OCR Interpretation


Sunbury American. (Sunbury, Pa.) 1848-1879, June 03, 1848, Image 1

Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026403/1848-06-03/ed-1/seq-1/

What is OCR?


Thumbnail for

N BU RY
AMERICAN
H. B. MASTER, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR.
OFFICE, CORNER QF CENTRE ALLEY MARKET STREET.
ft gwtlg aetospgpgr--Ocotc to HolMci, Uttwiture, 3t.ral8, jToreCfln an Somrstfc firto, scfenct an the arts, Burttulture, iWartets, Bmusriiwnts, c.
NEW SERIES VOL. 1, NO. 10.
SUNBURY, NORTHUMBERLAND COUNTY, PA., SATURDAY, JUNE 3, 1848.
OLD SERIES VOL. 8, NO. 36. '
TERMS Or THE AMERICAN.
THE AMERICAN it published every Saturday at TWO
DOLLARS per annum to be paid half yearly in advance.
No paper dieoulinued until all arrearage! are paid.
All communicatiout or letter! on businws relating to tha
office, to insure attention, must be POST PAID.
TO CLUBS.
Three eoplei to one address, WOO
Seren Do .Do WW
Fifteen Do Do 000
Five dollars in advance will pay for three yeai'itubaoxip
tion to the American.
One Square of It line, 3 timet,
Every tubwquent insertion.
One Square, 3 months,
Six months,
One year,
Ravinese Cords of Five lines, per annum,
Merchants and others, advertising by the
year, with the privilege of msertieg dif
ferent advertisements weekly.
Or Larger Advertisements, as per agreement.
flOO
a
850
375
600
300
1000
H. B HIASSER,
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
SVHBURT, PA.
Business atienileil lo in lh Counties of Nor
thuml erland, Union, Lycoming and Columbia.
Refer tet
P Ar A KnvnnnT. 1
I.nwau Sl Bianoff.
So ins & SaonoaAtt, 'Aifa.
Rrtnoltis, McKarlano at Co.
Srnmo,noou St Co.,
George J. Weaver,
ROPE MAKER & SHIP OBANDLEB.
Ifo. 13 Korth Water Street, Philadelphia.
HAS rnnaiantly on hand, I general assort
ment of Cordage, 8eine Twines, etc., in
Tar'd Roper-, Fiahing Ropea, White Ropes, Manil
la Ropes, Tow Line for Canal Boats. Also, a
complete assortment of 8rine Twinea, Sic. auch at
Hemp 8!iad and Herring Twine, Best Patent Uill
Net Twine, Cotton 8had and Herring Twine, Shoe
Tlireails, &c. &c. Alao, Bed Cords, Plough Lines.
Halters, Traces, Cotton and l.inen Carpet Chains.
Sic, all of which he will dispose of on reasonable
trims.
Philadelphia, November 13. 1 47. ly
rnn
Wright's Indian Vegetable Pills.
Henry Mnssor. Hunlmry.
E. St J. K:u(Tuin. Augusta township.
John H. Vine, nt, Chillinqusque.
Kase & Bciii tracer. Ely-liurg.
Snnuel H'th, I. it tie Mnhonjy,
William Deppi-n. Jark' -n.
Irehnd and Haynes. McEwenseille.
William Heimn & Brother, Millon.
I'ouythe, Wilson & Co., Noithumberland
JamKS Red. Piitisgrove.
G. W. Scott, Rdshville.
W. ft R Krgi'ly, 8hmokintown.
Rhodes & Farrow. Snydcrstown.
Amna T. Briaell, Turhutsvilla.
Bcnneville Holshue, Upper Mahonoy.
J.hn G. Rrnn. do do.
E. I.. Piper, Wattonlown.
Wholesale, t the office and general di'pol, 169
Race it., Philadelphia. V c. 18, IS47. ly
TUB CUE VP BOOK STORE.
D A1TIELS &, SMITH'S
Ciikaf New & Second hand Book Siork,
North West corner of fourth and Arcli Street;
Philadelphia.
Law Books, Theological and Clatsical Book),
MBDICAXs BOOKS,
BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORICAL BOOKS,
SCHOOL BOOKS.
Scientific and Mathematical Boms.
Juvenile Books, in great variety.
Hymn Booka and Prayei Bookt, Biblea, all ixe
and prices.
Blank Boohs, Writing Paper, and Stationary,
Uiol'e ati ttttall.
rr Oca prices are much lower than the rioclik prices.
CT Libiaries and small parcels of books purcluised.
iy Books imported to order from London.
