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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, August 26, 1890, Image 4

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DAILY HERALD.
PUBLISHED—
SEVEN DAYS A WEEK.
JOSEPH D. LYNCH. JAMES J. AVERS.
AVERS & LYNCH. - PUBLISHERS.
■ntered at the postoffice at Los Angeles as
second-class matter. ]
DELIVERED BY CARRIERS
mJt *9c Per Week, or 80c. Per Month.
TERMS BY MAIL, INCLUDING POSTAGE:
Daily Hebald, one year *f ?9
Daily Herald, six months 4-25
Daily Herald, three months 2.25
Weekly Herald, one year 2.00
Weekly Herald, six months LOW
Weekly Herald, three months ho
Illustrated Herald, per copy 16
Notice to Mail Subscribers.
*he papers of all delinquent mall subscribers
to the Los Angeles Daily Herald will ba
promptly discontinued hereafter. No papers
wUI be sent to subscribers by mail unless the
same have been paid for in advance. This rule
Is lnneKible. AVERS & LYNCH.
The "Dally Herald"
May be found in San Francisco at the Palace
hotel news-stand; in Chicago at the Postoffice
wews-stasd, 103 East Adams street; in Denver
at Smith & Sons' news-stand, Fifteenth and
Lawrence streets.
Office of Publication, 223-225 West Second
street. Telephone 156.
TUKSDAT, AUGUST S6, 1890.
The Herald in the Country.
Persons leaving the city for the sum
mer may have The Herald sent by mail
to any postoffice address by leaving orders
at the office. Those at the seaside can
have their papers delivered by special
horse carrier, thus receiving it much
earlier than if ordered through the mail.
Leave your orders and addresses with
the local agents:
B. W. Saunders, Santa Monica.
N. O. Anderson, San Pedro.
E. J. Pratt, Long Beach.
S. B. Hall, Redondo Beach.
Hunt <& Hargitt, Avalon, Cata
lina Island.
A LAUGHABLE GAME-THE FACTS.
There has probably never been a more
favorable development in the polities
of California than the attempt to refer
the nomination oi Mayor Pond to the
preference of Buckley. It is a part of
that artificial politics to which we refer
red to yesterday. As a matter of fact,
the advocates of this notion attempt to
ride two horses. The first say that Buck
ley is not in politics for bis health, and
they apparently forget that no one jjjhaa
said at any stage of the contest that Mr.
Pond has exhibited anything like a sack.
That awful contrivance was located else
where.
If Mr. Buckley has not been in politics
for his health, it looks very much as if
he might have been supposed to have
had a casual acquaintance with at least
one of the candidates who is said to be
altogether without means, and whose
many winning qualities would doubt
leßS have made him hosts of friends
without such gross incitations to cordial
ity as are involved in "rascal counters."
That Mr. Coleman received the support
of Mr. Buckley at the opening of the con
vention, no man who cares to respect his
own intelligence can doubt. There is
also little doubt that the Hon. William
D. English would have come next in the
order of the Boss's preference if the dem
onstrations of the country delegntes had
been less emphatic.
In considering the action of the San
Francisco delegation, the fact ought not
to be forgotten that Mr. Pond started in
the delegation from his own city with a
small but compact and highly respect
able support. He figured in the first
ballot with twenty-two votes. By some
strategy this was reduced to twenty
votes on the second ballot. Probably no
incident within the bounds of imagina
tion could have lowered Mr. Pond's vote
below that figure. On the third ballot
Mr. Coleman attained his greatest
strength in the vote of the San Fran
cisco delegation and in the convention.
On that ballott Coleman had 90, Pond
34 and English 19. As the total vote of
the San Francisco delegation was 144, it
will be seen that, counting every vote at
Buckley's supposed command, that is,
reckoning all that had not been declared
for Pond, of their own motion, for Cole
man, the Boss could only have increased
that gentleman's vote to 248, or lacking
seventy-two votes of the number neces
sary to nominate.
On the other hand, if on the third
ballot Mr. Buckley had thrown the
ninety votes which he was supposed to
control to Mr. English, that gentleman
would have been as far away from the
goal as Mr. Coleman.
In addition, the fact must be borne in
mind that, while the San Francisco del
egation was changing front, the country
delegations were altering their votes
with lightning rapidity. These repre
sentatives of the genuine sentiment of
the state were rising and recording
their changed preferences with electri
cal rapidity. When the result of the
fourth poll showed Pond to be the Dem
ocratic nominee for governor, there was
not one delegate in fifty that knew that
the San Francisco delegates had signi
fied their eleventh hour preference for
Pond. Asa matter of fact, the count
showed that,with that portion of the San
Francisco delegation that had voted for
Pond on the third ballot, and without a
single vote from any possible followers
of Buckley in the San Francisco dele
gates, the mayor of San Francisco was
nominated for governor by eighteen
majority.
We give this resume of the facts in order
that the average reader may realize the
gauzy character of the newspaper com
ment on matters political, even in what
would ordinarily be regarded as reliable
journals. Mr. Buckley's support was
indespensable to the success of either
Mr. English or Mr. Coleman. The re
sult showed that Mr. Pond was inde
pendent of it, and absolutely so. Then,
for the thousandth time, in this instance
with reference to journalism, we may
see, in the language of Falstaff, "how
thifl world is given to lying."
