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The Tarboro' southerner. (Tarboro', N.C.) 1867-1873, September 05, 1867, Image 1

Image and text provided by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library, Chapel Hill, NC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026522/1867-09-05/ed-1/seq-1/

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.... .
- a . . . - ... ' v... . .V- .. -, . .. , - .
j THE SOUTH E USE Ii"." T '' " ' ; "- M ' i"-' : ' - '
)
One copy one year
One copy sis months
Oue-copy ihrcc iimjiuIis
.v,.w x.... , - . I - " : ' . ' , l f.. V .1 - . f si . .;i .
Twenly-rive per crnt. Is a3lfd to the
aboc raics ulitu paid at tbc ccl of tte
year.
1'itor ssioa.
Ij. I). PESDKIl
ATTORNEY AT LAW,
IV TARBOUO', N. C.
' -OFFICK, one door ImIow Tost Office,
aud one above the store of I reniler & Co.
All business intrusted 'to my care will
te promptly nnJ strictly atteiiJed to.
Sept. 2-:. 18Gt. 12-tf
GILBCRT ELLIOTT,
ATTORNEY AT I.AV,
, 0t3.cn Xo. 24 Vest Haia Street,
Xorrollc, Va.
1!I-ki:k.c i;s :
rtlessrs. Daiii-y, Hymaii Co., Nov.-York.
lr. V. 1. CfiMnoMts. Iniitiinor;-.
Messrs. C. W trraiuly -V: Sons. Iorfi!!;.
lion. A. Graham. Hilisl.oro', N. ('.
Jloe- V.. . II. Smiii!. $1 uriVocboro". X. C
Ails'. "-'A o!'-t
ASA EllifiS. J. EDWIS MOOr.t
BIGGS & MOORE,
ATTORNEYS AT EAW,
Tarboro', N. C,
WILL attend the Courts in tho Coun
ties of Marti!), B.Ttio, Pitt, iid.o
conihe, llaliinx, Nash, Wilson :it.d Wavue,
:ind nlso tLe redeval, Laukriij t :.:i.l Su
preme Courts. Stiict nttemiou paid to
the eallfctiou and adjustment of claims,
mid to Crse? in r.aiikrui tey.
August 1, 18G7. .")")- tf
Wilson C'trolinhin and (JnMsh.'ro"
:;r insert for cue mouth and scud bill to
this o Hiec.
DR. R. F. ROBERTA,
13 EN
TARIJORO', N. 0,
Oifiee at tl-,e Edgecombe House, where
he ean lie foutid on Monday and Tuesday
.of each week.
May 2, lSi;7. --1-tl'
A. E. KICKS, I). 1). L , would rppect
f'jlly say to tiie Citicns of Tarhoro' and
.its vicinity, that he isaain in the pr-ietice
.i f his I'tofession and will in the future
:is in the past endeavor to disclrii ge hi
.duty faithfully for all those who ieouin
Lis service
Addr.-s, Kocky Mount, X. C.
Feb. :, :Sf.! 10 tf
XV
ini S " Ij
CO.,
COTTOX FACTORS,
'I'd CHAMBER STRKiT.
;lnr.e 15;
20-tf
Jilrl.
. Vi'i'iitr. CI,'.:. 11. Uiiit'irdsoit
JAS. II. MvCT.UEr:, of N. c,
77. J. COXFFl .& COti
Manufacture! s and lea!-rs in
JIuls, (Utps. Furs. Slrttw Guixls.
25! & 2.-I! CANAL STWF.ET,
Neailj opposite EM-'e's IIoti-1.
NEW" YOJ!:C.
-luly 2 "" tf
11(5 YT,
of Washington, X. C, with
CHICHESTER & CO.,
Wl!'!I.KSl.K OKALKiiS IN
Foreign and Domestic Hard
ware, No 10, llari-lriy Street-, neav Aston Home,
Nuw York.
tJ All orders proni'dli attended to. 13
Feh. 10 U-tf
liiiUU it & tt
YLEZf,
1 l'r2 IV.
:irl Sti'oet,
NEV YORK.
a 1151-llAL ADVANCES ON COX
.Hi .siuiiiio'tits of $.'ottn and' ot'icr
P:oincc -Bagging-, Ealc E.opc an.i liia
Ties. !;iiii-.i,t-d m I'liintcrs i-n J'avi .ral-lu
lii-ios.
V.il.
i:k in;
Couiji, i ssioii 5Jej-chai:ts,
l:5D P-avl Street,
?w Yorli.
Strict Personal Attsniioa given to
TJ$ EST ROLL AND GUNNY RAG
fcj i-incr, IIuiic! r.nd Iron fv.rnisbod at
Jovt s niai ui't t iitcs.
Taxes on Coltnu will
paid by o:ir IV:
ends
Mess
i'. Pender vV Co.: Mat'.ew Wi-ddeil.
ssrs. Smith Xr Williams. Tarboro".
x. c. .1
Liiiil.-ev. Rocky Moent. ,.C.
Messrs. G. 1. Rrcwn
: Co., Wiislnuutoii. X.
An.-, ii'.i. :)-lf
A T. Ri'.UCH tt CO.,
COTTON FACTORS,
.D
Jmcral Commission Mtrchants,
For the Sale of Cotton und other '
Southern Produce.
No. ICO PEARL STREET,
KW YORK.
fXKvVTlES isbi;iping Cotton to us can bo
VuVutimodated with funds to pay Tax
py callinon Messrs. Brown &' Pippe or
-ilr. II. DTetl. Tavboro'.