Philadelphia, April 1, 184B y
POUTER & E1TGLISE,
GROCERS COMMISSION MERCHANTS
and Uralers In Seeds,
to 3. Arch St PHILADELPHIA.
Constantly on hand a general assortment of
GROCERIES, TEAS, WINES, SEEDS,
LIQUORS, &c.
To which they respectfully invite the attention
of the public.
All kind of country produce taken in exchange
for Groceriea or told on Comtniitinn.
Philad April 1, 1848
OLIVER. & MOLA1T,
IMPORTERS AND DEALER! IN
ZEPUYE VfURSTEU, CAJiVASSES, PATTERNS,
Cottons, Needles, Pins, Sewing Silk,
Eteel Beada, Bag Clatpt, Steel Tatieli. Steel
Purse Ringa, Purse Clatpt, Plain and Shaded
Purte Twitt, Trimmings,
Fancy Goods, &c.
Cheap for Cash to Wholesale Dealers, at the
New Thread and Needle Store,
JVo. 3 Njrth fourth 4 Mi. 178 Chettnut Street:
PHILADELPHIA.
, April 8, 1848
FlfcST TUHMXVXH FIAXTO rOBTSS.
rHE SUBSCRIBER hat been appointee agent
J. for the tale of CONRAD MEYER'S CELE
BRATED PREMIUM ROSE WOOD PIANOS,
at, thi place. These Pianos bare a plain, mat
live and beautiful exterior finish, and, for depth
of tone, and elegance of workmanship, are not
surpassed by any in the Ufcited States
These instrument! are highly approved of by
the roost emibent Professors and Composers of
Music in this and other cities. '
, For qualities of tone, touch and keeping ia
tone upon Concert pitch, they cannot be sucpas
ltd by either American or European Pianos.
Suffice it to say that Madame Castellan, W. V
Wallace. Vieui Tempt, and bis sister, the cele
brated Pianist, and many others of the most dis
tinguished performers, hatre given tbeae instru
ments preference over all others
They have alao f ceived the first notice of the
three last Enbibitions, and the latt Silver Medal
by the Fiankliu Inati'.ute in 1843, was awarded
to tbem, which, with other premiums from the
same source, may be seen at tbe Wart room No.
C3 south Fourth tt.
lET-Another Silver Medal was awarded to C.
Meyer, by the Franklin Institute, Oct. 1843 for
the best Piano in the exhibition. -
Aesin at Ihe exhibition of the Franklin Intti
tula, Oct. 1846, the f.rjt premium and medal waa
awarded la C. Meyer.for bia Pianos, although it
had been awarded at tbe exhibition of the year
before. on tbe ground that he bad made still great
er improvemxnts in bis Instruments within the
past 13 mon:ht.
'Actio at tha laat exhibition of tbe Franklin
Institute, 1847, another Premium was awarded
te C. Meyer, for tbe best Piano in the exbibitioa.
At Boston, at their latt exhibition, Sept. 1847,
lA.meyer received toe nt.it stiver Medal and 111
nlorna, for lb beat aquarsj Piano in tbe exhibition
These Pianos will be said at the manufaetu
rer's lowest Philadelphia prict, if not something
lower, rersons are requested So call and exam
ine for themselves, at lbs residence of tbe sub
enter. H B MASSER
f"nbnry, April 8, 1848
DEMOCRATIC
National Convention.
Retirement of the Barnburners A Letter from
President Polk, withdrawing his name
The Bailotting Selection of Gen. Cass on
the Fourth Ballott.
FOURTH DAY'S PROCEEDINGS.
Baltimore, May 25, 1848.
The Democratic National Convention re
wwembled this morning at 9 o'clock. Tha
minutes of yesterday were read and approved.
The President stated that the pending ques
tion was on the adoption of the original reso
lution as amended last night. The Conven
tion having sustained the call for the Previ
ous Question, no debate was allowed.
Gen. Houston, of Texas, asked leave to ex
plain the state of the question, but the Con
vention refused to hear him.
The vote was then taken by States on the
resolution of Mr. Yancey, of Alabama, as a
mended by Mr. Bartley, of Ohio, to the effect
that both contesting delegations from New
York be admitted to seats, with power to cast
a joint vote, equal in number to that which
the State is entitled in the Electoral College.
The amended resolution was carried by the
following vote :
Ayes. Nays
Ayes. Nsys.