THE LOS ANGELES HERALD: TUESDAY MORNING, AUGUST 26 1890.
THE WASTE OF SCHOOL MONEYS.
The council and the board of educa
tion have come into serious collision.
The board sent in to the council their
estimate for the support of the schools
for the ensuing year, and asked for $78-,
847.20 as their apportionment of the tax
roll. The council cut this down to $70,
--743, and then $20,000 was deducted from
this allowance and placed in a new fund
called the bridge fund-} In the course of
the debate, it was claimed that the board
is keeping up the salary of teachers to an
exorbitant and unwarranted rate. The
teachers proper are not paid too high,
but the salaries of all the officials, and
those of the principals, ought to be cut
down from 20 to 50 per cent. There has
been extravagance, if nothing worse, in
the expenditure of the $200,000 voted to
the department by the people for new
school buildings. Boom prices were
paid to favorites for lots, and the high
school building will cost the city twice
as much as should have been spent for a
suitable structure. The board has acted
in bad faith with the people in the high
school building business, and public con
fidence in them has well nigh vanished.
The way in which the high school
business has been managed would put
the veriest tyro in affairs to the blush.
The plans and specifications, after they
had been in the hands of the board long
enough to have been studied in all
their details,and corrected and amended
to the satisfaction of every member,
were advertised and bids asked for from
contractors. The bid of Mr. Beyrle for
$00,000 was accepted, and this was the
full extent the building was to cost.
Instead of stopping at $60,000 it has cost
over $70,000. This has been accom
plished by the most extraordinary items
of extras ever worked up in a building.
Let us just look at some of them. The
extras allowed for the foundation amount
to $0,000.97; for a cement floor to the
basement, $1,1:34.08; for deadening the
floors, $2,502; for tanks in towers, $386.
These are the principal items of extras
allowed, and they foot up $10,682.65;
over one-sixth of the entire original
bid. A proportionate raise over
the original bids seems to have been the
rule all the way through in the building
of the new school houses. Whether
these things are the result of incapacity,
carelessness or jobbery,it is all the same
to the tax-payers, who have been very
badly served and very copiously bled
in this business. If it were only possi
ble to get at the bottom facts that gov
erned the purchase of lots for new
school buildings, a rich mine of collu
sion, favoritism and reckless waste ol
public money would be exposed. Per
haps the peoole will yet get at the in
side history of many things in connec
tion with the way in which this great
wad of school money has been made to
fall far short of accomplishing what was
expected.
Tub colored Republican clubs of Los
Angeles—and the colored man and
brother is numerous in these diggings,
having three clubs in Los Angeles and
one in Pasadena—are up in arms against
their treatment at the late Markham
reception in the pavilion. It appears
that two speakers were selected from
this sensitive and highly ebullient race,
but it was not found expedient to allow
of the eventuatiou of their oratorical
pyrotechnics. This was a great insult
to the colored man and brother, as well
as a great hardship to the audience;
for, considering the poor character of
the Caucassian oratory on that occasion,
that of the descendant of the patrollers
of the bank of the Senegambia would
have been a yearningly sought for des
deratum by the audience. These
clubs, whose numbers are as penum
brous as the skins of their owners, will
proceed to raise Cain, get a move on old
Ned, or vote the Democratic ticket, un
less some formal and ceremonious
amende honorable is tendered to their of
fended dignity. They have dolled tire
Markham rose and trampled it underfoot,
so to speak. They reject the old saw that
"a rose by any other name would smell
as sweet," and insist on being served
with boutonnieret of the true Markham
variety, or they will forswear the flower
altogether and don the Pond lily.
For the thousandth time we are in
formed that the Hon. James G. Blame
has no aspiration for the Presidency—
that that chapter in a once promising
; career, only clouded by the Mulligan
I letters and the Fort Smith & Arkansas
j Railway affair is a closed book forever
j and aye. All this recall a line of Byron's
!in Don Juan, which was uttered by the
Iby the charming Julia, and which ran
I "and swe ring she would ne'er consent,
j consented." Let us hope that no na
; tional convention of the Republican
| party will ever enable the modern doubt
ing Thomas to say of the Plumed Knight
"methinks he doth protest too much."
The way in which the people of San
Francisco discount the veracity of their
local papers, ought to make the hair of
their editors stand on end. Whenever
1 a statement, a rumoror a story is traced
! and the quest runs up against the news
-1 papers, that settles it. "There is no
j need*of going farther," they say; "we
have reached the fountain of untruth."
As the president has suspended the
army order changing the army head
quarters here, a strong effort ought to
be made to induce him to make the order
permanent. The chamber of commerce,
whose influence and representations
doubtless induced the president to take
an interest in the matter, should perse
vere in their work.
Tun first two years of Governor Stone
man's Democratic administration cost
the taxpayers $(5,571,308; the appropri
ations for the last two years of Water
man's Republican administration foot
up $12,734,510. It is indeed time we
had a man like Pond to take hold of the
helm of state.
Wells' Hair Balsam.
If (rray, gradually restores color; elegant tonic
dressing, 50c,51.00. Druggists, orf 1.00 size pie
paid by express for $1.00. E. S. Wells, Jersey
pity.
LO, THE WOODEN INDIAN
THE ART OF MAKING FIGURES FOR
CIGAR STORE SIGNS.
