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The Washington times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, September 19, 1918, FINAL EDITION, Image 1

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THE WEATHER:
Cloudy tonight Tomorrow probably
rain. Temperature at 8 a. m., 56 degrees.
Normal temperature for September 19 for
last thirty years, 67 degrees.
EDITION
1
vTTTm-ir in -rr Publlahed every erenlnr (Including Sunday)
J U JMJirt lOtv, vO. Eatered as eecond-claas matter at the paat-
ofnee at Washington, D C
WASHINGTON, THURSDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 19, 1918.
fOosngWalJ Street Prices. PRICE TWO CENTS.
BRITISH CAPTURE
OF HINDEHBURG
GIRL SHOT BY
KIN SAYS
TRAGEDY WAS
AN ACCIDENT
Unaware of the death of her sixteen-year-old
cousin, Hugh Tracy.
who fired a bullet Into his brain
(fetter shooting her In the left arm
,twith a revolver pretty Evelyn Hat-
ton, seventeen warn old. n. stenoc-
jrapher at the Patent Office, at noon
'today related the events which led
l Up to the shooting. She told her
fetory to Detective Joseph Conners
iind Mrs. Marian Spingarn, director
tor women's work in the police de
partment, as she lay on a cot in the
emergency oHspltal.
l Know he snot himself, but Is
IC dead?" she asked.
, The shooting occurred at the
.tome of Mrs. Bertha Wallace,
'(Tracy's grandmother, 915 N street
northwest, soon after 10 o'clock last
might after the couple had been
'.playing cards with other members
lot the family.
Girl Describes Shooting.
' "Hugh was in his, grandmother's
i reora and I vrxvX .there fo pet -some
matches to light the gas Incite ball.
he told the police officials. "There
was a light "burning In the room and
I saw Hugh tossing about a pistol In
a playful manner. I told him to put
the pistol away, as he might hurt
himself, and as I was afraid of get
ting shot.
"After getting the matches I went
downstairs and lit the gas and then
returned to the bedroom to return
the match box. He was still playing
with the pistol and pointed It about
the room, saying: This Is the way
the marines kill the Germans.'
"I was afraid, and again told him
to put the pistol away. I then start
ed to leave the room, telling him I
was going home.
"Walt.- he said. Til go home with
ou
"He then put out the light in the
bedroom and Just as I started out of
the room he shot me.
"I cried, "Look what you have done,
and then I ran down the steps
"As I ran I heard another shot, and
I supposed he had shot himself. I
was so excited that I do not know
what happened after that. It was an
accident,"
Qnealloninc Cantlnurd.
Despite this statement, the girl still
le being questioned by Mrs. Spingarn
(Continued on Page 2, Column 6.)
The identity of the negro who shot
and almost Instantly killed George
Edward Blnns, twenty-eight years old,
3020 M street northwest, is still a
mystery to thepo!lce.
Five perfons are held in the seventh
reclnct police station as witnesses.
Shot In Saloon.
The shooting occurred in a near
feerr salon at 3004 M street northwest
)ast night about ten o'clock.
Blnns, witnesses say. was acci
dent!) shot when he attempted to
top a fight between James Eddy, of
3026 M street, and the unidentified
roan, the bullet being intended for
J.ddy
Eddy Is held at the roller station,
but will not disclose any information
vhich might lead to the arrest of the
negro
rollre Hare Description.
A description of the n'ero git en to
the polK-e by persons who witnessed
the shooting ha? been sent to all
policemen In the city and a search was
instigated early this morning.
The victim of the ehooting was
married and had three children.
John, five ears old; Mary, five
months old. and George, three years i
old. Blnns was employed by the
llartlg ice Company mornings, and
in the afternoon was bartender at
ue saloon on M street
The owner of the saloon, James
t Inspau, of 300 11 street is held as
r witness.
D. C. MAN WOUNDED
I"rivate Japn Tories i? listed In to
u v s casualty announcements as a
V athln;ton man. K II Gepraian. tJCS
H. trect. according to the casualty lists.
If the ne-rrest r"Utite of the vround'd
., Idler Gepsalan cannot be located at
lu -L rtreet address
POLCE SEARCH
FOR
WO BIS
5-CENT FARE
MAY BRING
UNIVERSAL
TRANSFERS
By BILL PRICE.