I'roperty coyeied by lusur.ice ns scon
as ftarted. oct 13-4t5-tf
.TOUN S. DA NC Y, JOI IN II. II Y.M AN,
'f Tarbor.j N. C. of Scotland Neck, X . C.
JU.VEPU U. Ill MAN,
late of Tarboro', N. C.
DANCY, iii MAN & CO.,
GENERAL
Commission Merchants,
' for the Sde of all kinds of
SOUT II E U N 1' R 0 D U C E,
and purchase of General Alerehandise,
No. 24 Exchange .Placed
- KEAY A 0H.X..
24, 2D-tf
8U2.
HAFFA, HIGHES & CO.,
- GENERAL
Commission jNIerch.an.ts, i
" A K I AGE.VTS JOR TUB SIK OF '
i'lour, GraJoKpork Lard,
i , . mu&h f i iv it,
Ari Country Producu 'Geuerally,
No. "'414" Wonth WlnVjcy,
fl I . , ....... - . I. , . : .... ... - i- -1 .,.,. r 'i; i - . .... . - ,1 K . llUllll U. LUtC .VLVt.t4' WW"', w F
r ' I-jrrn: :JJr . ," ; r T7 less icsestcd fw Iweaty DcGars a jesr;:.
VOL. XLIII. . TAKDOilO', EPGEC03IBE COUNTY, ' NORTH 'CAROLINA, THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 5,1867. O- 40- mnildy tho.ufSawr
" . iii i . m in m.im iii am i wt".""'?- """""" m iii ! ii aiimnuHinw wmuimii m mi im i 11 iijftfiiiMi ea aerm v fit t,!a' -
RIIKS, HILL & CO.,
COTTON AND
(re??. Commission .Merchants
NORFOLK. VA.
"gpj AGGING and HOPE furnished pay
Hi) al.'le in Cotton. Liberal advances
made. - scp 1 40-tf
JA3IES GORDON & CO.,
Comm ission Jlcrcia n (s,
NORFOLK, VIRGINIA.
-grjlXOfl'T IT.USONA'L ATTENTION
L given to the sale of Produce of every
kind, and to the purchase of all. supplies
for Farmers, Merchants, and others in the
country. i.ov 29, 1 -tf
Geo. 11. Freer, John Ft. Jenl,
of X. C. of X. C.
FREER & 'SEAL,
Gen. Commission Merchants,
NORFOLK, J1.
LIBERAL ADVANCES ON CONSIGNMENTS
Refer to Exchange National Bank, Nor
folk.
np
M-1y
V. Y. Grand;, G. 11. Grundy, C IV. Grundy. Jr
C. W. GRr)Y & soss,
House Established 1813,
FACTORS,
KOHUWRDIXG AND COMMISSION
31 E 11 C II A XT St
!NIoIntoslis Whai'i",
AO h' FOLK,
OH THE SALE OF COTTON,
. tiiain, .avai Mores ami ooitntry i'ro
dyee seiieraliy, ;u:d imtah$&:r$ of lieucral
Merchandise," ;
fcept 15
-tf
C0WAN0 & IMRRISS,
Grnrral Cotsiss:'ia Mfrfhy.n,
Coiamtu-tu- Street,
NORFOLK, VA.
ILL attend promptly t- sales of Cot-
ton, Grain, Lumber, Tobacco, Na
val Stoics, Sc., and purchas ? of Su; plies,
aud forw..iuing Cotton :md Tobacco la Eu
rope if desired.
1). G. Cov.'..o, W'dxhiiyfoii Co., A". C.
K. J. IIauuiss, GrumUle, lute of Halifax
Cimaiii, X. C. " aug l-oj-Cra
'r- Refers to T. E. Lewis. Tarboro'.
KAUcn cii:.;s. ' " j. Blue
KADER CICGS & CO.,
GEXr.KAL
Con
soinmission
H'eJianfs,
AND
COTTON I "A CTORS,
McPhails Wharf,
NORFOLK, VA.
Shipments made to Liverpool fire
of
fot warding Coi.ttalseioa!, s;n4 the usurd
advances made
Br-y" Special stfituv.i paid to Gie sale
of ("ottou, aud all Linda of Country Pro
duce, june 12 27 ly
.1. E). K 10 SOD. AST..
PRACTICAL I IATTEJ1,
buksite und Rettiil Dealer iti
I La.!;, C;'apt, Straw Goods,
L n. bl eilas, CaLi S. ,
No. 18 Main Street,
NOR FORK", VA.
a p.
IS. 21 My
. Lfrkhy. W. M. .Millar.
J. II" Grundy. Foriueily of X. C.
BERKLEY, 5IILLA3 & CO.
Vbol-s:re Dealers in
J )iy Goods cl Notions,
5:J Alain Street,
Second & Thirl Floors,
NORFOLK, VA.
auar. liS. 1''. I v
LyTAJJLISIIiI) 18::il.
J. 31. FREE! IN,
Watchmaker and Jeweler,
NO. '20 .MAIN ST R KEF,
Corner of Talhot Street.
NORFOLK, VA.
CONSTANTLY ON" IIAX'D A FULL
assortment of W'atcbe.;, Jewelry, Sil
ver ware, &c.
