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Los Angeles herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1890-1893, May 31, 1891, Image 9

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PAGFS *=> A.O 12.
VOL. 36.—N0. 44.
NOVELTY * THEATER.fc-
North Main, near First Street.
OVERWHELMING SUCCESS 1 PRODIGIOUS PROSPERITY!
WEIEIK c t^a e t n u°rS2v, MAY 30.
An Avalanche of New Artists! New Attractions! New Features!
FANNIE HARRINGTON, Soubrette. WM. M'COLLUM, Eccentric Comique. LIZZIE
ERRICKSON, Vocalist. TRAINED DOGS. LEONI, Famous Aeriallst.
PANTZER, Human Serpent. JAS. SNIDER, Dialectician.
Continued Success of our Milesian Humorist. HON. FELIX HANEY, M. P., in bis ludicrous
domedy entitled "THE GENUS TRAMP."
ADMISSION, lOc and' 30c. :-: CUIjTAIN at B:lt5 P.M
Matinees Saturday and Sunday at 2
GRAND OPERA HOUBE,
McLain Si Leu ma n. Managers.
4- .NIQHTB 4
AND SATURDAY MATINEE,
Commencing... WEDNESDAY, JUNE 3
KATIE EMMETT!
In her great play,
I THE WAIFS OF NEW YORKj
A Realistic Picture of the Lights and Shadows
- ln the Great Metropolis.
A POWERFUL COMPANY and
ELABORATE SPECIAL SCENERY!
Seats now on sale.
ORAM) OPERA HOUSE.
McLain A Lehman, Managers.
Tuesday Evening, June 2d,
Complimentary Benefit tendered to
MANAGER
MARTIN LEHMAN
—BY THE—
OWL DRAMATIC CLUB!
On which occasion they will present T. W. Rob
inson's original comedy in three acts,
.i,........... , i
caste:!
With new and appropriate scenery,
costumes, etc.
Tho Club will spare no effort to make this -
performance fully up to the standard of excel
lence already attained. ,
Admission, 25c, 500, 75c and 11 Box office
open for sale of' reserved seats on Friday, May
29, at 10 o'clock.
» •
jq-EW VIENNA BUFFET.
: THE ONLY FAMILY RESORT,
; ■ I
114 AND 110 COURT STREET,
Opposite the Courthouse. V. Kerkow, Prop.
FREE ENTERTAINMENT AND CONCERT
-Every night, and Matinee on Wednes
day from 2 to 4 p. m.
Family Entrance. Family Department.
THIS WEEK—SECRET OF PYGMALION and 1
MADEMOISELLE PAULINE CELLUTA of '
l'ari«, ln connection with a fine Orchestra.
MISS lENASKY, Leader and Soio Violinist.
Fine Lunch and French Dinners all day.
The only place for Imported beer, Lemp's
Extra Pale Beer on Draught.
jyjEINE'S ORCHESTRA
Can be engaged for Balls, Parties, Soirees, Re
ceptions; can furnish any number wanted.
—also —
Music arranged C. Calvin on short notice.
Office at 26b S. Main street, opposite Third
street Office hours from 10 to 12 a. m.; and
irom 1 to 3, p. m. A
5-30 3m FRED. MElNK.Tsanager.
NHEJj*tR-BUSCH CONCERT HALL,
403 N. Main street
W*\_ (i l\' AND
FREE OONOERTI
Every Evening by
MISS ADELE GREVE'S LADIES' ORCHESTRA.
Anheuser-Busch Beer on draft, 5 cents.
Kari-S Dutzlkr & Co., E. L. Sikwkkk. ,
4-H-if Proprietors. Manager. ,
JM>B ANGELES NATATORIUM '
NOW OPEN FOR THE SEASON !
: WAIJM SWIMMING BATH! j
Hot and Cold Baths for Ladies and Gentlemen
ln Porcelain Tubs at all hours.
Large Dressing Room ln connection with
Ladies' Baths.
W. J. McCALDIN, Preß't and Manager.
3-19-3 m ,
EDUCATIONAL. '
W^oo^blijby^usinesscoLLEGif""
—AND—
SHORTHAND AND TYPEWRITING
INSTITUTE,
245 South Spring Street, Los Angeles, Cai.
The leading exponent of practical business (
education.
For circulars and specimens of penmanship, -
call at the college office, or address HOUGH, •
FELKER & WILSON, Proprietors. 4-5 3m
lANO INSTRUCTION, $10 TERM. EXPE- :
rlenced teacher. A. A., Box 20, this office.