"Universal" transfers between
Washington street railway compa
nies is a strong probability along
with the expected ultimate decision
of the Public Utilities Commission
in favor of a straight 5-cent fare,
hearings upon which will shortly be
gin.
The railroads are not suggesting
such transfers, but it will be sug
gested by citizen organizations and
individuals, and there was little
doubt today that the members of
the Utilities Commission will give
serious thought to the subject in
writing their probable decision fa
vorable to an increased car fare.
There will be no surprise should this
desired concession from the railways
be inquired into at the hearing and
be incorporated into whatever deci
sion of & favorable nature to the
"roads is renderedT
Long Desired.
"Universal" transfers has been the
theme of every citizens association
of the District for years. It has been
often favored by the Federation of
Citizens' Association.
The street railways have resisted
the efforts for such transfers. That
was during a period when they were
not conducted In the same manner
as now. They may not do so now.
They are asking financial conces
sions from the public which It may
be decided that they are entitled to.
The public may and nrobablv will
ask for some concessions In return
and the foremost of these will most
likely be interchangeable transfers
at certain points in the city
The time for street railway com
panies to snap their fingers In the
face of the public passed come time
ago. One of the Washington com
panies at least followed that policy
to its own serious harm. It has
changed Its policies. Both of the
operating companies here now real
ize that there are two big interests
in a street railway line the stock
and bondholders who furnish the
money and the people who pay their
money to ride. The public has a long
memory and is generally willing to
play square when it has been play- j
ed square wltb.
Will Seek Facta.
The facts to be sought by ' the
commission, which it can obtain
through Its experts and those of the
rallwa8, will be whether free trans
fers between the two companies at
important points would seriously
lessen the revenues that would be
derived from Increased fares that
Is. lessen the reenues to the point
of harm
Street railway experts associated
(Continued on Page 3, Column 1.)
E
BASLE, Sept. 10 The wealthy in-!
habitants of Mulhausen are ca-uat '
Ing the c.t. the Nachrichten de
clares. The rest of the population are pre- (
paring to comply with the military,
order to Icate A .similar exodus
from other Rhine towns Is reported!
to be under way, through fear of !
Franco-American push In Alsace I
U-BOAT ATTACKS
RELIEF VESSEL
GERMANS FLEE AS
YANKS NEAR RHIN
CHRISTIANIA. Sept 19 The N'or-jP'ea
v,eglan Heamer BJoernstJerne KJoern-
son (5.526 tons) employed in Belgian
irnci worn, was sneueo ana aamageti Tombs. I
by a German submarine while en' It v,ns announced by the district attor I
route from America to Amsterdam. It rc's office that anj effort on the part
ma announced today She put Into f C'lapln or hl friends to Inne a i
Eergen for repairs. Iunj" romnnssivn appointed for him.
The attack occurred outside -he Roiild b- oppntul b the district attor-'
rr zone An Inquiry will be held 'nev
AUSTRIA'S PEACE PROPOSAL
Austria said nothing
Bat aowwhen the ailits aim
E
CHICAGO. Sept. JO. Madame Ern
estine Schumaan-Helnk's voice is si
lent; that is the price she has paid
for "doing her bit."
At the Michael Reese Hospital
where she is under care of physicians.
It Is said only complete rest can pos
sibly restore her olce. exhausted
from frequent use when the prima
donna sang before thousands of army
boys. The Immediate malady Is a
severe cold contracted on her return
trip from California.
8 BILLIONS TAX
Secretary of the Treasury McAdoo
today put the quietus on fears that
the nation must bear a greater tax
than $8,000,000,000 for the fiscal jear
to carry on the war.
In an official announcement issued
as Congressional leaders were lioun
dering In confusion as to how best
to meet the added ( 7.000 000.00.) de
manded thU week by the Wa- De
partment, McAdoo declared, "it would
be unwise to go further in taxation
at the present time
"Conditions which mii;lit develop
in the future," he added, will de
termine the question of fur.hi-r in
creases In taxation lor th pre sunt I
fiscal year It is our plan to ask 'or
SS.000.000,000 In taxes."
