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Sunbury American. (Sunbury, Pa.) 1848-1879, August 28, 1874, Image 1

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The Sunbury American
Is Ptblihhed Evkkt Friday, bv
EM'L WILVEBT, Proprietor,
Corner of Third St., and Market ftpmre,
suNBrnr, pa.
At One Dollar and Fllty Cents
If paid strictly In advance ; fl.75 if paid within the year ;
or ti.00 in all cases when i;mnit is di-layed till after
expiration of the year. No subscription discontinued
until all arrearages are paid uiiIuhs at the option of the
publisher. THr.fii! tlms are rioidlt adhered to.
AU new subscriptions to the American by xrt-ou living
outside oi the :ouuty of Northumberland, mufit be ae
coiuiauied with the Cash. This in niale necessary ly
the difficulty eiperieucud in collecting impid sulwrrip
tinns at a distance.
KALTIMORE LOCK
J)R- JOHNSTON',
HOSPITAL
Physician of this celebrated Institution, has
discovered the most certain, speedy, pleasant and
effectnal remedT in the world for all
DISEASES OF IMPRUDENCE.
Weakness, of the Back or I.mbs, Strictures,
Affections of Kidneys and Bladder, Involun
tary Discharges, Impoteney, Genera! Debili
ty, Ncrronsnes, Dyspepsy, Lanptor, Low
Spirits, Confusion of Idftas, Palpitation of
the Ileart, Timidity, Tremblings, Dimness
of SIpht or Giddiness, Disease of the Head,
Throat, Nose or Skin, Affections of Liver, Lnnps,
Stomach or Bowels these terrible Disorders
arifine from the Solitary Habits of Youth those
secret" and solitary practices more fatal to their
victims than the song ot syrens to the Mariners
of Ulysses, blighting their most brilliant hopes
or anticipations, rendering marriage, Ac.,impoF
sible.
IOUNG MEN
especially, who have become the victims of Soli
tary Vice, that dreadful and destrnctive habit
which annually sweeps to an untimely jrrave
thousands or youne men or the most exalted
talents and brilliant intellect, who might other
wise have entranced listening Senates with the
thunders of eloquence or waked to eestaey the
living lyre, may call with full confidence.
MARRIAGE.
Married Persons or Young Men contemplating
marriage, aware of Physical "Weakness, (Loss
of Proereative Power Ipoteiey), Nervous Ex
ritability, Palpitation, Organic Weakness, Ner
vous Debility, or any other Disqualification,
speedily relieved.
He who places himself under the care of Dr. J.
may religiously confide in his honor as a gentle
manand coutidenUy rely unon his skill as a Phy
sician. ORGANIC WEAKNESS.
Impoteney, Ixh?s or Power, immediately Cured
and full Vigor Restored.
Thi Distressing Affection which renders Life
miserable rn marriage impossible is the penalty
paid by the victims of imp-opcr indulgences.
Tonne persons are too apt to commit excesses
from not belnr aware of the dreadful consoqenccs
that may ensue. Now, who that understands
the subject will pretend to deny that the power
of procreation is lost sooner by "those fallini; into
improper habits than by the prudent t Besides
bcinjt deprived the pleasures of healthy offspring,
the most serious and dest ructive symptoms to bot h
body end mind arise. The system becomes de
ranged, the Physical and Mental Functions
Weakened, Loss of Proereative Power, Nervous
Irriubi.rty, Dyspepsia, Palpitation of the Hejtrt,
Indigestion, Constitutional Debility, a Wasting
of the Frame, Cough, Consumption. Decay and
Dentb.
A CUBE WARRANTED IN TWO DATS.
Persons ruined in health by unlearned preten
ders who keep them trifling month after month,
taking poisonous and injurious compounds,
should nlv immodiatelv.
' ' 11R. JOli.xblu.N,
Member of the Royal College of Surgeons, Lon
don, Graduated from one of the most eminent
Coregeg in the United States, and the creater
part of whose Ke has been spent in the hospitals
of l-ondon, Pris, . Philadelphia and elsewhere,
has e fleeted some cf the most astonishing euros
that were ever kuon n ; many troubled with ring
ing in the head and cars wlicn asleep, great
nervousness, being alarmed at sudden soituds,
bashfulness, with frequent blushing, attended
sometimes with deranguinent of miud, wore cured
immediately.
TAKE PARTICULAR NOTICE.
Dr. J. addresses all thofce who have injurrd
themselves by improper indulgence and soiitarv
habits, which rnin both body and mind, unfitting
thctn lor either business, study, society or mar
riage. TnrsE are 6omc of the sad and melancholy
effects produced by early habits of youth, viz :
Weakness of the Buck and Limbs, Pains in the
Back and nead, Dimness of Sight, Loss of Mus
cular Power, Palpitation of the Heart, Dyspcpsy,
Nervous Irritability, Derangement of Digestive
Functions, General Debility, Symptoms of Con
eu motion, Ac
ii est aixt The fearful effects on the mind
are much to be dreaded Loss of Memory, Con
fusion of Ideas, Depression of Spirits, Evil
Forebodings, Aversion to Society, Self-Distrust,
Love of Solitude, Timidity, fcc, are some of the
evils produced.
TBOrsaXDS of persons of all ages can now
judge what is the cause of their declining health,
losing their vigor, becoming, weak, pale, nervous
and emaciated, having -singular appearance
about the even, cough and symptoms of consump
tion. TOUNG MEN
Who have injured th mselves y certain prac
tice indulged In when aloue, a habit frequently
learned from evil companions, or at school, the
etlects of which are nightly felt, even when
asleep, and If not cured, renders marriage impos
sible, and destroys both mind and body, should
apply immediately.
What a pity that a young man, the hope of his
country, the darling 'of his parents, should be
unatchci from all prospects and enjoyments of
life, by the consequence of deviating from the
path of nature and Indulging in a certain secret
habit. Such persons mcnt before contemplating
:iAKKIAGE.
reflect that a sound mind and body are the most
necessary requisites to promote connubial happi- j
ties.. Indeed without these, the journey through
life becomes a weary pilgrimage ; the prospect
hourly darkens to the view ; the mlud becomes
shadowed with despair and tilled with the melan
choly reflection, that the happiueas of another
become blighted with our own.
A CERTAIN DISEASE.