I ,
How Taste in the Mutter of Images Has
Changed —The Indian Displaced by More
Civilized Caricatures —The Labor and
Cost of tho Statues of Wood.
The tobacconists' figures have undergone
many changes since they first came into
use. They have attained a very respectable
degree of excellence in certain directions,
and considerable inventiveness and great
variety of design have been shown in their
production. Most of these figures are made
of wood. Some, however, arc of metal,
cast in molds. These, of course, are much
more expensive, and the designs are limit
ed in number.
The wooden figures being more within
the reach of most dealers naturally offer a
greater variety in design. The wood used
is generally white pine, which is bought in
logs of various lengths at the spar yards.
The artist begins by making the roughest
kind of an outline—a mere suggestion of
what the proportions of the figure arc to
be. In this he is guided by paper patterns.
The log is blocked out with the ax into
appropriate spaces for the head, the body
down to the waist, the portion from there
to the knee, the rest of the legs (which are
at once divided) and the feet. In its pres
ent embryo state the figure to be is not
very apparent to the eye. The feeling for
form in the chopped block is so very ele
mentary as to have complete suggestive
ncss only for the practiced artist.
HOW THE INDIAN IS MADE.
A hole is now bored into ctich end of the
prepared log about five inches deep. Into
each of these holes an iron bolt is placed,
the projecting parts of which rests on sup
ports, so that the body hangs free. The
carver now goes from the general to the
particular. The surface of the wood soon
becomes chipped up by tho chisel, and the
log generally takes on more definite form.
Then, when the figure is completely
evolved, the finishing touches are put on
with finer carving tools.
Detached hands and arms are made sep
arately and joined on to the body by
screws. Then the various portions of the
figure are appropriately painted, the whole
is set upon a stand running on wheels, and
it is ready for delivery. Old figures that
have become scratched and broken, that
have split and cracked with the grain, or
are dingy and dirty and need to be fresh
ened up with new coats of paint, are also
brought to the shop and doctored and
patched up into a respectable semblance
of newness.
Time changes, and so docs the popular
taste. At first the red man ruled tho mar
ket almost completely. Then came a heavy
sprinkling of other figures—fiery Scotch
men, English officers with small fatigue
caps or high bearskins, and heavy swells
of ante-bellum times and the war period,
with mnrvelously wide pantaloons and
waving mutton chop whiskers, ogled sim
pering Dolly Vardens, with short cut
skirts, bustles and hats tilted forward over
the eyes. Then came grave Turks, gor
geous sultanas and columbines with alarm
ingly short skirts. Punch, with rubicund
nose and protuberant chin, was a favorite
figure. There was also the conventional
plantation ''nigger," with striped panta
loons and a great expanse of shirt collar.
Few of these old figures are seen nowadays.
ORIGINAL DESIGNS.
Meanwhile the spirit of realistic art en
tered more and more into the work of the
sign sculptors. The wooden Indians grew
better, quite artistic In some instances.
Even the half nude was attempted with
success. In the latter respect the best work
has undoubtedly been exemplified in the
metal figures of Indians and Pucks. The
"artists," advancing in technique, grew
ambitious; more variety became the watch
word. The dude, who had occupied the
pen of the writer and the pencil of the
artist, was now perpetuated in wood. Effi
gies of baseball players gave sign of a pub
lic spirited nature, aud there has been quite
an eruption of Pucks, good, bad and exe
crable. "Vaultin' ambition" strove even
to portraiture.
The price of these figures varies greatly.
You can get a small Indian for $16, or you
can indulge your artistic taste up to the
tune of $125. Metal figures run as high as
$175. Most figures that are ordered arc
simply copied from existing ones, the same !
design being $>ften repeated. Such work is
exemplified in certain forms and types that
have grown conventional and are familiar
to all. But some dealers, with discrimi
nating and fastidious tastes or peculiar
hobbies and with the money to indulge
them, have special figures made to order.
One old gentleman in Third avenue, near
Ninth street, had himself cut out in wood
in the uniform of some military company
to which he belonged. Another gentleman
in Broadway put up a figure of Edwin For
rest in Roman garb, redundant of muscle,
in front of his store. This figure has since
gone to Philadelphia. Still another, up
town in Tenth avenue, ordered the coun
terfeit presentment of Boston's shining
light, John L. Sullivan, in his baseball
suit. Another Tenth avenue man had an
elephant and the golden calf made for his
two saloons. One western man ordered
figures of the Goddess of Liberty and of
Bartholdi's statue somewhat altered from
the original. The carver naturally is glad
to get out of the rut of wearisome conven
tionality sometimes, and puts his best foot
foremost when filling such orders.
SOME OFT SEEN FIGURES.
But the tobacconist is not by any means
the only customer that the sculptor in
wood has to supply. Chiropodists want
large white or gilt feet to display before
their doors, glove sellers hang up wooden
gloved hands as signs of their calling, and
livery stable owners call for heads of
horses. More than that, our artist in wood
is at times called upon to exercise his cun
ning in manufacturing wooden hands for
such persons as have had the misfortune
to lose one of those that nature provided
them with. A down town firm puts springs
into these, so that they can be used to some
extetit by the wearer.