Watehcs carefully and properly Repair
ed, npr. 4. IS-tf
CHERRY &
.1 u
9
(Late AV. P. ROBERTS Jr. & Co.,)
Manufacturers) YhoJesaie and Retail
Dealers in
Cookl"? and Resting Stoves,
Tin, Copper and Sheet Iron
. WAR 12,
LTouse Furnishing Goods, and Drokcrs
iu Metals,
Ccr. Roanoke and Wide Water Sis.,
Norfolk, Va.
mar. 28. lC-Om
L. DricL-hoitse. ' X- J- Thomas.
L. L. BRICKHOUSE & CO.,
Wholesale and Retail dealers in
BOOTS, SIIOES5,
Trunks, Valises, Carpet Bags&c,
No. 2 3 INIain Street,
Opposite Taylor, Martin & Co.,
Norfolk, Va,
XgxF Full stock constantly on hand fljt
Lowest Market; Prices. -Jons
II. FEiiEEE7of Morganton, N. C.
mar 28. l.C-ly
C F Greenwood. Fred Grecmcood.
ESTABLISHED "1847,
C. F. GREENWOOD &0O
Watchmakers and Jewelers,
DEALERS IX
a"j"UNL AND SHAVER WATCH-
ea, DiiHoonus, Pearl and other rich
Jewelry, Solid Silver and Plated JYare,
.Spectacles, Clocks
' . 'AND '
Fancy Goods,,
No. 27 Main etrcet.
. .. .- J
" No vfolk, Vir;ri 11 i a ."
-N; 1L Watches nul Jewelry repaired by
iii'e most skillful mrkiueuud Trarrauted,
W. HORNER)
tJSucccssor io P. DIL WORTH.)
No. 1 Wicle Water
Street.
' ' NOIIFOLK, VA..
WILL PAY THE HIGHEST MAll
ket pries for Colt on and "Woolen
Rags, Rope, Paper, Meiuls, Doues, &c
June 6, 1SG7. 27-ly
TAYLOR, MARTIN CO.,
DEALERS IN.
Hardware, Cutlery,
BaR iron and steel,
WAGON MATERIAL,
BKLTING ANJ PACK IN 3,
House Furnishing Goods, &c,
Circular Front, coiner of Main street and
Alurket Square, f
Norfolk, Va."
Nails Ft Factory Prices, Trace Chains,
"Yted, Hilling and drub Hoes, Horse Col
lars aud Humes, Axes, Saws, &c, &c.
The tradi supplied at Northern prices.
mar. US. lu-ly
S. Y. SELDXER.
89 Main
Stret
NORl'OLK, VA.
ESTABLISHED 1854.
Wholesale and Retail
Clothier jiKil Merchant Taylor.
BLEEPS CONSTANTLY ON HAND
one id" the lanrest and best selected
ttceks of Ready 3Ja?Ia CfOlhtug and
gent furnishing goods, also a flue assort
meat of piece goods, which he is p;vpa.ed
to make up to order in the latest and most
fashionable styles, a call is veiy respect
fully requested. S. Y SELDNEIt.
April 4, lSi',7. 18-tf
Wholesale Grocery House.
K3HTJL ELLIOTT & CO.,
Wholesale Grocers?,
No. 12 Roanoke Squire,
Norfolk, Va.
fpiIE UNDERSIGNED HAVE KS
S. tablished at 12 Roanoke Sijiwre, Nor
folk, Va., as Wholesale Dealer? in
Groceries, Rrovisioris
AND
Domectio Liquors.
Orders promptly and carefully attended to.
Consignments of good iu the Grocery
line solicited, and ptompt reluj'vs made.
WM II. SMITH, ScoUan-i Nick, N. C.
C1IAS. G. ELLIOTT. - r , . v
Gil "CUT ELLIOTT, Laleof- C
April 4, lSs',7. 18tf
DAVIS & BROTHER,
Who!, sale dealers iu
GBOCERIES, LIQUORS,
and AjjftitS- for Cnr?in Bilj Cutch
Snuff", aiul various grades of
VIRGINIA M AN U FACT U RED
Tobacco.
WT EEP CONSTANTLY ON HAND
a full slock of Su-ar aud Codec,
I'lour, Lard, Bacon, Candles, Family :nid
Fancy Soaps, Cheese, Butter, l'ith, Pork,
Salt. Candy, Tiackcts, Brooms, Shot, Pow
der, and many other articles, to complete
the assortment usually-found in a J()).
Any consignment will have especial at
tiou. No 4 Rowland's Wharf,
Koi'iblk, 'a.
np. 23, 1807. il-ly
Ed. I'. Tali,. FJ. M. Moore. Ed. J. Gijilh.
KDW.UU) P. TABB & 40.
WHOLESALE DEALKRS IN
HARDWARE, CUTLERY
AM)
FANCY GOOIXS,
West rile Market S.juare,
NrI'olk, Va.
Sign ol the AnvtL
A GENTS FOR THE SALE OF GLD
lx Doiniiiion Nails, Emery's Cotton Gin,
Boyle S: Gambles Circular Pit and cut
Saws Worreii lid. Gum Belting, all sizes.
A large Etock always ou hand of Axes,
Spades, Shovels, Forks, Chain Traces.
IIollov AVare, Horse Collars, Rope.
Agents for Fairbanks & Go's Standard
SCALES,
that will wcih a Gold Dollar or a Canal
0 it X-saed.
A large stock foveas WnrJ, C&aa
and Glass. Attention of the trade re
spcclfully solicited. mar. 2S. IG-ly
THE JOURNAL OF
BOOK BINDERY,
In connection with our splendid
mr .1013 PRINTING QFFOK,
is new in successful operation, tnd vc are
making , ' ;
SUPERIOR BLANK-BOOKS,
Binding and Rebinding Periodicals, Old
Bookt, Music,
AND EVERY KIXD OF AVORit
Done in a First-Class Book-Bindery.
THE BEST OF AVORKMEN ONLY
are ercplbycd by us.