When the misguided and imprudent votary of
pleasure finds that he has Imbibed the seeds of
this painful disease, it too often happens that an
ill-timed sense of shame, or dread of discovery,
deters him from applying to those who, from
education and respectability, can alone befriend
him, delaying till the constitutional symptoms of
this horrid disease make their appeaxauce, such
as ulcerated sore throat, diseased nose, noctural
pains in the bead and limbs, dimness of sight,
deafness, nodes on the shin bones and arms,
blotches on the head, face and extremities, pro
gressing with frightful rapidity, till at last the
palate of the mouth or the bones of the nose fall
in, and the victim of this awfol disease becomes
a horrid object of commiseration, till death puts
a period to his dreadful suffering, by sending
him to " that Undiscovered Country from whence
no traveller returns."
It is a melancholy fact that tnousand DIE
victims to this terrible disease, through fulling
into the hands of Ignorant or unskillful PRE
TENDERS, who, by the nse of that deadly Poi
son, Mercury, Ac, destroy the eonstKntiou, and
incapbleof caring, keep the nuhappy sufferer
month aflsr month taking their noxious or in
jurious compounds, and instead of being restored
to a renewal of Life Vigor and Happiness, iu des
pair leave him with ruined Health to sigh over
his galling disappointment.
To such, therefore, Dr. Johnston pledges him
self to preserve the most Inviolable Secrecy, and
from hie extensive practice and observations In
the great Hofpitals of Europe, and the first it:
this country, vir : England, France, Philadelphia
and elsewhere, is enabled to offer the moct cer
tain, speedy and effectual remedy iu the world
for all diseases of imprudence.
DR. JOHNSTON.
OFFICE, NO. 7. S. FREDERICK STREET.
Baltimore, M. D.
Left hand side going from Baltimore street, a few
doors from the corner. Fail not to observe name
and number.
No letters received unless postpaid and
containing a stamp to be used on the reply. Per
sons writing should state age, and send a portion
of advertisement describing symptoms.
There are so many Paltry, Designing and
Worthless Impnsters advertising themselves as
Physicians, trifling with and ruining ths health
of all who unfortunately fall Into their power,
that Dr. Johnston deems it necessary to say es
pecially to those unacquainted with his renuta
tion that his Credentials or Diplomat always
ban in his office.
ENDORSEMENT OF THE PRESS.
The many thousands cured at this Establish
ment, year after year, and the numerous im
portant Surgical Operations performed by Dr.
Johnston, witnessed by the representatives of the
press and many other papers, notices of winch
have appeared again and again before the public,
besides bis standing as a gentleman of character
and responsibility, is a sufficient guarantee to the
afflicted. 6hia diseases speedily cured.
April 3. 1874. ly
LUMBER AXD PLAXIXU MILLS.
Third Street, adjoining rhila. & Eric R. R., two
Scares North of the Central flotel,
SUNBURY, PA.
lit A T. CLEMENT,
IS prepared to furnish every descrlpt km of lum
ber required by the demands of the public.
Having all the latest Improved machinery for
manufacturing Lunber, he is now ready to till or
ders ef all kinds of
FLOORING, RIDING, DOORS SHUTTERS,
SA8II, BLINDS MOULDINGS, VE
RANDAS, BRACKETS,
and all kinds of Ornamental SerowlWork. Turn
ing of every description promptly executed. Also,
A LARGE. ASSORTMENT
BILL LUMBER.
HEMLOCK and PINE. Also, Shingles, Pickets,
Lathe, &c.
Orders promptly filled, and shipped by Railroad
or otherwise. IRA T. CLEMENT.
declM58:U
a-sraousneci in is JO. t
PRIC E 1 50 IN AliTATCE.
J3roftssixrit:tI.
JOSEPH K. AK.VOLII,
ATTORNEY and COUNSELLOR AT LAW,
Ilerudon", North'd county, Pa.
All business matters in the ccunties of North
umberland, Snyder, Union, Pe-ry and Juniata
promptly attended to. Consultations can be had
in the German und English languages.
april 17, lS74.-ly.
EDMUND DAVIS,
ATTt
ATTORNEY i!T LAW,
SUNEURY, PI
Office in Haupt's Building, soUh side of Mar
ket street. june5,'74.-ly.
A. SOBER.
ATTORNEY AT LAW
AND COfSTT SOLICITiK.
Office on Front Street below Market, Sunbury,
Pa. Collections and all legal business promptiy
attended to. . .
JANES BEARD,
ATTORNET AT LAW.
Office in Haupt's building, Sotth East Corner
of Market Square, Suubury, Pa.
Special Attention Paid to Collections.
JAMES II. JIcDEVITT,
Attorney at Ijaw and
United 8tates Commissioner. OiBee with S.
B. Boyer, Esq., iu Bright' Bnlldiog, Sunbury.
Pa. Aug. 22. '7a. l.v.
A S. Bit ICE,
.. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
and acting JUSTICE of the PEACE.
Next Door to Judgt Jordan's Residence, Chest
nut Street, Sunbury. Pa.
Collections and all legal matters promptly at
tended to.
JEREMIAH SNYDER.
ATTORNEY AT LAW, AND
ACTIXG JUSTICE OF THE PEACE,
Conveyancing the collection6of e!.iims,writing
and all kinds o.' Legal husiuess will be attended
to carefully and with despatch. Can be consult
ed in the tnglish and German language. Office
formerly occupied by Solomon Malick, Esq., op
posite City Hotel, Sunbt.rv, la.
March 29, 1873. ly.
GA. BOTDORF,
Attomev-at-Lav,
GEORGETOWN,
Northumbcrlind Co., Penna.
Can be consulted in the Enclish nnd German
languages. Collections attcidcd to in North
umberland and adjoining couuies.
Also Agent for the Lebanon Valley Fire Insu
rance Company, mhlj
rp II. II. HAKE, Attorn:y at Law, STJN
JL. BURY, PA. Office i Market Square,
(adjoiuing the office of W. I. -Jreeuongb, Esq.,)
Professional business in this aid adjoining coun
ties promptlv attended to.
Sunbury, March 16, 1 S72.-1 ,-.
W.CT PACKER,
Attorney at Law,
Suntrary, Pa.
November 9, 1S72. tf.
