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The Washington times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, November 30, 1911, Last Edition, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026749/1911-11-30/ed-1/seq-1/

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Far Tonight
Arid Friday.
Last Edition
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NXJMBBB7283. Yesterday's ClrcuUtfen, 50,407i
WASHINGTON THURSDAY EVENING, 2KOVJ1MBBB 80, 1911,
Eighteen Pagee
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'DISTURBERS' AS
TARSITS1HPEW
Donahue Arraigns "Those
Who1 Would Change
Social Order."
CARDINAL GIBBONS
. ASSIStS At MASS
Distinguished Gathering f Attends
, Thanksgiving Mass At
St. Patrick's,
Rearing a ''sermon tbat breathed
tk spirit of peace and content, but
rwklcb, embraced reference to na
tional political unrest and "the at
tempts of some to uproot social and
BISHOP SCOF
a moral i order," President Taft, mem-f;
bera of Ills Cabinet, Government of--
flcials, diplomatic representatives of
twenty Latin-American republics and
Bndrer.f citizens, gathered at St
Patrick's Cathollo Church today In a
Tmanksgiving service.
His eminence, Cardinal Gibbons,
assisted at the mass, which was wit
, aessed by a distinguished assemblage
of notables of this and other coun
r tries. ' '
Third Service of Kind.
. it. was the third Pan-American
Thanksgiving celebration and the air of
thankfulness which pervaded St. Pat
rick's today Is typical of that which ex
ists In every home and In every church
n this and other lands.
.'The church was crowded to the doors,
sores stood In the aisles and outside
aad hundreds ware unable to obtain n-
fanes. When the President and, Mrs.
reached1. St." Patrick's' Sit , ' ,
ibb they left' after the impressive
reroo&le. .the, waltlns crowds who
isd the streets applauded 'them:
;r . ... -
.-.-C?PWJ?! . fi V
tds jkl.'Jmv.' ratrica j. Donanoe,
bishop, of Wheeltn.- i preached the
Thanksslvins'sermon.' It was a rather
unusual oration, 'touching the custom
ary Thank-glvlrig'tbp'lcs.'the President 'i
arbitration treaties the industrial situ
ation, the 'wan now waging In foreign
lands, and Anally the tendency of tin
American people "to sometimes lose
their heads and go off. after false polit
ical leaders."
Bishop Donahoe expressed the hope
that, the Senate, would approve the
President's arbitration treaties with
France and Great Britain.' '
"I am not able to state the Influences
St work to withhold the ratification of
these treaties," he said, "I Impugn no
man's motive, but I express the belief
that the great majority of the people
Of the United States want these treaties
ratified1 at the coming, session of Con
gress, thus adding their, moral weight
to the world-wide peace movement."
Praises Republics,
Turning to the diplomatic representa
tives of twenty Latin-American repub
lics, the bishop referred In complimen
tary terms to the attitude of these re
publics toward International peace. He
praised Andrew Carneglo for his dona-
Uons to The Hague and the gift which
made possible the magnificent building
now-housing In Washington the Bureau
of American Republics. The flags of all
the nations comprising the Pan-American
Union were draped about the pil
lars of St. Patrick's, thus giving the
Oumkaglvlntf service patriotic improa
flreaess. In his comprehensive sermon, the
bishop made such reference to political
unrest that his remarks may bo con
strued an directed at tne growing in
fluence of Koclallsm.
"But while we hove everything to be
thankful for let us not forget the un
ndlng struggle between capital and la
bor, the law's delay, and the attempt
of some to destroy the home and up
root the social and moral order of to
4y. A few years ago this cloud on
the political horizon was no larger than
a man's hand. Today It may well give
ua. pause, and It Is going to require pru
dence and model ation and statesman
ship to deal with these Issues."
Compass Points West.
.Taking the compass, for Illustration,
Bishop Donahue if erred to the fu--l
that the needle ordinarily points true
north. "But of late the needle seems
going westward in this country," he
continued. "The American people may
lose their heads for a time: they may
be swayed by so-called leaders, but in
the end they will turn, and the needle,
the end they will turn, and the needle
will point again to the north of noble
thinking and living.
