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Sunbury American. (Sunbury, Pa.) 1848-1879, June 17, 1848, Image 1

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'11,
III CAN
H.B. MASSER, EDITOR AND PROPRIETOR.
OFFtCE, CORNER OF CENTRI, AlLY & MARKET STltEET.
1 'V " r' " i ' i "
21 jramfls Jlrtospaprr-Dcbolrt to $omtcs, attfraturt, iaoralft, iFowtiro attt
omestc $ltthtis:M'b the ttf ts; flBrlculfurr , iHamt is, amuKtmtnts, Set.
NEW SKIUKS VOL. 1, NO. 19.
SUNDURT, NORTnUAiaERLAND COUNT: Ki.;HSATUflDAY, JUNK 17, I8JS.
OLli SfeR.Efc VOL. 8, NO. 38.
SfJIBIKY
... I H . J. . V. . j
TERNN OF THE: AMBRICAS.
FUR AMERICAN Is tmbliabwl everr Saturday H TWO
bpLLARS per annum to b paid half yearly in advance
R mmr diee -ntinued until all erreernsra ate paid,
All comeMnieations or Ictura on business relating to the
Ace, to insure attention, muat be POST PAID.
TO CLUBS.
IVe copies to one address, 8500
Seven Do Do 1000
Fifteen Do Do 9000
. Fire dollare In advance will pay tor three yeax'i subscrip
tion to the American.
Due Square of 16 linee, 3 limee, f 1 00
Every subsequent ineertion, 93
One Square, 3 montha, 950
Sic montha, 373
Owe year, 600
Saeinew Cards of Five linee, per annum, 3 00
erehante and othere, advertising by the
year, with the privilege of inserlieg dif -
I Went advertisements WeeYly. BOO
Or Larger Advertiacmenta, aa per agreement.
H. 3. MASSES.,
ATTOUNGY AT LAW,
1 lUWBtTHY, PA.
Vueineee attended lii in the innli of Nor
tbumterland, Union, Lyrumini nmt Columbia.
Refer (oi
P. fV A. RovotinT. "
. Iinwia cV Bnnil
Months A. XmiMiiM, yi'Mlarf.
RtTKOLiia, McKmsn A I5n
Srtatsn, 'too ii ft Co.,
George J. Weaver.
BOPS MAKER & SHIP CHANDLER.
No. 1 3 North Water Street. Philadelphia
TTA8 constantly on hand. gener! Rssnrt
JB mrnt of Cordage, Seine Twinee. &c, viz :
Tat'el Rope, Pishing Ropes, Whit Ropes. Manil
U Ropes, Tow Lines for Canal Boat. AIo. a
complete assortment nf 8eine Twines. Ac. such a
Tremp Htiad anil HeTrtiig Twine, Best Patent (Jill
Net Twine. Cntlnn Shail and Heninu Twii e.Rhoe
Thrraile. Ilc. etc. Alan, Bed !onli. IMmnh Line.
Hniier,Trneee. Cnttnn and l.inen C irpet t-hiin.
Ac, all of which he will dispusa of on rnaann.illr
teima.
Philadelphia, Noeemliei 1 3. 1 47. ly
rim
VT right' Indian Vegetable rill.
Henry Mear. Kunliii'y.
K Sc I. Kiuffmn, Augnala lownthip.
John H. Vine nt, Ctiillinquaqtie.
Kaa 6c Befat"eer. Ely-liu'g.
Semuel Hetli. Little Mahnny,
William Ueppi'n. Jacka n.
IreUnd ai d Haynea, McGwcnsville.
William Heinui & Brother, Milton.
Potvythe, Wilaon A Co., Nuithumberland
Jamea Ryed. Pntiegrnve.
G. W. 8eoH. Ito.hville.
W. A R Feo'ly. Shxmofcinlnwn.
Rhndea A Parrnw Snyderatown.
Amoa T. Beie. ll, Ttiihutaville.
Brnnevilie Hnlahuc, Upper Mahonoy.
J..hn O. Renn. do do.
E. Pn er, Wateontnwn.
WhoteMHle, M the offie'e and general depot, I69
Rare at., Philadelphia. U e. 18. IS47. ly
TUB CUE IP BOOK STORli.
DA1TIELS& SMITH'S
Cmkap Niw A Second hand Booa Siork.
North Wt$t tome' nf fourth and Arch Streets.
Philadelphia.
Law Books, Theological and Classical Books,
mSDIOAX. BOOKS,
BIOGRAPHICAL HISTORICAL BOOKS,
SCHOOL BOOKS.
Scientific and Mathematical Do .ks.
Juvenilt Books, in threat variety.
Hymn Books snd Prsyei Books, Bibles, all sites
and prices.
Blank Boohs, Writing Paper,andStationary,
lVul,-'t ad li't ail.
XW Oca prieee are much lower than the tmtui prices.
