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Last Edition
Generally Fair To
night and Tuesday.
WASHINGTON, MONDAY EVENING, JULY 1, 1912.
Sixteen Pages
PniOE ONE CENT.
NUMBER 7497.
Yesterday's Circulation, 47,165.
ON THE 30TH WILSON PASSES CLAR
t-
1
u
I'.
f
APPROPRIATION
TO PAY CLERKS
Both Houses of Congress
Pass Relief Measure
At Noon.
ALREADY SIGNED
BY PRESIDENT
Fears of Half-Million Government
Employes Are Set
At Rest.
Setting at rest the fears that
more than half a million em
ployes of the Government would
be dropped from the pay rolls
at midnight, the joint resolution
extending the appropriations of
the past fiscal year through July
was passed by both houses of
Congress within an hour after
they convened at noon, and was
shortly afterward signed by the
President.
It is expected that before Aug
ust 1 the appropriation bills will
have passed, although there is a
possibility of a further hitch be
cause of the implied threat of
President Taft to veto the legis
jTlatjye; fcjMlvtttd ) jJi;Hll!
wnicn contains a. prpvisiuu iu
abolish the Court ofCommerce.
However, should such a situation
develop a further Cxtensipn of
the old appropriation bill will be
possible.
Relief Measure Hurried.
The House Approplatlohs Committee
took up the emergency measure at U
o'clock this forenoon and after a brief,
discussion It wan recommended for im
mediate passage. Congressman Fitz
gerald, author of the resolution, ar
rived late, but he had made provision
that there should bs no deiay If he was
not present.
When the House convened at noon
the Fitzgerald bill was taken up
promptly and unanimously passed at
12:15, only a short discussion resulting
from Us presentation.
It was then hurried to the Senate and
passed without debate.
Why It Was Necessary.
The enactment of the joint resolution
was mado necessary by the failure of
Congress to pass nine of the annual
appropriation bills before the beginning
Of the fiscal year 1913. The bills In ques
tion were the agriculture, army In
dian, legislative, Military Academy, na
val, pension, Postofflce, and sundry
civil. The army bill for 1913 was
passed by both houses, but was vetoed
by President Taft on June 17 because
of objection legislation Included In the
measuro.
Under the provisions of the measure
passed today, sums equal to one-twelth
of the appropriations made for the nec
essary operations of the Government for
1912 are appropriated for July of the
fiscal year 1913, or the proportionate purt
of ouch sums for such part of July as
shall elapse before the enactment of
the respective approprlaUona for 1D13.
All amounts expended out of such funds
will be deducted from the appropria
tions finally made for each purpose for
iho entire fiscal year of 1913.
Members of the House Appropriations
Committee declared today that the fu
rore occasioned by the failure of the
appropriation acts to pass was 'really
unfounded, as similar situations have
developed before for the same cause
and that never has the Government ma
chinery been stopped. They are free
In their statements to the effect that
the departmental heads were prema
ture in their fears, the Democratic
members going" so far as to state that
the Administration has simply been
trying to reflect upon the statemanshlp
of the Democrats for political reasons.
It Has Been Done Before.
It was pointed out by members of the
Appropriations Committee that jqlnt
resolutions or acts similar to the one
(Continued on Fifth Page.)
WEATHER REPORT.
FORECAST FOB THE DISTRICT.
Generally fair tonight and Tuesday;
warmer tonight,
TEMPERATURES.
V. S. BUREAU. IT AFFLECK'S.
8 a. di 66 1 8 a. in..... 71
t a. m , 67 ) 9 a. m 74
10 a. m., ,. 69 f 10 a. m 79
11 a. m...... 70 I 11 a. m.. 79
11 noon 71 1 12 noon 78
1 p.,m ,,.. 72 ) 1 p. m... i0
2 p. m 73 I '2 p. tn. S3
TIDE TABLE.
Today High tide, 9:10 a. m. and 9:44 p.
m.: low tide, 3:20 a. tn. and 8:52 p. m.
Tomorrow High tide, 9:51 a, m. and
10:23 p, m.; low tide, 4:01 a. m. and 4:31
p. tn.
BUN TABLE.
Sua rises 4:37 I Buq set' 7:30
TTR
DEMOCRATS AT
BALTIMORE ARE
TALKING OS
Tentative Plan Calls for Ad
journment Until August
First.
WOULD USE PRIMARY
TO SETTLE PROBLEM
Clark and Wilson Both Have
Veto Power in Conven
tion, Apparently.
By J. 0. WELLIVER.
CONVENTION HALL, BAL
TIMORE, July 1. When the
convention met at 1 1 o'clock
there was persistent report that
Wilson was to receive the vote
of Indiana on the second ballot,
and that this would be the signal
for breaks in Iowa and the South.