Q B BOYER. Attormv and Counsellor
KJ at Law. Rooms No. 2 3 Second Floor,
B right's Building, SUNBURY PA. Profcssiona
business attended to, in the ourIs of Northum
oerland and adjoiuing couctbs. Also, in the
Circuit and Dtitriet Courts foi the Western Dis
trict of Pennsylvania. Claims promptly collect
ed. Particular attention paid -o eate$ in bank
ruptcy. Consultation can be had in the (icr
man language. mar2"i,'7I.
L.
II. KASE, Attorney at Law, SUN
BURY, PA., oflico in .Yasser's Building
near the Court House. Front Room up stairs
above the Drue Store. Collections made in Nor
thumberland and adjoining counties.
Sunbury, Pa., June 8, 1S72.
S P.WOLVEKTOS, A.tornev at Law.
Market Square, SUNBURY PA. Profession
al business In this and adjoining counties prompt
.y attended to.
HB. MASSER, Attorney at Law, SUN-
BURY, PA. Collections attended to in
the counties of Northumberland, Union, Snyder,
Montour, Columbia and Lycoming. ' aplKMV.t
S
OLOMOX MALICK,
ATTORNEY AT LAW.
Office at his residence on Arch street, one square
north of the Court House, near the Jail, SUN
BURY. PA. Collections and all proressionat
business promptly attended to in this and adjoin
ing counties. Consultations can ne had in I lie
German language. July27-1872.
O. W. ZIEOLER. L. T. ROHRBACH.
ZIEGLER & ROHRBACH,
ATTORNEYS AT LAW,
Office in naupt's Building, lately occupied by
Jndge Rockefeller and L. T. Robrbach, Esq.
Collections and all professional business
promptly attended to in the Courts of Northum
berland and adjoining counties.
Dec. 2. 1871.
Dr. A. C. CLARK,
IN Mrs. Donncl's building, up stairs, above T.
II. B. Ease's law office, opposite the Court
House, Suurury, Pa.
June 13. 1S74. mo. pd.
B. C A DWALLADER, Market Street,
SUNBURY, PA.
Dealer in Drugs, -Medicines, Paints, Oils,
Glass, Varnishes, Liquors, Tobacco, Cigars,
Pocket Books, Dairies, Ac.
D'
R. C M. MARTIN, Office in Drug
Store, Clement House Stock, Office hours :
from 11a. m., to I p. ro., and from 6 to 9 p. tn.,
at all other hours, wben not rroiessionaiiy en
gaged can be found at residence, corner of Front
and Penn street, SUNBURY, PA. Particular
attention given to surgical cases. Will visit
Patients either in town or country.
pcfcls nnts jjjestattrants.
C"EMEXT IIOCSE, ThirTstreet below
Market, Sunbury, Pa. THAD. S. SHAN
NON, Proprietor. R'lomsucat and comfortable.
Tables-supplied with the delicacies of the season
and the waiters attentive and obliging.
Suuqury, April 24,1874.
CRAWFORD IIOI'SE. Cor. Third and
j Mulberry. Business Centre, Williamsport, j
D. B. ELSE .V: CO., Proprietor
June 20, 173-
TTXITEB STATES
HOTEL, W.
IJ KITCHEN, Proprietor. Opposite the De
pot SIIAMOKIN, PA. Every attention given to
travellers, and the best accommodations given.
April 51
ANIIINGTOX IIOCSE, C. NEFF
Proprietor, Corner of Market A 8ecoud
Streets, opposite the Court House, Sunbury,
Pa: May28,'70.
ALLEGHENY IIOI'SE, A. BECK,
Proprietor, Nos.812 and 814 Market Street,
above eighth, PHILADELPHIA. Terms, $2
per day. ne respectfully solicits your patron
age. Jan6'72.
XT
ATIONAL HOTEL.
AUGUSTUS
jji WALD, Proprietor, Georgetown North'd
County, Pa., at the Station or the W. C.
R. W.
Choice wines and cigars at tne Dar.
The table is supplied with the best the market
affords. Good stabling and attentive ostlers.
H I'M MEL'S RESTAl RAXT,
LOUI8 HUMMEL, Proprietor,
Commerce St., SnAMOKIN, PENN'A.
Having just refitted the above Saloon for the
accomodation of the public, Is now prepared to
serve ".lis friends with the best refreshments, and
fresh Lager Beer, Ale, Porter, and all other malt
quors.
msutrss
W. H. RBOADS. J- PACKER HAAS
WS. RHOABS A- CO.,
RETAIL DEALERS OF
ANTHRACITE COAL, SUNBURY, PENN'A.
Officb with Haas, Faoelt A Co.,
Orders left at Seaskoltx A Bro's., office Market
trcet, will receive prompt attention. Country
ustora respectfully solicited.
Feb. 4, 1871. tf.
ANTHRACITE COAL !
VALENTIXE DIETZ, Wholesale and
Retail dealer in every variety of
ANTHRACITE COAL, UPPER WHARF,
SUNBURY, PENN'A.
All kinds of Grain taken In exchange for Coal.
Orders solicited and filled promptly. Orders left
at 8. F. Nevln's Confectionery Store, on Third
treet, will recieve prompt attention, and money
rceeiptedfor, the same as at the office.
COAL! CO A LI COAL! GRANT BROS.,
Shippers and Wholesale and Retail Dealers in
WHITE AND RED A8n COAL, SUNBURY, PA.
(lower wharf.)
Orders will rereive prompt attention.
DEVTIKTRY.
GEORGE M. RENN,
In Simpson's Building, Market Square,
So-nrnr, Ta.,
1 prepared to do nil kinds of work pertaining
to Dentistry. He keeps constantly on hand
a large assortment of Teeth, and other Dental
material, from which he will be able to select,
and meet the wants of his customers.
All wort warranted to give satisfaction, or else
the money refunded.
The very best Mouth Wash and Tooth-Powdcrs
kept on hand.
His references are the numerous patrons for
whom he has worked for the last twelve years.
Sunbury, April 21, 1872.
SEW (OAI, YARD.
THE undersigned having connected the Coal
business with his extensive FLOUR & GRAIN
trade, is prepared to supply-families with the
VERY BEST OF COtL,
CHEAP FOR CASH.
Egg, Stove and Nut, constantly on hand. Grain
taken In exchange for Coal.