-This is the only establishment of thf
kind in Tide-water Virginia, aud we can
do work as well and cheap as it can be
done in the North.
EVERY VARIETY OF BOOK and
- JOR PRINTING
Promptly executed,
IN PLAIN CP. FANCY" COLORS.
Call at the JOURNAL olSce, 12 Roanoke
avenue, or address your orders to
2. RICHARD LEWELLEN, '
Supt Norfolk Pnntipg Houae-Ck).
May 2, 1807. 22-If
JNO. W. WHITE,
Cabinet 3Iakcr and Undertaker,
' Tarboro' N, C.
HAS m hand a large "lot of "Bedsteads,
Chairs and others articles of Furniture,
which he oilers to the public cheap. Xv
Cash, all kind of wsod Cpfiias,, of all sizes
on hand. ' . , - , .
' AH kind3 of Furniture Made a.ud He-
TILE SOUTIIEKiNEK,
THURSDAY, - -
SEPT. 5, 13G7
The Removal of Gen. Sheridan.
Corrcspccdrnre Btt-a'ern the President ami
tRiai .raist.
General Grant to President Johnson.
Hf.ai QfAUTEns. Ar.iiks of rnr.'J
United Statk. V
Washington, D. Au;;. 17, 1&57. J
Hit Excellent'!, Andrew Johison,
President nf the United Statin :
Sir : I am in receipt of your or
der of this date, directing the assign
mcnt of General ii. II. Thomas to the
command of the fifth Military Dis
tried, General Sheridan to the Depart
ment of tlfJklissourt,'. ftlid Ueoerfe
Hancock to the Department of tie
Cumberland ; also your note of this
date (enclosing these instructions,)
saying, " Before 3-ou is.sue instructions
to carry into effect. the enclosed order
I vould be pleased to hear any sug
gestions you may docm necessary n
specting the assiguiiuuts to which the
order refers."
I am pleased to avail myself of this
invitation to urge, earnestly urge
urge in the name of a patriotic people
who have sacrificed huudreds of thoit
sands of loyal lives and thousands of
millions of treasure to preserve the
integrity and union of this c uutr'
that this order be not insisted on. It
is unmistakably the expressed wish of
the couufry that General Sheridan
should uot be removed fixm his pre
sent command. This is a republic
where the will of the people is the law
of the land. 1 beg that ti eir voice
may be heard.
General ir!i;iidan has ,pen'iruifJ hi
civil duties faithfully and intelligently.
His removal will only be regarded as
an effort to defeat the laws of Con
gress. It will be interpreted by the
unreconstructed" element in the South
those who did all they could to break
up this government b- anus, and now
wish to be the only element consulted
as to the method of restoring order
as a triumph. It will en.buhlen them
to renewed opposition to the will of the
loyal mai-SjS, believing that they have
the Executive with them.
The services of General Tho-mas iu
I . .itt li i; ir for the Union entitle him tot
souse consideration. He has repeated
ly entered his protest against being :ts
sigued to either of the five Military
Districts, and especially to being as
signed to relievo Geiier.-'l Sheridan.
General Hancock ought not to be re
moved from where lie is. Ilis depart
ment is a complicated one, wi.ieh w ill
talij? a new CMmmander some time to
become acquainted with.
Tli,erc are military reasons, pecunia
ry reasons, and, above all, patriotic
ruasn$, wh;' this order should not be
insisted on.
I beg to refer to a letter, marked
private, which I wrote to the Presi
dent when first consulted ou the sub
ject of the change iu the War Depart
ment. It bears upon the subject of this
removal, and I had hoped would have
prevented it.
1 have the honor to be, with great
respect, your obedieut servant,
li. S. GRANT, (Jeu'l IJ. S. Arm-.
and See'y of Wax d interim.
PRESIDENT
JOHNSON
CHANT.
TO GENERAL
Execxtiye Mansion,
Washington, -Vug. ID. 18G7. j-
Generr.m. ; I have received your
cmmunvjulio.y of tlie lllh insiunt,
and thank vua for lhenromptuess will).
vs iiicu nave Buuuiineu oi!i
. i . 1
vieffs
respecting the assignments directed in
my order of that date. When I sta
ted, iu my -unediicia! note of the 17th,
that I would be pleased to hear any
suggestions you might deem necessary
upon tLe subject, it was uot my inten
tion to ask from you a formal report,
but rather to invite a verbal statemeut
ot any reason affecting the public in
terests which, in your opiniou, would
render the order inexpedient. Inas
much, however, as jou have embodied
vour siguest i;:i;; ii: a written Oinaiu
nication, it is proper thut I should
make some reply. . ..