Maine,
N. Hampshire,
Massachusetts,
Vermnnt,
Rh'xte Island,
Connecticnt,
New York,
New Jersey,
Pennsylvania,
Pelnware,
Man-land,
Virginia,
N. Cnroliiyi,
S. Carolina,
Geoifria,
8 o
Alabama,
Florida,
Mississippi,
Louisiana,
Texas,
Arkansas,
Tenneaee,
Kentucky,
Ohio,
Indiana,
Illinois,
Michigan,
Iowa,
Missouri
Wisconsin,
0
0
0
0
4
0
10
10
9
i
4
I
3
6
0
7
as
i
3
o
o
o
o
a
i
9
o
o
o
o
9
6
IT
11
0
10
Total votet 130 ayes, 120 nays.
The qnestion then recurred, still under the
operation of the previous question, on the n
doption of the original proposition as amend
ed, which was carried 133 ayes to 118 nays
the only difference from the first ballot be
ing Massachusetts, 10 yeas, 2 nays, and Mis
souri, 2 yeas, 4 nays.
Tha President then announced that both
delegations from New York were received
into the brotherhood of the Convention.
Mr. Hannegan rose and said that he felt
bound, under the instructions of the Indiana
Slate Convention, to submit the following re
solution :
'Resolved, That the New York Delegation
known as the Syracuse Hunker Delegation,
are rightfully entitled to cast the vote of said
State in Convention."
Senator Turney moved tq lay the resolu
tion on the table, but withdrew it for Mr.
Dickinson to read a protest from the "Hun
ker" delegates of New York against admit
ting llm Barburners. The paper rend denoun
ced th proceedings as unjust and calculated
to satisfy neither party, while it would pro
duce much mischief.
. There was now much sensation in the
Convention.
Mr. Turney renewed his motion, and Mr.
Hannegan's resolution was laid on the table
ayes 157, nays 95.
Mr. Sanderson then moved that the Con
vention proceed to nominate candidates for
President of the United States, and upon it
called the previous question.
Mr. Cambreleng asked permission for the
Barnburner delegation to retire, which was
granted.
Mr. Ramsey, of Teun., then obtained leave
to read a letter from President Polk, which
communication states that he had been led to
suppose, from speculations in the publie press
and the iuquiries of Delegates to the Conven
tion , that some of his political friends might
be inclined to propose the use of his name
for re-nomination as a candidate for the Pre
sidency. He wished to state distinctly that
any such use of his name was without his
agency or desire ; and to relieve the Conven
tion of any embarrassment that might be lelt
he reiterated his desire to withdraw to pri
vate life the close of his official term.
This communication was received with
much applause.
Mr. Yancey, of Alabama, then moved to
lay on the table the motion to proceed to the
nomination of candidates, and that the Con.
vention proceed to ballot for a candidate to be
supported by the Democratic party for the
Presidency.
This was lost by the following vote :
at. Nays.
Z I
19
6
4
6
T
as
8
17
. Naya.
Maine,
N- llamshtre,
Massachusetts,
Florida,
Alabama,
Mississippi,
Louisiana,
Texas,
Iowa,
Vermont,
Rhode Island.
4
S
s
7
i!
s
19
19
S3
4
Connecticut,
sew torn,
New Jersey,
Pennsylvania,
Pels ware,
Maryland,
Arkansas,
Missouri,
Illinois,
Indiana,
Miehifran,
Teniwaea,
Kentucky,
Ohio,
Wisconsin,
Virginia,
N. Carolina,
8. Carolina,
Georgia,
It
I 1
Total yeas, 34 ; nays, 91a,
Our despatch read : Total, 21 to 232, but
we have preserved the correct addition of the
vote by States, as given correctly.
The cakV for the 1'revious Question was
then sustained und the resolution to proceed
to nominate candidates to be ballotted for as
the candidate! of the Democracy for Presi
dent. .
Wilson MoCandless, of Pennsylvania, nom
inated James Buchanan.
Judge Ellis, of Mississippi, nominated
Lewis Cass.
Hannjbal Hamlin, of Maine, nominated
Levi Woodbury v. .. ;
The several State delegations then retired
to consult together relative to their ballots,
and motion was made to adjourn until 6 o
clock, but was negatived. ''
The Convention the proceeded with the
following result to the.
FIRST BALLOT.
Woody. Csas. Buck. Calh'n. Dal. Worth.
9
Maine,
N. Hamp..
6
12
2
3
Massachus's
Vermont,
R. Island,
Connecticut,
6
New York, (no vote.)
New Jersey,
Pennsylva'a
Delaware, S
Maryland, 2 6
Virginia, 17
N. Carolina, 1
S. Carolina,
Georgia, 5
Alabama, 5
7
20
10
2
4
Florida, (refused to vote.)
Mississippi, 6
Louisiana, 6
Arkansas, 3
Missouri, 7
Tennessee, 1 7
Kentucky, 1 7
Michigan, 6
Iowa, 1
Illinois, 9
Indiana, 12
Ohio, 23
Texas, 4
Wisconsin, 4
Total, S3 125
S3
3 8
No oue having a majority of two thirds,
the Convention proceeded to a
SECOND BALLOT.