VT Ulnar iai and email parcels of fcrnke purchased.
iy Books imported to orrlrr from London.
Philadelphia, April 1, lt48 y
POlCTEP. & E1TGLISH,
GROCERS COMMISSION MF.RCIIAJiTS
aaid Uemlrra In Seeds,
N- 3. Aich St I'HILAUELPHIA.
Constantly on hand a general assortment of
GROCERIES, TEAS, WINES, SEEDS,
LIQUORS, &.c.
T which they respectfully invite the attention
of the public.
AH kinds of country produce taken in exchange
for Groceries or sold on Commission.
Pbtlad April 1, 188
OLITEP. &. MOL AIT,
Impoktkes and Dealers in
ZEPHYR WORSTED, CANVASSES, PATTERNS,
Cottons, Needles, Pins, Seiring Silk,
...! r..,i. Pla.ns. Steel Taasela. Steel
Puree Rings, Purse Claeps. Plam and Shaded
Purse Twist, Trimmings,
Fancy Goods, &c.
Cheap for Cosh to Wholesale Dealers, at the
New Ttsrvad and XceUlo Kture,
Ma 3 Nurtk f-urih N. 17S CUet.ut SueeU
PHILADELPHIA.
April 8, 1848
"lOrff JESftT JB3Z fflaS
rs r JPBBMXUM PIAMJ rOAtES,
i HE SUBSCR1BKR hasbeeuappoiiiteii agent
1 for the sale of LO.NKAU M r. i r. H a LhLL
BRATED PRE 1U ' ROSE V OOU PIANOS
this mac. These Piuoa bavu a plain, mas
atv and beautiful exterior finish, and, lor depib
ol tone, and elegance or workinar.ship, ate not
lurpassed by any in the United Stales
Theee instruments are highly approved of by
Ihe most ernihent Profesaois and t.omposers ol
Music in this and other cities.
For qualities or tore, touch and keeping in
tone upon Concert pitch, they cannot be sucpas-
eel by eltner American or cuiop-au na.io..
Suffice it to say that Madame Castellan, W. V
Wflkaea. Vieus Ternns, and bis sister, the cele
brated Pianist, and many others nl Ihe most ilis
inquisbed performers, nave given tnese insiru
irernea over all others
They have also r ceived the first notice of the
k... l..i Fahihitions. and the last Silver Medal
bribe Fianklin Inatitute in 1843. was awarded
to tbem. which, with other premiums Irom Ihe
a i ka U'ara.tiuim Nn
same source, may o seen ' -
58 south Fourth st.
iwinnth.r atilvee Medal was awarded to C
Meyer, by the Frahklin Institute, Oct 1843 for
the Best fiano in me roiui"-
. ik. ..kihitinn of the Franklin Insti
tute. X-t 1848. the first premium and medal was
warded t 43. Myer for his Pianos although it
had been warded at tne exniomon n, ...
that he had made still great
er improvements in hie instruments within the
Whst 'the last exhibition of the Frankli
saji. another Premium was awaraeu
t, C Meyer, lor tne wr"-..-
At Boetos). at laeir iaai n.u.i.... ay. ..
C Meter raeeived the first stiver Medal and III
pWana. for the beat square Piano in the exhibition
p , . d -in k. aold at the rr.annlaclu
Mr'.heweat Philadelphia price, if not something
fewer.- Persons are requesiea isniisr..,.,
in. for thsmselvM. st lh rf
Pbeiry, A'rril 8, 1848 -
HISTORICAL.
THE FALL OF KINGS.
CHARLES , LOVIS PHILIPPE.
A friend has furnished for the Baltimore
American, Ihe following interesting paper,
translated from the N. Y. Courier des Eiats
Um; setting forth the striking similitude of
of the leading events prior and subsequent to
the fall of Charles X. and of Louis Philippe:
1. The Duke of Ber
1. The Duke of Or
leans, son of Louis
Philippe.
2. M a r r i e s a fo
reign Mcclenbergian )
Princess.
3. From this mar
ry, son of Charles X.
2. Marries a foreign
(Sicilian) Princes.
3. From this mar-!
ringo springs an heir
mulii fo the crown.
4. Whose father, the
Duke of Berry, dies,
opsasiinatcd.
5. On the thirteenth
of February, 1820.
6. Darin" the veat
riage springs un heir
male to the crown.
4 Whose father the
Duke of Orleans, dies
by accident.
' V On the thirteenth
of July, 1842.
6 During the year pre
ceding the full of Louis
procedins the fall of!
Charles X. 1 1829.1iPhilippe, bread rises
bread rises to an ex- to an exorbitant price
hoibitant price: 1 franc 1st April, 1 franc, 21
50 centimes Ici-iilimrs.