. 5-17 Sun Wed7t j
A. SCIIdoL OF ART AND DESIGN (IN- '
• corporated). Open daily, except Mon
days, front 9 to 4 p.m. Corner Spring and j
Third Bts. 5-1 lm j
08 ANGELES UNIVBR9ITY-FOR BOTH '
oexes. Collegiate, preparatory aud train
ing school departments. Music, art and elocu
tion. Military drill and Delsarlo. Send for j
catalogue. CALVIN ESTERLY, President. P.
O. box 2893 3-22 tf j
LOB ANGELES BUSINESS COLLEGE; Ex
perienced teachers; complete course of
study. E. R. SHRADER, I. N. INSKEEP, F. W. j
KELBBY, proprietors, 144 8 Main st. 2 r 14-3mo ,
SCHOOL OF CIVIL, MINING, MECHANICAL, :
Engineering, Surveying, Architecture'
Drawing, Assaying. A. VAN DER NAILLEN .
723 Market st., San Francisco. Send forcir.
cnlars. 12-10 12m
dyers and kiniBheuB.
'
street. Best dyeing in tho city. 1-13 tf
ETRO PO LIT AN STEAM »YE-WORKS,
241 Franklin st. Fine dyeing and clean- i
lng. 113-tf |
CONTRACTORS AND BUILDERS. ■
C~TT KVBACB, CONTRACTOiR aTTuTtSeIL .
Office and shop 419 East Seventh st. Tel
ephone No. 306. 5-13-tf
LOS ANGELES HERALD.
AMUSEMENTS.
SPECIAL NOTICE.
have all errors and excessive valuations ln
assessments corrected is during the meeting of
the board of equalization, if you will list
your property with me, I will furnish you with
a statement giving description and assessed
values, will see If the assessments are equal
ized and have any errors corrected. This will
save time aud trouble when you come to pay
taxes. Charges moderate. Reference: Los
Angeles National Bank. GEO. MUNROK, Pub
lic Accountant, 41 Bryson-Bonebrake block,
Los Augeles. 5-9 2m
REMOVAL NOTICE—THE Raßioia.>
Steam Dying and Cleaning Works, formerly
carried on at 2(14 S. Main St., has been removed
to No. 274 3. Main St., four doors south of the
old stand. 5-13-1 m
R. CHAS. DE BZIGEIHY HAS REMOVED
his office and residence to 653 8. Hill St.,
corner Seventh Office hours, 9-10 a.m., 2-4
and7-Bpm. Telephone 1056. 3-31 tf
OTICB —THE LOS ANGELES CITY WATER
Company will strictly enforce the follow
ing rule: The hours for sprinkling are between
6 and 8 o'clock a. m., and 6 and S o'clock p. m.
For a violation of the above regulation the
water will be shut off, and a fine of $2 will be
charged before water will be turned on again.
aul7-lv _^
EXCURSIONS.
REGULAR
leave l.os Angeles June Ist, Bth, 15th, 22d
and 29th via Rio Grande route; experienced
manager in charge; Pullman tourist cars
through to Chicago and Boston. Ask for rates
and circulars. J. C. JUDSON & CO., 119 N.
Springst 5-16 tf
JUDSON EXCURSIONS EAST EVERY MO.N
day via Rio Grande route. Experienced
manager in charge. Tourist cars to Chicago
and Boston. J. C. JUDSON & CO., 119 N. Soring
•t; je!2-U
SPECIAL TEACHERS' EXCUKSIoN WltiL
leave Los Angeles June Ist for all points
east via Denver and Rio Grande and Rock
Island railways, stopping one day at Salt Lake
City and a few hours at Glenwood Springs,
Colorado's famous bathing resdrt. Through
Pullman tourist cars, saving hotel expenses;
personally conducted. For particulars, cir
culars, rates, etc., address F. VV. THOMPSON,
138 8. Spring St. 5-10 tf
OCX ISLAND ROUTE EXCURSIONS
leave Los Angeles every Tuesday via Den
ver and Rio Grande railway. Through Pull
man tourist cars to Chicago via Salt Lake City,
Leadvllle and Denver. For circulars, rates,
etc., call on or address F. W. THOMPSON, 138
3. Spring st. 5-10 tf
r>H!LLIPB' EXCURSIONS EVERY WEEK
X via Denver and Rio Grande railroad. Only
excursions running tourist cars through to
Boston. Office No. 125% W. Second st., bet.
Spring and Main sts., 3 doors from Spring St.