Relating the things for which the
American people Bhould be thankful,
the bishop declared that the work done
by the Agricultural Department and te
a.ricultural schools throughout tho
country to be perhaps the greatest
blessing of them all. Intensified farm
continued on Ninth Page.)
WEATHER REPORT.
--tjrcasT FOR THE DISTRICT.
Fair tcnlght; lowest temperature
nhnut 2S degrees. Frldav fair, light to
moderate weit winds.
TBM PEIRATURES.
tt ntlREAU.
AFFLECK'S.
la m S
Oa. ni
10 a. m 3
F a. m
0 a. m
10 a. m
31
33
3T
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Jl a. m
12 noon
1 p. n
2 p. m
11 a m.
33
39
40
12 noon 46
1 P. m 41
2 p. m I
SUN TABLE.
IUs 6:M I Sets..,
.4:33
TIDE TABLE.
Today High tide. 2:38 a. m. and 3:10
- m Low tide. 9:12 a. m. and 9:60 p. m.
PTomorrow-Hlgh tide. 3:33 a. m. and
l: p. m. Iw tide, 10 a. m. and 10:43
V. m.
" i
Criminologist,
FRONT
How Contestants Started
in the Big Race
Driver. Car.
Louis Wagaer... ...,..,. ...Flat
L. A. Disbrorr Pope.Han-ier
Charlie Basle ... Bulek-Huadred
L. A. Mitchell.,... Abbott-Detrolt
Balph Malford loaler
Bob Barman '. Mara oh
Eddie Kearne; Bens
David Brace-BrowB. .. .Flat
Harry Cobe. Baick-Haadred
Carl Llnberg Abbott-Detroit
Cyras Patchke Maraon
L. A. Bergdoll .' Beas
Caleb Bragg Flat
Spencer Wlsbert Mercedes
Ralph DePalma Mercedes
Victor Henery .. .Beas
FOR GRAND PRIZE
Wagner and Hemery, Early
Favorites Forced to With
draw Pace Terrific.
SAVANNAH, Nov. 30. Darid Bruce
Brown took the lead in the twentieth
1.- - , tlrmrtA -!--- D.1-V. -T..1- I
4y V UIO Ul.tAU A.O .WC ill Mill-
ford advanced to second place, and Ed
die Hearne, who bad been leading for
ten laps, roped back to third.
SAVANNAH, oZ, Nov. SO.-Eddle
Hearne, driving a Bens at llghtnln,
speed, was In the lead In the Orn
Prize race at the eighteenth lap In the
twenty-four-lap contest; this afternoon.
Ralph Mulford, winner of Monday's
Vanderbllt Cup race, was second In his
Lozler, and Bruce.-Brown, In a Fiat
was third.
The two favorites, Louis Wagner, who
smashed his car, and, Victor Hemery,
whose car failed, were both out of thf
race. Five others had given up, leavtn
nine cars fighting It out at that stage
of the race.
Wagner's Great Speed.
Wagner made the first lap of the
course at the rate of seventy-six miles
an hour. The race Is for 408 miles, or
twenty-four times around the circuit.
The record Is now held by Natarro,
who. In 1910. won the Florlo Cup race.
averaging 74.16 miles an hour for 612
kilometers or about 329 miles. Wagner
won the Grand Prize In 1908, and the
third Vanderbllt in 1906.
Victor Hemery, driving a Bens, who
was the last starter today, won the
second Vanderbllt In 1905, and has Un
tuned second twice In the Grand Prize.
The line-up at the start today presented
the greatest collection of cars and driv
ers ever assembled In one race.
Mulford, who won the Vanderbllt Cup
on Mondoy. and shattered all speed rec
ords for that distance. (2S9 miles), was
classed with Hearne and Bergdoll in
the betting at 6 to 1. Hemery and
Wagner werd favorites at 3 to 1. David
Bruce-Brown, the York millionaire who
won the last Grand Prize, was quoted
at 4 to 1. Bragg was 6 to 1, and De
Palma 8 to 1. Tho bookmakers came
here from New York and did a big busi-
Weather Is Cold.
It was freezing cold when the crowd
came out this morning, but all persons
were heavily wrapped In overcoats and
blankets, and prepared to spend the
day beside the course.
