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The Washington times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, September 17, 1918, FINAL EDITION, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026749/1918-09-17/ed-1/seq-1/

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EDITION
te atam tuts
THE WEATHER:
Showers this afternoon or tonight. To
morrow fair, cooler. Temperature at 8
au m., 67 degree. Normal temperature for
SepL 17 for last 30 year, 68 degrees.
.-, . o Publlahed every evenlnr (Includlni Sunday)
IVTnVlRKlK I O.OOO. Entered aa eecond-clau matter at the poat-
1 jJ.fXJJjJL. vMwt. m Waahlnrton. D C
WASHINGTON, TUESDAY EVENING, SEPTExAIBER 17, 191,
PRICE TWO CENTS.
UNCONFIRMED REPORT THAT
THE KAISER HAS ABDICATED
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------i
LONDON, Sept. 1 7 It was learned here this afternoon that rumors are current
in border countries that the German Kaiser either has abdicated or is about to ab
dicate. The rumor was of the vaguest sort, but it was regarding some trouble in
the Hohenzollern family. There is absolutely no confirmation of it here. One re
port was that the entire Hohenzollern dynasty had abdicated or would abdicate.
ALU m
m vi
FN
SAYS 1
LONDON, Sept. 17. "President
Wilson speaks for the allies," de
clared Lord Northcliffe, writing in
the Evening News today, relative to
the reply to the Austrian peace
proposal.
"The only question here is how the
refusal should be couched.
A small, timid minority fears a
flat rejection will drive Austria
back into the arms of Germany. But
the fact is that Austria has never
left them."
PRESIDENT'S NOTE
ENDS PEACE DRIVE
The peace olTcnsire of the Tntral
powers has completely collapsed. It
can be renewed only by them accept
Inc the basic suggestions (or ending
the war promulgated by the United
States. No attention will be paid to
any maneuvers in the future unless
the Teutonic alliance complies with
the conditions that are known to the
entire world.
That was the position of American
officialdom today. President Wilson's
action in setting aside all binding
red tape and squarely warning Aus
tria that a subject on which ihe last
wo- had been said will not be re
opened for quibbling, has cleared up
what might have proven an ugly sit
uation. The slightest evidence of
temporizing would have been seized
upon by the Austro-German control
aa proof that there was a weakening
in the war aims of the allies.
One Courae Only.
But there can be no misunderstand
ing of the language of rejection of
the Austrian ambiguous offer. The
tTnlted States "will entertain no pro
posal for a conference upon a matter
concerning which it has made its po
sition so plain. ' declared the Presi
dent That single sentence closed the
book Nc. until the central powers
are willing to meet the terras of the
Vnlled States and the allies the war
will continue.
Nothing that has transpired to date
In the war has had such a strengthen
ing effect on the morale of the na
tion, officials tald today, as the
(Continued on Page -, Column .)
JARS BIRMINGHAM
nilUf i:GIIA3f, Al Sept. IT. With
trrnrndoDi explosion, which hI
tbe eallre rltr from md f end, the
Xorth nirmlncham Powdrr riant, a
branch of the Aetna KxpIoaMe Com
jfT blew op abont 12:10 o'clock this
jftrrnooH.
t'ommunicatlon ivfth Ihe plant Is
rut off.
.t etlraale of the daraaee or ea
paltie. la rail able.
POWDER EXPLOSION
How President
Germany's Peace Move
This reply, which is the shortest document this Govern
ment has issued in diplomatic correspondence, was issued
half an hour after the proposal was handed Secretary
Lansing by the Swedish minister:
The Govemmeat of the United States feels that there is
only one reply which it can make to the suggestion of the
imperial Artro-H igarian government It has repeatedly- and
-with entire jetdor stated the terms upon which' .the United
Stales vroold consider peace 'a'd"can and' will entertain no
proposal for a conference upon a matter concerning which it
has made its position and purpose so plain.
The President's Peace Terms.
