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The Scranton tribune. (Scranton, Pa.) 1891-1910, January 02, 1897, Image 10

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THE SCTJANTON TIUBTTOTS-SATUIlDAY MOliNIN'GU JAKUARlr 2, 1897.
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Copyright. 1807, by
PA11T I.
Con le no), the lilgliwayinnn, started
uj In Ills bed when the Kraut bell of
Notre Duine Htruck twelve, Silently,
niul with a wakhiK mini's curiosity, he
counted tho strokes, nodding his head
at each one, and thinking to himself
tlint It would be live or six of the
morning and time for him to be about.
Hut when the clock went on to tell
the hour of midnight, an exclnmatlun
burst from his lips,
"Kaprlntl," said ho to himself. "I
have not slept an hour. I might know
that by the music below, tfalnt I'aul!
what throats they have!"
No man cares to be deceived with
the tricks of sleep; nor was Con le ltol,
otherwise the Little IJed Man, other
wise Jacques Cabot, the notorious
scourge of the highways about Tails,
and one of the most successful robbers
that ever yet spurs to a horse, an ex
ception to the rule. Ho concluded that
lie had a personal grievance agalpst
the night for thus cheating him. He
began to tell himself that he was thirs
ty, and would do well to draw on his
boots and venture out to a cabaret for
n cup of wine. Then he remembered
that he was not In tho habit of losing
bis Bleep because a few cutthroats
bawled beneath Jio windows of his
garret. Some strange sound, some un
usual omen of the night, must have
troubled his ears while lie slept, he
said. And, for the llrst time for many
a day, lie began to remember that the
guards of the new lieutenant of police
were then hunting for him out In the
woods beyond Fontenay.
"Sang-bleu," he cried, springing sud
denly from his bed, and going to the
window of his garret, that he might
look down thence to tho narrow street
below, "am I a woman that I should
start at shadows on the wall? What a
thing to tell at the house of the lied
Cock, too!"
He put his head out of the window,
and the moving panorama of the slum
below reassured him. There, in tho
heart of the thieves' quarter of the
Paris of ITS!), ho might well think him
self, safe even from the early energies
of II. do .Sartlnes who had just come to
be lieutenant of police. Though tho
day had begun with driving sleet and
bitter wind, few of the beggars In that
Hue St. Sauveur thought of sleep, or
Indeed of anything but thcf- pleasures.
Hegularly, when night fell, these
rogues, whom Coq le ltol now looked
down upon with satisfaction, hastened
to quit tho church doors and tho gates
of the hotels and hurried to the laby
rinth of the lllthy lanes and tottering
houses, which had marked their king
dom behind the Hue Mauconsell, almost
since Paris had risen about the islands
of the marshes. A motley group they
were; blind men counting their sous;
lepers washing off their sham sores;
lame men carrying their crutches; ven
dors of oranges with their cry; "Portu
gal, Portugal;" rogues whom the gib
bet long had claimed in vain. Weary
with the labors of the unbefriendlng
day, eager for the shelter of the caba
ret, ripe for quarrel or drink or play,
they now rioted In the security of, the
alleys behind the markets, and so hid
from the night of the greater Paris the
cankering sore which was her re
proach by day.
Coq Le Pol permitted the bitter wind
to blow upon his face for some min
utes; then he drew back his head, for
lie remembered his intention to drink a
cup of wine at tho nearest cabaret, and
he found the idea a very good one.
"Bah," said he to himself, as he
tugged at his long boots and looked at
his pistols, which lay ready for prim
ing, upon the table by his ragged bed,
"what have I to do with woman's tat
tle lure? Guards In the Hue St. Sau
veur! Norn du dlable, what a day that
would be. I would like to see It."
The notion amused him, and ho
chucl'led to himself pleasantly; but, of
a sudden, the laugh died down upon his
lips, and he sat upon the bed like one
petrified. He had become aware In
that Instant of the piesence of another
In the room a gaunt llgure dressed
from head to foot in black, and masked
so closely that even the eyes were not
visible. Noiselessly, with no drawing
of bolt or creak of foot, the appartltlon
had come to his bedside. The robber
G
"IMBECILE,"
SAID HE, "WOULD
COMES TO SAVE
feared nothing human but now he
trembled so that tho whole bed shook,
and the sweat fell In Icy cold drops
from his brow down upon his nuked
chest.
"God have pity, who are you?" ho
asked, not Uarlnir so much as to raise
his hand to tho pistol beside him,
Tho stranger laughed merrily, and
crossing before tho robber, he sat him
self upon a rough oak bench, which was
tho only seat, other than the bed, In the
jnlsejablo attic. Coq lo Pol could seo
by the little light which fell through
tho lattice that his visitor wore good
clothes, nnd that the hilt of his sword
was n-gllttor with diamonds.
