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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, August 29, 1890, Image 6

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6
MY GUEST.
At early daw a I woke,
I heard a robin and looked out;
Beneath my window, whei\» tho roses bloomed.
Love stood in blushing doubt
His smile was very sweet,
But yet his lips did not his name disclose.
I knew him not, and soon ho went away.
Bearing one crimson rose.
Beneath the high noontide
I met him by the shady garden wall;
Wespokeof many things; he clasped my hand-
One kiss, nnd that was aIL
Alas: I knew him not,
And yet he wore my rose upon his heart 1
But still the perfume of his kiss remains,
Though I let Love depart.
The day wanes. Toward the west
I lift my eyes—and lo! he comes once more.
He comes a victor, for I know him now,
And open wide my door.
My rose is now his sword.
My will to conquer and my pride to slay;
But song and sunshine Uli my happy heart,
For Love has come to stay.
—Kate FieJCfs Washington
Renan in His Old Age.
Ernest Renan, the religious historian
and critic, has charming quarters at the
College de France, of which he is rector.
His rooms are lit throughout with elec
tric light, conveyed from the college lab
oratory, and they are furnished with both
taste and luxury. Renan is getting to be
as stout as the typical medieval abbot, and
for the same reason—love of good cheer.
Mme. Renan, a daughter, by tho way, of
Ary Scheffer, the painter, is a remarkably
good cook, and her pride is to tickle Re
nan's palate every day with some cunning
ly devised dish. Renan has a heavy, sen
sual face, with not a little of tbe Jew in it,
although he has not a trace of Judaism in
his blood.
Eight centuries of Breton life lie behind
him, and he can today make out an honest,
irreproachable pedigree which few aristo
crats could equal. The great man is as
dogmatic as ever Macaulay was. He can
not bear to be interrupted when talking,
and it goes hard with him to patiently en
dure a contradiction. When he receives
guests at his weekly gatherings he holds
forth to them by the half hour. He is fond
of standing before the grate, and from that
position he lays down the law upon any
thing and everything. For ability to speak
learnedly and eloquently upon any subject
he may be compared to Mr. Gladstone.—
Scottish Leader.
Sunday on Boston Common,
One of the most; striking things is the
sight which is presented by Boston Com
mon on Sunday afternoon. It is coming to
be a grand rendezvous for cranks of all
sorts. The Salvation army holds its meet
ings here; there are lectures on the faith
cure, on the single tax, on astrology and
on Socialism, with all varieties of orators,
who must speak or die of inward inflation.
There is a mixture of hymns, of turgid elo
quence, of wild declamation, of argument,
which it would puzzle the editor of a prize
conundrum column to make head or toil
out of; the singing of psalm tunes and the
thumping of holy tambourines and the
waving of gospel banners, the smoke of vile
tobacco and the sound of Strauss waltzes
from the band stand. It is wonderfully
orderly for such a motley gathering, but,
souls of the Puritans! what would the
godly forefathers say could they but return
with earthly eyes to behold the spectacle!
—Chicago Tribune.
A Good Manager.
A bareheaded woman, with a faded and
ragged dress, solicited alms the other even
ing of a gentleman who was crossing the
City Hall park. He came to a halt and
asked:
"Is it for drink?"
"No, sir; it's for food."
"But I don't know how you live. I have
to practice economy in order to have mon
ey in my pocket. You may be recklessly
extravagant for all I know. How much
money have you spent today?"
"Well, sir, I've made seven cents run
five of us on cold potatoes so far; and if I
can get three more we'll top off with bread
and water before we go to bed. Might leave
out the bread, sir, if I can find a bit of tar
somewhere to thicken up the water and
deceive the children. Can you draw it any
finer than that, sir?"
The man held out a dime as he passed by.
—New York Sun.
Taking Up Indifferent Husbands.
A little man asking how it happened that
many beautiful ladies took up with but in
different husbands, after many fine offers,
was thus aptly answered by a mountain
maiden:
A young friend of hers, during a walk,
requested her to go into a delightful cane
brake, and there get him the handsomest
reed; she must get it in once going
through, without turning. She went, and
coming out brought him quite a mean
reed. When he asked if that was the hand
somest one she saw, "Oh, no," replied she,
"I saw many finer as I went along, but I
kept on in hopes of a much better, until I
had gotten nearly through, and then was
obliged to select the best that was left."—
New York Ledger.
