nervous debility,
An*alL\QE LOSTVICOR,
-V* PREMATURE DECLINE,
l'lllll Mill * I Kidney nnd Bladder ditllcul
r ff»n El I ties, can find perfect health and vigot
■II Wl IMII without stomach medication. Seat
W 1 lIUIIM scaled free on application.
MARSION REMEDY CO., 19 Park PUOE. Hey YoR".
BOOKS ON
4 BCHITECTVRE!
BUILDING!
JPAINTTtm !
Decorating, etc. My 100-pagt- Illustrated
Catalogue s«m free. Address: WM. T.
COMSTOCK, «3 Warren .St., New York.
Mar2S-sa-8l
the coulter dry goods house*
THE COULTER
DRY GOODS HOUSE
AT
Ladies' All Pure Silk Vests, in &* A f\f\ Ladies'all pure silk Vests, in fine
fine colors; worth $1.50 each. J\ I MM colors; worth If 1.50 each.
Each
AT
1,000 yards Victoria Lawn Goods; (~\ _ 1,000 yards Victoria Lawn, good
value 12' aC per yard. Q value at i2!;;c a yard.
A YARD
AT
Ladies' Black Pure Lisle Thread T „,..„ t,, ,„, r . , m .
Hose, extra length and finish; % w L ' S '°, W
worth 05e per pair. SJSfi 1(18,h and fin,sh ;
r 1 worth 05c per pair.
Per Pair
00 dozen Brown and White and Al 00 dozen Brown and White and
Blue and White Shaw Knit r—r Blue and White Shaw Knit
Grangers' Cotton One-half Hose, / tp> Grangers' Cotton One-half Hose
extra heavy and knit tops; worth * w extra length and knit tops- worth
10c per pair. Per Palr 10c per pair.
Carpenters' Laced Back Sus- AT Carpenters' Laced Back Sus
penders, will give to every motion « penders, will give to every motion
of body and will not slip trom )p of the body and will not slin from
shoulders; have been sold at 75c the shoulders; have been sold at 75e
Per pair. Per Pair P er P alr -
Ladies' Egyptian Yarn-Vests, all QU p Ladies' Egyptain Yarn Vests, all
cotton, superior finish, have been '' J V-/ cotton, superior finish-have been
sold by us at each. sold by us at 12j$c each.
Each
Ladies' 5-button length Silk Z^CIC 3 Ladies' 5-button length Silk
Taffeta Gloves, in black and colors; *-— 1 Taffeta Gloves, in black and colors
worth 35c each. worth 35c each,
• Per Pair
Ladies' plaid and stripe White T Rf> Ladies' plaid and stripe White
Dress (ioods; good values at 20c A.HJ\J Dress(ioods; good value at 20c and
and 25c a yard. 25c a yard.
A Yard
Gents' Jeans Pants, manufactured ft* A \~f\ Gents' Jeans Pants.manufactured
by us of pure Kentucky jeans, IS I J"M I by us of genuine Kentucky jeans
with best ot trimmings and worth V 1 with best of trimmings; have been
$2 each. sold at |2 each.
Per Pair
AT
10 dozen all pure sewing silk i—> 10 dozen all pure sewing silk
5-button length Gloves, thread very Moves, 5-button length, very soft
soft and lustrous; worth 40e a pair. * —l — and lustrous; worth 40e per p"air.
Per Pair
Ladies' plaid and stripe White 1 ( jC* Ladies' plaid and stripe White
Dress (ioods; worth from 12J a c to V>» w Dress Goods: worth 12';, c to 15c
15c per yard. per yard.
A Yard
Gents' white merino Shirts and Gents' white merino Shirts and
an n sizes Pants; worth »1 to $1.35 per suit
A Suit
tm mm to DRY GOODS H ° usE
1 JlJl Ul/UL 1 JjH 20I,203,205S.Stiri.gSt,ear.Se e i»i
JOE BAYER. & (o.
Wholesale and Retail
Wine - and - Liquor - Merchants
29 NORTH MAIN ST. 4* TELEPHONE 38.
a(i-tf
(J*. $7.00 FOR $3.50
Vj£^7 > ' J/B A Ja* /J /j _ Makes his elegant and finest finished $7.00
„ £ 3/ _/ % / C// photos for:f:i. 50 per dozen. We make a specialty
-: __ v y of BABIES' and CHILDREN'S PICTURES; also
«m*ll_\\\fM_______ t or family groups. We solicit comparison with
' mMm **»***^' higher price works, and guarantee ours as good
as any $7.00 Cabinets made in the State.
Developing, printing and finishing for amateurs; also amateurs' supplies at Eastern prices
See our work and compare our prices.
marB-3m Old No. 41, New No. 147 South Main St., Los Angeles, Cal.
New Mexico Coal Co.
MINERS OF
GALLUP, SUNSHINE AND CERRILLOS
G O -A.
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
The Best Domestic Coal in the Market
Also Wellington, South Field Wellington
Greta and Wallsend Coal,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
CHARCOAL AND WOOD IN STOCK.
CHAS. A. MARRINER, General Manager.
city office: yard:
Hotel Nadeau. Cor. E. First St. & Santa Fe Ate.
TELEPHONE 855. mrll-Gm
RAMONA!
The Gem of the San Gabriel Valley.
ONLY THREE MILES FROM THE CITY
LIMITS OF LOS ANGELES.
Property of the San Gabriel Wine Company.
Original Owners.
LOCATED AT SHORB'S STATION,
On line of S. P. B. R. and San Gabriel
Valley Rapid Trausit R. R.,
From 10 t» 15 minutes to the Plaza, Los An
geles City.