Tou earnest !y urge that tlia Grder bo
not insisted on, remarking- that " it is
unmistakably the expressed wish of the
country that General Sheridan should
not be removed from Lis present
.command. v AVhile 1 am cognizant of
the efforts that have been made to re
tain General Sheridan in command of
the Fifth Military District; I am net
aware that ta question has ever been
submitted to the people themselves
for determination. It certainly would
be unjust to the army to assume that,
iu the opiniou of the nation, he alone
is capable of commanding the States of
Louisiana and Texas, and that v,-ere he
for any cause removed, no other gener
al in the military service of the United
States would be competent to fill his
place. General Thomas, whom Ihtiye
designated as bis successor, is well
known to the country. Having won
high and honorable distinction in the
eld., he has since, in the ex.cutiou
of the responsible duties of a
part meat', commauder, exhibited great
ability, squud discretion, and sterling
patriotism. He has not failed, undee
ihe most trying circumstances, to en
force the laws, to" presrv.a peace and
erde.r, to enqourage the restoration of
civil authority and to promote, as far
as nossiblcv a soirit of recoueUisiiaMi
His administration , of the Dpart-j,
ment of th,e Uumberlana will certain
ly .compass rupst favorably" ';vith. that
of General Sheridan in the Fifth
Military District
These allairs ap-
: pear to be. in a disturbed "coadistioij
and a bitter spirit 4f autagtu"u;m
j seems to have resulted from GetWi'sl
Sheridan BJinngcmeBt. has ren-
.Ajli.i1 liitnarVW.JriMfcriAM I'd in n v i -ma
by the manner in which he has ex
e cised even the powers conferred by
Congress, and still more so by a re:
sort to authority not granted by law
nor necessary to its faithful and effi
cient execution, His rule has, iu
fact, been one of absolute' tyranny,
without reference to the principles of
our government or the nature of our
free institutions. The state of affairs
which has resulted from the course
he has pursued, has seriously inter
fired with a harmonious, satisfactory
"and speedy execution of the acts of
Congress, and is alone sufBciet to
justify a change. Ilis removal there
fore cannot " be regarded as an effort
to defeat the laws of Congress;" fur
the object is to facilitate their exe
Ctioi', through an officer who has never
land, and to exact, within his juris
distion, a like obedience from others.
It caunot be "interpreted by the
unreconstructed element in the South
thost who did all th:y could to
break up this government by arms
and now wish to be the only elemeut
cansulted as to the method of restor
ing order as a triumph j" for, as in
telligent nicu, they must know that
the mere change of military comman
ders cannot alter the law, and that
General Thomas will be as much bound
by its requirements as General Sheri
dan. It cannot " embolden them to
renewed opposition to the will of the
loyal masse, believing that they have
the hxectitive with them ;" for thoy
are perfectly familiar with the antece
dents of the President, aud kuow that
he has not obstructed the faithful ex
ecution of any act of Congress.
No one, as you are aware, lias a
hitrhcr appreciation than myself o!'
the lilies oj General
'fM h
r,o one would oe Jess inclined to ass'gn
him to a command not entirely to his
wis Ives. Knowing him as 1 do, T can
not think that he will hesitate for a
moment to obey any order having in
view a complete and speedy restoration
of the Union, in the preservation of
which he has rendered such important
aud valuable services.
5;-vGcneral Hancock, known to the
whole country ns a gallant, ableand
patriotic soldier, will, 1 have no doubt,
sustain his high reputation in any
! position to which he may be assigned.
It, as .you observe, the department1
which he will have is a complicated
one, I feel confident that, under the
guid nice and instruction-) of General
Sherman, General Sheridan will soon
become familiar with its necessities,
and will avail himselfof the opportuni
ty the Indian troubles lor the display
of the energy, enterprise and daring
which gave him so enviable a reputa
tion during- our recent civil struggle.
Iu assuming that it 'm the expressed
wish of the people that General Sher
idan should not be removed from ; his
present command, you rem irk that
"this is a republic where the will of
the pcplo is the law of the land,"' and
beg that their voice may be heard."
This is indeed a republic, based, how
ever, upon a written constitution.
That constitution is the combined and
expressed will of the people, and their
voice is law when reflected in the
manner whi,::h that itrumeut pre
scribes. While one of its provisions
makes the President Commauderin
Chief of the army aod navy, another
requires that ' he shall fake caro that
the laws lie faithfully .executed,"
Relieving that a chaugc 'iy the jc,om
of the Fiiili Military District, is absol
utely necessary for a faithful cxecu
ion.cf a.ws; I have issued the or
der which is the subject of this corres
pondence; and iri - thus exercising a.
power i hat inheres in the-Executive,
under the Constitution, as Commander-in-Chief
of the military and naval for
ces, I am discharging a duty required
of me by the will of the nation, as for
mally decided in the supreme law of
the land. Ry this oath the Executive
is solemnly bound, '-to the best of his
ability, to preserve, protect aud defend
the constitution,'' aud although in
times of groat excitement it may be
lost to public view, it is his duty, with
out regard ro the consequences to him
self, to hold sacred and to enforce any
and all of its provisions. Any other
etiu&a srouid lead to tj;
Restriction
of the republic; for, tha Constitution
once tibi l s'icdj there would be no Con
gress lor the exercise ot legislative
powers, uo Executive to see that
laws arc faithfully executed, no ju
diciary to afford to the citizen protec
tion for life, limb aud property.
Usurpation would inevitably follow
;nd a despotisui.be fixed upon the peo
ple iu violation of their combined and
expressed will.
In conclusion, I fail to perceive any
"military," "pecuniary" or "patriotic
reason" why this order should not be
carried into effect. v You will . remem
ber that in .the first instauce I did not
consider General Sherman tthe jaost
suitable officer for the ecu;raand of the
Fifth Military District. Time has
strengthened riiy convictions upon this
point, anJ has led me to the conclusion
that patriotic considerations i demand
that he should b,e .superseded by an
officer who, while he will faithfully
execute the law, will at the same time
give uiofe general satisfaction to the
whole people, white uud black, North
and South.
: I am, GeneraL ; .very respectfully
yocrs, ;.; ,
' -. t Andrew Jojjxsox.-
Gcncral U. S. . Grant, Secretary of
A ad nUcnii. -"
It seemaihat'End-of-the-Vorld Dr.
Jummi,rgs ,ftiajde a trilling error i his
oalculatioes concerning the total de
struction to vtake place iu 187. In
fcvisbpg iiis '."work,--, he ibiind thai hp
Jiad overl&ok,ad figures which add some
thing likc a ui.lliou of years' to the race
whicbfhLs mutidiiuc sphcre has Jlrao.