Writing Advertisements.
Writing advertisements has become a
specialty and is one of the fine arts. Cer
tain men in the business who have pecu
liar aptitude and experience make very
handsome incomes. J. E. Powers, who
was for five years with John Wanamaker,
charges $75 a day for his services and gets
it. Rogers, Peet & Co. supply a special
artist, but Frank Chosenben writes the ad
vertisements of that firm himself. It isn't
an easy thing, either —to write a taking
"ad." If you think so, try it!— Chatter.
A Wonderful Clock.
A new French clock contains a novel ap
plication of the magnet. The clock is
shaped like a tambourine, with a circle of
flowers painted on its head. Around the
circle two bees crawl, the larger one re
quiring twelve hours to complete its cir
cuit, while the smaller one makes it every
hour. Different flowers represent the
hours, and the bees, which are of iron, are
moved by two magnets behind the head of
the tambourine.—St. Louis Republic
A Bara Avis.
A stranger in the city seeing an urchin
on Broadway patted him on the head and
said: "Can you tell me where Fourteenth
street is, little boy?"
The gamin stared seemingly incredulous
at the gentleman a moment, and then
shrieking hysterically to a distant com
rade:
"Hey, Chimmy," he yelled, "here's a fel
ler what don't know where Fourteent'
street is!" —Dry Goods Chronicle.
The manufacture of half silk gloria for
dust and waterproof cloaks is increasing in
the Gorlitz district of Silesia. One firm
with factories at Seidenberg and Ebersdorf
have increased the number of their looms
to 1,200. Another large firm will soon start
the manufacture of these goods.
They Can't Prove It.
Doctors say that Americans rush too
much and eat too fast, but when they are
asked for figures they can't show 'em. On
the contrary, the English, who never rush,
and who eat as though they had all day
to a meal, suffer with dyspepsia 28 per cent,
more than Americans, and the average age
at which business men die is 5 per cent,
below the hustling Yankee.—Detroit Free
Press. \
THE LOS ANGELES TIER ALP: FRIDAY MORNING, AUGUST 29, 1890.
A FEMALE LIVERYMAN.
SHE RUNS A BIG STABLE BETTER
THAN MOST MEN COULD.
The Only Woman In the Business in New
Tork City—She Drives Sharp Bargains,
but She Bold* Her Trade—How She
Manages and How She Lives.
A wide awake, energetic woman keeps a
livery stable at No. 105 West Forty-ninth
street. Her name is Annie Childs. a*id she
is fair, plump and not yet 40. Mrs. Childs
hits H clear, ruddy complexion, an elastic
step and an easy, conversational style that
tells its own story of genteel associations
and intelligent observation.
This courteous and thoroughly efficient
business woman is known from one end of
the livery trade to the other. "You'll not
find a man in a livery establishment in
N£w York who knows tho business better
Mrs. Childs," a prominent liveryman
said to a reporter. "Oh, yes, she's got a
husband, but it's Mrs. Childs who is known
to the trade. She is in full charge of the
stable, and when I say that I mean that
she's the boss. I'd trust her with any
branch of the business in preference to
nmst men. The fact is she's 'up to snuff'
and no mistake. If you don't believe it go
and see for yourself."
The reporter did go and see for himself.
It was early iv the forenoon, and business
was quiet, therefore Mrs. Childs was up
stairs in her comfortable homelike apart
ments, making her baby a frock. The vis
itor was ushered into a bright little office,
the distinguishing feature of which was its
extreme cleanliness. Tho walls were lined
with pictures of famous horses. There
was an oval mirror over the marble basin
and on the mantel a vase of flowers.
HOW SITE STARTED.
Mrs. Childs, who was called through a
tube, made her appearance in the space of
exactly one minute by the reporter's watch.
She came down smiling, and was a goodly
sight to see in her trim black jersey and
bright, silky looking gray poplin skirt.
Her collar was fresh from the iron, her
hair tidily done and her finger nails neatly
manicured.
She sat down quickly, and opened the
conversation quite as gracefully as many
ladies do in their own drawing rooms.