Woodb'y. Cass. Buch. Dallas. Worth.
Maine, . 9
New Hampshire,
Massachusetts,
Vermont,
Rhode Island,
Connecticut,
N. York, (no vote.)
IVew Jersey,
Pennsylvania,
Delaware,
Maryland, 2 6
Virginia, 17
N. Carolina, I
S. Carolina, 9
Georgia, 2 4
Alabama, 5
Florida, (refused to vote.)
Mississippi, 6
Louisiana, 6
Arkansas, 3
Missouri, 7
Tennessee, 1 7
Kentucky, 1 8
Michigan, S
Iowa, 1
Illinois, 9
7
26
3
10
1
4
Indiana, 12
Ohio, 23
Texas, 4
Wisconsin, 4
50 143 54 3 5
No candidate having been chosen, tho
Convention proceeded to the
THIRD BALLOT.
Woodb'y. Cass. Buch'n. Worth.
Maine, 9
New Hampshire; 6
Massachusetts, 7 5
Vermont, 2 4
Rhode Island, 4
Connecticut, 6
N. York, (no vote.)
New Jersey, 7
Pennsylvania, 26
Delaware, 3
Maryland, 2 6
Virginia, 17
North Caiolina, 11
South Carolina, 7
Georgia, 2 8
Alabama, 4
Florida, 3
Mississippi, 6
Louisiana, 6
Arkansas, 2
Missouri, 7
Tennessee, 7 2 3
Kentucky, 8 1 2
Michigan. S
Iowa, 4
Illinois, 9
Indiana, 12
Ohio, 23
Texas, 4
Wisconsin, 4
SI 156 41 5
Still no candidate havinir two-thirds of all
the votes, the Convention proceeded to the
FOURTH BALLOT.
Woodb'y. Cass. Buch'n. Butler. Worth.
Maine, 9
N. Hampshire, 6
Massachusetts, 4 S
Vermont, 6
Rhode Island, 4
Connecticut, 6
York, (no vote.)
New Jersey, 7
Pennsylvania, zo
Delaware,
3
6
17
11
9
10
Maryland,
Virginia,
N. Carolina,
S. Carolina,
(ieorgia,
f lorida,
Alabama,
3
5
Mississippi, 6
Louisiana, 6
Texas, 4
Arkansas, 3
Tennessee 2 7 2
Kentucky, 1 8 1
Ohio, 23
Indiana, 12
Illinois, 9
Michigan, S
Iowa, 4
Missouri, 7
Wisconsin, 4
38
179 33
1
Whole number of vote cast, 254
rsecessary to a choice, itu
Cass received 179
And was declared nominated for the candi
date of the Presidency to be supported by the
Democratic party.
RECAPITULATION
Ut.
Cass, 125
Buchanan, 68
Woodbury, 53
Calhoun 9
Dallas, 3 .
Worth, 6
Butler,! . i j,r
3d. Sd. 4th
133 158 179
64 41 . S3
69 51 38
3-
6 6 1
I.-- ti. -t. i ' .
Arte the result of tha bvat ballot bad been
announoed, m motion vt nude that the Con
vention naniiaoukly pledge itself to tjupport
the nominee, which was adopted amid loud
cheering, and the Convention adjourned un
til b o'clock, P. M
From the lmtIf. I
THE SUNSET OF BATTLE. I
"The shadows of evening are thickening. I
Twilight closes, and the thin mists are ri
sing in the valley. The last charging
squadron yet thunders in the distance ; but
it presses only on the foiled and scattered
foe. For this day the, fteht ia over !
And those who rode foremost in its
field at morning where are they now 1
On the bank of yon little stream, there lies
a Knight his life blood is ebbing faster,
than its tide. His shield is rent, and his
lance isbroken. Soldierwhy faintest thou?
the blood that wells from that deep wound
shall answer.
It was this morning that the sun rose
bright his hopes it sets upon his grave.
This day he led the foremast rank of spears,
that, in their long row levelled when
they had crossed the foe's dark line death
shouted in the onset ! It was the last blow
that reached him. He has conquered,
though he shall not triumph in the victory.
His breast plate is dinted. His helmet
has the trace of well dealt blows. The scarf
on his breast. She would shrink but to
touch it now, who placed it there ! Sol
dier, what will thy mistress say t She will
say that her Knight died worthily.