"lion solr, M. Jacques Cabot," said
the man, leaning back against tho
wall, nnd crossing his legs for comfort,
"bon solr, or, perhaps, I should say
1 ' I ' i i&a -id ---
JjUte oAil
Max Potuborton.
rightly, bon Jour. The clock has Just
gone twelve, 1 think."
Coq laughed nervously. Ho waa
ashamed now that he should have so
carried himself.
"Sang-bleu," said he, "I thought you
were the devil."
The man neglected to see that he was
unanswered.
"You ure an early riser, M. Cabot,"
he continued, playfully, "to bo out of
your bed at midnight. Cell, what a
monk you would make."
Tho lubber shrugged his shoulders,
and since he feared his visitor no long
er, he stretched out a hand and took up
one of his pistols. In the same mo
ment, the man In the mask gave a sharp
lunge with his foot, and so cleverly
was It done that the pistol went Hy
ing up to the roof, and theru exploded
Willi a crash like that of a caimoirr
"Imbecile," said he, "would you lire
upon one who comes to save your
neck?"
Coq le Pol sank bac"k upon the bed
with a sigh. After all, he said to him
self, there was something uncanny
about the coming of this mask.
"Well," he usked, doggedly, "and
what next?"
The man rose and opened the win
dow. "This Is no time for words," said he,
"let your ears tell you the tale."
He held up his hand wnrnlngly, bid
ding the other to listen; and while
tho two stood there at tho little case
ment a stranee sound arose above the
hum of the city life. It was a sound
neither of beggars growling nor of
rogues at their play. AVhen It had con
tinued a little while, there was added
to It the loud rattle of musketry, the
clash of swords, and tho tiamp of
many feet; while, clear above all, and
resounding like the note of a trumpet,
v, as the cry: "The guards, the guards."
"You hear," exclaimed tho unknown,
drawing back from the window, "our
friends, the cut-throats, are welcom
ing the guards of the new lieutenant of
police. Shall I tell you, M. Cabot,
"IF YOU CAME HEME TO AID ME,
THIS IS, THE TIME FOU YOUP
WORK."
how many years it Is since a dragoon
dared to pass the Virgin's statue? You
have no love for histoiy, you say. Saint
Denis, I do not wonder at It, since It
Is for you that M. do Sartlnes has
hi ought about this pretty play, and
come into this den of beasts."
Coq le Hoi, quickened by tho danger,
took ui) his second pistol. His natural
courage had returned to him now.
Little man that he was, little, and with
a face like a young girl's, he had made
danger so good a bedfellow that sur
prise was rather pleasant, than alarm
ing, to him.
"Bah," cried he, "that Sartlnes should
be such a fool as to look for me at
the house of the Ped Cock. Oh', we
shall have a merry night, comrade
yet who you are, and why you are here
the devil take me if 1 can say."
He buttoned his cloak around his
shoulders with Itching fingers,, con
vinced, though he did not say so, that
this man ho had come to him so mys
teriously, had come as a friend. Mean
while, the whole quarter without was
thundering with the clamor of the mob
hell Itself seemed to have been loosed
In that labyrinth of crime and squalor.
Coq le Pol was sure that hla liberty
was a matter of moments.
" ,
YOU PIPE
YOUP NECK?"
UPON ONE WHO
"Look you, my friend," lie continued
to tho unknown, who had watched him
with some amusement and perhaps u
little malice, "I am now going upstairs
to get some fresh air upon the roof.
But 1 shall not forget that you, who
ever you may be, warned me of to
night's affair. I wish you good night,
monsieur. When we moot again, it
may be your turn to thank mo, and
to tell me how you got Into this house.
I hope It will be ho."
The stranger laughed aloud, Insolent
ly Indifferent to tliedinsto of the other.
"You are going on the roof, M. Ca
bot?" he exclaimed, mockingly; "sure
ly that Is very thoughtless of you."
"And why, monsieur?"
"You shall be tho judge of that.when
I tell you that live of Sartlne's men ure
there before you,1'
fm ';
' itj m TJX?'
,sO
Coq le Hoi thought for a moment
that this man had Vi'ijaJ'ed him, but
he was too wise to act upon his sus
picious. "I shall see for myself," said ho; nnd
with that he quitted the room, only to
return a moment later with a face
white with fear.
".Monsieur," said, ho, trying to force
a Jest; "you have reckoned well.
There arc exactly live of Sartlno's men
nbove us. How many there may bo
In tho street belowj I will not venture
to hazard. Nor will I dispute with
you any longer. If you came tiere to
aid me, this Is tho tlnio to do your
work; but If you are upon any other
errand then Clod help you, for I will
certainly blow out your brains."
The stranger laughed again.