"So you think it odd to see a woman in
the livery business, do you?" she said
laughingly. "Well. I have never thought
of it in that light, but perhaps that is be
cause I have never had time to think much
about it. It has taken pretty much all my
time to get through with the actual busi
ness of it for the last sixteen years. I am
English, was born and reared at Edmon
ton, near London, and grew up with horses
for my playfellows, as so many English
girls do. I have never seen a horse yet
that I was afraid of, aud I am called a good
horsewoman. My father-in-law was a
crack horseman and so are all his sons, in
cluding my husband, so you see I have al
ways been surrounded by horses.
"When we came to America my husband
wanted to open a boarding stable, but he
had other business to attend to and could
not give his personal attention to it. He
never thought of my going into the busi
ness, but I saw that he needed me and I
immediately announced my intention of
carrying it on myself. We opened a stable
in Eighteenth street, between Sixth and
Seventh avenues, and there I conducted it
on a small scale, keeping my office in the
sitting room. My business gradually kept
growing larger until the little writing
desk which served me in the sitting room
would do no longer, and I moved down
stairs and went into business profession
ally. From that time on I have conducted
every detail of the business without help,
save that of the ordinary hands employed
about livery stables, and can say without
egotism that I have made it a success. I
take orders, see that they are properly
filled, attend personally to getting them
out, receive customers, keep books, buy all
the carriages, harness and occasionally
horses.
HEIJ TEKSONAL SUPERVISION.
"Another branch of the business consists
in selling vehicles for my customers who
are abroad—in fact, I attend to everything
in connection with the business, and have
never yet been cheated in a single instance.
I find that horsemen treat me with the
greatest respect, never indulging in coarse
language in my presence. I assure you I
couldn't be treated better if I were dear
old Queen Vie herself. Then, too, I don't
think they would try to take advantage of
me as they do of a man. The men I deal
with always seem inclined to favor me,
and I assure you I drive very sharp bar
gains. I know by actual experience that I
am a more economical buyer than my
husband, and, for that matter, I think
women always look sharper to the pennies
than men. The men in my employ obey
me implicitly. I never have any trouble
with them, but I keep a sharp lookout that
they do their duty. I attend to every order
that leaves the stable in the course of the
year, and in order to do it am often obliged
to stay up until 2 or 3 o'clock in the morn
ing.
' 'I think the absence of tobacco smoke and
dirt from my oflice has been a drawing
card for my stable. It's rather pleasant,
even for a man, don't you know, to sit
down and give his order in a clean, quiet
spot. I receive all complaints, for they are
sure to come sometimes, no matter how
careful you are, and when I have a breath
ing space I go out and collect bills. Col
lecting requires tact and patience, but I
have never had any trouble with it. My
most fastidious customers are of course la
dies, but I usually succeed even in pleas
ing them. After having done right by
them once they are almost sure to come
back again, and in this way I often keep
their custom from year to year.
"And how about your home life, Mrs.
Childs?" "Oh! it goes on beautifully. You
don't think I'd sacrifice that to my busi
ness, do you? No, indeed. I have three
little children aud my husband to provide
comforts for, and I never neglect them.
In the first place, I have excellent health,
and can cram a great many duties into a
day. I keep a capable servant, give my
orders in the mornings, and see that every
thing is set going before I go to the office.
When I want anything particularly nice
to eat I manage to prepare it before busi
ness hours. I do all the sewing for my
children, too. We rent a farm at West
chester, and in the summer time we live
there, driving in and out early in the morn
ings and necessarily very late at night.—
New York Press.
A Wash for the Eyebrows.
The red oxide and vaseline ointment for
the growth of brows and lashes is quite
harmless. There is only one grain of mer
cury to tho ounce, you know. Apply the
ointment with a camel's hair brush or
with your finger along the edge of the eye
lids and on the eyebrows before retiring
for the night. Wash it off in the morning
with a claret glassful of hot water, in
which as much baking soda as will lie on
a five cent piece has been dissolved.—Ex
change.
To Utilize "Black Strap."
A lignite sugar refinery has been estab
lished in Philadelphia for utilizing "black
strap," the refuse of molasses. Hitherto
this substance has been used in making
rum, but the product has always been in
excess of the demand. The inventors claim
that tho process will revolutionize the su
gpr industry. It is clarified through pul
i verized lignite.— Hotel Rec-
A-hcad ofevery 'thing
that can be used for washing
and cleaning, is PEARLINE.