P. T. Barnum has been supplied with a
number of wooden figures which appear
in his parades. They are all life size or
larger, and include Bluebeard, Cinderella,
Mother Goose, Sinbad the Sailor, Red Rid
ing Hood and the Old Woman That Lived
in a Shoe. Forepaugh has an equestrian
figure of St. George and the Dragon. The
figures on Barnum's vans are also carved
in wood.
One firm that deals in woolen rags had
a figure of a ragman nine feet high placed
on fop of its building in Franklin street,
near Center. When it moved to its present
auarters, in West street, near Canal, a sim
ar figure was put up for it, so that there
are two of them now. Another well known
figure is the cow that is milked daily on
Coney Island. At Narragansett Pier there
in a huge dragon twenty-three feet long,
which curls around a column on the water
tower in Earl's court. Again, William De
muth has had carvings executed on his
yacht at Lake George, and similar work
has been produced for others.—New York
Times.
Caoutchouc oil is said to have proven
efficient in preventing rust, and it has
been used by the German ahny. It only
requires to be spread with a piece of flan
nel in a very thin layer over the metallic
surface and allowed to dry up. Such a
ooating will afford security against all at
mospheric influences, and will not show
any cracks under the microscope after a
year's standing..,.
Health in Collecting Autographs.
Mr. Ferdinand J. Drecr, who has resided
the greater portion of his life at 1,520
Spruce street, is distinguished as an anti
quarian. Mr. Dreer is a native of Phila
delphia, having been born in this city on
the 2d of March, 1812. For many years he
was engaged in the manufacture of gold
ware and assaying, but he retired from
active business in 1862. It was in 1849 that
he first commenced his collection of auto
graphs with a letter of Lord Stirling, of
Revolutionary fame, as a nucleus. At that
time he had not the slightest idea to what
an extreme his inclination would lead; but
finding after a few months that he derived
great pleasure, and that his health, which
was well nigh broken down by excessive
work, improved by autograph gathering,
he continued to indulge his love for the
fascinating amusement until the present
time, when his collection has grown to the
enormous size of considerably over 20,000
autograph letters signed, repaired and in
dexed. Mr. Dreer takes great delight in
repairing and arranging his letters, which
task he accomplishes with the aid of old
paper resurrected at odd moments from
attics aud cellars. So nicely is this mend
ing done (even the water mark being some
times identical) that it is discovered with
difficulty.—Philadelphia Ledger.
Rest.
Two gentlemen were looking at a paint
ing of a corn field in France, a typical
French corn field, in which poppies shone
out here and there among the corn. "It
reminds me," said one, "of something
Ralph Waldo Emerson said to me when 1
was a young man.
"I had told him that I was tired out, and
was going away for a long rest; told him
how I intended to occupy my leisure, spoke
enthusiastically of my prospective travels
and out-of-door sports. I could enjoy a
lifetime of such plans.
"He had listened with sympathetic inter
est, but at my last remark something in
his face prompted me to ask, 'You do not
think those things a waste of time, Mr.
Emerson f
" 'No,' he replied, 'oh, no; bfkt the poppy
should always grow in tho corn field.' "
In that exquisitely poetical phrase the
philosopher-poet and preacher fixed the
truth that work is the complement, the fit
and best accompaniment of recreation; the
truth that inspired another poet to write:
Rest is not quitting the busy career;
Rest is the fitting of self to its sphere.
—Youths' Companion.
How Onyx Is Mined.
Onyx is got out In as large blocks as it
can be quarried. The quarrying has to be
done with wedges and saws, as it cannot
be blasted or dug out with safety. The
grain and streaks are so delicate that a
blast might spoil thousands of dollars'
worth. One cave of onyx was ruined by
the use of powder. The man who owned
the cave started to get out the onyx by the
slow process of saws and wedges. He got
out several car loads, when the thought
struck him that he could take all the onyx
out of the cave at one blast. So he put his
men to work and drilled around the cave,
arranging his blast so that he would have
840,000 or $50,000 worth of onyx to be
shipped at once. The drill holes were
charged and the blast was exploded. None
of the onyx was fit for use except In
mosaics and such work. There was not a
sound bit four feet long in the cave. This
taught the other onyx miners a lesson,
aud no shocks aud blasts or detonations
are allowed in the cave or in the neighbor
hood for fear that the onyx may be cracked
or that some small cracks may be en
larged.—New York Sun.
rpHE SISTERS OF THE HOLY NAMES.
1 a brunch of the convent of Our Lailv of the
Sacred Heart. Oakland, have opened a boarding
school at Ramona, Cal.; the location cannot be
surpassed in beauty and salubrity; the course oi
Instruction is of the hi chest grade. For terms
apply to the LADY SUPERIORESS. The classes
will he resumed Sept. Ist. IS9O. f25-llm
AMUSEMENTS.
GRAND OPERA HOUSE.
M c Lain tSi Lehman, Managers.
■1 NIGHTS AND SATURDAY MATINEE,
Commencing
< Wednesday, August 87, 1890.
Daniel Frohman's production of mark
TWAIN'S beautiful stor/,
PRINCE AND PAUPER.
Authorized by Mark Twain. Dramatized by
Abby Sme Richardson. Interpreted by
ELSIE LESLIE
And a complete and competent Dramatic Com
pany wiili correct costumes, accessories, etc.