Aye, rouse thee lor the hsht vet chafes
in the distance ! Thy friends are shouting
thy pennon floats on high. Look on
yon crhnsoned field, that seems to mock the
purpled clouds above it ! prostrate they
lie drenched in their dark red pool thy
friends and enemys the dead, and dying !
The veteran, with the stripling of a day.
The nameless trooper, and the leader of an
hundred hosts. Friend lies by friend. The
steed with his rider. And foes linked in
their long embrace their first, and last
the gripe of death.
iar o'er the held they lie, a fjoreous
prey to ruin! while plume, and steel mori
on; salve and ataghan; cresent and cress;
rich vest and bright corselet we came to
the fight, as we had come to a feasting
glorious and glittering, even in death, each
shining warrior lies !
His last Hance still seeks that Christian
banner ! The cry that shall never be re
peated cheers on it3 last chanre. Oh ! but
for strength to reach the field once more !
to die in the foe's front! Peace, dreamer!
Thou hast done well. Thy place in the
close rank is filled and yet another waits
for his who holds it. Kniirht ! hast thou
yet a thought bend it on heaven! The
past is gone; the future lies brforc thee.
Gaze on yon gorgeous sky thy home
should lie beyond it !
Lite honour love they pass to him
that gave them. Pride that came on like
oceans billows see round thee how it lies
mute and passive. The wealthy here are
poor. The high born have no precedence.
The strong are powerless ; the mean con
tent. The fair and lovely have no follow
ers. Soldier! She who sped .thee on thy
course to day her blue eye shall seek thee
in the conquering ranks to morrow, but it
shall seek thee in vain ! Well ! thus it is
thou should'st have died ! with all to live
for. Wouldst thou be base to have thy
death a blessing 1 Proud necks shall mourn
for thee. Bright eyes shall weep for thee.
They that live envy thee. Death ! glory
takes out thy sting.
The shades of night are drawing on
soldier, thine eyes are darkening. A last
rim of the sun lies yet upon the distant hill
even as he sinks, thy soul shall follow
him 1 bee how thy steed leeds beside thee.
His dark eve falls mildly on his master
and he pauses. Poor wretch! thine instinct
sees some wrong, yet knows it not. Brouse
on ; and heaven which guards its meanest
creatures send thee a kind protector.
Warrior ! ave, the stream of that rill
flows cool ; but thy lips no more shall taste
it. The moonlight that silvers its white
foam, shall glitter on thy corselet, when
thy eye is closed and dim. Lo! now the
night is coming. The mist is gathering on
the hill. The fox steals forth to seek his
quarry and the grey owl sweeps whirling
by, rejoicing in the stillness. Un, soldier:
how sweetly now sounds thy lady's
lute how fragrant are the dew sprinkled
flowers that twine round the casement from
which she leans! That lute shall enchant
thee those flowers shall delight thee no
more.
One other charge ! soldier, it may not
be. To thy saint and thy lady commend
thee ! Hark to the low trumpet that sounds
the recall ! Hark to its long notesweet
is that sound in the ear of the spent and
routed foe !
The victor hears it not. When the
breath rose that blew that note, he lived
its peal has rung,' and his spirit has depart
ed. Heath ! thou should'st be a soldiers
pillow. Moon ! let thy cold light this
night fall upon him. But, morning! thy
soft dews shall tempt him not the soldier
must wake no more. He sleeps in the
sleep of honour. His cause was his coun
trys freedom, and her faith. He is dead !
The cross of a christian knight is on his
breast : his lips are pressed to his lady's
lOKen : soldier, larewell."
TITUS
Ths Country The Graks and Grain
Crops. A ride into the country at this sea
son of the year presents a most beautiful
eight. The season is remarkably forward, and
everythiug is growing luxuriantly. The grass
and the grain promise abundant crops, and
fruit, particularly cherries, hang in the most
profuse clusers upon branches of the tree
This is. not only the case in our immediate
neighborhood, but accounts from other quar
ten, in our exchanges, give the same testi
mony- . In the counties of Bucks, Montgo
mery, Lancaster, Chester, and Lebanon, of
our own State, harvest time promisee to re
ward bounteously the husbandman's toil, And
over the whole eountry plenty seems prepa
ring to shower golden fruilt into his lap
From tho Phila. Ledger. I
THE REVOLUTION IN HAYTt SANOl'IIV A
11Y BCEIVES CIVIL WAR.
We have received by Special Express, the
New Orleans Picayune on the 12th, which
brings us intelligence that a most sanguiuary
war of colors had again broken out in Hayti,
characterized by ravages of the most awful
character. The extracts of the New Orleans
papers do not explain the cause of this out
break, but previous information, received by
way of New York, announced the threatened
danger, from a determination of the black
population to have the constitution of 1816
restored. This was opposed by themulattoes.