If your work is heavy, it is a
necessity ; ifyourwork is light,
it is a luxury. It lessens the
labor of washing, and helps
everywhere in the housework.
There's nothing so harmless
—so effective—so popular and
yet so new—it is rapidly suc
ceeding soap. Try it forwash
ing dishes —try it for washing
anything —everything ; only
try it—for yenir own sake and
ours. A house without Pear
line is "behind the times."
Beware of imitations. iSi JAMES I'VLE. N". V.
LUMBER YARD
CLARKI HUMPHREYS
DEALKKS IN ALL KINDS OF
LUMBER
YARD:
San Mateo and Seventh-street Bridge.
General Business Office—l2s West Second S,
Burdick Block.
P. O. Box 1235. Telephone 178.
mls-3m
Kerekhoff-Cuzner
MILL AND LUMBEE CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
Main Office: LOS ANGELES. Wholesale Yard
at SAN PEDRO.
Branch Yards—Pomona, Pasadena, Lamanda,
Azusa, P.urbank. Planing Mills—Los Angeles
and Pomona. Cargoes furnished to order.
WESTERN LIB! i.
YARD:
Corner Ninth and San Pedro Streets.
LUMBER of all classes can be had at this yard.
mt> tf
J. M. Griffith, President.
H. G. Stevenson, Vice-Pres. and Trea*.
T. E. Nichols, Secy. E. L. Chandler, Supt
J. M. GRIFFITH COMPANY,
Lumber Dealers
And Manufacturers of
DOORS, WINDOWS, BLINDS, STAIRS,
Mill work of every description.
934 N. Alameda Street, Los Angeles.
jul tf
PERRY, MOTT <Sc GO'S
LUMBER YARDS
AND PLANING MILLS,
No. 76 Commercial Street. jul tf
NewMexieo Coal Co.
COAL
our own coal and handle direct to
the consumer
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
NEW MEXICO
Coal Company
TELEPHONE 855.
All kinds of Foreign and Domes
tic Coal in stock.
CHARCOAL AND WOOD
city office: yard:
Hotel Nadeau. Cor. E. Firat St. 4 Santa Fe lie
TELEPHONE 855. mrll-6m
WAREHOUSES.
Naud's Warehouse.
GRAIN, WOOL,
—AND—
General Merchandise Warehouse.
ADVANCES MADE ON WOOL. ml2-tf
CALIFORNIA WAREHOUSE,
Corner Seventh and Alameda.
Grain, Wool and General Merchandise
Warehouse.
Storage, Commission and Insurance.
mal4-tf
WAGON MATERIAL,
HARD WOODS,
I RON, STEEL,
Horseshoes and Nails,
Blacksmith's Coal, Tools, Etc.
JOHN WIGMORE,
117 and 119 South Log Angeles Street
jul tf
Baker Iron Works
950 to 966 BUENA VISTA ST,
LOS ANGELES, CAL,
Adjoining the Southern Pacific Grounds. Tele
phone 124. m 22
TROY LAUNDRY,
Works, 571, 573 and 575 North Main Street Telephone No. 46.'
MAIN OFFICE, UNDER LOS ANGELES NATIONAL BANK, FIRST AND SPRING STREETS.
DressCShirts and Lawn Tenuis Suits and Tennis Shirts Neatly Done.
GANAHL LUMBER COMPANY
Main Office and Yard, First and Alameda Sts.
Carry the most complete stock of seasoned REDWOOD, PINE, LATHS, SHINGLES,
etc,, etc. We have also opened our
HARDWOOD YARD
With an assorted stock of seasoned
Oak, Ash, Cherry, Maple, Poplar, Elm, Walnut, Cabinet Woods,
Mahogany, Spruce, Hickory, Etc., Etc. jel6-3m
J. C. CUNNINGHAM,
Manufacturer of and Dealer in
Trunks and Traveling Bags
132 S. MAIN ST., Opp. Mott Market.
Telephone No. 818.
Repairing promptly attended to. Old trunks
taken in exchange. Orders called for nnd
delivered to nil parts of the city. au-0-3m
MERCHANT TAILORS.