Tour under direction of Mr. Al Hayman.
l!o.\ office open fur sale of seats Monday at to
a.m. Telephone 511. uu22-td
HAZARD'S PAVILION.
FEANK W. Conant, Manager,
Monday, Sept. 1, 3 and 3,
Mcl AHE it YOUNG'S
OPERATIC MINSTRELS
35 ARTISTS 35
New Songs. New Jokes. New Ideas.
EVEItY ACT A FEATURE.
Don't fail to see McCabe it Young's beautiful
FLOWER GARDEN FIRST PART.
Watch our
GRAND STREET PARADE.
Seats now on sale at R. 8. Stonemiin's Music
store, 10b' north Spring et. au2o-td
PALACE RESTAURANT AND SALOON,
Corner First and Spring Streets.
The Most Magnificent and Popular
Resort in the City.
FKEE CONCERTS!
* *
BY THE
CELEBRATED PHILHARMONIC SOLOISTS
Every Night from 8 to 12.
JOSEPH SCHURTZ, PROPRIETOR.
jeB-lm
FIVE CENTS A LINE.
Situations obtained, help secured, houses
/ented, property of all kinds bought and sold,
and money loaned by advertising in these
columns.
Everybody Reads Them.
WANTED—MISCELLANEOUS.
W" A YOUNG MAN Wilt) HAS A
light team anil wagon, work of any kind.
Address JOHN DE PONCE, P. O. Box, 1973,
Los Angeles. au24-7t
ANTED—ASSISTANT BOOKKEEPER AND
tpye-wrlter. Adddress with reference,
P. O. box 2050. au23-4t
WANTED— BUGGY, PHACTON OR SURREY
in exchange for diamonds, gold watches
or jewelry. Room 15, 124><j S. Spring st. PAC
IFIC LOAN (JO. au3-tf
WANTED— A RANCH HORSE, WEIGHT
1,300, sorrel, in exchange for buggy,
carriage or wagon. Write or call, 339 N. LOS
ANGELES ST., city. jy22-dAW-tf
WANTED— PICTURES TO FRAME, CHEAP
est place at BURNS'S, 250 S. Main St.
au2l-tf
ANIED — TO BUY SECOND-HAND
wagons and carriages. 128 SAN PEDRO
st je6-3m»
wanted—female help.
work, Apply at 631 S, Spring street.
au2o-tf
WANTED —H ELF.
WANTED— A GOOD SOLICITOR, GENTLE
man or ladf, easy place to woik ami good
pay, ATLAS ENDOWMENT ASSOCIATION,
Room 53, Bryson-Bonebrake block. au2o-3t
ANTED—IO CANVASSING AGENTS, LA
dies and gentlemen. Apply it TEMPLE
BLOCK Photographic Gallery, between f» and
10 a. m. au24-7t
\\T ANTED—ALL NEEDING HELP FREE—
VV employment or any information, address
E. NITTINGER'S BUREAU: established 1HXO;
3191£ 8. Spring street, Los Angeles, Calif. Tele
phone 113 mlg-12m
WANTED—MALE HELP.
\\-an TED — TWO ERRAND BOYft CALL
V> at L. M. WAGNER t t CO., 126 North
Main street, au26-3t
XX7ANTED—S,OOO ABLE BODIED MEJTfOR
>> Bering sea. Call at THE CHICAGO, 150
North Main st. an 1 -1 m
STORAGE.
junction \v ai;t:n o t" s i-: — junction
fj Downeyave. and San Fernando st. Rates
reasonable. Tel. 385. C. RAPHAEL & CO.
]y3-6m
FOR KENT—HOUSES.
170K KENT—COTTAGE OK 4 ROOMS, CLOSE
J 1 in, unfurnished. Inquire at 213 SOUTH
11 ILL ST. au2(i-tf
T"X>R RENT-FOl'R CHOICE HOUSES, FIVE
F to twelve rooms each, by W. 8. DE VAN,
215}4 West First St., Room No. 1. au24-4t
rpo LET.—A SMALL COTTAGE OE 3 ROOMS
JL at 213 south Hill st. No children. aul3.tf
T?OR RENT—HOUSE OF 8 ROOMS, NO. 511
Temple street, for $20; 2 houses on Castelar
street, one of 5 and one of 7 rooms, $10 each; all
in good condition. Apply to ROOM 5, Dueom
mun block. B. C. HUBBBLI., jy3l-tf
FOX SALE—LIVE STOCK.
170R SALE—2O HEAD OK FRESH MILCH
A 1 cows; graded Jerseys, Durham and Ashyres;
all gentle for family use. 235 S. Los Angeles
st. C. E. ('ROWLEY. aul9-2W
TjlOR SALE—PUPS RETRIEVER AND WATER
F Spaniel, graded. 201 N. Mathews street,
Boyle Heights. aulG-lm
TO LET.
rpo LET-UNFURNISHED ROOMS FOR HOUSE
A. keeping, cheapest in the city; no children;
203 S. LOS Angeles street. au23-5t
TO EXCHANGE.
rpHK RIM AN REAL ESTATE EXCHANGE
JL Company has Clear Eastern property to
Hade for incumbered he uses and lots in Los
Angeles. We assume indebtedness. Room!),
Redick Block. I.os Angeles, Cal. au23-liuo
LOST AND FOUND.