"I do not keep my brains in tho cell
ing of your garret," said he. "Upon
my word, you are a very impertinent
fellow, It.' Cabot. I am half of the
mind to leave you to Sartlnes, who lias
sworn to dig up the atones of Paris,
rather than lose tho pleasure of your
company."
"lie has'swom that," muttered Coq
le Pol, beginning to tremble again.
"As 1 say. Did you not stop the
coach of Mine. Goeftrln but a week
ago, and wound two of her lacqueys?
Very well, Mine. Goeffrlu complained,
to the king, and the king to M. de Sar
tlnes. And now, you see, the dragoons
are coming to beat In the door of your
house. Oh, the lieutenant knows well
that he could only take you with
dragoons. What a man ho Is to trap
you here like a bear In a cage. For
you are trapped, M. Cabot. Yon street
Is as full of police as an orange of pips.
And hark, there are the troopers them
selves." PAPT II.
The clamor without, a clamor In
which were commingled tho hoarse
cries of men, the shrieks of women, the
ringing of hoofs upon the Hags, the
clash of steel, the loud note of com
mnnd, now rose up from the very street
below them. Coq le Pol listened to the
hubbub, and his knees quaked under
him; but the unknown, who had timed
his play to the ultimate moment,
seemed at last to turn from his humor
and to take pity upon the trembling
robber.
"Come," said lie, "follow mo and ask
nothing. You have a lanter there
light It!"
The hunted man was now as clay In
the hands of this maker of mysteries.
He lighted his lantern mechanically;
mechanically he followed tho stranger
down the dark nnd narrow stairs of
the house of the Ped Cock. Ho could
hear those without beating already
upon his door; but he trembled no long
er. The man who went before him
seemed to fill him with a new courage,
as a measure Is filled with wine. He
did not ask, whence does he come,
whither does he go? He said only, he
will save me. And when at length he
found himself out In the narrow, hlgn
walled courtyard,' which was called by
courtesy his garden, he was like a child
obeying a father, and trusting him un
questlonlngly. "Monsler," he exclaimed, with hum
ble clvilty, "there Is no door to the
street here."
"You He," said the stranger, curtly;
"give me your lantern."
Coq le Pol watched him with amaze
ment now. For when the masked man
had taken tho lantern in his hand, he
walked straight to tho mouth of the
old well which was the one conspicu
ous thing in that filthy and deserted
court. Then he unwound a long roll of
thin rope, and attaching the lantern
to this, he lowered It into the orifice.
Coy le Pol, looking over his shoulder
timidly, watched him as one watches
a conjuror at his tricks.
"del, monsler," cried he, "you can
not hide me in the well."
The unknown laughed scornfully.
"St. Denis," exclaimed he, "that a
man should live live years In a house
and vet know nothing of Its resources.
Do you follow the path of that light, my
filond. Well, tell mo what you see?"
"The walls shows me walls green with
slime and fungus," said tho robber. "I
see groat gaps where bricks have been;
there are lizards of strange shapes, and
rats feeding and now I see the water.
Holy AMrgln you would not send me
down there, monsieur?"
"Look again," cried tho other, un
moved at the plea; "upon the right
hand side of the well at a little distance
above the water's edge, what see you
now?"
Coq le Pol stretched out his neck and
searched the foetid depths with eager
eyes. The twinkle of the light below
was like a star seen through a black
tube. The rats lie 1 at its light; stones
fell with resounding splashes while
they ran; cold air oozed up and seemed
to freeze the lobber's face.
'Mun Dleu," said he, "you have dis
covered something, monsieur; there Is
a little tunnel running Into the well,
and the wuter does not cover Its
mouth."
"You have said well," answered the
unknown; "thiough that tunnel we
shall pass to our friends. After you, M.
Cnbot. This rope which holds the
bucket will bear the weight of three
men. Trust your life to It rather than
to your friends without. I wait for
you."
Coq le Pol shuddered.
"Clel," said he, "1 dare not go down
theie."
"You dare not sang-bleu, do you
hear those blows? They are from the
sabers of tho guards who beat In your
door. Shall 1 leave you to receive your
guests? I give you one intitule."
He folded his arms and waited. Coq
le Pol, now wringing his hands, or run
ning to and fro In his distress, or peer
ing with a horrid fear Into the well be
low, was like a woman distracted.
"God have pity," he cried, "1 cannot
I cannot."
"The half of a minute Is gone," an
swered the unknown, In a voice hard as
Iron.
"Do you wish to kill me, monsieur?"
moaned the robber.
"You have ten seconds yet," cried the
unknown.
"You torture me," walled the rob
ber. "The guards are Just beating In your
door," replied the unknown.
It was as he said. Tho great Iron
bound gate was giving way to the
crashing blows which fell upon It. Coq
lo Pol listened for one long Instant
und then, reeling, staggering toward
the well, he clutched the rope and be
gan to descend.