Cobe, driving his Puick-Hundred, was
ditchtd and droprcd out of the nice In
the third lap.
Brugg forged into the lead and cov
ered his flist lap at tne phenomenal
ppoed of eeveniy-nlne miles an hour.
Closo behind him was Bruce-Brown,
thundering over th-i course at 11 terriflo
rate, and only thiee seconds behind
Bragg on the first round. Brown ami
Bragg continued In tho lead, and at the
third lap Bragg was ahead of the New
Yorker by only one second.
Hemery failed to develop the speed
expected of him In the early stages of
the race. His Bens developed engine
(Continued on Second Page.)
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NOW irAOING RACE
and Pictures Showing the ffiaradfoistics of Smith
AND.SIDX VHWS OF JAMES SMITH.
i V
'. i
Editorial In Commoner Suggests
Congressman's Dismissal From
Steel Probing Committee.
f J ,
LINCOLN, Neb., ;Nov. 3a The ousting
of Congressman Martin W. Littleton
from the Stanley steel Investigating
committee waa urged by William J.
Bryan, In an editorial in the Com-
r-oner, today.
After declaring the committee's Inves
tigation had already "forced the Admin
istration to begin the Steel trust suit."
the success of which 'depended upon
the disclosures made by the committee,"
the editorial declared that the Demo
cratic majority In the House should
support Chairman Stanley and Con
gressmen Beall and McGllllcuddy in
their demand for Littleton's retirement
"It H very plain." Bryan says, "that
Mr. Littleton cannot ue depended upon
tn hiil In cnrrvlnir out a Democratic
program of genuine antagonism to truJJV
Imposition. He Is a thorough-going re
actionary, and he will be retired front
the cohimittee If the House Domocruts
really 'desire that Democratic profes
sion on the trust iaesllon be accepted
seriously."
Children Are Guests
Of Salvation Army
Five hundred white children were the
guests of the Salvation Army at the an
nual Thanksgiving dinner for the poor,
at National Rifles Armory Hall, 918 G
street northwest, today.
The youngsters were given turkey,
cranberry sauce, pumpkin pie and other
good things. Tho feast was made pos
sible by citizens who gave special con
tributions to the dinner fund. Major
Escott was In charge.
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DEMANDED BY BRYAN
Last Minute News Told in Brief
STEAMSHIP DISABLED.
HALIFAX. Nova Scotia. Nov. 80. The
steamship Campanello of the Uranium
line, from Rotterdam for New York,
with 235 passengers was compelled to
put In here for repairs. Her captain
reports that she haa passed through the
most severe storm he ever encountered.
GOVERNORS IN DETROIT.
DETROIT, Nov. 30. The "Western
Governors' Bpeclal," carrying about
thirty distinguished Westerners, Includ
ing eight governors, arrived In Detroit
early today, and the party was enter
tained at a Thanksgiving dinner by
the board of conjenerce.
C
V m - r
REPEAT OF REBELS
Foes of Imperialists Realize Their
Cause Is Not So
Bright.
PEKING, Nov. SO. Manchu sym
pathizers have taken a new lease on
life since the recent defeats of the re be It
at Han Ynag, Wu Chang, and Nanlun
and are now loud In their boasts that
the dynasty will be saved. Reports of
wonderful successes by Imperial arms
are being sent broadcast by the govern
ment In 'the hope ot cau-Un, desertion
from the rebel ranks. Then reports are
much exaggerated to iniiui-a:e revolu
tionary sympathisers.
One report given out by the MancnuB,
but lacking confirmation, is to the effect
that 6,000 rebel recruits In the province
of Hupe have mutinied and shot their
officers. Rebel sympathisers admit that
their cause Is not as bright as It was a
fe wdays ago, but are firm In the beuef
that they will overthrow the dynasty.
Hundreds Are Fed
At Gospel Mission
Two hundred and eighty meals are
being served 'to worthy poor persons
at the Gospol Mission, 216 Jonn Marshall
place this afternoon. The first table of
fifty-six persons was served promptly
at 1 o'clock. MealB are to be served
every hour thereafter until six thla
evenlmr.