Legend cf a Remarkable Cave in Ply
nicftib, Vt.
The following legend is related of
the discover? of a eavc in the oown of
Plymouth, Art., which still attracts the
attention of curious tourists. It is
reached by a trip of twelve miles from
the depot in Ludlow :
Many hundred years cg.o, long be
fore the White Man sought a home on
these wild New Englaud shores, the
Red Man roapied free oyer its hills
and valleys, and through the long un
broken forests, pursued the chase, un
molested. There was no fear within
his breast, for he was nurtured amid
the wild, and rugged in Nature, and
taught from his infancy, to war fear
lessly with the warring elements to
traverse, with a light and a . fearless
step the hanging cliff,' or the yawuitig
precipice, and to meet with a dauntless
soul the fiercest foe or the bitterest tor
tures. But tho White Man cau;e and their
forests have been cut down, their wig
warns burnt, and the' crushed from
the face of the earth, or driven back
and still further back, until now onlv,
the far wiLii of the AY est, echo back
the shrill sound of their car-whoop.
All is changed.
Where once stood
their wigwams
now cluster the little
villages of the White Man; where
our-e gleamed their council fires now go
upward to heaven the graceful domes
of the House of God. Over the scenes
where once they met in bloody strife
now rustles the rich harvest fields of
plenty. Where once stood their hunt
ing grounds, now show the quiet herds
of the husbandman, and where once
they marked ti.cir iraii, uoy sweeps
onward the proud engine in its hurried
mai.':
h. -
IjL'.t let us
remember, that the very place where
we now live was once inhabited by this
brave and warlike race, that evciy hill
aud valley over which the eye may
roam, was once the home of these wild,
untutored sons of the forest. The
very sod upon which we now stand
once bore the impression of their light
and stealthy foot, and the ech ) of ev
ery hill and vale once gave back the
sound of their fearful war-whoop, their
3'ell of defiance, and their song of
death.
At the time of which I speak, the
northern part of the Riack Riycr Val
ley was inhabited by a tribe of Indians
called tho Shickarces. and in the little
valley iu the vicinity of what is now
called the Plymouth Cave, they had
planted a row of their wigwams, iu the
center of which, ecm on flu; ren tpot
tunc oc upicJ ly the. dtcc'liuy of the
White Mm, stood the wigwam of tl a'r
chief, Moulea. -
They were a peaceful race, but th
Ouolacs, a powerful tribe inhabit
ing the southern part of the lllaek
River Valley, headed by their chief,
Eagle-eye, who, iuj-he. ambition cf his
heart, wished to possess all the land
lying upou the borders of this stream,
from its fountain, to where its waters
minglo with the Connecticut had
made war upon them and driven them
back, until the little valley I have men
tioned, was the only spot they could
call their own.
Monolea was a brave chieftain. He
had warred nobly with the Onolaes, but
they were inany. Ar;d nor driven to
the last extremity, he culled his brave
warriors to a council. And as they
met around tlnr council fares, and its
uiue tuning names rose upward ii the
still night air, shedding their pale light
uroii the gathered ioiuis whose mus
cular strength seemed to bid defiance
to the storms of life it revealed fea
tures, upon whose every muscle was
written a stern defiance,- eyes that
flushed like the lightning's fiery gleam,
and dark brows tint frowned above
them like the native hills by which
they are surrounded. Clad as they
were in their native costume, with their
long, black hair hanging loosely over
their shoulders, seated iu silence around
the burning brands those chieftains
met for a last effort it was -an inter
esting sight. Monolea spoke:
" Rravc warriors, the hour is come.
Here upon this little spot we can yet
call our own, you have met to decide
whether it shall pass tj the Onolaes.
To-morrow'; .sua will rise upou cur
last great struggle, ,r even now, the
f.-e are on our borders. To-morrow's
1.,'sun wijl set upou us slaves or cou-
queror s. My warriors, which shall
be our fate ? Let the tojnahawk and
th.j scalping knife answer, for they
must decide the day. Who is the first
to meet the foe ? 'Tis life or death.
'Tis slave or free. Who gives his life
to-morrow for his race ?"
I, I, and I, cams' lorth from every
breast iu firm, deep tones, that seemed
to come from some far depth of fear
less, calm, determined souls.
It wasdetermined immediately that
they should prepare rithout delay for
the attack, which was hourly expect
ed. ; Aud as the moou came forth upon
her nightly round, and cast her pale
rays through the arching branches of
those tall old trees, they fell upon dark
dusky forms gliding stealthily among
the shadows, gleamed for a moment
upon the tomahawk so soon to be dyed
iu blood, and then fell with a slanting
beam upon the -arrows, waiting only
for a skillful hand to guide their path
to the human heart. All was cow
ready. The Shtekarecs waitiag only
for the approach of the foe. An iour
later and they pjet the 0nclae.3 and
the Shickarees rand the valley and the
hiUside around ti?o Cavo, became their
bailie grannd-.
- With fine wild veil tb Shickar
rushdXnponXbe foe, and ere. the dJ
11 il r i 1 Ii -
it bck, t&fzfZ'
tiAis raLg4(
even abi
erty. The Onolaes were two to one of
the Shickarees, but the Shickarees were
nerved to desperation. The tomahawk
gleamed for a moment in the air and
then fell with a deathly weight upon
its Tietini. The arrow whizzed in its
rapid flight and then buried itself deep
in the heart that grew stiM beneath its
pressure. The keen edge of the tcalp
ing knife became dulled by repeated
use. the Onalae, and the Sliickaree, lay
side by side in death, each clasping the
other in a deathly embrace, yet none
paused to behold their work of desola
tion, but " foe grappled with foe, till
I the life blood burst from their agonised
bosoms in falling." The -yell of defi
ance, the death-shriek of agony,' and
the work of carnage grew wilder and
fiercer than ever. And as the gray
light of the motynng grew brighter and
brighter in the East, aud the first ray
of the rising sun looked down upon the
, bloody scene, the two chiefs met face, to
lace.