TO
SIN
SACRIFICES
voice o rows
LIMIT THIS YEAR
AIN
ASKS
BESENTTOCHAIRii
j NEW YORK. Sept. 11 - I ant to fi
to the electric chair." Charles E. Cliapln,
'former city editor of the Eienlng World,
Is quoted as saing by Assistant Dis-
I trlrt Attorney MrOe during a confer
ence at the arraignment of the editor
muay uii iiii'- i muiuurirj msj
wife. '
"I am perfectly jne ' t'hapln Is said
to hiivo addd. "1 don t want an mti. .
' it commihslon appolniid I want tot
' pav the price ' i
Chaplns counsel en:-recl n formal
of not gullt for his client at Jie
arraignment. The Judge announced he
,h plcA and r,majc3 the editor to th-
ELEVEN MILES OF OUTPOSTS
LINE OH THE PICARDY FRONT
tCopr rtxfct. ISIS. Br Jaaa T. lfCalcheea.I
about peace whea German was rictorionzlj advancing.
rietoriously adrancing Austria wants
Slash French Mother's
Throat to Stop Prayers
As Americans Advance
WITH THE AMERICAN'S ON'
THE METZ FRONT, Sept. 19.
While a French mother In Hatton
sllle (a mile north of Vlgneullee)
knelt by the bed of her sick
child, praying for an allied vic
tory as the Ameri:aus were ap
proaching, a German clashed her
throat, according to storks told
by the villagers to American of
ficers. Lieut, Raymond Pennoer en
tered Hattonvllle with a tank and
found the woman's body in a pool
of blood beside the bed. Her
throat was cut. Villagers told
how she was killed
STAND OF ALLIES
LONDON', Sept. 19 The Interallied
labor conference war aims committee
today recommended adoption of the
attitude that the allied goernments
would be assuming a heay and peril
ous responsibility hv adopting
purely negative policy.
The committee declared the allies
should publish a collective clrclara
tlon of war alms and Intentions. In-
dorslng President Wilsons fourteen
points, and should Interrogate the
central empires regarding their gen
eral, specific war alma
Samuel Gornpers. president of the
American Federation of Labor, said
American delegation supported
committee recommendations, al-
ough 't Cid not agree with the Im-
i plied reflection on the actUItlrs of
the allied governments.
ON POWER BILL
The emergency puurr bill, empow
ering th 1'rei.ld" nt to take over, con
struct, nr extend financial nld to long
distance power transmission projects
Interstate Commerce Committee to-
was favorably reported by the Hoilfr
day.
The bill contemplates gi neratlrn (
power at 111.- coal mliii-i. jnd Its trans
mission to his manure ! -n nut
"oriRlderatlon nr the bill bv the
House will be asked lrii-nei!mtly alter
the disposal of tl e revenue bill
LABOR CRITICISES
FAVORABLE REPORT
to stop the awful slaughter.
HOOVER PUTS BAN
Fl
Found guilty of unfair practices In
selling sugar. George X. Fries, pro
prietor of the Fries Market, 98 Center
Market, was placed today under the
ban of the United States food admin
istration by Herbert Hoover. Tho or
der Is to take effect on September 23. i
It Is the second issue in Washington.
All persons holding licenses under
the food control act are forbidden to
deal with Fries, his servants, agents
or employes. All such persons are
warned that such dealings will make
them amenable to Rule IT, of the
Rules and Regulations of the United
States food administration which pro
vides for the revocation of the license
of any licensee violating the order.
Complaint recardlng Fries came
through the District food adminis
tration, whose agents found he was
selling from two to ten pounds of
sugar to Individual customers without
permits. To hide such violations of
the sugar regulations. Fries. It was
charged, substituted the entry "O K."
for "sugar" on the sales slip when
ha sold more than the permissible
amount to a customer
Convicted at Hearing.
Fries was given a hearing before
the District food administration, and
found cullty. As the local adminis
tration was without power to act. the
case was carried to the Federal food
d m)n 1st rat Ion
Thi Food AdmlniRtrallon order!
does not mean that Fries' place of
buslnex.s will be cloved summarily,
but Fries will be forced to close
when his present stock of supplies
is exhausted.
If Fries shows willingness to live
up to the regulations of the Food
Administration, It Is said, he will be
given another hearing, and If condi
tions justify 'he ban will be lifted.