?V4
CANTA FK ROUTE STILL AHEAD OF ALL
O competitors, both in time and distance, to
all points East. Special tourist excursions last
every THURSDAY. ..For full information, a«
ply to or address any agent, or CLARENCE A.
WARNER. Bxc. Manager, 80 K. Spring. l-13tl
PHYSICIANS.
DR. CHAPMAN, 223 S. SPRING ST., FOR
merly House Surgeon City and County Hos
pital, San Francisco; also Surgeon ln Hospital
for Ruptured and Crippled, New York city.
5-55 6m
DR. T. L. BURNETT, FORMER ASSOCIATE
demonstrator of anatomy, Hospital College
of Medicine, and .visiting surgeon to Masonic
Widows and Orphans' Home and Infirmary of
Louisville. No. 341% S. Spring St. Special at
tention to surgery and gvntecologlcal surgery.
5-30 lm
DR. ALBERT WILLIAMS, HOMEOPATHIST,
131 N. Spring St. (Phillips block): general,
family and obstetric practice. Telephone 433.
Day and night 1-10-tf
LZABALA, M. D., FROM THE FACUL
. ties of Paris and Madrid. Office and resi
dence 310U N. Main st , Los Angeles, Cal.
Telephone 278. Office hours—ll to 12, 2to 4,
7 to 8. 5-19
MRS. DR. J. H. SMITH, SPECIALTY, MlD
wifery. Ladles cared for during confine
ment at 727 Bellevue aye. m 28 tf
R. HUGHES, FORMER RESIDENT 3UR
geon to the New York Hospital. Specialty:
Surgery aud Genlto-Urlnary diseases. 175 N.
Spring st. Hours, 9to 11, 2to 4. 2-22-tf
RS. DR. WELLS, "THE CLIFTON," 233
N. Broadway. Specialty, diseases of
women. Many years of successful painless
methods in rectal diseases.
HAS. W. BRYSON, M. D—l3BU SOUTH
Spring st. Telephone: Office, 796; resi
dence, 798. 12-17
&. C. EDGAR SMITH—DISEASES OF
women a specialty; rectal diseases treated
by the Brinkerhoff painless system; office,
corner Main and Seventh sts., Robarts block.
Telephone 1031. ml6tl
DR. M.HILTON WILLIAMS. DIBEABE9 0I
the head, throat, chest and blood a speci
alty Office 137 South Broadway, MILLEB
BUILDING. 9-5-tf
REBECCA LEE DORSEY, M. D. OFFICE
No. I\i N. Main st. Special attention given
to obstetrics, gynecology and diseases ol
children. Hours 9to 11 a. m. and 2t04 p. m.
Telephone 513. )e2-tf
specialists!
seuse and Manual Therapeutics. Consul
tation and diagnosis free. Office 121 North
Broadway. Hours, 10 to 2, sto 7.
5-14-lm
R. ROBERT BROWN IS PERMANENTLY
located at 316% S. Spring St., where he
will diagnose all diseases without asking any
Questions. All consultations free. Women's
diseases a specialty. 5-12 lm
R. TOM SHE BIN, CHINESE PHYSICIAN
and surgeon. Euclid, 361 N. Main St., op
poslte the Baker block.. 5-27 lm
MIDWIVEfT
First St., Los Angeles, Cal, Graduate of
two colleges: Newland's college, St. Louis, St.
Louis School Midwifery, St. Louis. Also pri
vate Instructions in obstetrics. 5-13-3 m
DENTISTS.
Ro.
• to No. 131 N. Spring st:, rooms 1 and 2,
Phillips block, Los Angeles. Cal. mlstf
ADAMS 8R03., DENTISTS, REMOVED TO
208 N. Main street, opposite Temple block.
Painless filling and extracting. Crowns, $5 up;
best sets teeth, $0 to $10. Rooms 1, 2, 3. 4, 5
and 6. ' 1-17-tf
DR. C. STEVENS & SONS, 107 N. SPRING
St., Schumacher block, rooms 18 and 19;
teeth filled and extracted painlessly; plates (4
to $10; heurs, Ba. m. to 5 p. m., Sundays, 9a.
m. to 1 p, m. je26-tf
W. WELLS, COR. SPRING AND FIRST
. its., Wilson block; take elevator; teeth
filled and extracted without pain; gold crowns
and bridge work a specialty. Room 36. m4tf
DR. TOLHURBT, DENTIST, 108% N. SPRING
St.. rooms 2. (> and 7. Painless extracting
PASTURAGE.