The blacks being the most numerous, and be
ing joined by tho army, compelled President
Soulougue to dis-niss his ministry, and to ac
cede to their demand in relation to fhe con
stitution. The mulattoes took up arms to
overthrow the Government, but it seem, by
the following accounts that the blacks have
been too much for them. It seems as if the
atrocities of 1800 were to be renewed.
From Jamnlca and Port an Prince.
Port-au-Prince. This unfortunate coun-.
try has again become the arena of a sangui
nary scene. We learn from respectable au
thority that the black population have risen
en mass: against the inhabitants of color, and
were committing awful ravages among them.
The causes of the outbreak we are unable to
ascertain, but it is supposed to be a dissatis
faction of the browns to be governed by the
present President. The British merchants
resident at Poit-au-Pi inco engaged the brig
Queen Victoria, which happened fortunately
to be there, and sent, through the British
Consul to tho commodore on the station, re
questing the immediate presence of a man-of-war
to protect British subjects and their
interests. There was a French vessel of war
nt Port-au-1'rincc, and we are informed that
her presence tended in a great degree to quell
the outbreak which took place, but which,
notwithstanding, was of a most serious na
ture. The Queen Victoria anchored at Morant
Bay on Thursday last, and the capital fort
with came to Port Royal to deliver his de-
patches to the commodore. It was said tha.
the number of persons killed in one day ex
ceed two hundred.
Herz, the pianist, was at Kingston on the
30th. He advertises for sale his piano, "be
ing about to return to the United States."
A smart shock of a earthquake was felt in
the town of Falmouth on the 21st nil., nt n
bout a quarter past 6 o'clock, A. M. It was
of brief duration not lasting more than a few
seconds, and its undulating motion appeared
to be from nearly cast to west.
Since the above was in type we have read
the following in last evening's Courier being
an extract from a letter to a commercial
house :
Hayti has again been the scene of blood
shed and murders. We learn that the brig-
antine Queen Victoria, (of Trinidad) Captain
Tucker, from Port au Prince, bound to Ham
burg, with a cargo of coffee, &c, put into
Morant Bay on Thursday last to purchase
stores, as none could be procured at Port au
Prince in consequence of the state of affairs
at that place; and that Capt. Tucker reports
that he has brought despatches from the Bri
tish Consul there to Com. Bennet, on this
station, requesting that a vessel of war should
be immediately sent to Port au Prince, where
a serious disturbance had taken place a large
number (some say upwnrds of a hundred) of
the colored population having been massac
red by their black brethren. The cause of
this outbreak has not been fully mentioned,
but it is said that the lives of people of color
were daily being sacrificed in large numbers.
This determination on the part of the blacks
to exterminate the browns had been brewiug
for a long time, in fact since tha tyrant Sou.
louque has been president j and it is now be
ing realized with a vengeance that none but
savages would be guilty of committing.
The Commodore, we understand, has been
unable to comply with the requisition of Her
Brittanic Majesty's Consul at Port au Prince,
there not being a single vessel of war at Port
Royal at this moment, excepting the guard
and store ships, which are useless in their
present condition.
It is certainly a cause of much regret that
this island should be left so destitute of ves
sels of war ae it is at present. It has been
said that we can have no possible cause for
alarm, but who can tell what a moment might
produce t The present outbreak in Hayti,
where the presenae of a man-of-war to pro-
tect British interests would be of much ser
vice, is a Hull'u-ient proof why Port Royal
should not be as she now is destitute of at
least one available vessel of war to be used
in cases of emergency. Who knows how
many innocent beings have by this time been
sacrificed to a merciless mob ; who, had pro
tection been afforded by one of her Majesty's
vessels, would have been enabled to save
themselves and their families from the gene
ral massacre which, we are told, was going
on in that unfortunate country.
Eric Bank again. Gen. Reed, the Presi
dent of this Bank, at first, on hi stopping
payment, proposed to pledge all hi property
said to amount to a million to meet all tbe
liabilities of the bank ; but subsequently he
declined to do this, on the ground that he
ha made auch other arrangement m will
enable him to pay off everything, without
laying up bis estate. ., . . , .
A Down East Editor mistake General
Winfteld Scott for Sir Walter Scott, tnd
says he it glad to find that Sir Walter can
fijht hattles is wen as write toout trtem.
Correspondence of the Public Ledger. , (
THE MECHANICS' FAIR AT BALTIMORE.
Baltimore, May 20, 1848.
A machine for making" pale fence struck
us as new. In an instant the holes are drilled,
and the broom-handle-like pale is pointed by
another tool. One hand will furnish panels
enough in a day to enclose an acre of ground.