"When you come to the tunnel, kick
against tho wall and that will swing
you In," cried the masked man, bend
ing over to watch him; "leave the lan
tern until I tollow,"
"You will find my body," howled the
robber from the darkness.
Lowering himself hand under hand
Coq le Pol went down Into the well,
The unknown waited until ho had
reached tho light and had entered the
dark hole ubove the water. Then he,
too, clutched the rope, but he could
not keep back the laugh from his ltps.
"Sang-bleu, Sartlnes," fld he to him
self, "a merry night to you and a mer
rier day tomorrow. To be fooled by a
woman at your time of life! Oh, you
amuse us finely."
"Are you coming monsieur?" roared
Coy le ltol from below; "oh, for pity's
sake be quick."
The unknown hesitated no longer,
but swung himself cleverly upon tho
rope nnd so disappeared Into tho dark
ness of the well.
Five' minutes later a terrible cry, like,
a cry of victory, arose suddenly from
the ranks of the sweltering mob gath
ered In tho narrow nlloy before the
house of tho Hed Cock. From lane to
lone, .and street to street, It spread,
until "it was echoed In long drawn hoot
ing, even across tho fretting waters
of the Seine.
"Coq le Pol has escaped! Ilola
Iloln! llolal Coq le Pol Is free. Long
life to tho Little Pod Man. Viva!
Down with the guard. A bas Sartlnes.
llolal Hola!"
Loud, terrible, long sustained was the
cry. H'jxhllaratod by the unexpected
tidings, spurred to now courage by tho
joyous news, the mob fell upon tho
sulking troopers with unv weapon that
enmo to his hand: and In the stilling
courts and alloys there were soon to be
heard the sluleks of dying men, tho
booming of muskets, the shriller wall-
mm"
I T.-V "
;
'&g
HE FOLLOWED THE STPANGEIl
DOWN THE DAPIC AND NARROW
STAIPS.
ing of the women. It was not until
dawn broke that tho beggars began to
number their dead and to forget that
Coq le Pol was free.
M. de Sartlnes had supped well, as
he always did, at the Hotel lieautie
lllls. Though he declared that the
gloomy old house in the Puo St. I'aul
was more forbidding than the Bastlle,
where Its exterior was concerned, there
was no one readier to admit that Mile.
Corlnne de Montesson, Its mistress, was
the cleverest woman In Paris, and tho
most fascinating. Besides, was she
not the particular patron of all tho
rogues and vagabonds In the thieves'
quarter, and could she not, If she would,
be of more service to tho court In gen
eral, and to himself, M. de Sartlnes In
particular, than a squadron of drag
oons? It was a big "If," since made
moiselle's charity and large-hearted-ness
were traditions In tho city; but the
lieutenant still hoped and supped.
On this particular evening the ex
cellent man rail much need of conso
lation, and of the rich red wine which
added the luster of the ruby to the
sparkling Venetian glass In which
madamo's guests were always served.
For It was the evening of the day
when Coq le Pol had slipped through
his fingers In so miraculous a manner,
and, In escaping, had set the whole city
laughing at her lieutenant of police.
Nor had the good Sartlnes secured at
that time tho reputation which, In after
years, brought him fame beyond the
fame of any one who had occupied the
office which he glorified. Ho had yet
to in-ove himself; and In proving him
self, he had begun with this disastrous
and long-remembered fiasco.
Depressed by tho icllectlon, gloomy,
and not a little Irritable, he had gone
lo Mile, do Montesson's house, scarce
daring to hope that she would aid him;
convinced, none the less, that she would
amuse him. Ho had found her, to his
satisfaction, alone, yave for the pres
ence of her wonder-loving physician,
Antonio, and of her young kinsman,
Benolt, who was said to be the finest
swordsman In Paris, as It was always
at tho Hotel Beautrelllls; and when it
was done mademoiselle carried her
guest to the great music room, and
there caused her servant to bring the
delicious coffee of the east. And this
being served, llatlm, her harpist, began
to touch the strings of his Instrument
carresslngly,' while mademoiselle her
self, sharing a rest-giving lounge with
the gloomy lieutenant, endeavored to
play wittily upon hla melancholy.
To be Continued.
A pickpocket is
despised, dreaded
! and avoided. He
'Jas a sueaknik,
despicable foe
who robs a man
unawares. Men
hate him v.'orsa
than the more
bold highwayman
whose attack is
made in the open.
There are some dis
eases that ure like pickpockets. Thcv
are sneaks. If men only knew it, these
sneaking diseases are more to be dreaded
than small -pox or yellow fever. The
sneakinjj disease begins with some slight
disorder of the digestion and sluggish ac
tion of the bowels. The blood becomes
disordered and the body receives insuffi
cient or improper nutriment. Emacia
tion follows and the sufferer is troubled
with nervous prostration, brain fair. Mid
debility, and very likely falls a victim to
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ical Discovery one or the best medicines ollerea
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Dr. Pierce's Common Sense Medical Ad,
viser has had a larger sale than any other
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This book of i,oo3 pages with 300 illustra
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r.lJbfif.tMttffliftJ
rlFMllMlMBJl
IThefin tlnv !ni,sulea ar
Ireat In -IS bourn without
IncoDvenlenrit. nttecllonal
tu wlticti C'opmlbu, t!u
u. una initi'iiuii. nm.