CHEAPEST SUBURBAN TOWN LOTS,
VILLA SITES, or
ACREAGE PROPERTY.
POPULAR TERMS.
PUREST SPRING WATER..
Inexhaustible quantities guaranteed.
Apply at offlce of
San Gabriel Wine Company,
Ramona Los Angeles Co., CaL,
m7-ti Or to J. M. TIEKNAN, Ramona,
FOR RENT
At Redondo Beach.
A STORE, 40X20 FEET,
NEWLY FITTED UP.
Also Six Rooms and Balcony
Over Store.
Store suitable for family residence or lodgings
situated on sea front, midway between the
wharf and bath-house, opposite California
Southern railroad depot. Also on same lot
A Villa of Ten Rooms,
And cellar, hard finished, flues in each room.
Apply to
P. J. SOLAN,
ap2l-7t On the Premises.
* l!i 1 I s
a lis §' S ° f^s
5 2 c 55» o —} A •
6to D-fr 1 ° "n § ' a
a c/i »o | „ Oj go f\y j»
* S la? n VI
h ? wi y-* v«
5 O
jROQUOIS * *
-H ATTENTION !
Nominations for offleers of the Iroquois Club,
for the ensuing year, will be asked for at the
next meeting, Tuesday, April 29th. The officers
to be nominated are:
President,
First Vice-President,
Second Vice-President,
Secretary,
Financial Secretary,
Treasurer, and
Nine Members of the Board of Trustees.
A. F. MACKKY, President.
A. C. Clarke. Secretary. ap24-6t
OPTICIANS AND JEWELERS.
THE LOS ANGELES OPTICAL INSTITUTE.
N. STRASSBTJRGER,
Scientific and Practical Optician. Strictly Re
liable.
209 N. MAIN STREET,
Opposite New U. S. Hotel.
Testing of eyes FREE by the latest improved
methods. Physicians' prescriptions and maU
orders carefully filled. Artificial eyes inserted
without pain. sTjßf-Grinding lenses to order
on premises a specialty. fl4 tf
WAREHOUSES.
Naud's Warehouse.
GRAIN, WOOL,
—AND—
General Merchandise Warehouse.
ADVANCES MADE ON WOOL. al2-tf
CALIFORNIA WAREHOUSE,
Corner Seventh and Alameda.
Grain, Wool and General Merchandise
Warehouse.
Storage, Commission and Insurance.
marl4-tf
MISCELLANEOUS.
CAUTION jfeja^figyaaj
UAa %J A lUil price are stamped on the
bottom. If the dealer cannot supply you.
send direct to f^rtory encloses advertised
W. L. DOUGLAS
$3 SHOE GENTLEMEN.
Fine Calf, Heavy Laced Grain and Creed
moor Waterproof.
Best in tho world. Examine his_ _
85.00 GENUINE HAND-SEWED SHOD.
§4.00 HAND-SEWED WELT SHOE.
«3.r.0 POLICE AND FARMERS' SHOE.
•2.ffo EXTRA VALUE CALF SHOE.
$2.25 & S2 WORKINGMEN'S SHOES.
•2.00 and «1.75 BOYS' SCHOOL SHOES.
All made In Congress, Button and Lace.
$3&52 SHOES LAifiis.
•1.75 SHOE FOR MISSES.
Best Material. Best Style. Best Fitting.
W. L. Douglas, Brockton. Mass. Sold It
MASSACHUSETS
Boot # Shoe House,
Sole Agents for Los Angeles,
| fel-5m 129 WEST FIRST ST. .
m 2L LIHsUHH m
7*3 Be?-'" i *_\\__ 5
t — 1 s° wmW'- ■'■ 'M'<-H 53
» » HHM a
co ISfe'l ?
„ m > o WSmh rZEH
►rj oo g 3 HffiE^^'KA|
°* m R^^l
§ § * m&m
L -1- w -• ■r''Pv > M
>>. M» CD IIMI
o II g 3 ii
*s r w HEoi
<~> r - REl^ll
~ Blfff 61
il st' ll '
RE-OPENING
—OF—
THE COMMERCIAL RESTAURANT
DOWNEY BLOCK.
Antonio Perpich, the well-known caterer, of
twenty years experience in Los Angeles, hereby
informs his many friends and the public in
general, that he will, on
Saturday, April 26th, at 6 a. m.,
Reopen this popular first-class restaurant,
haying had it thoroughly renovated. Excel
lency of viands and wines, good cooking, care
ful service and modes of prices guaranteed.
Private rooms. Wedding dinners a specialty.
All the delicacies of the season on the daily bill
of fare.
ap2o-lm ANTONIO PERPICH, Proprietor.
Ela Hill Stock Farm
H. M. JOHNSTON'S STABLE,
Corner Downey Avenue and Alta Street
East Los Angeles.
The following well-known horses will make
the season of 1890:
DASHWOOD — By Legal Tender; dam by
Volunteer.
LARCO —By A. W. Richmond; dam by
Overland.
FOSTER—A grandson of The Moor; dam by
Overland.
IDLER—By A. W. Richmond; dam by Ben.
Lippincott, by Belmont.
PASTURE «3.00 PER MONTH.
£t\T~ ALL MAKES AT OWNER'S RISK.
JOSEPH KOMEKO, MANAGES,
Downey-Avenue and Alta Street, all-lm
EXCELSIOR
CARPET CLEANING CO.
NEW MACHINERY.
EXF>EIiII VCEI) WORKMEN.
SATIS!' >N C AB . NTKKD.
Fourth and Broadway, Telephone 576.
5

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