WANTED— HORSES TO PASTURE; ABUND
ahce of grass and water, at $2 per month,
on Washington st. Ofllce, 258 S. Main St.
5-10 lm
WANTED— HORSES TO PASTURE; ABUN
dance of grass and water; board fence;
horses called for If desired. W. E. HUGHES,
rooms 86 aud 87, Bryson-Bonebrake build
ing; 4-12-tf
ARCHITECTS.
RB. YOUNG,
. Wilson block. 104 S. Springst. 1-29-1
SUNDAY MORNING. MAY 31, 1891.—TWELVE PAGES.
PLAYS AND PLAYERS
How Eastern Companies Fake
in California.
News About Theatrical Eventy
Announced for This City.
Features of a Late Parisian Fin dt
Cieele Comedy.
■a i
The Owls Benefit to Manager Lehman.
Katie Emmett on Wednesday-
News Notes and [Gossip.
Of late years it haa been the habit of
a certain clasa of companies that visit
the coaat during the summer season, to
bring an inferior class of artists. Their
booking is generally done months be*
fore, while they have an excellent com
pany, and while the press ia loud in
their praises, and the local manager
congratulates himself that he has se
cured a first-class booking, but alas,
when the time arrives he finds that in
stead of artists of reputation, the com
pany is made up of a lot of barnstormers
brought together for' the coast tour.
They are generally greeted with empty
houses, aa they deserve, and their man
ager discovers that the people are not is
easily imposed upon as he imagined,
and he then does the injustice [of
saying that the town is worse thfn
dead.
A notable example of thia waa the cake
of the Fakir company at the Loa Angeles
laat week. Thia company advertised
before it came here that it had in its
personnel several popular artists. The
Herald was handed, by its advance
agent, a cast of the company, and in
good faith printed it in last Sunday's
issue. Of that list the following were
not in the company when it arrived :
Mark Sullivan, George Mitchell, Fred
Rankin, Lizzie Derious Doly, Jennette
St. Henry, Katherine B. Howe, Mollie
Sherwood and Dudie Tracy.
More than that, two characters were
entirely cut out, those of Tommy Tombs
and Chloe.
Manager Wyatt knew nothing of thia
until the programmes were printed, and
then it was too late to take any action.
Such a way of doing business is noth
ing less than fraudulent; lithographs of
Sullivan and Lizzie Daly were stuck in
windows, and no information aa to the
true condition of the company was given
until the curtain went Up on the per
formance.
Another case in point waa that of
Miller Brothers' Kaiaaka company.
This was advertised through the east as
possessing "forty chunks of feminine
voluptuosnesa," meaning forty ballet
girls. When the company arrived here
there were with it exactly six dancers.
The Jarbeau company played the same
trick, though to not quite the same ex
tent.
Another "kick," that theater patrons
and the local managers have to register
against the traveling manager is the
habit qf cutting a programme short on
the last night, in order to finish in time
to take the train north. In such a case
lines are omitted, situations cut out, en
cores refused and the show, whatever it
may be, ia rushed through at a Sunol
gait. The manager of the local house i 3
helpless in this matter, and deserves no
blame. The proprietor of the com
pany ia the one at fault. There ia
no reason why the patron of a perform
ance at ita last presentation should not
get as much for his money as the first
nighter.
AN END OF THE CENTURY COMEDY.
"Pshaw! What doea it matter?"
That is what a deceived husband says
to his wife who has just confessed her
frailty to him, in the comedy Amour
euse, the latest success at the Odeon
theater, Paria. Then the curtain falls.
The play ia essentially an end of the
century affair in its tone. Mile. Ger
maine marries Etienne Feriaud, who
first meeta her for the purpose of plead
ing the cause of his friend Pascal Del
annoy. Germaine fancies Etienne,
however, and Pascal takes the matter
good naturedly, and continues to be a
friend to both. Germaine ia so
much in love with her husband
as to be tiresome. The honeymoon
will never end. He reproaches
her for her excessive ardor and
a quarrel results. At the climax Pas
cal Delanny enters and Etienne in hia
anger cries out that he can take his
wife if he wants her. "
"Yea, take me, I must revenge my
self," cries Germaine, and for revenge
she immediately proceeds to break the
seventh commandment all to pieces
with Pascal as her confederate.
Then she recovers from her anger and
finds she is more than ever in love with
her husband, and is horrified at her sin.
Etienne also finds that a too loving wife
is very nice to have about the houae and
is quite ready to make up when Ger
maine comes to him, falls on her knees,
confesses, and is met with a kisa and
the words: "Pshaw! what does it mat
ter."