J. M. CADWALLADER.
Sunbury, Jan. 15, 1870. tf.
t IT
JOIIV NEAOLEY. n. w. rERUT
STEAM PEAISISQ .Til EES,
MILLERSBURG, PA.
NEAGLEY& PERRY,
Manufacturers and Dealers in
Flooring, Siding, Surface Boards, Lath,
Stripping, Shingles,
And all kinds of Sash, Doors, Shutters, Blinds,
Mouldings, Ac.
Hemlock White Pine Bill Stuff, and all kinds
of Building Material.
S.air building and church work a specialty,
March 13, ly.
Kaildlng Lots) For Sale.
NINETEEN LOTS, 25x100 feet, fronting on
Vine street, in Sunbnry. Trice $125. Also
thirty lots, 25sl37, fronting on Spruce and Pine
streets. Price f IS per foot. Also eight lots, 25
x90, fronting on Fonrth street bctw-n Walnut
and Spruce. Price ?450. Also 21 lots. 25x110.
fronting on Third and Spruce streets, between j
walnut and fcprucc. i nce 400. Also 5 lots
21x230 on the north side of Spruce stieet. Price
00. Also 16 lots in Cake'own. The above
prices do not include corner lots. Persons de
siring to purchase will do well to call soon.
Terms easy. IRA T. CLEMENT.
jan. 23, 3m.
Pnslilonablc Millinery GooiIh
JUST OPENED!
MISS M. L. GOSSLER,
On Fourth St., below S. V. R. R.,
SUNBURY, FA.,
Has just opened a full line of
Spring Millinery Good. The
latest nyles of
tiih Katsand Bonnets.
Trimmings, Handkerchiefs, Ladies' SffV3?r5
Collars, tiloves, nnd Notious gene- JSj&Sa
rally. Particular attention of al!pgjitg
the ladies in the county is directed
to her afsortineut, as her stock is larger than
ever, and goods sold cheaper.
Sunbury, May 1, 1S74;
COXLEY. IIACKETT A MATEER,
DEALERS IN
HARD W ARE.
CUTLERY, IRON,
GUNS, NAILS,
TOOLS, ROPE,
GLASS, PULLEYS,
PAINTS, PUTTY,
OILS, VARNISH,
SHOE niSTIDIISrGrS,
I.EATI1ER r.EI.TlSO,
Fisihiiig Tackle, million.
A full line of goods at low prices.
NO TROUBLE TO SHOW GOODS
Pleasc call nnd examine
SIGN OK THE ANVIL.
HH Market Street,
SCXBCRY PA.
June 5, 174.
KEEP IT IIAXDV!
The Reliable Family Medicine.
DIARRHEA, Dysentery, Cholera, Summer
Complaint, Cramps, etc., quickly cured by
the use of
JARDELLA'S
Compound Syrup of Blackberry Root and Rhu
barb. An old, well tried remedy, entirely vege
table, pleasant to take, quick and certain in
effect ; eau be depended on In the most urgent
cases; maybe given to the youngest infant as
well as to adult. It contains
NO CAMPHOR OR OPIUM.
It is a pleasant extract and readily tr;keii by
children. It has often saved life when phyi
cuns bad detaired. Keep It in the houe and
use In time. All we ask for it is a trial. Don't
let your dealer put you off with something else.
Buy it. Try it. Sold by Druggists and Store
Keepers throughout this State. Prepared oulv
by HANSELL A BRO..
jul9,-3m 2000 Market Street, Philadelphia.
TIIE GREAT PRIZKS
or Tnn
Fourth Gift Concert
JCIltUCky PllbllC LibrflTY
WERE DRAWN AS fOLLOWM :
The tirsl prize of $187,500, the capital prize,
by clubs In Memphis, Tenn.
The second gift, ?75,000, was paid to State
Bank, Madison, Mo.. J. H. Wakefield and A. I..
Situs, of Trenton, Ky., H. H. Bollinger, Pem
broke, Ky., P. W. Dooner, Los Angelos, Cal.,
W. G. Byerly, Portsmouth. O., FlintACham
berlin, Waco, Tex., and others, the tickets hav
ing been sold in coupons.
The Farmers National Bank, of Richmond,
drew the ball of the third prize, (37,500. Wm.
E. Oates, Vickshurg, Miss., J. M. Copelatid,
Franklin, Ky., Armstrong A Sawyer, Gransburg,
Ind., each one-tenth. The remainder was held
in clubs.
The llrst prize of the third drawing was all in
one ticket, and owned by L. H. Keith, Esq.,
Kingston, Mass., to whom was paid (100,000 iu
cash.
THE FIFTH GIFT CONCERT,
I
which Is positively the last which will ever be
given under this chatter, will come off in Public
Libra rv Hall, at Louisville, Ky.
Friday, Jalj 31,171.
2,500,000
divided into twenty thousand gifts, will be dis
tributed among the ticket-holders.
LIST OF GIFTS.
One Crand Cash Gift -..$250,000
One Grand Cash Gift 100,000
One Grand Cash Gift 75.000
One Grand Cash Gift 50,020
One Grand Cash Gift 25,000
And 10,995 gifts, ranging in value from $20,
000 to $50.
Grand Total, 20,000 Gifts, all cash, $2,500,000.
PRICE OF TICKETS.
Whole Tickets $50 00
Halves 25 00
Tenths, or each Coupon 5 00
11 Whole Tickets for 500 00
Foi tickets and information apply to
THOS. E. BRAMLETTE, Ageut Public Library
Ky., Public Library Building, Lonisvllle, Ky.
Or THOMAS H. HAYS A CO.,
july3,'74. 609 Broadwoy, New York.
TbeCXIVERSAL MEDICINE
For the HOUSEHOLD.
Try It. Price per bottle 25 cents. For sale
by all Druggists. REUBEN HOYT, Proprietor,
203 Greenwich St.. N. Y. mav29.-4w
SUNBURY, .PA.. FRIDAY
tesl stair Mcb 3riirfin.g.
piTE SUNBURY AMERICAN
The Largost and Most Complete Estab
lishment IN THIS SECTION.
NEW TYPE,
NEAT WORK,
IMPROVED PRESSES,
SKILLED WORKMEN.
ORDERS PROMPTLY FILLEI1.
S-PRTOKS MODERATE.-
BOOK, CARD AND JOR PRINTING
EXECUTED IN THE BEST STYLE.