-JVU X ,-j. -
) K
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7 ""4S339
ni& m
'feASfcEkJ
&& v;rw& u.
VTrl NdC ' fOWV'1filiJ
fftff9W V
hattm: or Tin: wh,kuni:ss.
Theru M'cro Features Tluit llnvo
Never Hccn Matched in tho Annuls
ol'Vurlnro--Tlic Scene Was Ouu of
Unutterable Horror.
The losses were found to bo: killed,
2.2IC: wounded, 12,037; missing, 3,33.1! total.
17.GG0. The damage Indicted upon tho ene
my Is not known, but ns ho wan tho as
saulting party as often us tho Union
nriny, thero Is reason to believe that tho
losses on tho two sides were about equal,
Taking twenty-four hours us tho t.mo
actually occupied In lighting, and count
ing tho casualties In both urtiilcs, It will
be found Hint on tlint bloody Held every
inlntlto recorded the loss of twenty-live
men.
As tho staff ollleors threw themselves
upon tho ground that night, sleep camo
to tlujm without coaxing. They hud been
on tho move since dawn, galloping over
bad roads, struggling iibnut thiough for
est openings, jumping livulets, wading
swnmps, helping lo rally troops, dodging
bullets, and searching for commanding
officers In nil sorts of unknown plafia,
Their horses hud been crippled, and thoy
themselves were well-nlgli exhausted. For
tho small part I hnd been nble to per
form In the engagement, the general v"
omtnanded mo lor tho brevet rank of nn
jor In the regular army "for gallant nnd
meritorious services." Ills reeoimncti U
tlon was afterward npproved by the
president. This piomotloii was especially
gratifying for tho reason that It vns con
ferred for conduct In the llrst battle In
which I had served under the command
of the gencrnl. In-chief.
There were features of the battle which
have never been matched in :ia- annul
of warfare. For two days nearly '.MO.OOO
veteran troops hnd strangled In n Joath
grnpple, confronted at each step with
almost every obstacle by which nm tiro
could bar their path, and groping their
way through a tangled forest the Impene
trable tjloom of which could be likened
only to the shadow of death. The under
growth stayed theli progress, the uppar
giowth shut out the light of heaven, of
ficers could uirely see their troops for any
conslcleiable distance, for smoke cloud M
the vision, and a heuvy sky obscured the
sun. Directions weie ascertained and
lines established by means of m pock'it
coinpass, and a change of position often
presented an operation more like a prob
lem of ocean l.avlgation than a question
of military manoeuvres. It was Hie sense
of sound and of touch rather tha.i tho
sense of sight which guided tho move
ments. It was n battlo fought wb'i the
ear, and not with the eye.
All circumstances seemed to combine
to make the scene one of unutterable hor
ror. At times the wind hovled through
the tteetops, mingling Its moans with
the groans of the dying, and heavy
branches were cut off by the fire of tho
artillery, and fell crashing upon :he heads
of the men, adding a new terror to battle.
Forest 11 res raged; ammunition trains ex
ploded; the dead were roasted In the con
flagration; the wounded, roused by its hot
breath, dragged themselves along with
their torn nnd mangled limbs, In the ma
energy of despair, to escape the ravaqc?
of the Humes; and every but-h seemed
hung with shreds of blood-stained cloth
ing. It was as though Christian men had
turned to fiends, and hell Itself had
usurped the pluce of earth. "Cam
paigning with Grant," by General Horace
Porter, In tho December Century.
&iy
sx
RSI S3
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othtr dlgestlvo organs, 'eavitw tho bowels In
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Sick Headache,
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Constipation,
Piles
-AND-
Al! Lives1 Disorders.
RADWAY'S PILLS ara purely vojiotnblo
mild and leil.ililu. lull) Period DUustinn,
complete absorption and healtlitul regularity.
2J cjnts a lox. At Druggist?, or by mall,
'took of Adv.co" Iroo by mail. '
RADVAA.V St CO.,
No. SS 1-lm Strcst, New York.
C;i5CHEO DT TMt HlOHKT MtDICM. Al.THOMTIt!
illCftlJAtJHL Tills MENTSOr
ixrrALEit v.'iil uiiro you. A
wonderful Lonn t MiiTerorr
4 f-ftik -":-'"" o'coi iiroix,
A
&fibk orll.VTi'Fr.Vinc. vlff-mi.