SIMPSON'S FINE TAILORING PARLORS,
I.os Angeles Theatre Building, up stairs.
Telephone 284.
I take this opportunity of expressing to you
my sincere appreciation" for past kindnesses at
your hands, and of netifying you of the re-open
lng of my Tailoring Parlors at 227 S. Soring St.,
Los Angeles Theater building, at which location
I shall he pleased to have you call nnd inspect
my new line of samples of the latest patterns
in"woolens, both imported nnd domestic.
aul-3m JOHN H. SIMPSON.
v THETAILOR *
MAKES THE I W 1
fiH BEST FITTING Clothes A
WtWk 40 Per Cent. I.esq fifjlj
|fl! I Than any other house Ej jja\
jj jjyl on the Pacific Coast sjj
141 and 1435. Spring St.
English Serge Suits to order, §22.50
Wortli 535.00.
Jjjj? TO ORDER,
fmh $3.50
/ ■' \ AND UPWARD,
r MAP TO ORDER
If $15.00
raalrfr AND UPWARD,
111 GABEL'S,
MW' aoß STOCKTON BT.
V Branch,424 KEARNY St.
3-45 NORTH MAIN ST.
ST. EI.MO HOTEL,
wfs
UNITED STATES STABLE,
PETER CLOS, Proprietor.
Horses, Carriages and Saddle Horses To Let.
All Kinds of Horses Bought nnd Sold.
Horses Boarded by the Day, Week or Month
Telephone 255.
No. 952 Flower street, Los Angeles, Cal .
jyl4-tf
F. HAN I MAN,
Telephone 188. P. 0. Box 537.
LOS ANGELES FISHING COMPANY,
Wholesale and retail dealers in
FISH, GAME AND POULTRY
AH kinds of OYSTERS always on hand.
Stalls 8, Hi 13,16,18 aud 20, Mott Market, Los
Angeles, Cal. mlB-5m
EDUCATIONAL.
Rev. D. W. Hanna, A. M- Prest.
Cor. Bth and Hope sts,
Fall term of sixth year commences
September 10, 1890.
FACULTY.
Rev. I). W. Hanna President
Alice M. Broadwell Lady Principal
Christine Moodie, Ella E. Ives.
Margt, F, Hamilton, Blanche N. Epler,
Win. Havemann, a. m. Rev. N. Saunders, a. m.
LIMDA A. CARVER Prln. Preparatory Dept.
Asst. " " "
Jean Russelj Prin. Primary "
Lucy S. Hanna Secretary
The conservatory of Music is under direction of
PROF. A. WILLHARTITZ.
The Art Department is under care of
MISS ELLA S. GOODWIN.
The Department of Elocution and Oratory is
under the care of MISS ELLA E. IVES
For catalogue &c. apply to
au7-(iw D. W. HANNA, President.
ANGELES UNIVERSITY.
Devoted to Christianity and culture. Healtlilul
retired and beautiful location. Preparatory,
collegiate and elective courses. Military arid
calisthenlc drills. Modern languagess, elocu
tion and art, special. Best music courses. Bus
free for students to and from cable cars. Re
opens for both sexes, boarders and others. Sep
tember 2nd. Expenses moderate. For particu
lars address, C. ESTERI.Y, President.
au22-lm P. O. 80x2893.
LOS ANGELES COLLEGE.
CONBKVATORY OF MUSIC.
Rev. D. W. Hanna, A. Willhartitz,
President Director
The following branches are taught in classes
and by private lessons:
Piano, Organ. Violin, Violoncello, Guitar, Man
dolin. Banjo, Flute. Voice Culture. Theory
of Music. Musical Pedagogy. Instru- "
mentation, Choral Singing, Music Reading.
FACULTY.
A. Willhartitz — Piano, Organ, Harmony,
Instrumentation.
M. A. Brown—Voice Culture.
H. E. Hamilton—Violin,
c. 8. DeLano—Guitar and Banjo,
w a lte r McQui i. la n—Flute.
Amelia Werner—Mandolin.
Lessons given before and after school hours.
For further particulars call at COLLEGE,
au7-7w Cor. Bth and Hope Sts.
ST. HILDA'S HALL
GLENDALE.