BUSINESS CARDS.
WEDDING CARDS,
VISITING CARDS,
SHOW CARDS,
BALL TICKETS,
BLANKS,
HANDBILLS,
MERCANTILE LETTER HEADS,
NOTE HEADS,
BILL HEADS,
ENVELOPES,
CARDS,
CHECKS AND DRAFTS,
PROGRAM MES,
DODGERS,
PAPER BOKS. - ;
MANIFESTS,
CIRCULARS.
Everything that is needed In the prlntin; de
partment will be executed with promptness and
at low prices. All are invited to coll and exa-
j mine our samples. No trouble to give estimates
and 6how good?. We shall cheerfully do this
to all, who call for that purpose, without clurge.
J5Orders for Subscription. Advertisiig or
Job Printing, thankfully received.
Address
EM'L WILVERT, Proprietor,
SUNBURY, rA.
Siil) erasing SlsYinm
SUNBURY AMERICAN
18 THE
BEST AD VERISIKU MEDIUM
In the Central part of the State,
IT CIRCULATES
In one of the Most Thrifty, Intelligent and
WEALTHY
SECTIONS OF PENNSYLVANIA.
Sample copy of paper sent to any address tree
of charge.
TOY CONFECTIONERY STORE.
Everybody is invited to come and bny of .the
handsome assortment of
TOYS AND CONFECTIONERIE8
at
SAMUEL P. NEVIN'S STORE,
in frame building, adjolaing Moore A Disslnger's
bulldlag, THIRD STREET, 8UNBUEY, PA.
Just opeued a fresh supply of Confectloserijs of
every description.
TOYS OF ALL KINDS
constantly on hand. The best RAISINS, FIGS,
CURRANTS A DRIED FRUIT.
PURE RIO COFFEE, TEA & SPICES,
fresh Bread, Buns A Cakes, every morning
FANCY CAKES, BISCUIT8, CRACKERS, Ac.
ORANGERS, LEMONS,
FRESH FISH EVERY DAY
will be sold at the lowst rates. The best of
Albemari Shad will be delivered at the residence
of purchasers in any part of the town.
Call and see the excellent assortment of goods
and ascertain prices.
MORNING, AUGUST 28,
tltct 3ocfrn.
NO TIME LIKE TIIE OLD TIME.
There is no time like thu old time,
When you and I were young,
When the buds of April blossomed,
And the birds of spring-time sung.
The garden's brightest glories
By summer suns are nursed,
Rut oil, the sweet, sweet violets,
The flowers that open lirst !
There U no place like thy old place.
Where you and I wers bom,
Where we lifted first our eye-lids
On the splendors of the morn,
From the milk-white breast that wanned us,
From the clinging arms that bore,
Where the dear eyes glistened o'er us,
That will look on us no more !
There U no friend like the old friend
That has shared our morning day?,
No greeting like his welcome.
No homage like his praise ;
Fan s is the scentless sunflower,
With gaudy crown of gold ;
But friendship is the breathing rose,
With sweets in every fold.
There is no love like the old love
That wc conrtctl In cut r.:,io ,
Though our leaves are falling, falling,
And we're fading side by side,
There are blossoms all around us,
With the colors of our dawn,
And wc live in borrowed sunshine,
When the light of day is gone.
There are no times like the old times
They Miall never be forgot !
Thrc is no place like the old place
Keep green the dear old spot !
There are no friends like our oM friends
May heaven prolong their lives !
There are no loves like our old loves
God bless our I.ivini, wives !
THE VIGILANTES.
I was yet many miles from Denver, and
was in the worst defiles of the Rocky
Mountains, when at noon I dismounted by
the side of a little spring. I had just light
ed my cigar, and was lying under a solita
ry tree, when a mounted figure came over
the ridge just behiud me. He was a tall
man, wearing a felt or leathern hat.
squeezed into no shape at all ; his black
hair had probably not been cut for a
twelvemonth; he was clad in buckskin
from neck to ankle ; a buffalo robe covered
his saddle, by the side of which hung an
eighteen shot rejiealing rifle ; on each hip
he carried a large revolver, aud a straight
knife in a leathern sheath hung in his belt.
At the sight of me he recoiled, and half
drew one of his revolvers ; but seeing that
I w.i3 alone and quite in his power, he
came slowly on. keeping however, his eye
on me all the while. I thought concilia
tion best, so said 'Good morning.'
'Good evening,' he replied, as everybo
dy out there would have replied, whatever
the time of day.
'Will you have a drop of brandy ?' I
asked, by a sudden impulse. He grimly
smiled assent, and drank, pronouncing it
good ; and then he said, 'Where's your
hoss, stranger !'
. I looked round, nod to my dismay saw
that my steed had vanished had 'vamoos
ed,' the stranger said ; then continued I
thought I saw a Win the eullv over
there, and when I ace you I thought it
might be yourn. Here, come this way.'
1 scrambled over the rugged slope after
him, but the horse was nowhere in sight.
The stranger pointed to where he had seen
it, and then, by signs wholly unintelligible
to me, we tracked it for some half a mile,
until we found it in a perfect maze of rocks
and gullies. I thanked him very heartily,
and made an oiler of reward ; but with the
samo apathy which had marked his conver
sation all through he declined it, and bid
ding me 'good day,' rode slowly off, first
having conducted me back to the track.
I followed the road until night came on,
when I found I had really lost my waj
To make matters worse, I found that my
horse was nearly exhausted, and could only
limp painfully along the rough track. I
was growing more out of heart with my
situation than I ever was in my life, when
on turning an angle l lounu mat i nau
come upon a large tiact of level ground,
and that not a hundred yards ahead, stood
a shanty, from which a light feebly gleam
ed. My jaded horse pricked up his ears
and stumbled briskly along, and in another
minute I was knock.ng at the rude door.
It was thrown open by a gaunt-looking
fellow in an old blue army cloak, and who
held, although he partially concealed it, a
pistol in his right hand. The interior, as
I could see, was of an uninviting charac
ter, scarcely an article of furniture and
lighted by a lamp which, void of glass,
flared on the window ledge.