I^ST—
\j werto name "Rex." lias long silky ears,
white spot on breast, was lately clipped, leav
ing brush on end of tail, and carried Tax 408.
Any information leading to his recovery left at
the P. O. or 1110 COURT ST., will be suitably
rewarded. au2B-lt
lOST —ON GRAND AVENUE AND ll¥
j tween Main and Pearl, 1 collection book.
Return to RoomsBl and 83, TEMPLE BLOCK.
nu26-2t
SPECIAL NOTICE.
EARNEST RIM AN. EXPERT EXAMINER Ol*
Aid land titles. 20.years in the business. Sat
isfaction guaranteed. Charges liberal. Call at
Room 9, Redick Block, No. 238 West Ist street.
Los Angeles, Cal. au23-lmo
IJV K. MOREHOUSE. CARPENTER AND JOB
lld her, buys and sells si nd-hand goods of all
descriptions; keeps constantly on hand ladders
of all kinds. Masons' hods, daubers, etc., 616
8, spring street,
-\TOTICE— THE LOS XxGELES CITY WATER
IX Company Will strictly enforce the follow
ing rule; The hours for Sprinkling are between
(i aud 8 o'clock a. m,, and t> and 8 o'clock p. in.
For a violation of the above regulation the
water will be shut off, and a fine of $2 will be
charged before water will be turned on again.
• aul7-ly
FINANCIAL.
PACIFIC LOAN COMPANY* —LOANS MONEY
in any amounts on all kinds of personal
property and collateral security, on pianos
without removal, diamonds, jewelry, sealskins,
bicycles, horses, carriages, libraries or any prop
erly of value; also on furniture, merchandise,
etc., in warehouses; partial payments received,
money without delay; private offices for con
sultation; will call if desired; W. K. DeGKOOT,
Manager, rooms 14 aud 15, No. 124*,£ South
Spring st. m3O
7 TO 7 LOAN AT R. G. LUNT'S
LOAN AND INSURANCE AGENCY.
Cor.First & Broadway, Redick block, Los Angeles
Agent for the
GERMAN SAVINGS AND LOAN SOCIETY,
of Sun Francisco. jul-3m
CRAWFORD & McCREERY,
Room 10, over Los Angeles National Bank,
Corner First and Spring streets.
SHORT TERM LOANS A SPECIALTY.
BUY NOTES AND MORTGAGES jy27
MONEY TO LOAN ON MORTGAGE—MOR
TIMER «i HARRIS, attorneys-ttt-law, 79
Temple block. u22-tf
SAVINGS BANK AND TRUSI
Company, 426 S. Main st. Money to loan
ut reduced rates. jel-tf
JOS ANGELES LOAN CO. WILL LOAN
j money on pianos, without removal,
diamonds, jewelry, carriages, horses and any
thing of value; private rooms for consultation;
all business confidential; money withoutdelav.
ROOMS 8 AND 9, Wilson block, cor. First arid
Spring sts. W. D. Eckstein, manager. m29-tf
MONEY LOANED ON REAL ESTATE, DlA
monds, watches, jewelry, pianos, seal
skins, live stock, carriages, bicycles, and all
' kinds of personal and collateral security. LEE
BROS., 402 8. Spring, mIS-tf
AAA AAA T0 LOAN AT 9 PER CENT.
spAsUUUsUUy gross to 12 percent, gross, on
improved property—Los Angeles city or acreage.
HELLMAN, ALLEN & CHALFANT, Perrett
building. 127 W. Third st. mlO-llm
MONEY TO LOAN AT CURRENT RATES
on good risks only. M. F. ODEA, 114
Broadway. ml3-tf
\i \i\ AAA T0 LOAN UPON IMPROVED
©4j\IU»yUU City and country property; low
est rates; loans made with dispatch. Address
the Northern Counties Investment Trust, Ltd.,
FRED. J. SMITH, Agent. Pomona. Oaf.
BUSINESS CHANCES.
■\X7 ANTED—A PARTY WITH 115,000 to $20,-
VV 000. A good opening for the right per
son. Room 53, BRYSON-BON Eli RAKE block.
au26-3t
rplIE UNDERSIGNED WISHES TO COMMUN"
--L icate with a responsible, energetic person
in Los Angeles who would like to handle the
/Ktna Mineral Water there. *TNA MINERAL
WATER CO., 106 Drum St., San Francisco.
au22-7t
FOR BALE — CHEAP, WASHINGTON GAR
DENS, with long lease. Saloon und fixtures
and furniture for picnic grounds can be bought
cheap, Call at once. au2l-7t
SEE NOTICE OF HOTEL FOR SALE, A FINE
business opportunity, In another column.
jy2i)-lm
PERSONAL.
IPERSONAL1 PERSONAL — 1)0 YOU WANT A SNAP?
House and lot 4 blocks from postoffice, 11.
-000, part cash. J. C. WILLMON, 230 W. First
street. au22-0t
6»Tj>CONOMIO" PRICES—SUGAR, 20 LBS.