T.Retrogradinrr course! 7.netro;rndiiir course
of the government, of- of this government, af
ter the brilliant liopcs.ler tne brilliant proini-
which had been enter
tained, induces the
friends of their coun
try to address advice
to it relative to the
ses which had been
made, induces enligh
tened men to address
counsels to it relative
to the crisis about to
ensue.
crisis about to ensue
8. These counsel
8. These counsels
are disdained by the
Executive.
9. Discourse of the
nre disdained by the
Jvvecutive.
9. Discourse of the
crown containing bit
ter and offensive words
erown rnntiiiinnrr bit
ter and olfmiM ve words
ngiiinst the Opposition,
session of 1828.
10. Results in the
protestation of 221 de
puties. 11. Capture of the
Devof Algiers.
airninst the Opposition,
(session of 1S48.)
10. Results in Ihe pro
testation of n large
number of Deputies.
11. Capture ol Abil-
el-Kader.
12. Ordoiinauces of
12. Ordonnanceof the
the 25 1 li July, annul
ling the liberty of the
press.
prefect of police, ad
vertised on Ihe 21st ot
February, annulling
ilia liberty of the re
union.
13. These ordonnan-
13. This ordonnnnce
ces give rise to riotous
irives rise to notousas-
assetnblagcs on Mon-'semblages on Monday
day evening, in w hich
evening in which the
ipapers arc loudly read
mid commented upon.
the papers are Jotully
rend and commented
upon. These meet ingsjThese assemblages are
are a species ot pre
face to tha revolution
about to brek forth
on lh-- morrow.
11. The ordonnances
are revolted against,
a species of preface lo
the Revolution about
to break forth on the
morrow.
14. The ordonnance
is revolted against, and
and tn-' power tails in-
he power falls into thi
to the hands of the in- hands of the insur-
surgents.
15. The combat lasts
3 days the 27th, 28th
and 29th July 1830.
genls.
15. The combat lasts
3 days the 22d, 23d,
and ' 24th February,
1848.
16. Comme nc i n s
1C. Commencing
1 ucsday Hinl ending
Tuesday and ending
on Thursday.
on J hursilay.
17. 1 lit! people gain
17. I lie people tri
he victory over the
umph over tho troops.
royal troops.
18. 1 he ien u armie
18. The municipal
is the lirst to present
guards is the first to
present itself at the
combat, and succumbs.
self at the combat,
and succumbs.
91. It is disbanded.
19. It is disbanded.
20. The royal invio
lability, as proclaimed
ill the" charter of 1830,
becomes a laughing
20. The royal iuvio-
ibility, as proclaimed
ii the charter of 1814
becomes a laughing
stock .
stock.
21. Louis Philippe is
dethroned at the age
of 74.
21. Charles X. is de
throned at the age of
74.
22. In July, the month
22. In February, the
of the Duke of Orleans' Imonlh of the Duke of
ath.
3. Ho abdicates in
Uerry's death.
23. He abdicates lit
favor of his grandson,
thB Count of Paris, ten
years of age.
favor of his grandson,
the Duke ot Bordeaux,
ten years of age.
24. J he UnKe ot lior-
24. The Count of Pa
deaux is presented as fis is presented as King
King.
25. He is refused, wiili
25. II e is refused.
the reply that it is tool
w ith the reply that it is
tale.
wo late.
26 A Pro visional
26. A Provisional Go
Government is estab
vernment is establish
ed. lished.
27. The royal family
27. The royal family
is obliged to fly from
France.
is obliged to 11 y from
France.
28. And adopts Eng
28. And adopts Eng-
land as its place ol ex
and as its place ol ex
ile.
He.
29. Two days after
29. On the day of the
8th of February, at 2
the Revolution, a fear
ful tempest, accompa
o'clock in the after-
nied by thunder and
lightning, breaks out.
, a fearful whirl
wind and tempest, no
eoiiipauiedby thunder
and lightning, arose.
30. The Ministers ofl
30. Ihe Ministers of
Louis Philippe are pub
Charles X. are public
ly accused.
licly accused.
31. The chief of the
family dieson a foreign
soil.
Whiff National Convention
TO NOMINATE CANDIDATES FOR THE
PRESIDENCY AND VICE PRESIDENCY,
Held at the Upper Saloon of the Chinese
Museum,
Philadelphia Jane 9, lt.
GENERAL TAYLOR NOMINATED
On Fourth Ballot.
Great Confusion in the Convention.
NOMINATION OF MR.FILMORE AS VICE
PRESIDENT.
The first day of the Convention was occu
pied in organizing, which was done by selec
ting Gov. Morehead ot North Carolina for
President, and a number of Vice Presidents
and Secretaries'. Various preliminary mat
ters were then discused, and committees &e.,
appointed, when the Convention adjourned.
In tha evening, of the second day, after
great wafmth and excitemant between the
Clay and Taylor men, in regard to the vote
of delegates for Texas, Arkansas and Suulh
Carolina, the nominations were made and
I'm balloting? commenced:
SECOND DAY'S PROCEEDINGS.