Boarding and day school for girls, will re-open
SEPTEMBER 10th.
Faculty increased, terms reduced.
Thorough instruction in all departments. Pri
mary, Collegiate. Business, Especially strong
Musical faculty. Circulars at Booksellers and
at room 35. California Bank building.
Address, Rev. J. D. Easter, D. D.
aulO-lm Mason, P. 0.
COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS
Of the University of Southern California will
open the fall term on the 17th of September.
Full Faculty for both College and Seminary.
Prof, F. A. Bacon will have charge of the
Department of Music. He lias secured the ser
vices of Miss Pearson, of Philadelphia, to teach
the instrumental music. Prof J. lvey will con
tinue to give instruction in Art.
Terms in all departments reasonable.
For information address
M. M. BOVARD,
President of the University,
Or W. S. MATTHEW, Registrar,
au 17-lm University P. 0., Los Angeles, Cal.
Fittest Wines, Liquors
AND
FULTON BLOCK
\- 7 New High St.
LOS ANGELES, CAL.
BIDS WANTED
ON TELEPHONE LINE.
Sealed bids will be received at the office of
the Bear Valley Land & Water Company, in
Redlands, for the building of a telephone' line
from Redlands to the Bear Valley dam. Bids
to be opened at the Office of the company on
Tuesday, September 16th, 1890, at 2 p m.
Specifications can be seen at the office of the
company. The company reserve the right to
reject aiiy and all bids. JOHN G. NORTH,
au 17-lmo General Manager
i^M
P" Hp to every man, young, middle-aged,
Jp r\ C XLm and old; postage paid. Address
Dr. H. Dv Mont, 391 Columbus Aye., Boston, Mass.
MEDICAL.
A SCROFULOUS BOY
Running Sores Covered His Body and
Head. Runes Att'ected. Cured
by Cuticura Remedies.
When six months old the left hand of our
little grandchild began to swell, and had every
appearance of a large boil. We poulticed it, but
all to no purpose. About five months after it
became a running sore. Soon other sores
formed. He then had two of them on each
hand, and as his blood be
/ZgjtZ??£jSgK l came more and re impure
il took less time for them to
MT YvSSI hreak out. A sore ("nme on
■ TMb " K '< , hlii. beneath the under
XT Z3t SS> \H np,which was very offensive,
■n «■» v*>k Wff His head was one solid scab,
V SJ) discharging a great deal.
M 'y Tliis was his condition at
\ j twenty-two months old,
7 when I undertook the care
/ V*"«HK him, his mother having
£j\\** t ' died when he was a little
"7) - consumption "(scrofula of
course. He could walk a little, but could not
get up if he fell down, and could not move
when in bed, haying no use of his hands. 1 im
mediately commenced with the cuticura Rem
ediks, using all freely. One sore after another
healed, a bony matter forming in each one" of
these five deep ones just before healing, which
would finally grow loose and were taken out:
then they would heal rapidly. One of these
Ugly bone formations I preserved. After taking
a dozen ami a half bottles he was completely
cured, and is now. at the age of six years, a
strong and healthy child. MRS. E. s. Dll'iGGS,
May!), 1885. 012 K.ClftySt.,Bloomington.lll
M« grandson remains perfectly well. N
signs of scrofula and no sores.
MRS. K. S. DRIGGS,
February 7, 1890. Bloomington, 111.
CUTICURA RESOLVENT
Tlie new Blood Purifier, internally (to cleanse
the blood of all impurities and poisonous ele
ments and thus remove the cause) and Cl'Ti
cura, the great Skin Cure, and COTICUBA BOAP,
an exquisite Skill Beautifier, externally (to clear
the skin and scalp, and restore the hair), cure
every disease and hum or of the skin and blood,
from" pimples to scrofula.
Sold everywhere. Price, Cuticura, 50c. ; Soap,
25c; Resolvent, |1. Prepared by the Potter
Drug and chemical Corporation, Boston.
for "How to Cure Blood Diseases,"
TO THE UNFORTUNATE!
Weakness^
manently cured. The sick and afflicted should
not fail to call upon him. The Doctor has trav
eled extensively in Europe and inspected thor
oughly the various hospitals there, obtaining a
great deal of valuable information, which he is
competent to impart to those in need of his
services. The Doctor cures where others fail.