The Wilson people went to the
convention hall full of confi
dence and of fear.
"Wilson will win today, or he
will be out of it," declared one
of his strongest and most effec
tive supporters. "He is going to
get very close to, winning; but
whether he will get, over is.,an
'6iK&'Mni.t't "'? '
"There are two forces in this.
convention, at this time, and
both claim the absolute power
and purpose of deadlocking it.
The Wilson crowd is one, and I
have no doubt of their posses
sion of enough strength to do
just the thing they say. The
Clark crowd is the other; I am
doubtful whether they can hold
the necessary one-third of votes
to maintain a deadlock."
Bitterness Intense.
Bitterness between the two camps was
more intense today than ever before.
Conditions approximated closely to
those at Chicago In the last stressful
days before the break that produced
two political parties out of tho old Re
publican party. But there was no evl
uont purpose on anybody's part to pre
cipitate an open split
Clear-headed leaders have worked
uu a plan to avoid a party rupture If
wijrst comes to worst. Their plan, to
be brought forward If the deadlock con
tinues UU Wednesday, la this:
To Introduce- a resolution, which shall
declare the convenUon In recess until
probably August 1. Then, It Bhall di
rect the State organizations in each
State to hold a Presidential preference
primary for which the general regula
tions will be laid down In resolution
Plenty of latitude will be left for modi
fication with the view to meeting condi
tions in each State.
After the primary shall have indl
cated the 'preferences and named the
delegates of each State, the convention
would reassemble, with a new person
nel so far as the primary should make
changes, and the business of making a
nomination would be resumed,
This project was said to be the only
one to which the Wilson people would
consent, other than an Immediate nom
ination. They think they have the sit
uation In hand now, and will win If
the fight goes steadily on. They think,
too, that they would sweep the country
In a real preference primary.
On the second call of the roll for to
day's session, and the twenty-eighth
since the convention opened, Indiana
cast. twenty-nine of its thirty votes for
Governor Wilson.
"Within two hours, Illinois and Ohio
will go solid to Wilson," was the word
passed out from the Wilson forces. In
vestigation developed that this was the
deal.
Why Taggart Changed.
Indiana voted for Wilson because
Taggart had become convinced that
Kern had no chance, and that Wilson
was the strong man In the fall election,
with reference to carrying a Democrat
ic ticket In Indiana.
Roger Sullivan has taken the same
position in Illinois. For two days of
balloting he has been convinced that
Wilson was the right man to nominate.
He will follow Taggaret into the Wil
son camp sometime today.
Whether this will nominate Wilson Is
not certain. Illinois and Indiana will
not do the business: but other acces
sions are promised In various quarters
Wilson will flnd on this break, provld-
(Continued on Second Page.)
Keeping the
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OLLIE JAMES.
The' Senator-Elect from Kentucky, Who Is Haying More Than His Share of Trouble as Permanent Chairman of the
Democratie National Convention in Baltimore. "Three Davi of Verbal Encounters With the Howline Supporters
-7rf"l5cVit'ouS CanJdateitnavttXerHnfit So'atsotiaiiJ'VofceCati' Birely
yy.Tit:..- r, ,'-"".' .r --. : :
The Story Told By
Uallot. Clark. Wlleon. Underwood.
First 4404. 824 117
Sccoild 440$ 889 11114
Third 1-" 345. 114
Fonrth 448 840 112
Fifth . 448 851 110
Sixth 445 854 121
Sertuth 449 852 123
Llchlh 448 851 123
Ninth 452 851 122
Tenth 53G 550 117
Klorcnth ...J, 551 854 118
Twelfth 540 854 123
Thirteenth ... 554 858 115
Fonrteenth ... 553 SGI 111
Fifteenth ..,. 552 862 110
Bulletin
By THEODORE TILLER.
CONVENTION HALTj.
BALTIMOnii. Julv t.
11 :0J Convention called to order.
11:17 Call of the roll on the twenty
seventh ballot started.
Four votes bhlft back to Clark in
Connecticut. Maryland; and Illinois
"pass."
Wilson gains five In Massachusetts.
First cheering of day. The weather is
cool and everybody seems in better hu
mor. The llne-U"io far remains much
the same as on ijuturday.
As Nebraska cast thirteen for Clark,
three for Wilson, a gain of one for
Clark, the galleries interrupted by ap
plauding. Either because of the small
Clark gain or because Wilson was still
holding practically his own. James
warns the galleries pollco will clear them
if demonstration continues.