Mr. Lewis II. Campbell, of Ohio, nomina
ted, on behalf of the Whigs of his State,
General Winiield Scott.
Mr. Hunt ngdon, of Mass. I nominate as
a candidate for President, Daniel Webster,
of Massachusetts.
Gov. Kent, of Maine On behalf of the
people of the Union, I nominate General
Zachary Taylor.
Here the most enthusiastic applause broke
out from the floor of the Convention and the
galleries, which lasted many minutes. When
it had somewhat subsided, Mr. Blunt, of New
York, said
Mr. President, on behalf of the Whigs of
tho Union, I nominate Henry Clay.
Here the applause again broke out from
floors and galleries, which lasted as long as
tho previous Taylor demonstration, and was
equally as loud.
Mr. Wales, of Delaware, nominated John
M. Clayton, of Delaware.
Mr. Reese, of Ohio, said he had a letter
from Judge McLean, authorizing him towith
draw his name if it was presented.
THE FIRST BALLOT TAYLOR AHEAD.
The Convention then proceeded to the bal
lot amidst great excitement in the galleries,
at first applauding almost every vote.
Tho Stales worn allowed no more votes
th in there were district delegates present.
Thus, S.mth Carolina having but two dele
gates present, was allowed but two votes
its full complement was nine : where there
were more than the full complement, the
electoral vote only was given.
The Delegates of Louisiana gave the whole
vote of Texas, for 1 ay lor. 1 ho second dis
trict of Missouri, the district which Col. Rus
sell was named for in the morning, but which
proposition was not passed gave no vote, be
ing equally divided.
Mi. Newton, of Arkansas, being especially
empowered by tho State Convention, gave
the three votes of the Slate for Zachary Tay
lor; 279 votes were given, 140 were neces
sary to a choice.
The following was the vole :
. S1 ? 2
O Os
s,
I
Maine, 5 3 1
New Hampshire, 6
Massachusetts, 12
Vermont, 1 5
Rhode Island, 4
("iiiineetieul, 6
New York, 1 29
New Jersey, 3 4
Pennsylvania, 8 12
IX-leware,
Maryland, 9
Virginia, 15 2
Norm Carolina, 6 5
South Carolina, 1 1
Georgia, 10
Alabama, 6 1
Mississippi, 6
Louisiana, 5 1
Texas, 4
Tennesee, 13
Kentucky, 7 5
Ohio, 1 1
Indiana, 1 2
Illinois, 4 , 3
Missouri, 6 1
Wisconsin, 1 3
Iowa, 2 1
Arkansas, 3
Michigan, 3
Florida, 3
Total, 111 22 97
Ci
o
20
9
1
43 4 2
A motion was then made to adjourn until
nine o'clock this morning, which was nega
tived. THE 8F.COND BALLOT TAYLOR GAINING.
On this vole the chances were watched
v. ith silence and anxiety. Tho friends of the
candidates were too excited to cheer, and
could only mutely listen to the vote, and men
tally calculate the changes.
Tho votes of the Statca as follows :
-i
Si
5"
9
c?
o
w o
Maine,
New Hampfhire,
Massnchnsetts,
Vermont,
Rhode Island,
Connecticut,
New York,
New Jersey,
Pennsylvania,
Delaware,
Maryland,
Virginia,
North Carolina,
South Carolina,
3
6
12
5
3
G
28
4
5
10
IS
6
1
10
6
6
6
13
Georgia,
Alabama,
Mississippi,
nutsiana.
Texas, '
Tennessee,
Kentucky,
Ohio,
Indiana;
21
8
Illinois,
I
Missouri
6 one vacancy by a tie vote
Wisconsin,
i
1
Iowa,
Arkansas,
Michigan,
Florida,
3
3
3
esana-ejw
118
Total,
86 49 22
McLean received no vote on thia ballot
On the announcement of thia vota the ex
citement was intense. Over fifty gentle
men sprung to their foot and moved to ad
lourn until nine o'clock this morning. .
Cries of "No 1 No ! Go on" "another bal,
lot" "adjourn 1 adjourn '.""put the ques
tion" "vote it down" "let's go" were
heard from all part of tho room.
Tha President "The motion to adjourn
iu order I shall put H.'J.. Tho vote w.sthdn
put a great number void "Aye" the negaJ
live being called, A largf number, and, in the!
opinion of fie rep' tar, tho largest number,!
voted' .!" ' . . : ' ' " A
The President, "ihe aVea haro It."'-.!.
On this announcemeNt over -ft hundred
Delegates sprung' to Hoot, and demanded a
division. Cries of "it'a decided,'" "the Con
vention is adjourned,'? "k is fiol,':; "'take iho
division," "Mr. President, the meeting is not
adjourned," "the nays have the majority,"
"question," "question," "division," I'Jivi
sion," "yeas and nays," "it hag been, deci
ded." 7
The yeas and nays were called for
Mr. Sherman "The 'question has been
taken. It is too late forlhe yeas and nays
can be taken at anytime." -
The President "It is impossible to main
tain any motion during the-noisc and unless
members arc seated."