"O "v immtxltatcitiitf AnciUcicn
In pocket, rearlr to wpo on Urct .mlk-atlou of coltf.
Continued Uo JrifTertn JL'crmuncnt dirt.
IthfactlonffmirantccHlorrriOneyicfuTirtci!. 3rlaof
U. Trial fno nt Drutjtflsts. ItctfJtoraJ tvall.
J3 cents. li. D, CU533UH, Mr., ltraa Rivers, liici , U. S. 1
MFCUTUni 'no purpfli find safest rppily for
ltlril a nULi nil skin dUen-tJ8. rtcscma, Itch.Sif
HhtMtm. (tld Sores, turns, ruts. Vnidt.-rful in
ri'iiici'Y. cnrvrrinr l lii inrr
ivuirj'ifliLHi i-rico, 1 cio. hi uruu n a o
jr lfnnH pro: ' ' rMrf'nirwi
For sale b7 MATTHEWS BROS.
JOHN II. PHELPS. Scrnnton. Pa.
and
OsnipSexion Preserva;
DR. HEBKA'S
Removed t-reeklcs, Wmpltt.
Liver Mobs. B!sc!:hcde,
Sunhurn and Tin. end re.
etorcs tho c!:Ia to ita otIe!- z A Si'ilitifrz
nal freshness, producius ttAsJS.'tM'L'fjiS'.".'
clear and healthy cwa-(iSiir. jvyo'TCi.
plcxlon. Superior to all faea ' ' '
preparations r.:id perfectly harmless. At all
tlrupsiEts, or mailed for SCcta. Bend iur Circular,
VIOLA SKIN SOAP I lap!j Icccciir.raU) m a
Ekln rurllTlas fcloip, wjtqualal f.r tbo lollct, rDl wtOiaut a
rlvil Ut thu r.urwry. Absolaiel pure auA Jc'Jsatol civil
cteJ. Ai Orwul.u, Prlio 25 Cenis.
G. C. BITTNER A CO., Tof.euo, O.
For Bale by MATTHEWS BTtOS. and
JOHN IT. PHELPS, Scranton. I'a.
Taftr4 RJBJVlWf?!
?$$' r2 RESTORES VITALITY
v.YMl;. il
mawkEK'"'
mD.,.f?f VAVell Mar.
w
lGth Day.
w
of Me.
THE GREAT notll Day
produces thci nlxnu remits In Ufl days. It arti
potturfully and quickly. Curiu when ell otlicru fall
Vouuk men will resatu their lost manhooj.aailol.i
rueu Mill recover their youthful uccr by ubIhh
ItilVlVO. It )iiickli'cudgurelyreiitoieKorious
urns, I.oi-t Vitality, Iiupotctioy. Nliihtly KiuUsIonr.
I.obtl'owur.l'aillutf Memory, Waitlnu Dln;o'B,au(
all euccU of bdf-abuso or cicutsaud luillhcrctlou
v. bUh unnt J onu tor b'ndy. buviueus or uiarrlau'e. II
not only cures liy k'.nrllus at the seat of il.K-ieo, bm
lsagreat nrrio Ionic nail liloud builder, tirlnc
iuu track tho pink glow to imlo cliecks and rt
storlna tho tiro of youth. It wards off Junanit'
ind Conbumptlou. InsUt on bavins ItEYIVO, m
Jllicr. It can ba carried lu vibt pocket. By lutU
i 1 .0(1 per pick azo, or fix for 8n.t)0, with u pos
Ivo written u'lninmtco to euro or rcfur.
hn money. Circular free, Addrots
,-,, ,v.. .... . -. ,,, .,, .
I'or Solo by MATTHEWS UK03.. Drus
t;lit serauton, I'a.
P3dA
ST
wtmmmmsassiw
ltUerabSii
r, i.i,-,-r-rr,-f-w,?T , -TH-hfV.-, f-rrfritefr fcS
.AVegcfnblc Prcparalionfor As
similating IhcTcoJ fltitlRcgula
fuig llieSlQUtaxhs andEowcls of
:.vwuiTw.7r..
inrs MPisifti
ramfcHWifcWg
PrornolcsDigcslion.Chccriul
ncssandRcst.Contalns neither
Opmm.Morphinc nor Mineral.
HotNAqootic.
Ktcvr cfOMErSMtVUnimm.
jQxJSuaut
JMMUSJu-
JnhtSted
Jlpitrmint -Jit
CaitonstSsia
JiamSzcil -CJrnA'u!
Suatrr .
Wmmrccn. tlctrr.
Apcitcct Remedy for Constipa
tion, Sour Stomach.Diarrhoca,
Worms ,Convutsions,Fcvcrislv-
ticss and LOSS OF SLEEP.
Tac Simile Signature og
G?L&y';f&taZZy,
NEW "YORK.