Yesterday a large number of specially
filled Thanksgiving baskots were sent
out by the Gospel Mission to families
who by previous inquiry were found to
be without food for today, and worthy
or help.
The food today was donated by var
lous firms of the city, and the turkeys
were Daaca Dy me cnei 01 a leaaing
hotel of Washington. Huge trays ot
pork and beans were part of the menu,
furnished by another hoatlery.
The first religious services of the day
were held at 12 o'clock, and they will
continue steadily until 10 o'clock to
night, with changing leaders and sing
ers. Soloists from different churches
will furnUh appropriate music.
FLEET ATTACKS TOWN.
LONDON. Nov. SO. Dispatches from
Pcrim today declare the Italian fleet Is
bombarding Shelksald and that there is
danger that the entire town will be de
stroyed. The city Is practically without
defense, and the Inhabitants ere fleeing
to the Interior.
REBELS DEFEATED.
PEKING, Nov. SO. The rebel troops
were defeated today In a fierce battle
at Nlng Yuan province of Szo Chuan.
The conflict was most deadly, hundreds
being killed or wounded. The rebels
were finally defeated because ot the
overwhelming numbers of their foes.
PXOnMOK VXDITZ.
Smith's Characteristics
1 Bread Jaw.
Danrialaa tabercle, showlag
haadle-nhsped, Iobb; aad vo
laalaoas ears, staadlng far
oat fre head.
S Lobale nlsslBg.
4 Marderer's lock," characteris
tic stigmata of raaajr notorloas
assassins.
6 Receding chin.
ft Low aad flat-roofed skall.
7 Proajlacnt frontal crest,
8 Obleag orblt-1 cavity, direrg
eacc la appiraace of eves.
Heavy groySa ' "air as eeat
pared wltfr ids straggly teari.
t.
ST
'te-:
,1
c.l
l
op criminal;
.U
PROFESSOR VEDITZ
Expert Criminologist An
alyzes Facial Characteris
tics of Suspect.
"James Smith possesses a number of
the striking and obvious stigmata of
the violent criminal. These are the
characteristic markings which Indicate
clearly to the criminologist certain ab
normal tendencies which are sure soon
er or later to manifest themselves In
acts that outrage accepted laws of so
ciety." This was the verdict given today by
Dr. C. W. A. Vedltr, profesor of soci
ology at George Washington Univer
sity, and who for several years has
conducted a course In criminology and
penology at that unlycralty. Before that
he taught ths same subjects at Tale
University.
The statement of Dr. Vedltz was made
for The Times after a careful and
painstaking examination of full face
and profile photographs of the man held
for the assault of William Bennett and
suspected of the murder of .William. H.
Mickle, and of other crimes. His opinion
will carry great weight because of his
recognized authority in the field of
criminal study. He has studied the sub
ject in Germany, France, and Italv
under such masters as Ferrl, Tarde van
Liszt, and even the renowned Lom
broso. Says Smith Has Stigmata.
"I have no hesitation In declaring that
the photographs shown me Indicate that
Smith possesses a number of cranial
and facial stigmata ot the violent crim
inal type. Bear In, mind, however, that
even according to Lomoroso the pos
session of a few of these stigmata does
not conclusively mark one apart as a
malefactor: It is the number and defl
nlteness ot the criminal marks that Is
considered conclusive.'
Feature by feature, combining his
knowledge of physiology and psychology
with that of criminology. Dr. Vedltz
(Continued on Second Page.
MORSE IS WEAKER.
ATLANTA, Oa , Nov. 30. The condi
tion of Charles W. Morsa, the banker
prisoner at Fort McPherson Hospital,
waa not so good. He had a bad night,
and Is weaker. Mrs. Morso spent the
day with him.
RETIRES FROM KEY.
ASHTABULA, , Ohio.
Nov. 30. After
fifty-nine years service
at the key.
Henry T. Hall, has retired as manager
of a telegraph office hew. Hall claims
the distinction of being the first, man
to send the message announcing the
nomination of James Buchanan for the
Presidency.
SMITH HAS HARKS
SAYS
EVIDENCE AGAINST
SMITH WILL GO TO
GRAND JURY SOON
Prosecutor's Decision to Have Both Bennett
1 and Mickle Cases Probed Becomes
' Known Today.