HELP WANTED MALE
CIsl-!KK In elsftH ntorr; anmrr phone;
good penmanship rnulrel root!
waxes, permanent WArtKIKM)
3ANFORD, 910 B lit X V !
After only one insertion
of the above ad more
people applied than could
be used.
No matter what kind of
help you want phone The
Times, Main 5260.
MARKET
FOE MAY HAVE
H
GERMS
OF NFLUENZA
T
Widespread appearance of Spanish
influenza along the Atlantic coast
recalls warnings of navy officials
some weeks ago that German sub
marines may be responsible.
Lieut Col. P. S. Doane, head of
the health section of the Shipping
Board, today reiterated the warn'
mg. He declared it is quite pos
sible the epidemic was started by
'Huns sent ashore by boche subma
rine commanders. We know that
men have been sent ashore from
German submarine boats and it
would be quite easy for these agents
to turn loose the germs in theaters
and other places where large num
bers of people are assembled."
Original Warning.
When the original warning went
out. It followed 'HfBcapture vnd re
tention by U-boat commanders of
crews and passengers, from torseifoed
ships' andVthetr .ultimate release
again. It was feared then that these
prisoners, mlgrifhave been Inoculated
with the germs and then released to
spread t'uem. Exceptional care was
taken to guard i against this.
The fact that the disease his ap
peared particularly In cities where
there are army or naval training
camps adds strength to the theory
that Germans may have disseminated
the germs. '
It has been pointed out that the
malady made Its appearance In Spain
after the. appearance (n porta of that
country of German U-boats.
"The Germans have started epi
demics in Europe, and there Is no
reason why they should be particu
larly gentle to America." said Colonel
Doane
INFLUENZA IN PHUA
PHILADELPHIA. Sept. IS. Spanish
influenza today continued to spread
among the sailors at tho Philadelphia
nary yard and the civilian population
of the dovntown section.
Nearly 400 sailors and marines are
being treated at the ns,vxl hospital and,
at the League Island hospital, according!
to announcement by Chief Surgeon lick
erell.
BOSTON. Sept 19. Kurses of the
New England division of the Red
Cross have been ordered to mobilize
here immediately to fight the epidem
ic of Influenza which is taking a
heavy toll of victims In and about
Boston.
All hospitals are filled with pa
tients, and the city hospital here Is
practically under quarantine Vis
itors are barred.
TO
The loyalty plea has enabled union
leaders to persuad the mtjorlty of
.10.000 striking mine workers In
Pennslvanla to return to work
James B. Neale. director of produc
tion of the fuel administration, an
nounced toduy that he had been ad
lsnl the miners have decided to
await th' decision of Fuel Adminis
trator Carfleld in regard to their pla
for an Increase in uagas.
Of the twents Mx colleries ihat
were affected practically all are
operating again It Is expected that
nnrmnl conditions throughout the an
thracite neld will -btain by Friday
mornlns
AILING MENTALLY
i
LONDON", Sept. 19 (3.M) p. mi It J
was learned bv the International
j News Service this afternoon on re-'
liable authorities that rumors still j
persist In Holland regarding the
I troubles of the Ilohenzollrrn famll.
one of which Is that the Kaiser lsj
suffering from a mental ailment I
ALONG AS
STRIKING MINERS
RETURN
WDRKi
KAISER REPORTED
V. S. Nurse Wins
War Cross
3 sxr
Sl!tefJiQt
H'
KvX -H 1
BP'B-''VV?1 H 8
PF-'KvTPsH I
tPKjCl J!H a
HEBt3B'r ?-SB S
M rtK?B
Pi"-?5 I
BiPr'i,s 9
u JVIB'&3ii S
DR. MART LEE EDWARDS.
Of the staff of the Women's Over
seas Hospital, now In France, has
been awarded the French Croix de
Guerre. At the same time she re
ceived her commission as a lieutenant
in the French army. The hospital of
which Dr. Edwards is a member was
organized by the Women's Suffrage
Party. t
s J
LONDON', Sept. 19 (12-30 p. m.).
Pope Benedict, in his reply to the
Austrian peace note, holds that the
note is Inadequate, according to the
wireless press. His reply will be
published in the Observatore Romano,
according to the advices.
ITALY REJECTS
PEACE PROFFER
ROME. Sept. 19. Italy has followed
the action of the United States in of
ficially rejecting the Austro-Hun-garian
peace note.