THE OWLS.
On Tuesday evening the Owl Dramatic
club will tender Martin Lehman a bene
fit, at which time they will present for
the first time here, T. W. Robertson's
comedy-drama, Caste. Mr. Lehman has
been connected with the theatrical busi
ness, directly and indirectly, lnr the past
twenty years, and with the Owls since
their organization, eleven years ago, and
this is the only instance where' he haß
been tendered" an acknowledgement of
his services. The Owls will present, in
addition to the old favorites, Mrs. Min
nie Hance Owens in the soubrette part of
Polly, Mrs Vera M. Beane, in the leading
heavy part of the Marchioness, and Tom
Barnes in the low comedy part. Miss
Gertrude Foster will essay the leading
role of Esther, while Mr. Vogelsang
will be seen in the part of George
D'Alroy. Mr. Dobinson will be seen in
the difficult role of Captain Hawtree.
Mr. Lehman will portray the role of
the drunken father, a part entirely dif
ferent from anything he haa aa yet at
tempted. The play will be staged with
the same care of detail that has always
sharacterized the performances of this
popular club.
KATIE EMMETT.
The next profeaaional attraction at the
Grand will be Katie Emmett, in the
Waifs of New York, who begins a four
night engagement Wednesday, June 3d.
It ia decidedly a sensational creation,
with a great many features of thrilling
interest. The story deala with life in
New York. Pathos and humor give
spice and variety to the unraveling of
the plot. Love and its vicissitudes, of
course, play an important part, and vil
lainy of the worat sort is constantly in
terfering to interrupt the harmony of
two young hearts. Mias Emmett is ably
supported by Amy Ames, who created
auch a favorable impression while with
the Tin Soldier; Geo.W.Thompson, who
is recognized as being one of the beat
character comedians, and a company of
capable players.
SULLIVAN AT THE LOS ANGELES.
Manager Wyatt, of the Loa Angelea
theatre, haa booked the slugger-actor,
the immortal John L. Sullivan, in Dun
can B. Harrison's play, Honest
Hearts and Willing Hands. What
ever John L. may be as an actor,
he is certainly an object of interest to
thousands of people, as being the best
known specimen of a man physically.
He haa a chance to show himself in ring
attire during the play, in a glove contest
with another pugilist. That the big
fellow will draw a lull house is hardly
open to doubt.
NOTES.
Energetic, enthusiastic Bandholdt
has joined the Grand opera houae forces.
Lizzie Annandale, formerly with
Emma Abbott, has joined the Lamont
opera company.
It ia reported that Ada Rehan will
follow John Drew's example and leave
Daly's company.
There is a new electrical play called
Lewa the Lineman. In one of the
scenes a man hangs on the telegraph
wire—killed by the shook.
Sport McAllister is the title of Bobby
Gaylor's new farce comedy, which will
be aeen in this city next season under
the direction of W. A. Brady.
The Carleton opera company now in
cludes J. X,. Murray, W. H. Fitzgerald,
Charlea A/*feigelow, Jeannie Winston,
Alice Vincent and Marian Langdon.
Fanny Davenport at one time played
the part of Carline in Black Crook,
when it was under the direction of
Tony Denier. Clara Morris was also in
the cast.
Rose Beaudet's picture adorns the first
page of the last number of the New York
Dramatic News. She is now Mra. Sam
uel Edwards. Miss Beaudet was a Mias
Lang, of Stockton, this state.
A terrible warning to stage-struck as
pirants comes from Troy, Alabama. A
party of amateurs were rehearsing in the
theater, when the roof fell in. Two
were killed and two seriously injured.
The Herald last Sunday stated that
Janauschek would retire from the stage.
Tliißl was baaed on a telegram to the
New York Herald. G. A. Hall, the old
lady's manager, now denies the story.
She is still on it, or thinks ao.
Mrs. Minnie Hance-Owena.who ia cast
for the part of Polly Ecclea in Caste as
it will be played by the Owls on Tues
day evening, ia a very handsome woman.
She can beat be described as fascinating.
Her voice, face and figure would seem
to qualify her for a pronounced success.
Mr. Frank Conant has pictures of
Wallie Edinger, Gertie Homan, Georgie
Cooper, Elsie Leslie, Flossie Ethyl and
Tommy Russell, all the Little Lord
Fauntleroye. Of them all Mr. Conant
says that Georgie Cooper, the little girl
who played here last week, is the moat
talented,'an opinion that is shared by
many.