When Murphy voted ninety votex for
Cianc, W. it Enson. or Fauiuner, unnu
laun.ua county. In tho New york'Uel
f atlon, arose in Mb "eat and challenged
tPe vote ox me witiie.
Tne poll of the N-sw York delegation
showed senty lht for Cl.rk, nlr-o
for Wilson, two for Undorwood, and one
abeent.
I'nder the un't rule, however, tho en
tile ninety votes weru cost for Clark
Wo choice on twetity-sevenlh ballot.
After a lively caucus to dotertnlno
wnetber it would shift from Clark to
AVl'son the Illinois delegation deoldcd
to tind pnt fur the present and gave
ll'r f.fty-eirht votes! fot Chuk.
Twenty-seventh ballot ends and dead
lock is still with us.
Announced that half a vote from
Maryland la absent.
"No excuse for htm going broke here
at home," remarks a delegate who
came from a long way and has wired
his wife for more money.
The twen'.V'Ssvtinth ballot is Clark.
!(3; Wilson, 4W; Underwood, lit: Foxs,
r': Marhall. ?0 "Htinuon, 29. Others
scattering and no choice.
'Che ballot show net gain of six for
Clark, and losi of one for W'.lson.
The twenty-eighth ballot began at
lJf2S
On the twenty-eighth ballot Indiana
swings twenty-nine votes to Wilson.
Great cheering.
Indiana's switch had no effect on
Iowa and other States, Immediately
following, which Wllsonltes hoped would
turn to him
Many alternates are getting a chance
to vote today. Dosens of delegates are
"broke" and some have gone htme.
Telegraph companies send newspaper
copy awhile and then switch to mes
sages asking the folks back home to
rush money In ordtr that the once
Convention Delegates in Order
Harmon. Scattering
US 6S
141 4MS
140 47
130 47
Ballot.
Sixteenth ...
Seventeenth
Eighteenth .
Muctccnth .
Twentieth ..
Twenty-first.
551
545
-535
582
512
508
141 33
185 83
120 S3
130 35
Twonty-sccond 600
Twenty-third.. 407
Twenty.fonrth. 406
Twcnty-flfth... 460
Twcnty-slxth . 463
Twcnty-serentl . 4C0
Tnenty-eighth. 468
Twenty-ninth . 468
127 85
81 33
20 32
20 83
20 83
20 34
20 84
Story of Convention
"flush" delegate may get his baggage
out of "hook." '
When Missouri was called on the
Twenty-eight ballot the entire delega
tion arose and yelled in unison; "Champ
Clark thlrty-slx."
On tho twenty-eighth, Now York again
votes for Clark, tho florid-faced Mr.
Murphy casting the vote.
No nomination on twenty-eighth bal
lot. Except for Indiana's flop to Wilson,
line-up Is about same. Wilson loses
one In Wisconsin.
Twenty-eighth ballot resulted: Wil
son, 4S74: Clark, 46S; underwood,'
112; Foss, 3S; Harmon, 29; Bryan, 1;
Kern, 1.
A gale of laughter sweeps hall as it
Is announced from platform that all
Southern railway return trip tickets arc
good over Southern lines until July 10.
Delegates' tickets expire tomorrow
otherwise.
"Gee whls! Is it that long?" asked a
weary delegate.
On tho twenty-ninth Indiana casts
only twenty-six votes for Wilson, as
compared with twenty-nine on the pre
vious iuiioi. nern gets otner iour.
One delegate Is absent from Kansas
so Wilson has only thirteen followers
present, whereas the Instructions say
the vote Bhall go to Clark, unless two
thirds of the twenty change instruc
tions. With fourteen present the Kan
sas votes have gone to Wilson on sev
eral ballots.
A point of order Is raised and Theo
dore Bell, of California, has great
trouble In getting the hall to listen to
His argument that Clark now gets the
vote back, because two-thirds are not
for Wilson. Congressman A. Mitchell
IN CONGRESS TODAY.
SENATE!.
Fitzgerald joint resolution passed.
Senator Works Introduces resolution to
investigate preconventlon political ac
tivities of Government officials.
President's message on economy com
mission received.
Bill introduced to extend Jurisdiction of
District Supreme Court to quiet titles.
Indian appropriation bill taken up.
HOUSE.
Fitrgerald Joint resolution passed.
Resolution appropriating fl,3SO,000 for
armv and militia maneuvers passed.
Resolution upholding political Integrity
and honor of Speaker Clark passed.
Vetoed army appropriation bill again
reported out of appropriation committee.
Be lieard a Dozen Feet Awa.,
i, , -
Ballots
Clark. Wllaon. Underwood. Harmon Scattering
862
362
361
858
888
805
H2
112
125
180
121
118
115
114
115
108
20 33
20 80
20 38
20 30
20 87
20 37
F088.