I told my case, and sullenly bidding me
turj) my horse into the corral by the side
of the house, and then enter, he moved
away. When I had secured my steed in
the enclosure, and the door of the shanty
swung to behind me, I was almost sorry I
had not chosen to sleep with the wolves in
the mountain gullies. My host was silent
and sullen, showing very plainly his inten
tion not to talk ; presently, however, he
said ; 'Guess you'll want supper. There's
water in that puil ; there's whiskey in that
bottle ; there's beef in that locker. You
can't have nothin' else.'
I said which was partly true, that I was
too tired to eat. I certainly could not have
eaten or drunk in his dirty hovel, or of
such uninviting food, especially with so
forbidding a ruffian for my companion.
'Then you'll want to go to sleep,' he said
roughly, and kicked a bundle apart, dis
closing a couple of buffalo robes, with two
rude pillows. 'There you are. Go to bed
then.'
It was no use betraying any fear, and he
was evidently giving up his bed to me, sol
lay down, and in a short time was dozing,
when I was aroused by hearing the tread
of a horse, and then the door opened. I
half rose from my bed, and, to my surprise,
saw enter the man whom I had met at
midday on the mountain. He recognized
me, too, but said nothing distinct.
'Well, how is it, Joe ?' said the other
man, with a very serious, if not anxious
look.
Bad,' said my friend, or 'Joe' "very
bad. It's all correct.'
'And are they are the boys' began the
other.
'Yes,' said Joe, filling up the pause;
'they mean coming. They may come to
morrow perhaps to-night. We shall have
to vamoose.'
They conversed in undertones, as they
sat on their rude stools by the low wood
187 - 1.
fire, chewing or smoking, and occasionally
drinking from a whisky bottle ; their dis
course seemed very grave and disquieting
and from a word or two I caught, and from
their glances, I fancied they were often re
ferring to me. At last, in spite of myself,
I fell asleep, and tired as I was, might
have slumbered till morning, but a tremen
dous crash aw ke me, and, rising, I saw
that the door had leen burst open, and
that the shanty was filling with strangers
all armed, while Joe and his comrade had
drawn suddenly to my side of the room
On the instaut half a dozen men surround
ed them and took their firearms.
'Hollo !' exclaimed one of the new cod
ers, as he caught sight of me, 'who is
this Are there three in the gan ?'
All eyes being upon me, although I did
not quite understand the situation, I ex
plained briefly who I was ; and the account
seemed satisfactory.
'Xow, Joe Blakey, and you, Phil Maril.
I reckon you know why we have conie '
saiu the man who seemed spokesman.
Guess we do,' said Joe, in his usual an-
athetic tone-
'You expected a visit,' corf'ni me
man. 'We !tc neard all your bragging
against the Vigilantes '
'Never said so,' interrupted Joe.
I was amazed at these words. Here was
I in the presence of the promptest, most
terrible tribunal of modern times.
I soon understood the purport of the vi
sit, as addressed to my tost. 'You'e
been a terror to this here neighborhood,'
continued the spokesman ; you've stole
horses and cattle for more than two yearn
past, and tried to put it all on the Indians
You have murdered rren, and this here
traveler would never have seen daylight
again if we hadn't come in. You got the
Jew from Santa Fe iato your shanty, and
robbed and killed him.'
'No, captain,' barst out Joe; 'I bar out of several and rode away, and I never
that ; I don't deny the hosses, nor the cat- saw or heard of him again unless Joe Ba
tlc ; and I may hev killed a man or two ;' ker, from Colorado, who was shot at a sa
so may Phil ; but I never touched the Jew, ' loon iu Xavadu, was my friend, as some of
nor killed a man in my own shanty ; and my mining acquaintances declared to be
this here traveler should have gone his t the case,
way a safe man.' Then turning to me, he
said : 'You don't believe I inean't killing
of you, stranger ?'
'I do not V I said very emphatically, for
I meant it.
'Well, there's enough agin you without
that,' saiu the spokesman ; 'though we i
know you ain't so bad as Phil. You've j
! been warned to go time after time.' 1
'Not regular warned, captain,' argued
Joe ; 'and now we are going.'
'.No, you ain't, 3-ou-bet,' said the cap
tain, with a meaning smile, which ran re
sponsively through his band ; 'no, you
ain't. Your time has come ; but you shall
have a fair trial from the Vigilantes here
assembled, and what their judgment is you
must abide by.'
In an instant a sort of formality was
given to the assembly, theca: tain and an
other being the centre of a semi-circle,
while opposite to them were the two pri
soners, guarded by four men. I suppose
there must have been some seventeen or
eighteen of the Vigilantes altogether. With
a rapidity that almost stunned me the trial
rbegan and concluded: The prisone.s offer
ed no particular defeusc, they seemed con
scious of its inutility, and the evidence
asrainst them was chiefly accusation
it sufficed. When the captain asked the
verdict, there was a unanimous reply of
'guilty ;' and he addressed the culprits
thus : 'Say Joe Blakey and Phil Maril,
you hev heard the evidence in this honora
ble committee of Vigilantes, and the ver
dict of guilty. We therefore intend to
string you up, and we mean to clear the
country of all thieves right away. You
have ten minutes allowed you to leave any
message you wish.'
The apathy of the two men was extraor
dinary ; Phil only scowled al the speaker,
while Joe absolutely turned to his nearest
guard and asked him for a 'chew ;' and the
guard, pulling a cake of tobacco from his
breast, handed it to Joe, who broke a piece
off and began masticating it with apparent
relish. Just then I caught his eye, and I
thought it was fixed on me with such a
hopeless yet appealing look that I could
hesitate no longer. With an energy which
surprised myself I broke out into an ap
peal for the lives of the condemned, ex
plaining how I had been received by them
and given the best they had, and how Joe
had helped me to find my horse in the day.
'I will be security,' I coucluded, 'that they
leave the neighborhood. I bear letters
from good houses in New York to several
persons in this vicinity, some of whom may
lie known to you, and which will prove I
can bear out my offer.' I drew my letters
from my pocket, and read the addresses :
'Capt. Hiram Danks, Major Julius Blum
per, Sheriff Gollopy, Col. Vanwoort, Capt.
Hum pus '
'That's mo,' said a rough-lookins; man.
'Give it here.'
He wasn't much after my idea of a cap
tain, but, as it could do no harm, I gave
him the letter. He read it and handed it
to the captain, a leader of the band, who
read it also.