Ramsay Morris has been in the city
the past week, in the interest of Charles
Frohman's Men and Women company.
Mr. Morris is an author of considerable
notoriety, his principal work being The
Tigress. He has just turned over to his
publishers the manuscript of a new book
which will appear on the market in
September.
There has been quite a split in the
ranks of the Bostonians, and the result
will be watched with intereat by their
admirers in this city. In addition to
the retirementof Marie Stone, they will
also lose Juliette Cordon, who goes to
Europe this Bummer. Mr. D. W.
Dewey will replace Fred Pond aa busi
ness manager; and it is also reported
that Frothingham and Cowles will with
draw from the company.
Mra. Vera Beane, who will play the
Marquise de St. Maur in the Owl club's
rendering of Caste on Tuesday evening,
is aaid to have at one time been a pro
feasional. This ia not her first appear
ance in thia city. She came here from
San Diego about two years ago as one of
the amateurs who played that wonder
ful amateur play, A Woman Scorned.
Her acting made a decided impression
on those who saw her at that time.
The success of Charlea Frohman's
company in Men and Women iv San
Francisco haa been phenomenal, and it
is safe to predict a prosperous engage
ment here. Frank Mordaunt, Frederick
De Bellville, William Morris, R. A.
Roberts, Orrin Johnson and Sidney
Armstrong develop the serious intereat
of the piece with great skill and finiah.
M. A. Kenneday's performance of Col.
Zip is aaid to be one of the most
pleasing features of the play. Odette
Tyler, Etta Hawkins, Annie and Maud
Adams and Kate Massed form a coterie
of clever and attractive ladies.
Aa haa been mentioned before in the
columns of thia journal, Managers Mc-
Lain & Lehman are thinking seriously
of playing Sarah Bernhardt in this city
on her return from Australia, but as
their expenaea will run up to over $3000
for a performance, of course it is a great
undertaking, and will depend altogether
upon the spirit of liberality shown by
the people of the city. It has been sug
gested that a subscription list be start
ed, and at the same time the choice of
seats be sold at auction. To this end,
about the middle of July an effort will
be made to secure a subscription list
that will warrant Messrs. McLain &
Lehman in guaranteeing the amount
required.
Miles's Nerve and Liver Pills
Acton a new principle—regulating the liver
stomach and bowels through the nerves. A new
discovery. Dr Miles's Pills speedily cure bil
iousness, bad taste, torpid liver, piles, constipa
tion. Tjnequaled for men, women, children.
Smallest, mildest, surest! Fifty doses, 25 cts
Samples free by all druggists.
Use German family soap.
THE RANCHES.
Southern California Products
and Producers.
The Advantages of Bamboo as
Fencing Material.
How a Santa Barbara County Rancher
Makes Money.
The Proflts Troin a Riverside Orange
Orchard—News Notes of General
Interest on Farm Matters.
The Kern County Echo speaks of a
valuable invention of C. A. Maul in util
izing bamboo for fencing, and says that
Borne two or three years ago he got a few
bamboo roots from W. A. Saunders of
Fresno county. These grew and multi
plied until now Mr. Maul has about an
acre set to thia plant.
In the time that he has had it, oppor
tunity haa been had for studying its
growth here, and it may now be asserted
that on that point there is no need for
fear. It doea beat in damp land, pro
ducing there the greateat number and
largest growth of canea, but a valuable
crop can be secured on land of ordinary
moisture.
Mr. Maul haa just completed the con
struction of a mile of fence, using these
bamboo canea for pickets, and knows
what the cost is. His plan ia this:
Second-hand railroad ties Were bought
and split for posts. These, were set a rod
apart. With a machine that cost about
$25 the canea were woven into a web
using six No. 14 wires for the chain.
The canea were cut 3}4 feet long, the
fence posts are 4 feet high, and along
the top of the latter a barbed wire ia
stretched, ao that when completed one
haa a chicken or rabbit-proof fence as
well as a atrong stock fence. Thia fence,
Mr. Maul says, can be built for 40 cents
a rod where one raises hia own bamboo.
He thinks the full annual capacity of an
acre of bamboo, if well set and well
watered, would be fully four miles of
fencing.
The advantages of thia fence are
many. Firat and foremost it costs less
than almost any other fence made; it is
neat and attractive; about the only
item of expense is for labor, and that
keepa the money at home; it is very
durable, the bamboo becoming aa hard
as bone and never rotting; rabbits can
not gnaw it, and it will not ignite from
burning grass near it, as common pine
fencing or lath will; stock can see it,
and hence will uot run against it; it can
be made of any height desired, the canes
growing as high aa twelve to fifteen feet;
it may be taken down, piled up and
moved without injury and at slight ex
pense.