EXACT COPY OF YRAPPEB.
Vim
EgaregEreviErMrgn
eetorf of Wlioiesele and Retail
CITY AMD SUBURBAN
ART STUDIO.
P. Santeo E3S Spruce.
AIIII.KTIO AM) DAILY PAPKItS.
Helsman & Solomon, 103 Wyoming avc.
ATIII.KTIC GOODS AND IHCYCI.ES.
C. M. Florcy. ?22 Wyomlns avc.
AWXIXfiS AND ItCllIlKIt GOODS.
S. A. UroBby, 321 Lackawanna avc.
-
Lackawanna Trust anil Safe Deposit Co.
Merchants' and Mechanics', 423 Lacka.
Traders' National, cor. Wyoming and
Spruce.
West Side Bank, ICO N. Main.
Scranton Savings, 1-2 Wyoming.
I11.I1D1NG, CAIil'KT CI.KAN1NG, Vl C.
Tho Scranton Bedding Co., Lackawanna.
UIIEWIiKS.
Uoblnson, E. Sons, 433 N. Seventh.
Robinson, Mina, Cedar, cor. Alder.
13h:yci.i:s. glns, t.tc.
Parker, E. It., 221 Spruce.
uicYa.i: i.ivr.uY.
City Bicycle Livery, 120 Franklin.
uicYci.i: Ki:i.vis, mo.
Blttenbender fc Co., SISVi Spruce street.
HOOTS AND SIIOKS.
Goldsmith Bros. 201 Lackawanna.
Goodman's Shoo Store, 432 Lackawanna.
uiioKtiii and ji:vi:i.t:a.
Radln Bros., 123 Penn.
CANDY .MAN'l'I-'ACl CliKH.
Scranton Candy Co., 22 Lackawanna.
ZAKPU'IS AND W'AI.I. l'APT.lt.
Incalls. J. Scott, 41D Lackawanna.
i:ahhiagi:s and iiakxkss.
Slmwell, V. A 51u Linden.
CAHIUAGi: Ulil'OSITOHY. .
Blume, Wm. & Son, D22 Spruce.
CA'ixur.it.
Huntington, J. C
SOS N. Washington.
CHINA AND Gl.ASSW'AKi:.
Hupprecht, Louis, 221 Penn avc.
LIGAIt .MANLTAiri VKV.K.
J. P. Flore, 223 Spruce street.
I ON FEE llONERY AND TOYS.
Williams, J. D. & Bros., 311 Lacka.
CONTRACTOR AND ItUII.DER.
Snook, S. M., Olyphant.
CROCKERY AND GLASSWARE.
Harding, J. L., 215 Lackawanna.
DINING ROOM.
CuryYs Dluins B
oom, t05 Linden.
DRY GOOD?..
Tho Fuahlon, 303 Lackawanna avenue.
Kelly & Hcaley, 20 Lackawanna.
Finley, P. 13., 510 Lackawanna.
DRY GOODS, SHOES, HARDWARE, ETC.
Mulley, Ambrose, triple stores. Provi
dence. DRY GOODS, FANCY GOODS.
Kresky, E. H. & Co., Ill S. Main.
DRUGGISTS.
McGarrah & Thomas, 203 Lackawanna.
Loieutz. C. 418 Lacka.; Linden & Wash.
Pavis. G. W., Alain and Market.
Bloes, W. S., Peekville.
Davies, John J., 100 S. Main.
ENGINES AND IIOll.ERS.
Dickson Manufacturing Co.
1TNF. .MERCHANT TAILORING,
j W. ltouerts. 120 N Main ave.
W. J. Davis, 213 Lackawanna.
Eiio Audren, 119 S. Main ave,
FLORAL DESIGNS.
Claik, G. It. ft Co., 201 Washington.
1 LOUR, 1IUTTER, EGGS, EIC.
Tho T. II. Watts Co., Ltd., 723 W. Lacka,
Babcoek G. J, : Co., 110 Franklin.
FLOUR, FEED AND GRAIN.
Matthews C. P. Sons & Co., 31 Lacka.
Tho Weston Mill Co., 47-40 Lackawanna.
FRUITS AND PRODUCE.
Dale & Stovcns, 27 Lackawanna.
, Cleveland. A. S., 17 Lackawanna,
FURNISHED ROOMS.
1 Union House, 215 Lackawanna,
1'UUNUUHE.
Hill & Connell, 132 Washlngtsn.
Barbour's Homo Credit House, 423 Lack.
GROCERS.
Kelly, T. J. & Co,, 11 Lackawanna.
MeKargel & Connell. Franklin avenue.
Porter, John T., 26 and 2S Lackawanna.
Ulne, Levy & Co., SO I.ackawanna.
Piric. J, J 427 Lackawanna.