Elisha Briggs, Wyoming CO., New York.
A most efficient and quick-working slock
ing frame for family use, knits exactly as a
woman with knitting-needles, and the fabric
looks as if knit by hand. It is very Bimple,
and requires only the turning a crank ; a
child can knit a stoekingbone. Price $15.
J. McMullen, Baltimore.
A Chum to make butter in six minutes .'
The principle not apparent. Donahue.
A Mortising Machine. It has four knives
that cut from below upwards: viz: two
square outer chisels, and two in the centre
that, by an eccentric motion, cut from the
centre towards the outer ones. It is the most
efficient tool of the sort we have ever seen.
A. Chandle, Rockford, Illinois. Price S 100-
Metallic corn and (tour drier. This is a
hollow cylinder, ribbed horizontally. Steam
keeps it hot ; and as the meal or flour falls
upon it, it is thoroughly robbed of all its a
vailable moisture; which in a barrel of ordi
nary flour may be ten pounds.
The advantages of this operation are ob
vious. It protects from spoiling by heating,
&c, and it saves the carriage of the watery
ingredient. Such flour will of course re-ab
sorb the lost water when furnished by the
cook, besides the water usually taken up. Il
will enable us to prepare grain and flour for
shipment much earlier after harvest than is
safe in the natural way. Stafford, Cleveland)
Ohio.
THE SIAMESE TWINS.
The Siamese twins are living in North Car
olina, as farmers, and are both married. A
correspondent of the Richmond papers, who
has recently visited their home, writes some
interesting details in relation to their domes
tic life.
The twins chop wood remarkably fast,
four hands being on tho axe at the same time.
They also shoot at a mark or game with their
four hands restinz on the cun. Thev drive
their horses forty miles, to Wilkes, them
selves, and do any kind of work about the
farm. Mrs. fcng says her husband is very
kind to the negroes, and that Chang is very
severe with them. Mrs. Ens is also better
disposed than Mrs. Chang, and is the pret
tiest.
Mrs. Eng is very close and saving; and
Mrs. Chang is disposed to indulge in dress
and various other expenses. The twins rare
ly diller about a dress, but otten oilier in
their ideasof purchasing negroes or land. The
opinion of Eng is always the law, and Chang
readily acquiesces. Eng does all tho writing
including the signing of notes and other im
portant papers. Eng is one inch taller than
Chang, and Chang's wife is taller than Eng's.
Some old lady in the neighborhood, a few
days ago, asked Eng which was the oldest 1
and he replied that ho was just six months
older than his brother.
Well, says the old lady, 1 thought there
was about that much difference, for you are
purty considerable bigger than your brother
They are good on a joke, und the old lady
in earnest. They have a blacksmith shop on
their farm, and a ehoemaker's bhop also.
saw a good sized frame house that they made
without any assistance, from foundation to
roof. At the table they both use a bench.
and each lias his own knife and fork.
I asked them if they both expected to die
at the same time, and they replied that it
could not be otherwise: for if the came di
sease did not take them both of at one time.
as the living one would have to be seperated
from the dead body, the act of separation
would be his death; but their general lm
pression is that they will both die of the same
disease and at the same tune, llieir allee
tion for each other is very strong. Any
the neighbors ottering an insult to tlie one
the other immediately resents ; and it woul
take a champion to cope with them in a rough
and tumble fight. To use an expression o
their neighbors, "they fight like cals."
THE LOWER CLASS.
Who are they ! Tho toiling millions, th
laboring man and woman, the farmer, th
mechanic, the artizan, the inventor, the pro-
ducert Far from it. These are nature's no,
bility God's favorites the salt of the earth
No matter whether they are high or low
station rich or poor 111 pelf, conspicuous or
humble in position, they arf surely tha "up
per circles" in tho order of nature, whateve
the fictitious distenetion of society, fashion
able or unfashionable, decree.
It is not low it is the highest duty, pnvi
lege and pleasure, for the great man and the
whole souled woman to earn what they pos
sess, to work their own way through life, to
be architect of their own fortunes. Some
may rank the classes we have alluded to as
onlv relative low, and in lac. me miuiunij
classe. We insist they are absolutely the
vrv Wheat. If there is class of human
beinm on earth', who may proiwrly be de
nominated low, it is composed of those who
spend without earning, who consume without
producing, who dissipate tin the earning of
their tamers or reiauvra wuui ireiug ,
doing any thing n and of theraselve.
... .. ' .t: .rt:R.
we are an manners on tu ac ui .
And they who climb above us up the shroud,
Have only, in their overstepping place, '
Gained a more dancerous station and foot
hold more insecure.