HOW ONE RANCHER MAKES MONEY.
The Santa Barbara Press has the fol
lowing to say about Mr. Joseph Sexton's
ranch in Goleta. It illustrates the va
riety of ways by which the Southern
California farmer can make money:
Whether Mr. Sexton has an unusually
productive piece of land, or exerciaea
unuaual skill, we will leave for others
to decide, but no one can deny that hia
success haa been astonishing. He haa
only sixty-five acres in all, and while
only a small portion of it ia in pampas
graaß, he marketa $6000 or $7000 worth
of plumes every year. The past season
he shipped 250,000.
He has a few aerea in loquats that
bring a handaome little income of them
selves. Yet Mr. Sexton's principal bus
iness is as seedsman and florist; this sea
son he shipped 10,000 lily bulbs east
from half an acre of ground. When thia
field of lilies was in bloom it was esti
mated that there were one million of
these beautiful white flowers out.
Thousands of dollars worth of seeds,
plants, cut flowers, and nuts besides are
marketed annually. One acre of this
place ia more profitable than a whole
quarter section in many parts of the
atate that is devoted to wheat raising.
When Mr. Sexton exhibited his carna
tions two weeks ago, he had 460 varie
ties and since that time the number has
been increased to 500.
It would require a volume to describe
the many rare, beautiful and profit-mak
ing products of this out-door conserva
tory.
PROFITS IN ORANGES.
"A. J. Twogood, of Riverside, was one
of the firat settlers in that place, and he
haa been constantly engaged in the cul
tivation of oranges there to thia day.
Some twenty years ago he planted 430
treea twenty-seven feet apart each way,
a little more room than was usually
given the trees at that time. The treea
took up about six acres of ground. They
are now fine trees,allseedlings, of course
as the original navel buds had not
reached Southern California then.
Laßt fall and winter Mr. Twogood put
$2000 worth of fertilizers on his little
bit of ground, using all sorts of good
material, from sheep corals, stables,
bone and phosphates. He has just fin
ished marketing the crop, and finds
$7500 to the credit oi those cix acres of
twenty-year-old seedling orange treea.
It ia an average of about $17 a tree, or
$1250 per acre. If the cost of fertilizing
is deducted it still leaves a net profit of
$6500 from the six acres, or nearly $917
per acre. The coat of taking care of the
orchard ia nominal, and that of market
ing not large.—[California;
The latest gopher exterminator which
has been brought to the notice of the
people is the weasel, a small animal a
little larger than a squirrel, which is
the mortal enemy of mice, rats, gophers,
etc. It is claimed that one weasel will,
in a very short time, clean a ten-acre
lot of gophers.—[Ex.
California brandies have taken firat
rank in the world. In France, where
the beat brandy is supposed to be made,
at the Paria exposition, the California
product received firat prize, a gold medal
and diploma. Never drink brandy, but
if you will drink it let it be California
brandy, tbe best on earth, and the pro
duct of our own country.—[Pasadena
Star.
Well cured lemons will prove good
property later on. The foreign crop
PAGES Q TO 12.
FIVE CENTS.
has been badly damaged and prices are
advancing rapidly. Six dollars and
fifty cents per box for choice stock is
asked in the east at present. Dealers
predict that much higher prices will
rule. One shipper claims that choice
lemons in midsummer will sell at $10
per box.—[California Fruit Grower.
In Santa Barbara there is some inter
est being manifested in theChoco.a new
plant or vine, well known in the island
of Samoa. The fruit weighs on the aver
age about three pounds, and has the
flavor of a chestnut. It ripens in about
ninety 'days, and has been known to
grow to weigh twenty pounds. If it can
be grown in Santa Barbara it can be in
Riverside. A chestnut weighing three
or four pounds would be quite a curios
ty.—[Riverside Press.
The 1300-acre ranch of Dixie Thomp
son, just below town, will produce more
value this season than many whole
counties in Kansas. At a fair estimate
it will produce 2,000,000 pounds of beans,
which at the present market price of
three cents a pound will make Mr.
Thompson a gross sum of $60,000. It is
safe to say that he made more than that
sum from his Ventura county ranch last
season, and he can truthfully say, with
others, that there is money in beans.—
[Ventura Free Fress.