The President stated the allies' peace terms and principles
on July 4 at Mt. Vernon and they still stand. They are:
There can be but
one issue.
The settlement must
be final. There can be no compro
mise. No halfway decision would
be tolerable. No halfway decision
Is conceivable. These are the ends
for which the associated peoples
of the world are fighting and
which must be conceded the-n be
fore there can be peace:
First The destruction of every
arbitrary power anywhere that
can separately, secretly, and of its
single choice disturb the peace of
the world; or, if it cannot bo pres
ently destroyed, at the least its
reduction to virtual impotence.
Second The settlement of every
question, whether of territory, of
sovereignty, of economic arrange
ment, or of political relationship,
upon the basis of the free accept
ance of that settlement by the
peoplo immediately concerned, and
not upon the basis of the mate
rial interest or advantage of any
other nation or people which may
desire a different settlement for
the sake of Its own exterior in
fluence or mastery.
LODGESEES LOOSE
PEACETALKEND
By I r. MAOTl.t.
(United Treaa Staff Correspondent.)
Presiident Wilson's "prompt and
curt refusal' of the Au.stroHun
garlan peace bait will go far toward
making the German people understand
that the American people mean to
have complete victor," declared S-n
ator Lodge. Senate Republican leader
and ranking Republican member nf
the Senate Foreign Relations Commit
tee. today. In a speech on Austria's
not to the allies suggesting "unbind
ine" discussion
"The President s reply to this rtupid
note will meet. I am sure, with uni
versal approval," aid I.odge. "His
prompt and curt refusal of the Auvtro
Hungarlan offer wai not only right,
but wise, for it will, I believe, put
an end to loose and feeble talk about
these Austro Hungarian offers a.
kind nf talk which is not only de
bilitating and confusing, but dis
tinctly helpful to Germany
The President without entering up
on any details or definitions, says the
position and purpose of the United
States are plain.
Complete Victory Aim.
'I think that the purpose and posi
tlon of the American people are plain
and growing plainer clearer and
stronger e-er da The are becom
Ing so plain that 1 think even the
central powers will soon begin to un J
(Continued on Page -, Column 6J
Smothered
Third The consent of all na
tions to be governed In their con
duct toward each other by the
same principles of henor and of
respect for the common law of
civilized society that govern the
individual citizens of all modern
states in their relations with one
another, to the end that all
promises and covenants may be
sacredly observed no private plots
or conspiracies hatched. no
selfish injuries wrought with Im
punity, and a mutual trust es
tablished upon the handsome
foundation of a mutual respect for
right.
1'curth The establishment of
an organization of peace which
shall make it certain that the
combined power of free nations
will check every invasion of right
and serve to make peace and
justice the more secure by afford
ing a definite tribunal of opinion
to which all must submit and by
which evrrj International read
justment that cannot be amicably
agreed upon by the peoples di
rectly concerned t-hall be sanc
tioned. LOU HALL INDICTED
IN EVA ROY CASE
. Lou Hall was yesterday in. In led bv a
Fairfax county grand jury for the mur
der of Ka Hoy on August . Ai lie
passed from the couit house to the Jail,
his father, K P. Hall, charged that the
witnesses had impeached themselves .
their c-.timonv before the county in
vestigating body.
"It's Just a I expected , Hut aet
around HurKe Station can convict any
body," is the statement the slxty-slx-5
ear-old man made as he watched the
son walk back into the cell where he
has been confined for more than forty
da) .
"The murder of liille Ka Roy." said
the old veteran woodcutter, "musl
have certainly been committed bj
some fugitive from justice or erazed
man. I.011 Hall has alwa)s been an
easy-going sort of fellow and never
even resentful except when he drinks
a little whiskey. He Is the best na
tured of my six sons."
When Hall was brought Into court
to have his trial date set he had Just
finished washing and combing hi
long heard, which he has grown slnre
his ronllnement in jail lie showed
no agitation when informed of the
finding of the grand Jurj
His rose watf set hv ludce Brent
fT the second Monday of the Septem
II
ber term of court, which according
(Continued on Page S, CoL S.)