'Yes, that:s all sqnar nough,' said the
latter ; 'but the Vigilantes out here don't
vally New Yorkers, and don't work ac
cording to New York laws.'
'Nor they don't want no New York no
ney,' said a voice from the rear.
An assenting murmurendorsed thisseiti
raent, and I felt things were looking vry
black for my hosts. They were evidertly
of the same opinion, for Joe smiled sally
and said : 'It ain't of no use. sqiure, were
just as much obliged, though. I wouIuVt
say no more, or you'll maybe get into tru
ble yourself. If things is ready, I'm ra
dy,' he continued, turning to the leadr.
'Well, we shan't keep you a-waitag
long, Joe Blakey,' responded the latter ;'I
hear the young men a-coming back ; thy
have been choosing a tree.'
With horror I exclaimed : 'I ner
dreamt of such cold-blooded work as thi I
Look here, captain; the only reason I
don't offer money is because I believl
should do more harm than good by it ; ht
if you hang these men you will send ie
away with the feeling that I have thir
blood on my head, for they expected yar
visit, and I believe that but for my pe
sence they would have made their escae
to-night. If you won't listen to anythig
else you might think of that'
I was pleased to see that my words mde
some impression, for instead of answerig
me in his calm, cruel style, the captsn
turned to his gang, and a low, but earnet
discussion took place.
At least he turn d I
round, and in a very stern voice, qnite df- j
( New Series, Vol. 6, So. 23.
t Old Series, Vol. 35, So. 22.
fereit to that in which he had previously
spolen, said: 'Hear me, stranger I The
Vifilantes are very sorry for your position,
ami respect your fuelin's, but this is their
decsion, and I warn you that if you ques
tiot it by a single word, you will ruin the
m.m you most seek to help. Joe Blakey,
yot are considered by this honorable court
asthe best of the two, but you are very
bal for all that. Your life is spared ou
condition that you hev cleared out from
I : - i
uirr iu six iiours, and are not found within
a mmureu mues ot here ever after. Of
cojrse we give you time to go the iouruev.
Phil Maril, we know you are a murderer
and a treacherous one you die ! These is
the sentence. Boys, string up Phil Maril.
If you like to see justice done, in these
estein parts, stranger, come out with us
if not, good-bye.'
I turned deathly sick as the procession
ieu me snaniy, joe and I being its only oc-
.11. -
upauts. e saw no more of them, but
after a few minutes of almost aaonizin si
lence we beard a band of horseman ride
past the cabin, and could even hear their
voices and laughter. T '"oked almost
",Hn I,.-, - .. ..
breaking silent ior the nrst time SinceTu's
reprieve, said : 'They've done with Phil ;
there was worse men than him in the room
when the Vigilantes was here, though I
don t deny, squire, that we hev been hard
wretches.' He paused, as if taking a men
tal retrospect of the wretched portion of
his life, then, very suddenly changing bis
tone, said : 'Now, squire, I must g , and
that right away. I know where they've
hung Phil ; shall cut him down, and leave
some money with old Padre Francisco to
have him buried.' So he went, and I sat
alone in the shanty until dawn, when he
returned, looking as cold and impassive as
ever, lie mounted his horse the V 121-
lantes had left one for him, and mv own.
Sisrtllaitccns.
The I'owrr or Trnth.
A little girl, nine years of age, was ofler
d as a witness against a prisoner who was
on trial for felony committed in her father's
bouse.
'Now, Emily,' said the counsel for the
prisoner, upon her being offered as a wit
ness, 'I desire to know if you understand
the nature of an oath ?'
'I don't know what you mean,' was the
simple answer.
'There, your honor,' said the counsel,
addressing the court, 'is anything further
necessary to demonstrate the validity of
my objection ? This witness should be re
jected. She does not comprehend the na
ture of an oath.'
'Let us see,' said the judge. 'Come here
my daughter.'
Assured by the kind tone and manner of
the judge, the child stepped toward him,
and looked confidently up in his face with
calm, clear eye, and hi a manner so art
less aud frank that it went straight to the
heart.
t& you tvr take an oath ?' inquired
the judge.
The little girl stepped hack with a look of
horror, and Uie red blood mantled in a
blush all over her face as she answered :
'No, sir.'
She thought he intended to inquire if she
had ever blasphemed.
"I do not mean that,' said the judge, who
saw her mistake. 'I mean were you ever
a witness before ?'
'No, sir ; I never was in court before,'
was the answer.
He had the Bible open.
'Do you know that book, my daughter ?'
She looked at it, and answered :
'Yes, sir, it is the Bible.'
"Do you ever read it ?' he asked.
'Yes, sir, every evening.'
'Can you tell me what the Bible is?'
queried the judge.
'It is the word of the great God,' she an
swered. 'Well, place your hand on this Bible, and
listen to what I say ;' and he repeated
slowly and solemnly the oath usually ad
ministered to witnesses.
Now,' said the judge, 'you have sworn
as witness. "Will you tell me what will be
fa 1 you if you do not tell the truth ?'
'I shall be shut up in State's prison,' an
swered the child.
Anything else ?: asked the judge.
'I shall uever go to heaven,' she replied.
'!Iow do you know this ?' asked the
judje.
Tje child took the Bible, and turning
rapilly to the chapter containing the com
manlments, pointed to the injunction,
'That shalt not bear false witness against
thy neighbor.' 'I learned that before I
couM read.'
'Has any one talked to you about being
a winess in court here against this man ?'
iuqured the judge.
'Yes. sir.' she replied. 'My rnhr
heard they wanted me for a witness, and
last eight she called me to tell her the Ten
Commandments)aud then we kneeled down
together and she prayed that 1 might un
derstand how wicked it was to bear false
witness against my neighbor, and that God
would help me, a little child, to tell the
truth as it was before Him. And when I
came up here with father, she kissed me
and told me to remember the Ninth Com
mandment, and that Gou would hear every
word that I said.
I)o you believe this !' asked the judge,
while a tear glistened in his eye and his lip
quivered with emotion.
Yes, sir,' said the child, with a voice
and a manner that showed her conviction
of its truth was perfect.
'God bless you, my child,' said the judge,
'you have a good mother. This witness ia
competent,' he continued. 'Were I on
trial for my life, and innocent of the charge
against me, I would pray God for such wit
nesses as this. Let her be examined.'