43 88
45 32
43 31
43 63
43 61
88 63
8S 81
38 88
806
300
402
405
407
406
43794
486
112
112
112
112
Palmer speakB against the Bell point
of order, which Is based technically on
whether the "delegation" means those
present of tho full twenty, present or
otherwise. An academic debate ensues
Chairman James finally rules that the
twenty Kansas votes, under the pecu
liar circumstances, nevertheless, must
cr. to Wilson, as though the full dele
gation were present.
HOUSE VOTES FAITH
IN SPEAKER CLARK
Motion Goes Through With Unani
mous Support Against
Bryan Charge.
As an a,nswer to William J. Bryan's
charge at Baltimore that Speaker Clark
Is in league with unhealthy political
Interests, the House today, on motion
of Congressman Austin of Tennessee, Re
publican, unanimously voted full con
fidence In the Speaker, 'Yegardless of
pomicai ainnauons." Mr. Austin's
resolution was adopted amid a great
burst of applause on both sides of the
House.
Speaker Clark was not present, and
Congressman Alexander of Missouri
was acting Speaker. Missouri
ILLINOIS POLITICS
ARE BADLY MUDDLED
OYSTEiR BAY. N. Y., July L-Rnbert
R. McCormlck, leader of the Illinois
delegation to the Republican convention,
a Roosevelt man, who. when the bolt
came, decided to stick to Taft and the
organization, came to Oyster Bay today
for a conference with Theodore Roose
velt The Illinois, situation is badly
muddled, he said.
McCormlck, Is said to be an emissary
from Governor Deneon, seeking to ar
range an agreement between the Roose
velt and Deneen forces. When asked It
Deneen would run on a ticket with
Roosevelt. McCormlck declared he could
not aay.
BREAK TO WILS0
WAS BEGUN BY
INDIANA
CONVENTION HALL, BALTIMORE, July l.On
the thirtieth ballot, just completed, Wilson passes Olark,
the totals being Wilson 460, Olark 455, Underwood
1211-2, Foes 30, scattering 211-2,
CONVENTION HALL, July 1. With 29 roll calls
completed, the deadlock in tho Democratic convention
seems to be just as unbreakable as it has at any time since
the balloting started.
The delegates gatheredthis morning with the expec
tation that the leaders might over Sunday have reached
some agreement which would result in. a nomination.
It was generally thought that Wilson would be the
gainer by the recess conferences, but the first roll call
showed that nothing substantial had been accomplished.
Today's ballots have shown nothing decisive and
hold out no hope of any immediate and decisive result.
The 29th ballot in detail
State
Clark
Alabama ... 24 24
Arizona .... 6 5 1 ,-r- - -
Arkarias ..". jfe--V.-18'. '-" " -t '"'
Califprhia ... 26 26
Colorado ... 12 12
Connecticut . . 14 7 3 4
Delaware . . 6 6
Florida .... 12 12
Georgia .... 28 28
Idaho 8 2 54
Illinois .... 58 58
Indiana .... 30 26 4
Iowa 26 26
Kansas .... 20 20
Kentucky ... 26 26 ,
Louisiana ... 20 7 12 . 1
Maine .... 12 1 9 2 '
Maryland ... 16 11 44 4
Massachusetts .36 7 29
Michigan ... 30 18 12
Minnesota ... 24 24 -
Mississippi ... 20 20
Missouri. ... 36 36
Montana. . . . 8 2 6
Nebraska ... 16 3 13
Nevada .... 6 6
New Hampshire .8 3 5 '
New Jersey . . 28 4 24
New Mexico . . 8 8
New York ... 90 90
North Carolina .24 174 64
North Dakota . . 10 10
Ohio 48 19 29
Oklahoma ... 20 io 10 .
Oregon .... 10 10 .
Pennsylvania . . 76 4 72 .
Rhode Island . . 10 10
South Carolina .18 18
South Dakota . . 10 10
Tennessee ... 24 134 8 24 ' J.
Texas .... 40 .40 fT
Utah ...... 8 14 64 ;
Vermont ... 8 .8
Virginia .... 24 3 94 114 ,
Washington . . 14 14 -'--
West Virginia . .16 16 t-
Wisconsin ... 26 6 20
Wyoming ... 6 6 ;v
Alaska .... 6 6 , . , .J
Dist. of Columbia 6 ?' -z-Jkh $
Hawau .... 6 , 2 . ..?, f
Porto Rico. . . 6 1 jyJJjz: H
4684 436' 112' 8 334 1
Indiana votes four for Kern. Jm
follows:
Under-
Scatter
ing WHsoa
Foss
'i

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