SOgatiJafeAMIl
SEE
THAT THE
FAG-SIMILE
SIGNATURE
OF
f
&&&
JB'OXT THE
WRAPPER
OP EVEEY
BOTTLE OF
Cnstorh li pat cp la cno-sko tottloa only. It
Is net sold is balk. Don't allow anyons to Bell
yon anythiaj oho on tho plea or prorabo ttt It
In "just a3 good" and "'will un3wer every nnr
pose." -03- Geo tint you get O-A-S-T-O-H-I-A. '
Siofss- J?
tta'Jo TH
tlpt-jcC5r$5
13
&z
'M J"-
wipyur
&? SmP.TOTiFBiEHMSBr.'ia
GEXKRAI. MF.ltCltAXm.SI3.
Osterhout, N. P., 110 W. Market.
Jordan. James, Olyphant.
Bechtold. E. J., Olyphant.
UAKDWAHi;.
Connell, W. P. & Sons, 113 Penn.
Footo & Shear Co., 119 N. Washington.
Hunt &. Connell Co., 431 Lackawanna.
IIAKDWAKi: AND PLU.UHING.
Gunster & Forsyth, 227 Penn.
Cowlcs, W. C, 1907 X. Main ave.
IIAKXESS AND SADDI.UIY HAKDWAItn,
Frits, G. W 410 Lackawanna.
Keller & Harris, 117 Penn.
IIAKXKS4. TULNKS, ULCGir.S.
13. B. Houser, 133 N. Main avenue.
IIOTKI.S.
Arlington, Grimes & Flannery, Spruci
and Franklin.
Scranton House, near depot.
IIOL'SK. SIGN AND FRESCO PAIXTER.
Wm. Hay. 112 Linden.
IIU.MAX IIA1K AND I1AIK DRESSING.
X. T. Lis!:, 223 Lackawanna.
LEATHER AND FINDINGS.
Williams, Samuel, 221 Spruce.
l.mi:. C KM I. NT SEWER PIPE,
Keller, Luther, S13 Lackawanna.
.MILK, CREAM. 11UTTER, ETC.
Scranton Dairy Co., Penn and Linden.
Stone Bros., 303 Spruce.
AIIl.t.IINER.
Mrs. M. Saxe, 14S N. Main avenue.
.MILl.IXF.ItY AND DRESSMAKING.
Mrs. Bradley, 200 Adams, opp. Court
House.
.MILLINERY AND FURNISHING GOOD9.
Brown's Bee Hive, 221 Lackawanna.
.MINE AND .MILL SUPPLIES.
Scranton Supply and Much. Co., 131 Wyo,
.MODISTE AND DRESSMAKER.
Mrs. K. Walsh, 311 Spruce street.
MONUMENTAL WORE S.
Owen3 Bros., 21S Adams ave.
PANTS.
Great Atlantic J3 Pants Co., 310 Lacka.
wana ave.
PAINTS AND SUPPLIES.
Jleneko & McKee, 30S Spruce street.
PAIN IS AND WALL PAPER.
Wlnke, J. C, 313 Tenn.
PAWNBROKER.
Green, Joseph, 107 Lackawanna,
PIANOS AND ORGANS.
Stelle, J. Lawrence, 303 Spruce.
PHOTOGRAPHER.
II. S. Cramer, 311 Lackawanna avo.
PLU.MI11NG AND HEAIING.
Howley, P. F. & M. P., 231 Wyoming av.
REAL ESTATE.
Horatio X. Patrick, 320 Washington.
RI'BIIER STAMPS, SIENCILS, J5TC.
Scranton Uuuber Stamp Co., C33 Sprues
street.
ROOFING.
Xatlonal Hoofing Co., 331 Washington.
SANITARY PLU.MItING
W. A. V.Tedebusoh, 231 Washington ava.
STEAMSHIP TICKETS.
J. A. Barron, 215 Lackawanna and
Prlceburg.
STEREO-RELIEF DECORATIONS
P UNTING.
S. H. Morris, 217 Wyoming avo.
AND
TEA, COFFEE AND SPICE.
Grand Union Tea Co., "103 S. Main.
TRUSSIS. I1ATTLRIF.S, RUI1I1ER GOODS
Benjamin Si Benjamin, Franklin and
Spruce.
UNDERTAKER AND LIVEHY.
ltaub, A. It., 423 Spruce.
UPHOLSTERER AND CARPET LAYER.
C. H. Hazlett, 225 Spruco street.
WALL PAPER, ETC.
Ford, W. M., 120 Penn.
WATCHMAKER AND JEWELER.
Itogers, A. E., 215 Lackawanna,
WINES AND IIOUOHS.
Wnlsh, Edward J., 22 Lackawanna,
WIRE AND WIRE ROPE.
Washburn & Moen Mfg Co.. 119 Franklin
S '&?"" -&
(kaXAeuA
w -r
i

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