The Italian go mment takes the
stand that the entente powers have
repeatedly asserted the basic princi
ples upon which it Is necessary to
establish peace. The allied, peace
principles. It is pointed out. Include
the deliverance of Italian subjects
from the yoke of Austria and the se
curity of the Integrity of Italian na
tionality Italy is determined to fight on until
these alms are achieved
GERMANY AWAITS
OFFICIAL REPLIES
AMSTERDAM, Sept. 19 The Ger- I
man government will take no further!
poll' leal steps regarding the Austrian
peace note until the allied replies are
officially received, a seml-ofllcal dis
patch from Iterlln stated today
CALLS U.S. ANSWER
'COLD AND CUTTING'
THE HAGUE. Sept 19 "This co:d
and cutting scorn, this cool rejection,
has a more overwhelming and anni
hilating effect than all the official
phrases which the man In the White
House could hae employed." the
Ithenischc Westphall.-che Zeltung
declared, in commenting on President
l INon's reply to Austria.
"The contents of Wilson's reply
-onflrm the view we have already ex
pressed, that Wilson will not depart
from the conditions of war alms hith
erto proclaimed, and the pollcv of an
nihilation can find absolute expres
sion in him Moreover, he does not
give the Austrisn propo.sil ati posl
tie examination, and refuses any foi
ma! consideration on suggestions of
pes.ee, cspceialtv the ulca of a conference"
IS INADEQUATE,
POPE HOLDS
MK
ffi
fflN
BACK
BY HUES
LOXDOX, Sept 19. The Brit
ish hare captured more tian tea
thousand prisoners in their
latest drive against the German
strongholds between Cambral
and St Qaentia.
LONDON, Sept 19. The British
advance between Cambrai and St
Quentin paused yesterday afternoon,
and evening only long enough to
smash a series of heavy German
counter attacks, then swept forward
again on a. wide front,' capturing
about eleven miles of the outposts of
the Hindenborg line.
The German counter attacks be
gan about 5 p. in. on an eight-mile
froitt between Gouxeaocourt and
Trescanlt following a terrific bom- t
bardment The? were smothered bytr
the British fire, Field' HaTshal Eafet
reported today. A feir elements
entered the British trenches but
were aanihUated by counter attacks.
The British drive was resumed
shortly before midnight Austral
ian troops dashed forward and oc
cupied virtually the whole outposts
of the Hindenburg line from Pon
truet northward to Gouseaueourt
D.S. ARTILLERY
SHELLING HETZ
By FRED 8. FERGUSOX.
WITH THE AMERICANS ON THB
HETZ FRONT. Sept. 19. American
aviators today reported shells from
our heavy artillery dropping Is the
center of Metz. A big factory has
been struck and direct hits have been
scored on the fortifications.
An even week since the start of
the American drive in this region
finds our army thoroughly at noma
fifteen miles within the line which
the Germans held for four years.
The new line has been thoroughly
consolidated, roads repaired, and
the country generally cleaned up.
Refugees are returning to vil
lages between the Muese and the
Moselle, which had been under shell
fire since 1914.
FRENCH REPORT
FURTHER ADVANCE
PARIS. Sept. IS. "Our troop have
penetrated Contescourt (two and three
quarters miles southwest of St. Quen
tin), where the enemy was stubbornly
defending his positions." the French
war office announced today.
"North of the Alsne we maintained
all our positions.
"Northeast of Courlandon (on the
Vesle), a German attack was broken up
before It reached our lines.
ALLIED ARMIES
PURSUE ENEMY
LONDON, Sept. 19 (12.15 p m.).
The allied armies on the Macedonian
front have penetrated to a depth of
j twelve and a half miles and are re
' lentlessty pursuing the completely
beaten forces of the enemy, nigh:
and day, according to the latest Ser
j blan war office statement, just ra
; celved here.
ALLIES ADVANCE
IN MACEDONIA
PARIS. ept 19 French. Greek.
1 and Serbian forces have advanced te
a depth of more than nine miles on a
twenty-two-mile front, on the Mace
i donlan front, the French war offic
announced Fifty guns, a large num.
ber of prisoners and strategic posi
tions hse bieo taken
The text of the statement follows
H
N.
s&
T

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