SEVEN BILLION '
BUDGET !
IS SUBMITTED
TO IKS
7-
An estimate of $7,347,727,602.32
to carry out the new enlarged army
program under the eighteen to forty
five draft law was submitted to Con
gress by the War Department to
day. This came as a supplement to
President Wilson's answer to the
Teuton peace maneuver.
The- new estimates, if left uncut
by Congress, will bring total ap
propriations for the fiscal year of
1918-10 to more than thirty-six and
a half billion dollars.
Division of Funds.
The estimates arc divided us fol
lows:
For pay of the army. f791.619.9a-Mn.
For subsistence, including food.
S-.'6.1.tl0.022.0t.
For transportation. I. 'JiT-Sn 1.30.1 97
For clothing. $17R.70i.S31.81.
For chemical warfare. $198,701,000.
For ordnance. x:s.TK.VS7 UC0, includ
Ing $300,000,000 provided for in a pre
vious contract authorization.
For Provost Marshal General
Crovvderu office and for draft work
throughout the country. $2,1.61 7.30-.
For air service. i lTfc.TnNShft ".
which Ik in addition to more than
$101,000,000 previously appropriated in
the army appropriation bill.
The chemical warfare appropriation
Is carried for the first time as a sep
arate Item. The medical department
has always had charge of these expen
ditures. Ifwu.e Hearings Soon.
The new estimates will be tarried
in the next general deficiency bill,
hearing-" on which will begin before
the Hoii'o Appropriations Committee
in the next feA dayt.
In addition to the army estimates,
the bill will probabl carry estimates
of several hundred million dollars for
the Shipping Hoard, bringing the total
In the bill above SS.000,000,000.000, the
amount to be raised by the new rev -enue
bill, the largest in history.
The amount previously appropriated
and carried In contract authorization-'
for the fiscal jcar of 101&-1!) is $29.
701 '.Ml. 07". 07. Included in this amount
however. Is a half billion dollars con
traet authorization which is carried
as a direct appropriation in the es
timates submitted today.
AUTOS FOR SALE
IIRNDKKMV MOTOUCYCI.E. hr-C-in;
bt offer take It. ran hr irn
nr duy ."turn nl fi 30 rbon
Unc 5T"6. 0J Kichol. arc S E 11
Mr. De Vail, of the Dc
Comli Tire Co., 2203
Nichols avc, sold the
above advertised motor
cycle after the ad had
been in two das.
Phone Your Ads,
Main 526o.
Bill will be sent.
SOLDIERS AND SAILORS REBEL AGAINST
m ptNHTOJSMrr I T J "
He ivecoTTms
CNME
BLUEJACKET
AND NOW THE
N'KW YORK. Sept 17 -dmittms
that he hud Killed his wife, but de
claring that he had no recollection of
the dee1, according to the police,
Charles 13. Ohapin. city editor of the
Npvv York livening World, walked
into the Ve.t Sixty-eislith street sta
tion earlv today and save himself
up. He declared that all memory of
)i crime had panned from him until
he purchased a morning paper and
read that the police were searching
for him
Tnlk la Kamhllnsr.
Rambling almost Incoherently in
wm mm
HE KILLED
HIS WIFE
his talks with detectives, f"hapln at
iinien proudly answered their ques
ii'tlnns and. at other times, assumed a
J) (Continued on race 2, Column X)
lOsnricM: 1TM: Bj- J T. XcOatetw l)
THJC SOLDIERS GOT RID OF THEIR
"WHEREAS 1 PREFER.
To B CALLED A
Birr Nobody
CALL ME A BLUEJACKET
WfMEN I WMl WHITE
AtM
SAILORS WANT TO GET RID Or
i Wounded Male Only
American Casualty
In Dominican Fight
Kights between I'nltcd State
marines and Dominican bandits
occurred September 7 and it, ma
rine headquarters announced to
day. No marines were killed or
injured.