GEMS , OF POESY.
WASHINGTON'S ORATE.
BY MARSHALL S. FtKE. ;. 1
Disturb not his slumber, let Washington
sleep
Neath the bough of tho willow that over
him weep;
His arm is unnerv'd, but hi deeds remain
bright, "
As the stars in the dark vaulted heaven at
night. '
Oh ! wake not the hero, his battles are o'er,
Let him rest undisturbed on Potomac's fair
eliore,
On the river's green border, so flowery drest,
With tho heart he loved fondly let Washing
ton rest.
Awake not his slumbers, tread lightly around
Tis the grave of a freeman ; 'tis Liberty's
mound f '
Thy'name is immortal, our freedom ye won,
Brave sire of Columbia, cur own Washing
ton. ' ''
dh ! wake not tho hero, his battles are o'er.
Let him rest, calmly rest, on his dear native
shore,
While the stars and the stripe cf our country
shall wave,
O'er the land that can boast of a Washing
ton's Grave.
THE FIRST DUTY OF A STATESMAN.
Is to build up' the moral energy of a peo
ple. This is their first interest ; and he who
weakens il, inflicts an injury which no talent
can repair; nor should any splendour of ser
vices, or any momentary, success, avert from
him the infamy which he has earned. Let
public men learn to think more reverently of
their functions Let them feel that they are
touching more vital interest than property.
Let them fear nothing so much as to sap the
moral convictions of a people, by unrighteous
legislation, or a selfish policy. Let them
cultivate in themselves the spirit of religion
and virtue, as the first requisite to public sta
tion. Let no apparent advantage to the com
munity, any more than to themselves, seduce
them to tho infraction of any moral law. Let
them put faith in virtue ' as the strength of
nations. Let them not be disheartened by
temporary ill success in upright exertion. Let
them remember, that while they and their
cotempomrics live but for a day, the state is '
to live for ages ; and that Time, the unerring
arbiter, will vindicate the wisdom as well as ;
the magnanimity of the public manj' who
confiding In the power of truth, justice and
philanthrophy, asserts their claims, and rev- '
erently follows their monitions, amidst gene
ral disloyalty and corruption. Channing.
The Smiles of Infancy. Infants only a
month old are often seen to smile in their '
sleep, Dr. Beatlie says, "I have heard good
women remark, that the innocent babe is
then favored with some glorious vision. But '
that a babe should have vision or dreams,
before it has ideas, can hardly be imagined. -
This is probably the effect, not f thoughi,
but of some bodily feeling, or merely of some
transient contraction or expansion of the mus
cles. Certain it is, that no smiles are more
captivating. And Providence no doubt in
tend them as a sort of silent language to en
gage our love ; even as, by its cries, the
infant is enabled to awaken our pity, and
commaud our protection."
Shortening ihe Mississippi. Tho pro
cess of shortening a river, may appear some
thing new under the sun, but it has actually
been accomplished in the Mississippi, one of
the largest rivers in the United States. 'Du
ring a recent freshet tho river ir.ade a ,;bolt"
through its banks at Reccourci, where there
was a considerable turn, and took a straight
course for the nearest point of the stream,
cutting otr twenty-right miles in the length
of the stream. The largest class of steam
boats pass through up and down,' without auy
difficulty It is about four hundred yards
wide and the banks constantly caving Phi'
Utdilphia Ledger. s .
Preservation or Stair Carpets. "Stair
carpets should always have a strip of paper
put under them, at, and over the edge of
every stair, which is the part where they
wear out, in order to lessen the friction of the
carpets on the -boards beneath. . The strip
should be within an inch or. two as long a
the carpet is wide, and ulcut four or five in
ches in -width, 'so as to be at a distance from
each stair. This simple plan, so easy of exe
cution, will, we know,, preserve a stair car
pet half as king again as it would without the
strips of piper." GcrtiMiitoun Telegraph.
Mr. Madison's Mani-scripts. The House
of Representatives passed, after some debate
on Saturday, the bill for praying Mrs. Madi
son $25,000 for the MSS. of Mr. Madison. It
only awaits the signature of the President to
become a law. It is a remarkable cireum
stance that the bill passed on the anniveraa
ry of this lady' birth-day.
A Veteran Horse Wd are credibly in
formed, say the Meroereburg Journal, that
horsa belonging to Michael Stickle of Antrim
lowuship,-in this county, lately died at the
age of forty-four years and six month and that
until shortly before his death he could not be
managed by a rider.
To Ptciie Osions. Peel, and boil in tniilt '
and water ten minutes, drain o IT the milk and '
water, and pur scalding spiced vinegar en f
them

xml | txt