MAN GOES TO POLICE, SAYING
.HE KILLED TOBACCONIST
y Evidence against James Smith, the
tively Identified as John "Kabusta, wanted in Chicago for two murders,
suspected of , killing William H. Mickle two weeks ago with a monkey
wrench, and accused of assaulting Morris Bennett four days later with in
tent to kill with a hatchet, is to be presented soon to the grand Jury,
This decision on the part of the United States Attorney's Office and
the Police Department became known through authentic channels today,
and is indicative of the fact that the authorities do not feel that the cir
cumstantial evidence now at hand warrants formal charges being made
in connection with the Mickle murder.
Assistant Prosecutor Harvey Given will have charge of the presen
tation of the evidence to the grand Jury. Ho has personally conducted
the examination of the persons who already have made depositions rela
tive to the Mickle murder, and It is expected tbat other written state
'ments will be .taken within the next few days.
Declaring he murdered William H. Mickle, the tobacconist, at his
store, 1004 Seventh street northwest, a man giving his name as Dudley
Stone, appeared at the Ninth precinct station this morning and delivered
himself to the officers. A short time later, upon orders Issued by Major
Richard Sylvester, he was removed to Casualty Hospital for an exam
ination. At Casualty Hospital one of the nurses identified Stone aa a man
who had been treated on numerous occasions at the Washington Asylum
Hospital.
r-
GE
b
Elevens Meet Before Huge
Crowd, Under Perfect
Playing Conditions.
GEORGETOWN FIELD For the final
battle of the football season of 1911 on the
Hilltop, conditions could hardly have
been bettered. The recent rains made
the footing a bit slippery, but the wind
caused the lakes to vanish and the
quagmires to d'sappear. Harry Costello
smiled as he tested the gridiron. He
knew that, given half a chance, he
might run around one of the ends and
Blip and slide his way to a touchdown.
For fully an hour before the teams
appeared on the field the throng ot men
and women, all bundled up to withstand
the wintry bldits sweptng across the
hills from Virginia, filed into the seats.
Uvory precaution had been taken by
Manager Walsh to care for the large
crowd, and his plans worked like a
charm. Up the little Btreet leading to
the college campus came the football en
thusiasts, waving their colors and celo-
brating In advance the victory of their
respective heroes.
When the officials came on the field
fully 6,000 persons were seated on the
stands, In automobiles, and on the little
rising grounu at me enu 01 mo noiu,
waiting quietly for the two elevens to
appear.
In West Stands.
As usual, the Blue and Gray cheering
seotlons held the center of the Weet
side, flaunting their banners and break
ing out every now and then Into cheers
and songs. Tom Smith was breathless
by the tlmo tho players came through
the ropes at the open end ot the grld-
Le'hlgh's squad, big and faat, showed
on tho field first, tho players well-wrapped
to withstand the chill gales sweep
ing the playing space. At a quick Jog
they ran across the slippery gridiron
to their side, the varsity doffing sweat
ers and Immediately lining up signal
practice. , . .
Immediately from the packed cheer
ing section of the Pennsylvantans came
the Lehigh cheers. The Washington
alumni were there In force, all primed
for the occasion, uney sent " ""
cry for victory for the Brown and
Quickly the husky varsity team ran
through a number of plays, and then
Pazzettl. the quarterback of the visi
tors, sent out a long end-over-end jpunl
luJ .luHe fh asD of the waiting
halfback and rolled over the goal line.
This called forth wild yells from east
stand, filled with Pennsylvania looiero.
The r yells were drowned, however. In
a moment when "Dap" Dailey was
snled running along the sidelines on
tRe wes?8lde.Kfollowed by the Blue and
Grav battalion. The Hlltoppers shriek
ed and yeled in broken cheers, finally
winding-up In the regular Georgetown
cheer for the team and for victory.
Begins Practice.
Georgetown now began Its signal prac-m-
runnlnir off plays with ease and
accuracy. Then Harry Costello left the
line-up and spent a few minutes drop
kicking field goals In the teeth of tho
wind When his first attempt shot be
tween tho uprights the Georgetown
rooters went wild with Joy,- and ho was
given a long cheer.