. Notwithstanding this announcement, the
confusion and 'noise lasted over live minutes,
during which time tho President sat "down,
not being able to make himself heard. At
the lirst lull in the storm, he said, "owing to
the confusion, I declare Ihe meeting adjourn
ed." Lnuding huzzing greeted this an
nouncement from a portion of the members,
and each one putting on his hat prepared to
go off, and the premises were soon evacuated.
THIRD DAY..
The Convention opened with prayer by the
Rev. J. Lansing Burrowcs, of tho Baptist
Chuich.
The journal of yesterday's proceedings van
then red, after which tho balloting recom
meuced, with th? following result
THIRD BALLOT.
9
35
6
3 2
Maine.
New Hampshire,
Massaehuseels,
1
1
1
2
o
ermout.
Rhode Island,
Connecticut,
New York,
3
3
28
4
2
3
I
G
10
1
Pennsylvania,
12
1
13
7
1
10
6
C
G
13
7
1
5
4
G
3
3
3
4
He la ware,
Virginia,
North Carolina,
South Carolina,
Jeorgia,
fVabama,
is.i.-ippi,
Louisiana,
ennessee,
entueky,
5
1
1
3
4
1
Ohio,
21
G
mliaua,
lliuois,
M
sou i i,
Wisconsin,
nwa.
Arkansas,
Michigan,
F'jrida,
Texas,
133 74 51 17 1
FOURTH BALLOT.
V!
o
5"
5"
Maine,
New Hampshire,
5
2
1
n
4
3
6
4
12
2
8
in
10
l
10
6
6
6
4
13
11
1
7
8
7
4
4
3
2
3
Massachusetts,
Vermont,
Rhode Island,
Connecticut,
3
13
3
4
New tork,
New Jersey,
Pennsylvania,
Delaware,
Maryland,
Virginia,
North Carolina,
10
1
South Carolina,
Georgia,
Alabama,
Mississippi,
.ouisiana,
Texas,
1 ennessee,
Kentucky,
Ohio,
21
4
Indiana,
Illinois,
Missouri,
Wisconsin,
Iowa,
Arkansas,
Michigan,
r lorida,
171 3
63 14
Motion made to adjourn.
Mr. King spoke on adjournment.
New York wanted to adjourn.
Mr. Colier, of New York, came to consult
with his colleagues from other States. He
had done his best to present tho name of Tay
lor, but he desired to say that the wish and
vote of the Convention - would meet no ob
jection from him.
For himself ho thought New York would
support the nomination. Tho Convention
should now proceed at once to nominate the
Vice Presideut. He had warned his Whig
brethren about his nomination and against it,
but there shall be no rebellion against the
nomination of the nominee of the Conven
tion, as far as he is concerned. He nomina
ted for Vice President, Milliard Fillmore, of
New York.
The motion of adjournment here was with
drawn.
A Delegate of South Carolina, gave his
hearty approval to all that had been done
the candidate had been fairly nominated.
Mr. Allen frdm Maas. said that he could
not give his consent on th part of his State.
The discipline of the South again had pre
vailed. The North will spnrn the bribe of
fered her of the Vice President, aa a misera
ble boon. I say that tho Whig party of the
United States is here and henceforth dissolv
ed. (Tremendous hisses and confusion.)
We've struggled to preserve it as long' aa
we could do it with honor. By the Wcssinp
of GbfJ tHeNIisibliiiroft'ftirty'resirif 15 the adj
vantage of the cuuiHry-i-it ,.ls ime that wa
should separate. We spurn- the -nominee o
the Convention ami t tell you that Massachu
setts will spurn the bribe that is attempted to
be offered Ker, (alluding to I tne proposed
nomination of Abbott Lawrence for Vice
President.)
Groat confusion and hissing, with some
cheers, were here heard. j
A delegate V Ohio asked that Taylor
pledge himself to abide by the nomination of
Ihe Whig party! Let Taylor pledge himself
to its principles against "no extension of
slavery" (enthusiastic applause) "protec
tion of American industry"' (cries of "sit
down, sit down !") The gentleman asked if
he was to be gagged T (Cries of "no, no."
Motion to adjourn lost. Mr. Johnson of
Penn. said he' had been the iindnviating
friend of Scott-j-(Chair called Mr. J. to order.
It was moved again to support the order of
the day lost. A gentleman from Ohio ap
appealed from the Chairs decision, with ex
treme veh 'nience, but finally desisted, amidst
many cries of "sit down !"
Mr. Gentry thought an adjournment abso
lutely necessary.
A motion to suspend Ihe rules for 3 hours
was made, lost, made again, lost again.
Order of tha day called.
Motion to adjourn till one o'clock was lost.
Motion for a recess for half an hour was
lost.
The Secretary here called ihe roll.