Aid brown or 16 lbs. white, fl; 4 lbs rice,sago
or tapioca, 25c.; 13 lbs. white beans 25c.; starch,
4 packages, 25c; germea, 20c; silver cream, 15e;
10 lbs. cornmeal, 15c.; pickles, 10c. a qt.; good
black or Japan tea, 35c; sack flour, 80c;
Fresno flour, $1.10; 10 cans salmon, $1; 9 cans
oysters, $1; can roast beef, 20c: potted tongue
or ham, 10c; 4 cans sardines, 25c; 0 lbs.
raisins, 25c.; 40 bars soap, $1; bacon, 12Uc;
hams, 13>.i;e; pork, 10c. ECONOMIC STORES,
509-511 8. Spring St. Telephone 975, m 5 tf
DIVORCE LAW A SPECIALTY; ADVICR
free. W. W. HOLCOMB, attorney-at-law,
office, old Wilson block, 126 W. First St., rooms
10 and 11. ma29-tf
PERSONAL — INTERESTING TO EVERY
body How to make and save money. Read
the classil ed advertisements in the Herald
daily. A few cents spent in an advertisement
may make thousands of dollars for you. Yon
may procure a situation; sell your house and
lot; rent your vacant property; buy a paying
business or sell to advantage; loan your idle
money or borrow cheaper than from agents,
and in a thousand different ways use these col
umns to advantage. On this page advertise
ments are only FIVE CENTS A LINK A DAY.
EDUCATIONAL.
VOICE CULTURE AND SINGING TAUGHT
by Oscar N. Kleppcr. Apply at BART
LETT'S MUSIC STORE V aul3-lm
TIIK fall term of Miss MttrsVs School, a
Boarding and Day School for Young La
dies and Girls, at 1217 S. Hill St., and 1221 sS.
Olive St., will begin Wednesday, September 10.
aul2-lm
rpMNITY SCHOOL, 1534 MISSION ST., PRE-
I pares young men and boys for university
college and business. Kail session opens Mod
day, August 4, 1890 Address, Dr. E. B.
SPALDING, rector, San Francisco. tinll-I'mos
THE OCCIDENTAL UNIVERSITY OPENS
Sept, 17,1800Jnew courses of study added;
building unproved, belter equipment than ever
before. Address Prof. J.M.McPHERRON, station
X, Los Angeles, Cal. au7-lm
108 ANGELES BUSINESS COLLEGE AND
J English Training School, new number, 144
S. Main st. Experienced teachers; complete
courses of study. E. R. SCHRODER, I N.
INSKEEP, F. W. KELSEY, Proprietors. a22tf
TIT R. STOLL, VOCAL INSTRUCTOR.
T» ■ with German Conservatory of Music,
123 Fifth St., cor. Broadway. je29-tf
SHORTHAND, TYPEWRITING, TELEGRA
phy. LONGLEY INSTITUTE, 126 W. First
St., the only school in the city In which these
arts are taught by competent gentlemen,skilled
in their profession. Terms moderate. ELIAB
LONGLEY, 30 years a reporter, W. H. WAGNER,
stenographer and telegrapher. jul-Om
ACADEMY OF IMMACULATE HEART, PICO
Heights—The scholastic year comprises
two sessions of five months each. The first
session commences on the Ist of Sept. and
the second on the Ist of Feb. Pupils are re
ceived at any time. For particulars apply on
the premises. jul 5m
SCHOOL OF CIVIL, MINING, MECHANICAL,
Engineering, Surveying, Architecture,
Drawing, Assaying. A. VAN DER NAILLEN,
723 Market St., San Francisco. mlO-tf
OT. VINCENT'S COLLEGE, -
0 —GRAND AVENUE.—
A BOARDING AND DAY SCHOOL FOR
BOYS AND YOUNG MEN.
C'OVIISE, CLASSICAL AND COMMERCIAL
Fall term will begin on Monday, Sept. Ist.
Address REV. A. J. MEYER, C. M. Pres.
au 10-lm
-y-yoODBURY'S BUSINESS COLLEGE
SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING
INSTITUTE,
159 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cal
sessions day and evening.
For particulars, call at office or address
m2O-tf F. C. WOODBURY, Principal.
MEETINGS.
IT" NIGHTS TEMPLAR, CIEUR DE LION
IV Commander?, No. 9, K. T. — Holds Un
stated Conclaves in the asylum, in Masonic hall,
cor. of Spring and First sts., on the third Thurs
day of each month, at 7:30 p. m.
ELCOME LODGE, K.~OF 11., NO. 3~342.—
Meets Tuesday evenings, at room 45, Cali
fornia Bunk building.
/ j ODD WILL COUNCIL, NO. 029, AMERICAN
l_T Legion of Honor, meets on second and
fourth Wednesdays of each month at the Y. M.I.
hall, 17 North Main st.
LOSI OS ANGELES LEGION, n6~«7~SKLECT
J Knights. A. O. U. W.—Meets every Monday
evening, in Campbell's hall, cor. Downey aye
and Truman st.. East Los Angeles.
LOS ANGELES CHAPTER, R. A. M.--STAI ED
con vocations on the second Monday of each'
month, at 7:40 p. m., at Masonic hall, Spring
St., bet. First and Second.
1 ,tRATERnTtY LODGE, NO. 79, K.'oFP.—
_T Meets on second and fourth Wednesday
evenings in each month at Pythian Castle, 24
S. Spring st.
T.rOS ANGELES LODGE, NO. 2925, K. OF
\j ll.—Regular meetings are held every Wed
nesday evening, at 75 N. Spring it.
f l KLCICH WOMAN'S NO
VT 22.—Meets first and third Fridays of each
month, at 2 p. m., in Campbell's hall, East Los
Angeles.