Both teams then booted the ball up
and down the field, and some ot the
(Continued on Page Fourteen.)
ORGETOWN AND
LEHIGH
IMA
GUSH
OP SEASON
-i e$'f
(A' .
."
wandering lack-of-all-trades. posi
To Take Up Evidence.
The grand jury will be -mi n .
slder the Mickle murder evidence bobs
weea, it in 'the meantime developments
in the .polks tnve-Usattos do not eats .
furtbdc delar. Tfnv ,nt n.'.o. 1
"(WLVJUKbf Pe8tntaait6.the grand
jury uuan early date.
"i aon-t want Smith to' have to should
er the blame vot everything," said Dud
ley Stone, MM C street-northeast when
he appeared at the Ninth precinct stai
tlon this morning to give himself up.
'It waa I who killed William Mickle.
You might aa well lock me up." Stone,
who gave his name as George Davis,
was placed behind the bars, and had
been there only a short time when
Major Richard Sylvester, on his annual
inspection of the station house, entered
the prison with Commissioner Johnston
and Captain Daley. After a brief in
terrogatlon he gave" instructions that
the imprisoned man be removed to Cas
ualty Hospital for examination.
Examination Ordered.
Major Sylvester said he placed lltUs
credence In the man's confession.
"See whether he has the delirium
tremens, or what Is tho matter with
him, said the major. "If the people
at the hospital think he should be kept
there for treatment leave him there,
otherwise bring him back." The patrol
returned without Stone.
..: u If ,nPit''. one of the nurses,
who had formerly been at the Washlng
ttSi Afylum. Hospital, said that .8 Sne
Hmbe?n,itreated there a number of
l.Po"femen arched to the Ninth
E!Tln.ct, J?lB.. remembeted him. His
father had taken htm to the hospl ui
ror treatment on numerous occasions.
.,, rter -tlian th? 8,mPIe statement
that ho had murdered Mickle, Stone
would say nothing. Ho said he did not
care to discuss the details of the crime.
Stone does not appear to be more than
twenty-two yenrs of age. He was well
dresssd and of good general appearance.
When he was taken from behind the
bars and nlaced in thn imtmi wotmn k
did not appear to bo under the Influence
of drugs or Intoxicants. He talked but
little and seemed to understand every
thing that was said to him.
Olson Explains.
F. Olson, a merchant on Central avo
nue, near Crystal avenue, Capital
Heights, will not play a prominent
part In the trial against James Smith
for the assault on Morris Be-.nett, as
at first thought by the pollco. The
report reached the police today that
Olson had seen Smith In the wagon
with Bennett Just prior to the assault.
When seen today Mr. Olscn said:
"The only thing I know about this
matter Is that Mr. Schoelkopf. route
agent for Ewald's bakery, told me di
rectly after ho met Bennett on the roud
that he had seen a strange-looking man
in the wagon with him. Mr. Schoelkopf
said he had been especially attracted
to .ho man berauso he stood up In the
wagon affer he had passed ana looked
bacK. He said he thought h!n actions
were strange, but did not suspect that
there would be any such trouble.
Believe "Goldie" In Hiding.
Hundreds of Inquiries, and miles of
traveling, both In Washington, Prince
George's and Montgomery counties. In
all of which places she has repeatedly
visited, have failed to assist the police
In locating "Goldie," the mysterious lit
tle woman who formerly went under the
name of "Mrs. Smith," and who posed
as his wife.
The bluecoats today were almost on
the verge of discontinuing their search
for the elusive woman. Every clue given
them has been trailed, but each haa led
to no definite Information .regarding her
present niaing piace.
It is believed by the men who have
looked for her for so many days that
"Goldie" 1b hiding either In Baltimore, or
NorroiK
Sl!IIUIIItcllivi;D u. ...(t'.a uuiu.i, ll.mii
In Fairmont Heights and Cedar Heights,
say that the picture of "John Kabusta.",
ki-nt to Washington by the Chlcag?
rollce, looks more like Smith, as they
knew him a few years ago, than the
(Continued on Second Page.)
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