A detachment of ten marines,
commanded by Colonel George (.
Thorts, N'orthflcld. Minn., was
nmbusbed at a ford north of Dos
Rlos on September 7. Twenty
bandits were killed in forty min
utes' fighting. The only rasual
ity on the American side was a
wounded mule.
A detachment of these Ouareia
Xacional Dominicans, commanded
by marines, killed three bandits
in a skirmish near Hlguey on
September 9
NEW WIRELESS RECORD
Wireless messages from llrooklyn
navy yard are picked up bv balloon
news at Arcadia, fal . according to
a Department reports todat
TIiIb feat li due largel, to es:ab
Ushment of unusually long aerials
throujfh lone cables anchoring the
THEIR NICKNAMES
"New'. r.uR Mtv
BOO To CAU- A i
'SAMMY'. TMaYANK-
"SAMMY."
Wt I'm in Slue. I
HfTEtlD TO BE CALLED
A 6lvE"JAK-T OSL
wriu.
THERC LJ
mr
."RWCLE
THEIR -JACKIE.'
LEFT
Despite a thorough search extend
ing over thirty hours, the police and
had found no trace of the where
abouts of John Karly, the leper who
escaped from his Isolated ottage
prison on the hanks of the 13aatern
Branch
While a dragnet has been thrown
out for the rapture of Early, It Is
the opinion of Dr. William f. Fowler
that he might be in Washington and
may urrender after he goes on a
slgbt-seelnt: tour.
Every member of the Washington
Police Department has been given a
minute description of Early, i nd the
authorities nf all cities as far west
as Pittsburgh have been requested
by Inspector of Detectives Clifford
U Grant and Health Commissioner
Fowler to be on the lookout for tha
leper. AU railroad stations are belay
flM!iSa.
EV
AY
A
TEUTONS FALL
BACK ON ITZ
DEFENSES AS
By FRED S. FERGUSON.
WITH THE AMERICANS ON
THE METZ FRONT, Sept. 17 (2 p.
m.). Gradual progress of the
American line at the right and left
extremities continues as -the Ger
mans fall back toward the Metz de
fenses. Aerial activity is somewhat re
duced as the result of unfavorable
weather.
PARIS, Sept 17. America
troops have reached Vandtere,
within a mile and a half of tb
German frontier, La Liherte an
nounced today.
(Vanderies is in the Moselle val
ley, three miles north of Font--Mousson.)
BRITISH PUSH ON
NEAR ST. QUENTIN
LONDON. SepL 17 Further prog
ress toward St Quentin was reported
by Field Marshal rials today.
The British also Improved their po
sitions in Flanders and nolth of Lena.
"Our troops made progress yester
day in the direction of e Verguier,
northwest of SL Quentin." tbe stata
ment said.
We Improved our positions slight
ly yesterday, and during the night
northwest of Hulluck (between
Bassee and Lens) and northeast of
Xeuve Chapelle (north of L-Bassee).'
GREEKS ADVANCE;
FRENCH GET TOWNS
ATHENS. Sept. U (delayed) Greek
troops advanced from two to three miles
on a nineteen mile front in the Struma
sector, between the Vardar river and
I-ike Doiran. capturing several villages,
according to a dispatch from Salon!
today.
Tne attack was a complete surprise.
The Greeks lost only two officers and
ten men, while the Bulgarian losses
were extremely heavy.
The French captured Ventrenlk. Dobrs
PoUe. and Sokol. three vitally import
ant mountain positions which the Bul
garians had been fortifying for twe
jears
ADVANCING YANKS
FIND LOST FLYER
By HENRT G. WAt.ES.
WITH THE AMERICAN ARMT IN
LORRAINE. Sept. IS (delayed)
American troops, advancing on the
front east of the Mouse river, rescued
Lieut Palmar Galllard. of Mobile.
Ala . an aviator who had been forced
by engine troubla to land after ht
had shot down a German.
Galllard had been lost amid tha
wire east of St. MlhlM. which op t
W0N
1

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