Mr. Mitchell of Mississippi, nominated
Abbott Lawrence of Massachusetts, for Vice
President.
The following named gentlemen were also
nominated; J. M. Clayton of Delaware,
George Evans of Maine, Tlios. Ewing of
Ohio, Robert C. Wiuthrop of Massachusetts,
Win. A. Seward of New York, John Young
of New York. (A motion to adjourn fori
hour was lost.)
Mr. Choate. of Mass., having left the Con
vention in consequence of some unavoidable
cause, Mr. Sprague, of that State, was unani
mously substituted iu his place.
Mr. Seward's name was withdrawn.
Mr. Sergeant, of Pa., was nominated.
Hamilton Fish, ditto. .
T. Butler King withdrawn.
Ohio withdrew the name of Ewing, of
Ohio.
Ohio wisbvd no sugar plums from the Con
vention so said a delegate who arose at this
time.
Mr. Ashmun, of Mum., withdrew llie name
of Mr. Wiuthrop. So far as Mr. Ashman
knew, the last gentleman had spoken with
out consultation.
Leave was given Mr. Wilson, of Mass., to
say that he, lor one, would not be bound by
the proceedings.
Cries of you cannot proceed, then ; you
are not a Whig.
Chnir The gentleman will take his seat.
Delegate You shall not make a loco-foco
speech here.
Mr. Ashmtui He has a right lo be heard.
Brown of Pennsylvania. Mr. President
Chair order mpv
Mr. Wilson arose, (he is from Massachu
setts) ami proceeded to say that he came as
a Whig, and would go away a Whig, if the
Convention acted like Whigs. We have now
"a gentleman" who 1ms said ho will not be
bound by any party nomination (question of
order hero raised, that the Speaker had no
right to condemn tho doings of tho Convcn.
tion. Chair sustained the point of order.)
Mr. Wilson resumed, and said w hen he
went home, ho should, so help him God, do
all ho could to defeat that man, Gen. Taylor
who was not a Whig as he understood the
word. (Storm of hisses and considerable ap
plause.) An adjournment motion wa lost here.
Mr. Blunt of Massachusetts intended to sus
tain the nomination. It was not true that the
nomination will be received with disapproba
tion by Massachusetts. She will not stain
her banner now nor she never had. (Cheers )
Mr. Galloway, of Ohio, obtained leave to
address the Convention he said : 1 desire to
speak us calmly and dispassionately as I can.
I have always been a V lug and an ultra
Whig. I have found myself in a strange po
sition before this convention ; I love my
country and wish to aid in every measure.
which will contribute to its aucocss. I come
from the State of Ohio, though it is impossi
ble for me to say what tne people will uo
when they hear the nomination of tins Con
vention ; but I do say I will bo prepared to
do that v. hich my free spirit will dictate
when I meet the fieo citizens of Ohio. I
came pledged lo support any man who will
oppose the extension of slavery. God has
given me my nativity upon the free soil of
Pennsylvania, I should, therefore, differ in
opinion from gentlemon born in the suuny
South. I stand bv Ihe compromises of the
Constitution. I lova the conduct of my fulh-
Now, with the pledge I have given it,
it is hard for me to say what I shall do. I
will go home, 1 will say td them that if they
believe in the principles of the nominee, I
will say "amen," and stand by the nomina
tion of the Convention. There are doubts in
Ohio as to the whiggery of the numinee,
doubts cathered from hia letters and conver
sations. Let me say that these principles
are the fundamental principles in the hearts
and feelings of the people of Ohio. Mr. G
hero became exceeding eloquent, concluding
with a thrilling poetical cfudUUon from John
G. Whittier, which was rooaivod t iu close
with bunts of anplauae. , t r ,
The roll was called for tha first ballot for
Vice President . The vote was as fellow :
. Abbott Lawrence, it)9 ; M. Fillmore, U5;
A. Stewart, 14 ; J. Sergeant. 6 ; MeKennan,
13 ; Clayton, 3 ; G. Evans, C ; Scattering, 8.
The whole number ot voles bei lg 274, and
138 requisite to a choice, tho President an
nounced that no election had boen had.
THE SECOND BALLOT riLLMORK NOMINATED.
Before the vote was taken, a Delegate from
New York said that if the vote for Vice Pre
sident vasgiven to Mr. Fillmore, he could
carry the State of New York.
The names of Jno. Sorgeant, Andrew Ste
wart and T. T. MeKennan were withdrawn.
The ballot was as follows :
SECOND BALLOT.
M. Fillmore, 173 ; Abbott Lawrence, 87 ;
Jnd. Sargeant, 1 ; G. Evans, 2 ; Clayton, 3.
After Mr. Fillmore had been nominated,
on a question of unanimous nomination, a
gentleman from Nnw Jorscy, Mr. McCul
lough, said in a very animated speech, that
tho free State of New Jersey had first nomi
nated General Taylor on the battle field of
Trenton.