Try him. DR. GIBBON will make no charge
unless he effects a cure. Persons at a distance
CURED AT HOME. All communications
strictly confidential. All letters answered in
plain envelopes.
Send ten dollars for a package of medicine
Call or write. Address DR. J. F. GIBBON, Box
1,957, San Francisco, Cal.
Mention Los Angeles Herald. 07-12 m
DR. STE I N HART'S
This great strengthening remedy and nerve
tonic is the most positive cure known for
NERVOUS Debility, Spermatorrhoea, seminal
Losses, Night Emissions, Loss of Vital Power,
Sleeplessness, Despondency, Loss of Memory,
Confusion of Ideas, Blur Before the Eyes,
Lassitude, Languor, Gloominess, Depression of
Spirits, Aversion to Society. Easy Discourage
ment, Lack of Confidence. Dullness", Listiessness,
Unfitness for Study or Business and finding
life a burden, Safely, Permanently and Privately
Cured.
PRICES—S2.SO, in liquid or pill form, or five
times the quantity for $10. Address,
DR. P. STEINHART,
Rooms 7 and 8, No. -J 1 r»< „ formerly
Went First St., Log Angeles, Cal.
Office Hours—9 a. m. to 3 |p.m. Sundays—
10 to 1. Sundays 10 to 12.
All communications strictly confidential.
DR. WHITE,
133 North Main Street,
Los Angeles, Cal.
PRIVATE DISEASES.
Gonorrhea, Gleet, Stricture,
Syphilis, spermatorrhea,
Varicocele, Impotency or
lost sexual power. Nervous
Debility, Skin, Kidney and
Bladder Diseases, Unnatural
Discharges, etc., cured privately and perma
nently. Cures guaranteed. Consult the old
doctor. Rooms private Diseases of men only
English Private Dispensary,
133 North Main street. je24-lm
* DR. STAR'S *
CELEBRATED
Homoeopathic Specifics
For Nervous Debility, Decay, Etc., and
all other Homoeopathic Medicines fresh
and genuine, at the Homoeopathic
Pharmacy, No. 505 South Spring Street,
Los Angeles, and Branch Oflice, 99 South
Beach, below southern pier, Santa
Monica.
aMP'CUT this out.
COCKLE'S
Anti- Bilious Pills!
THE GREAT ENGLISH REMEDY.
For Liver, Bile, Indigestion, etc. Free from
mercury; contains only pure Vegetable In
gredient* Agents, LANGLEY & MICHAELS
CO., San Francisco. d2-diw-ly
PENNYROYAL WAFERS.
jrtßS__ Prescription of a physician who
has hud a lifo long experience in
tSwKLwjvT treating female diseases. Is used
"X£fyfC>T monthly with perfect success by
jSKT (T> over 10,000 ladies. Pleasant, safe,
effectual. Ladies ask yourdrug
»L \ P ist for Pennyroyal Wafers and
take no substitute, or inclose post-
for sealed particulars. Sold by
e»i»s'Y^*iP x all druggists, $1 per box. Address
THE EUREKA CHEMICAL CO., Detroit, Mich,
for sale by
I<. W. ELLIS 6c CO., DRUGGISTS
Sole Agents, 113 S. 3pring St 13-ly
S ns a Is acknowledged
'•'"''ins remedy fo*
'i r,;l "f he °nly saie remedy for
Rf 0 ; u " s,r!««'' * teucorrh«'o<.rVVhites.
Wtm I prescribe it and feel
WJJB Mf ,i only tiy safe in recommending it
IgUTHEEvuNsCHCMi"' nn to all sufferers
:incimn*ti,u Mga A. J. STONER, M. D.,
A Decatur, 111,
'<Bh b „ - jF « Sold by ■>> u-e-ista.
PRICK 81.00.
TOI^iTMEN
Buffering from the effects of youthful errors, early
decay, wasting weakness, lost manhood, etc., I will
■end a valuable troatise (sealed) containing full
particulars for home cure. FREE of charge. A
splendid medical work; should bo read by every!
man who la nervous and debilitated. AddraaaJ
Prof. F. C FOWLER, Hoodua. Conn.

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