RANGE BRANCH COMMANDERY, NO
30li, U. O. G. C—Meets every Friday even
ing. in new Odd Fellows'hull, Huyden" block,
East Los Angeles.
/ < AUNTI.ET LODGE, NO. 129,
VT Meets on Monday evening, in Pythian
Castle, No. 24 S. Spring St.
OLIVE I .<>IKi E,~NO. 26, XT OF pT—MEETS
every Thursday evening in Pythian Castle,
24 S. Spring, just below First st.
FOR SALE.
FOR SALE.—DRUG STORE. GOOD LOCA
lion. Doing a good prescription as well us a
good general business. Must sell on account of
ill health. LINDLEY it NEUHART, 112 S.
Spring st. aul2-2w
TJ-'OR SALE—ONE ALWOBT NEW BILLIARD
Jj table W illi cues, cue rack, balls, etc. Must
be Bold at. once. Cheap for cash. Apply at 200
North Main street. au22-9t
FOR SALE—BARRELS" AND TANKS FOR
wine makers. Apply al 58 N. Myers St.,
east of river. au2l-7t
yOK SALE—FRUIT PACKERS ATTENTION!
JT Grapes on about 45 acres for sale on the
vine. 35 acres "Mission," 7 ucres "Zinfudel,"
balance In "Muscats." For particulars, ad
dress JOHN ROCKWOOD, 302 E, Washington
St., Los Angeles. au2l-7t
TTIOR SA LE—CATALINA ISLAND, TI7E~NRAT"-
X 1 estO-room cottage in Avalon. A great bar
gain, terms easy on half amount of purchase.
Apply to owner, Mrs. Moore, 717 Weil Street,
Los Angeles. au2o-7t
IltOR SALE—A FINE NEW UPRIGHT PIANO
never been used. $i! 25.00.
tf PACIFIC LOAN CO., 124J5 S Spring st.
I-<OR SALE.—AT THE LOS ANGELES HORSE
market, 235 S. Los Angeles St., two carloads
of fine young horses and mares, broken or un
broken. C. E. CROWLEY, Prop. aul3-2w
17-OR SALE—DIRT CHEAP, A
J ning Babcock buggy, nearly new. Apply
to JOHN 0. BELL, 224 S. I.os Angeles st
jylO-tf
FOR SALE—City Property.
I7NOR SALE—SNAP BARGAIN: 192 feet front
E on First street, just over the hill. $30 per
front foot; part cash. Con double your money
on this in six months.
J. C. WILLMIIN,
nu2. r >-4t 230 West First Street.
IjiOß SALE-NICE HOME ON WASHINGTON
street near Figuerou, very cheap. BUR
BANK, BAKER & ODEA, 114 S. Broadway.
au2l-tf
IMiR SALE—GREAT BARGAIN; COTTAGE
J of 5 rooms and kitchen; hard finished;
garden, Stable, etc.; 3 minutes from cable; part
cash. BURBANK, BAKER & ODEA, 114
Broadway. tf
I r OR SALE-NEW 9-ROOM HOUSE AND
hath, lurge lot, cement walks, fine neighbor
hood, near corner Washington and Figueroa
sts.; only $4,000. BURBANK, BAKER & ODEA
114 S. Broadway. jy2s-tf
FOR SALE—ON INSTALLMENTS; 2-STORY
house, 6 rooms, large lot, Maple avenue;
close in; cheap. C. A. SUMNER & CO, 107
Broadway. jy23-lin
FOR SALE—Country Property.
IfOR SALE—6B-ACRE RANCH, NINE MILES
from court house; grain, alfalfa and fruit
land; all improved; price $100 per acre, or 50
acres at $80 per acre. R. 0. CARLTON, Ful
ton block. jy2s-3m
IjMJR SALE-PRODUCES AN INCOME.
A bout 200 acres, % milesouthof Norwalk
railroad station. An overflowing and overflow
ing artesian well. Best corn and alfalfa land.
Good for apples, peaches, pears, cherries, grapes,
plums, oranges, lemons, etc. All well fenced.
Must be sold to pay debt. Will be sold to
gether or in parcels. W. G. COWAN, adminis
trator, Rialto, Cal. Inquire of H. E. ROWLAND
on the place, or EDWIN BAXTER, attorney,?'
and 8 Jones block, Los Angeles. au 13-lm
I r 0R SALE—A PARTY WHO WANTS A
I piece of ground to improve and make a liv
ing on, can I uy 10 or 20 acres 10 miles from
Los Angeles and half a mile from railroad, on
his own terms; this is excellent soil and is
well adapted for deciduous or small fruits, or
chicken ranch; cash no object; a good oppor
tunity for the right man. Address P. O. box
666, Los Angeles. al-1 m*
MINING.
PACIFIC COAST MINING BUREAU—GOOD
mining properties bought and sold. Min
ing pro«pects and mines bonded, and capital
furnished for development of;those that can be
shown to have merit. NOLAN & SMITH, office
132 North Spring street, Los Angeles, Cal.
au24-6mo

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