. Gov. Vance, of Ohio, was sure that they
would now rescue this government and coun
try from the hands of thn spailer-i ho even
had hopes of carrying Ohio for Taylor.
Mr. Carroll, of New York, said that Gen.
Taylor surrenders to his friends lo no one
else to no enemies liko tha Whig parly,
Taylor surrenders to his friends, but never to
his foes New York will support the nomina
tion. Mr. Campbell, of Ohio, spoko a graat deal
about Whig principles, but did not mention
in what any one of them consisted. He
would have Gen. Taylor take hold of the
Whig banner of principles, and say that he
will live and die with that Whig banner
pledged to Whig principles the principles
of '44.
Mr. Sherman of Ohio hoped, implored that
the Convention would not press a rrwlution
for an unanimous nomination of the candi
dates presented. Press this resolution now,
said he you cannot pass it and you will
lose the State of Ohio. Let us. said he, go
down to Independence Square, and there rati
fy the nomination.
Gov. Vance here withdrew the resolution.
A gentleman from Maryland was satisfied
to go into the contest with Gen. Taylor, the
patriot, Maryland would endorse tho nomina-
tlriii
A gentleman from Ohio ofTurcd a resolu
tion relating to slavery, which brought out.
Mr. Brown, of Pa.. h denominated the
dologations on the right ot" tho Chair, some of
them, factionists.
Mr. Brown raised sueh a storm about his
ears that he had to sit down.
A motion to lay the resolution on the table
here prevailed.
A resolution from Mr. Hathaway, of N. i .
passed thanking the Committee of Arrange-
ments for their ellorts. He, and also ine citi
zens of Philadelphia for their courtesy.
The thanks of the Convention were tender
cd to the Chairman for his impartiality, &e.
A similar resolution relative to the officers
was passed.
It was moved that the President of the
Convention inform the nominees of the Con-
vention of their nomination, and publish their
replies, &c.
A vole of thanks was passed to the clergy-
men who had officiated.
Mr. Colyer, of Ohio, thought that Mr.
Brown, of Pa., had done it up brown, "hcu
he called some other folks fnctiomsts. He
had noticed that Pennsylvania always looked
one way and pulled another. (Laughter and
cheers.) We, in tho great Whig State of
Ohio, can give her vote for Taylor, and wo
will. She could elect Taylor lor President,
and his old white charger for Vice President.
A number of gentlemen from variousStates
followed in short speeches, told funny ancc-
dotes, exciting the laughter of the audience ;
said what they had done, and what they
would have done for Mr. Clay ; what they
will do for Gen. Taylor, &c.
Mr. Ewing, of Indiana followed in a simi
lar vein, but wo could not catch bin remarks.
He was about lo tell and anecdote of Gc-n.
Taylor, which he said, ho had teard from
Col. Haskell, but tho Colonel objected, ns he
had a patent tight for his anecdotes (Ap-
plause. and laughter.)
Mr. Ewing said if Col. ll.iskeil would tell
the story himsnlf, he would yield tho lloor to
him.
The Colonel was then loudly called for,
and for, and got up on a settee.
I was remarking the other night, ot a eon-
vival meeting, said he, hint Gen. Cuss, in
November next, would be very much like a
mnn nf mv nefi iiiiintauce. who was struck
overbv a fellow bv the name of Joe Lirkins.
They were nt a military muster on Sugar
Hill, when they got into a fight, aim joe, ot-
ing rather excited, strUCr: him a blow which
knocked him about forty rods against a worm
fence and sent down eleven ot tne paneia,
bars, supporters and all.
After he had laid there some time, ho got
up, rubbed his eyes, straightened himself up,
and inquired of the crowd, "has that storm
done much damage t" (shouts of laughter
and applause,) "did that lightning strike any.
body else but me !" (applause and laughter.)
So it will be with Gen. Case. Ha will get
up after the election in November next, and
if he can atraighten himself, will want to
know whether that lightening of the Whig
vote has hurt any body but hiui. (Great ap
plause and laughter.)
A question was asked a Delegate of Louisi
ana by another Delegate from another State,
whether General Taylor was nut opposed to
domestic industry ; the ejuesijener said ha
e. .1 1
88
believed him not lo be. Another question
asked was, is Taylor opposed to tho acquisi
tion of further territory, questions not an
swered A resolution was offered by Mr. Gentry,
that the Convention approve of the Alison
letter of Taylor, which resolution did not
pass. The previous question was called.
Tho resolution was here withdrawn, and a
motion to adjourn was made. An Inforrna)
discussion here took place upon a point of
order.
An adjournment having been moved, tho
President made some remarks of a general
nature, and returned his thanks to the Con
vention for tho honor which had been con
ferred on him. (Adjourned sine it.
THE SIAMESE TWIN'S.
Much has been said and written respect
ing this remarkable pair, Chang and JCng.