It was a fearful moment. Eah
knew that one must die. And with
hands clasping firmly the weapon of
djath, eyes flashing fiercely with the
deepest hate, features which spoke each
to each the sternest defiance, ti ey paus
ed for a moment to prepare for tL&
struggle.
I have sought for this meeting,"
said Alonolca, "and my prayer is an
swered." " Then hast thou sought thy
death." Was the Onolaes stern re
ply. A moment more and they closed.
Again and again, the sunlight flashed
upon the knife raised to give the fatal
blow, and again and again, was it ward
.ed off by the skill! ul antagonist, until
in an unguarded .momeut the knife of
the Oaolaj entered the side of Monolei
and his tall form was bent backward
like the oak in the tempest. For a
moment all seemed lost. Rut the next,
with a mighty effort, he clasped hisau
tagouist around the waist, and with a
sudden jerk both fell, the Onolae un
derneath, whose knife strikingdeep in
to the rocky soil, was shivered, leaving
him wholly at the mercy of his foe.
" Thine hour is come," said Mono
lea iu the hoarse, deep tones of ven
geance, " thiac hour is come aud my
revemp is sweet."
And he drew 'back his baud to give
the fatal blow, when the earth gave
way benoath them, and there came a
hollow rumiliag sound, as of a stone
rolling or its rocky bed, and the On
olae sank into the yawning chasm, Mo
nolea saving himself only by. clinging
to a tree at his side. When the Otio
lacs saw the earth open as it were, and
swallow up their chief, they were struck
with a surierstitious fear and fled. Tlio
...... -r -r- -
? Chickarees parsu-th.em, :-2ifyuL.
great number as thej w.eut, and the
victory was complete.
Moaolca, when he saw the chief
pass from his sight into the gulf be
neath, was struck with surprise, but
when he beheld the terror of the Ono
laes, he said there was nothing more to
feir, and ordering three of his men to
br'ug lighted brands, he descended with
them into the mysterious chasm where
he found the Onolae stunned by his
fall upon the rocks, lying in a state of
uncousciousness. Ridding two of his
men bear the wouuded chief to his
wigwam, Monolca, with the third,
passed .cAY iu hi? seareh tb.ro.ugU rqgms,
whose rocky partitions seemed to defy
the baud of time with floors laid
j loosely of the came jajtcrial, o? of the
; hardened earth up rocky staircases
through little recesses carved out by
Nature's hand, filled up with strange
devices of her own cunning workman
ship that mucks the skill of man, and
which his eye till this strange hour
had never sccii.- The heart of the
chieftain was filled with awe as he gaz
ed around upou this subterranean abode,
which his untutored mind beheld
as newly 'fSw.oncd for his strange re
lief. " "
'.' Surely the Great Spirit has been
with' to-day,'"' he said iu tones of the
deepest solemnity," " He has myste
riously saved us from the hand of. bur
enemy. I will offer unto Him a sacri
fice worthy of Ilis acceptance, even the
sacrifice of ma revenge. The Onolae
shall go free.'' f
Carefujly slopping jlto mouth .of the
Cu.'e, that it might serve them in the
case of another emergency, he turned
back and entered his wigwam,whcro
he found the Onolae seated upon the
ground, between the two Shickarces
in stoical sileuce. Ilis countenance
was pale from, the loss of blood, but
his look was calm and unmoved Las
the rock of adamant against whieh
the ocean surges beat forever, yet
harm it not.
" Art thou ready for the future?"
said Monolea.
" I am ready," said the chief, with
tho same calm, tone and fearless eye.
" I am ready." . -
"The Great Spirit has been with
us to day," said Monolea. " He has
scattered thy tribe like the leaves of
the forest, an$ given, thee into rny
hands."
" Begin thy tcrtuxe," answered the
chief, folding his arms upon his breast
with the same calm look and tone.
."Begiu thy 'torture. Yet wilt thou
lose thy .revenge, for ity .'spirit;, ye
caunot reach." '. .
"My- revenge 13 enough," rsaid
Monolea. "Go forth," thfouare
free
but he niovefr not. JjMsst. torturC
badbeihin i V r
lmTOlMi.V t. ,t-
A mln'-lcd- exorcsion 'cfinaredul- theJtidffthouidget o.y;dd rieb
ity 'aB,i: surprise 'passedv over A's fea- reJjebjKW.iirfout.'btjr
fnr ot tiift- f noi&a -.lur a- momeiu. i " rr- -i"',,'r'.-i"A- -v
rising fvoiri the gr&nd anl ltff .
forward, can beas gea:
"Ofcai.rjs
thou. '. If .it i fchylRh
smoke together the pipe
and our tribes shall ba brc'- f
"Said I not that the Great r Ii'Jfc
was with us?" said MjQiioIeaV ' .th
ha mis of th.e i?Q 'me t Qua ljouV??j
fore engaged in the bloody cotrtV V
now closed iu, the warm grasp 6i"'r--..
conciliation. "Said -I not thafctfe4
Great Spirit was .will.' "us T''Hib
bring forth tlu pipe of poaco naUlfcJi'
tuo smolfe ot thaf, -instead Qta-rux
council fires, rise )W" pho Great SftJr
it an inceiiSc .of praise and i Thafe
-.- 4-1?"-.-..