To the question by a representative of
the Santa Barbara Press, who visited
£11 wood the other day, Mr. Cooper said
that it was just one year from the time
the olive is in bloom to the time the
olive is ready for market, on the 30th oi
May. Mr. Cooper's olive orchard now
comprises about two hundred acres, and
the output this year will be equal to
twenty-eight thousand full bottles; that
at one dollar a bottle wholesale, is cer
tain cf a considerable business.
Some of the Southern California fruit
growers who have learned the art of
curing lemons properly for market, are
getting $5.50 a box for their lemon crops
in New York and Philadelphia. The
receipts of Mediterranean lemons in the
former city only last month were 83,500
boxes, and the receipts there will un
doubtedly be over 150,000 boxes this
month. So it does not seem that the
lemon growing industry in California for
the American market can be overdone
for many, many years.—[Pomona Pro
gress.
Those who contemplate the proba
bility of the orange business being over
done, ahoud take into consideration the
fact that the United States increases in
population about 15,000,000 every ten
years. Admitting that California ships
today 4000 carloads of oranges of 300
boxes to the car, it would give only one
box per year to every ten persons who
will come to this country in the next
ten years, to say nothing of the 65,000,
--000 who are already here. —San Bernar
dino' Times-Index.
The strange and very destructive
grape vine disease, that caused the ruin
of thouaanda of acres of vineyarda in
Southern California in 1887, 1888 and
1889. has certainly run its course. 1 A
few vines in Pomona died of the disease
two and three yeara ago, and for a time,
the owners of vineyard property were
somewhat alarmed. During the past
year, however, there has been no in
crease in the disease in this locality,
and the best kept vineyards have never
looked better than thia season. —[Po-
mona Progress.
The importance of our local bee indus
try ia usually overlooked and yet con
stitutes an important element in the
natural wealth of Southern California.
The season this year has so iar been very
favorable in its cool weather for the de
velopment of honey in the white sage,
the most valuable of our honey producing
plants. In the foothills in the vicinity of
Pomona are from ten to twenty bee men
with stands of bees ranging from fifty to
six hundred swarms. The total number
of stands is estimated at between two
and three thousand. As each swarm
will produce usually from fifty to two
hundred pounds of honey in a season, it
will be seen that, at the usual prices, the
Pomona honey crop will be worth from
$10,000 to $20,000.—[Pomona Progress.
Extent of American Tin Labor.
The Republican papers having de
clared that the duty on tin in the Mc-
Kinley bill had built up a new and great
industay in the United States that was
giving vast employment to American
labor, the St. Louis Republic has paid a
special visit to the tin works of Nied
ringhaus, cited by the tin maniacs as a
sample of what the new industry is do
ing. Having fully investigated the mat
ter, after having gone into the works
and seen what was going on in the way
of manufacturing tin plates, the Repub
lic states the case editorially as follows:
"At present the entire output of the
great Niedringhaus tin plate factory is
handled by a single Welshman, who,
with three boys and two other gentle
men, represents the American labor en
gaged in this great industry west of the
Alleghanies. Mr. Niedringhaus is un
derstood to be making arrangements to
furnish American tin cups to Republi
can clubs for 1892. The Democrats
ought to show their willingness to en
courage American industry by ordering
twice as many as the Republicans take,
stamping on each of them the cost of
manufacture, the tariff tax, the Belling
profit, the amount of wages paid, and
the names, nationalities, ages, and sex
of the 'American labor' employed. If
the Democrats show a proper apprecia
tion of their Niedring
haus will have to hire at least live
Welshmen and as many as fifteen boys
before hia infant industry cuts its eye
teeth."
ON REDONDO PIER.
A vision of beauty burst on my view,
With marble brow and Hps carnation:
Her hair was golden -of the sunset's hue,
On her face the glow of animation.
Her sylph-Uke form, to artists' ideal true,
Called forth murmurs of admiration;
Her liquid eyes were like the glistening dew,
Beautiful, queen of all creation!
"Oh Heav'nly one, in what pursuit are you
Abroad so soon—at hours so bewitching!"
"No angel I," said she, "although 'tis true
I'm an Angel (ena) out fishing".
Jno.
Even l>»wn to an Editor.
An exchange tells how a girl's taste
differs according to her age : At 16 she
wants a dude with toothpick shoes and
a microscopic mustache ; at 18 a base
ball player; at 20 a chief justice with
piles of tin ; at 25 she'll be satisfied with
a member of congress; at 30 a doctor or
preacher will do; at 35 anything that
wears pants, from an editor up.

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