Oi late tho public have sight of iheir move
ments. The following extracts from an arti
cle in the Soiifftr-rticj-, a Richmond (Va ) pa
per, is lull of curious matter:
"But I must hasten my description of the
'Siamese Twins.' I rode from Wilkes county
to their new residence in Surrey, &orho 40
miles, and arrived at their house the evening
of the second day, after leaving 'Trap Hill.'
On riding up to tho yard I observed the
'Twins' busily engaged in shingling a house ;
and on seeing me, they promptly approached
and requested me to 'walk In,' adding that
they would attend to my horse, and . in the
meantime I walked into tho house and intro
duced myself to Mrs. 'Chang,' pronounced
'Chun.' and found her to be quite a handsome
young woman, just 22. Her maiden name
was 'Adelaide Lates,' (sister of Saran ;) and
her dress and general appearance all indica
ting a degree of tidiness which Mrs. 'Eng'
lacks : indeed, the people about here all say
she is 'mighty townified.' Mrs. 'Chang' was
married on the same night of her sister, and
now has three children, viz: 'Josephine Vir
ginia,' G days younger than Mr. Eng's first,
'Christopher Wren,' 8 days younger than
Mrs. E.r8 second, and 'Nancy,1 nged only six
mo;itli3. They are all Very healthy and for
ward children, l:iit liavo their father's fea
tures clearly stamped upon them. You could
readily single them out of a crowd of ten
thousand children.
"After having passed some time with Mrs
Chang,' tho 'Twins' came in, and gathering
up their pipes, commenced pulling away at a
great rale. I found them exceedingly social
1 and soon had them fairly engaged in conver-
; salic.ii.
' "My first question was: 'How do you liko
farming V They both replied : 'We like
j him much; good business for us.' 'Do you
j raise much com and potatoes, liay, etc V
j 'Vl' make enough to eat and leed two nor-
j scs. cattlo and sheep and nogs.' 'i his is a
; new place, what did you pay it T' 'We pay
three thousand seven hundred and fifty dol
lars, and have no good house to live in.'
'How many acres of land do you plant 1' 'We
plant last year 200 acres.' 'Have you many
sheep, hogs, cows, turkeys, geese 'We got
I 00 sheep, great many cows and hogs, have
, 55 turkies, SO geese, some ducks.' 'How
; many plows do you run V .'Four plow,
j 'Does your land produce well V 'Some place
' nnke tirly bushel corn on one acre.' 'How
many negroes have you?' 'We got tirteeri
j (13) big and littlo.' 'How long have vou
; jvoj w x. C ?' 'We lib he!-o nine year.'
, ;vh tt made vou settle at Trap Hill?' 'Mighty-
, pllrtv place, high mountain, big rock, 'nough
j Aeer ,1ujrrels. foxes, and all kind of game.'
! ,you iove t0 jumt v (Mighty well; love
I B),oot mark, too.' 'Do you tote at elections V.
; l0nj VPS) licver mi any time.' 'Who did
you vote for President in 1840 ?' 'We vote
: for Gen. Harrison, and in 1844 we vote for
Jir, Clay, and now we ready to vote for Mr.
flay again, if he is willing.' 'Then you ara
both Whigs?' 'Well, wo au't nothiu' else.'
'How do you like our Republican form of go
vernment V 'We like him much, very
much ; much better than where we come
from.' 'Do you ever expect to return to
your own country V 'We never going back,
have wife mid children here, all 'Merican;
and we 'Mericaus tiotr too.' 'Have you any
relatives living in Siam !' 'We have mudder,
her very old. We can't write Siam, arid
! mudder can't write 'Merican. We only hear
fr0m home two time twee wo been in this
country. Can't get nobody to write Siam to
we mudder. and she can't Write 'Merican:'
'Would you not like lo see your mother!'
'We liko to much.' 'Have you much mo
ney !' 'We have some in New York.' 'Who
has charge of it I' 'We leave him witK Mr.
Bunker.' Il niay be proper here to statethat
their meney, 840,000 is invested in a wine
importing company at 6 par cent., secured
by mortgage on real estate, in the city of
.(. uuwnmo
: they bear, is their agent. They draw on
, him for the interest, but never ICUcH the prin-
cipal. Their investments in N. C. have been
made with tho interest of the money.
" 'Do you ever expect to travel again V
We wish to try it agalrt next fall, about Oc
tober.' 'What .direction are yon going!'
'We going to the west, we no go north.'
'What are you notions about the Christian re
ligion I Do you believe in our religion V
'We no like your religion, you quarrel 'bout
him too much : too much different church',
all say him right and t'other wrong; we nevi
or quarrel about our religion.' 'What do you
think will become of you when you die!'
'Wo go in hog first, and stay till wo repent
for do bad in dis world, don we go in horse
or deer, or some good animal, and stay al
ways ' 'Do you believe that if yon are in
Cmtifir4 on fwrth ytge J

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