Such is one of the inciSwifatMsi? 4 f
past history of . the place in
we now dwell. And
tion.has passed away, tiV"gH. .uq
vestige rernaiua upon the, spot t'j'
tell of the raco that has lived
' tafj
us, yet do I 'ove when the
clothed iu its summer verdure,
the wind cones feigning throauu- t
trees, like mournlul memoriesol Utfcik
... j. 1 n t
oiden times, to go and .seat,.-nic itt A
the mouth of this Cave, close' mf
eyes, and let my mind gj back inrjjf
the far chambers cf th,2 past, 11
walk amid its shadowy fcccucs y -unji' t
I seem to see once more the curhi
smoke of the wigwams, tho blazo f
the Council Fires, the ficidi sf tb4.f
bloody conflict, and I feel, that 1 ai. J j
indeed upou classic ground. ". v '','''(? I
; r Ht l
Farts lbci'-t Cottea. f
AVhile the party professing to be tk
especial friends of the negroes arc
pressing the lab.ou ,'wf tho Tovtv
stricken South by tajriiig its chief pr7i
duct, cotton, three cents a pound, Cos !
Sultan has taken pains to select judi;.
cious oibecrs to carry mtjo i.ei"CJJ tlrt '
cultivation of this great staple Xf cenv)
merce iu the Ottoman Eniplre. f
mong other means ad pted for Hni
purpose, he has madegrants of uricuitjf)
vated lands belougi.iig to the state, reiv'
froa, if used as cotton plantatiotis. '. If J
has exempted such lands ironfall taxes'
for five years, admitted lrctf frani ' ,diX
ties, all implements ond! machines 5Hi
quired for the cultivationTof coti;v41
commuted tithes, and made a' III
distribution of many hundreds cf jtotjiQ
of American cotton seed through tU'il
different cotton-growing districts of tho'
Ottoman Eim.ire. The cotton - thus'
grown from seed bought iu -thc United 1
States has realized nearly ns . high a'
price as the staple produced ip ouy
own country. "
Iu 1S02 little mci- than ll.UOO cwt,
of cotton fro in the Ottoman Empiro t
was imported into England. InlSG5,'i"
its fitiantitv was Inere:i5ecl mnrn . tlian.Jj
The British Commissioners cf Cu,
toms in their report bsucd List montlj
ot tne statistics ot trade and reveni?
for the year 18(50, mention hat put. o
the 11,(100,000 cwt. of cotton sent to1
England iu lSb'I, more than 7,000,000 ,:
cwt. were from the United States; whilij ;
even last year the pictutyi remained;
reversed. It is in this state of affairs S
press the production of this crcpi-Jbyl
loading it with taxation, while tbcyf
make the people pay taxcn by wilt or
proieexion upou arncies wuicii xzn
country and cir,cumstanc.cs di not j'
well CBablo vs to produce. But it ,
gratifying to know' that out recnjl J
tivo pncri'in". avn sn rrri'nf. trt'if. ro,'l
" " !-- ". V. v
ported to Ehglai$ ,6000.0 ewt.
cotton last year". But the increasiV.
consumption of cotton throughout ti
world, and yet more, the witbdniwuly
the jtsnited States from tho ;..tnit h
duiing the war, have to farWiy'B.;,l
I hip cultivation iu other ccuol n&r&j(L
tually creating it in 'sohio" inMa!i'tt?,v,
where none before existed, that the eupi ,
ply to England from other sources thau
the United States, which, inlSCt, vrLi' (
only 400.000 cwt. has been increased to
tnore thau 7,COO,000 cwt., or multiply 4(
v.n less than uiuetccn-fold m loUo.'
1117.. "' '
The Cmnd Army. f.
The Lynchburg Xttzs is in posses I
sion of the following curious document:
North Pom; ie Holston, ")
Was!iim:th. C., Vs., y
July -Hih, 1&G7. ' y
Hon. Thud. S'cvcus: '
Dear Friend: I liave been tlirot'g
the lower part of this ouiityaud S'tatvt'
since I .wrote you last. Have dono ,t
Kjilcndid luxin'-tif, have orgauiztd 6CtejV.
Camps of the "Grand Army," whlct j
arc recruiting rapidly. The oljccto.'
I explain them (privately (:f eoi:rsc')f
take amazingly, and I believe
.cur agents would follow my
would be sale hi alio.'.viug reconsl
t inn i Timing ii f r
'I tell thcin that or plan of cing-M
tion is only to effect the largf: hiJV
holders to ; compel them s to -""iv
their large bodies of --lahdtntdsay.ft1
or one hundred acre farms. p'lh.J
farms to be Eold to all elates rf -ter
sops in the South only, at from one't'l
ve;doUars per acre.'-- ' ;. ? --'
On this cxjjlunation, uc (ale Oii.
most litter ex-rh"h, tcl.o t though theif
hate vs arc hired ly th- hoeff a farrrjl
I am fariiu' Qonvineeu lliat it the rope?
arc worked- properly, the bill wonh!
carry by a popular Vote io the whole
South by next July. JL some-u
thing should be done tefpreetnt ' Ih tale
or tranzer of lands here1, 'ptMrpmrl-4-'"
wottld-'P.V"
wtTOJ''r
you;
-tou.,. jitoi
i
pwed at the shortest notice; .. -
f.' ; "... .; -
ii-' t ..i: . 1 v .
" ..' r"
. - 'A
ikJjf - '"' ' ' ' '7 w 4

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