She told the story with simplicity of a
child, as she was, but there was a direct
ness about it which carnedconviction or
its truth to every heart. She was rigidly
cross-examined. The counsel plied her
with infinite and ingenious questioning,
but she varied in nothing. The trnth as
spoken by the little child was sublime.
Falsehood and perjury had preceded her
testimony. The prisoner had entrenched
himself in lies, till he deemed himself im-
ptrgnable. Witnesses had falsified facts
Rates of Advertising.
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advertisements mm be paid before inaertion. except
wnere parties have account.
Local notices twenty cents line, and ten cents for
every snbseqnent insertion.
Cards in the "Business Directory" column 92 00 per
year for the first two lines, and $1.00 for each additional
Hike.
in his favor, and villany had manufactured
a sham defense. But before her testimony
falsehood was scattered like chaff. The
little child f jr whom a mother had nraved
for strength to be given her to speak the
truth, as it was before God, broke th run
ning vices of matured villiauy to pieces,
like a potter's vessel. The strength that
her mother prayed fir was civen her, and
the sublime aud simplicity terrible, I
mean, to the prisiouer and hiu associates
with which she spoke was like a revelation
from God himself.
TnE Bcildek of First Teeorapii.
A few days ago a telegraphic dispatch
from Maine announced the disease in that
State of Mr, G. F. Smith, who constructed
for Professor Morse, the forty miles of
magnetic telegraph from Washington city
to Baltimore, which constituted the origi
nal of the vast system of teleprapbs now
extended throughout the world. That line
was completed for use in the last week in
May 1844, the first news despatch bavin"
been sent over the wire on the 29th of May
The quite recent death of the constructor
9LLh.a.Iiue. jgtwrlUrj-Sed Jtl.a mini!
isting magnetic telegraph, and in doing so
we are better able to appreciate the two
hundred thousand miles of wire which form
the immense net work over the United
States to-day. Of these two hundred thou
sand miles of American wires, which would
encircle the globe more than eight times,
about one hundred and seventy thousand
belong to one company. In Jnne, 1844,
there were two operators at work ; in June,
1S73, there were nine thousand nine hun-
dre and thirty persons employed by one
American company, and about twelve
thousand by all the American companies.
In this exhibit of the growth of thirty years,
we limit the figures to the statistics of our
own country, leaving the world out of view
altogether.
Sleep obtained two hours before mid
night, when the negative forces are in ope
ration, is the rest which most recuperates
the system, giving brightness to the eye
and a glow to the cheek. The difference
between the appearance of a person who
habitually retires at ten o'clock and that of
one who is up till twelve is quite remarka
ble. The tone of the system, so evident in
thecomplexion, the clearness and sparkle
of the eye, and the softness of the lines of
the features are, in a person of health, kept
at "concert pitch" by taking regular rest
two hours before twelve o'clock, and there
by obtaining the "beauty sleep" of the
night. There is a heaviness of the eye, a
sallowuess of the skin, and absence of that
glow in the face which renders it fresh in
expression and round in appearance, that
readily distinguishes the person who keeps
late hours.
A newspaper man, interviewing the late '
General Ilillyer just before bis death, asked
him what he thought of General Grant.
"I never thought much of him," said flill-
ycr, "until at the battle of Fort Donelson,
when he came up late, after, Lew Wallace
had been demoralized, and he asked me if
there were any prisoners. Taking a pri
soner, and exlimining'hTs haversack, and "
finding several days' rations there, he said.
'Just as I thought. They are endeavoring
to escape.' ne then ordered the attack at
the part of the fort where the rebels were'
weakest, and they gave up after being
worsted and summoned before assault.
The trick of looking at the rations struck
me as a cute one."
Dr. Livingstone is said to have expressed
the utmost contempt for lions. "Yon talk
about the majesty of the lion," said he,
chatting one day at a party in London with
Sir Edwin Lanseer, "but too do not know
the beast. There is no more majesty about
him in the forest than there is about that
poodle. It is all poetry. Lions are arrant
cowards cowardly sneaking beasts. You
can hardly tell a lion from a donkey when
you come upon him in the forest ; and if
you come upon a lion suddenly, his first
impulse is to tuck his tail between his legs
and bolt. He will spring upon you if he
comes upon you unawares and can have
time to crouch, but if a man h is the conr- .
age to look a lion in the faee, you need not
even cock your ride."
Effect of Shoes ox Health. Wood
en shoes are highly recommended by tome
of the scientific societies, and in some in
stance? by the Governments of Europe, it
having been ascertained that not a few
diseases, result in impaired constitutions
and even loss of life, having resulted from
the practice of wearing leather shoes in wet
weather. An experienced workman from
France was a short time since called to Ger
many to superintend the manufacture of
wooden shoes on anextensivescalein the lat
ter country. These are represented as being '
light and easy to wear, and are provided
with a small cushion within the upper side
to obviate any pressure on that part of the
foot ; they are also said to be of neat and
pleasing appearance, blacked or varnished,
are made large enough to accommodate
comfortable stockings, and are furnished
witli leather straps.
A Mississippi Biude. A Mississippian
married a widow for her money, and on "
the wedding night possessed himself of the
treasure and struck out. Unluckily for
him, his wife's daughter, a strapping girl
of twenty, observed the theft and departure.
(Jiving chase she overtook her papa, threw
him down, lied him to a tree, and corrected
him with a hickory stick. Presently the
bride appeared and joined her daughter in
the castigation. The piteous cries of the
unhappy groom soon reached the ears of
the police, who hurried to the spot. Tied
to the roots of the tree was the husband of
only a few hours' creation ; the step
daughter, with her night clothes torn into
threads, stick in hand, and rapidly repeat
ing the blows, the bride was punching him
in the ribs with her fist, calling him thief,
robber, Kuklux, and demanding her mo
ney. The case was compromised by the
return of the money, but the honeymoon
was over. Louaviue uounerJouTnai.
Scsik Liberty, of La Crosse, has thir- .
teen lovers, and every one of them exclaims.
'Give me Liberty or give me death :' An
she's a red-headed girl at that.
To see a young man, with his hair '
ed in the middle, shoving a baby c?
scene as ridiculous as it is true.
'IF you are courting a girl,'
fornia paper, 'stick to her, r
large her father's feet are.'

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