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The Washington times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, November 07, 1918, FINAL EDITION, Image 2

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THE WASHINGTON TIMES. THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1918.
NEWS
LIBERTY BELL
, RINGS
J'illLADELPHIA, Not. 7. The
XJbsrty bell In Independence Hall Is
ringing- In celebration of the ending
of the war.
E
NEMY EVACUATES
ALL R01ANIA
PARIS. Nov. 7. The Germans are
vkcnatlnjr Houmania, said & dispatch
from Zurich today.
It was reported from Jassy that
Field Marshal von Mackensen Is di
recting the military evacuation.
AMERICA'S HAND IN
WAR GAME CALLED
WAR LORD'S BLUFF
America's entrance to the great
war In April, 1817. sounded the doom
of German hopes for thfc conquest
of the world. The crumbling of the
central powers was assured In view
of the dramatic efforts put forth
by this nation to bring a quick and
complete victory. Here are some of
the things America has accomplish
ed In her nineteen months at war:
Oar Contributions.
Increased her army from 212.034
officers and men to approximately
3.700.000 officers and men.
Increased her navy from 82,738 or
fleers and men to approximately
!ou,uwi onicers ana men.
Landed the flrst contingent of the
expeditionary forces safely at a
:B
U3K
i'-n
PARKER-BRIDGET
Hand-Tailored
Ready for Service
Suits for Men
$35
No Increase in Price
No Deterioration of Quality
npHESE suits are of a high standr
ard that give a service that
is remembered long after the price
is forgotten.
The reason is that the orders
were placed at a time when we
trould buy economically. The
variety of styles, models and
materials is very great, and there
is a suit for every man? no matter
what his taste.
Other Models From
$25 to $60 ,
French port SS days after declaring
war.
American destroyers arrived at a
British port to assist in patrol work
twenty-eight days after the war
declaration.
American troops went Into the
line for their baptim of fire 187
days after wo entered the war.
American troops permanently took
over a part of the firing line in Jan
uary. 1018. or nine months after en
tering the war.
Over 2.000.000 American troops had
arrived In Europe when the war
ended. Host of these had partici
pated In major fighting.
In the field of aircraft production
this country had produced here 0.074
Planes up to mid-October and 21.G72
engines. In addition we had acquired
abroad 3,129 planes and engines and
production was going forward at a
rapid pace.
Our Bridge of Ships.
Our shipbuilding record has aston
ished the world. During the war per
iod 732 ships were launched of which
471 of a total of 3,115.000 deadweight
tons have, been completed and are In
service, A total of 1,417 ships
320,000 deadweight tons were flying
tne American flag on November 1
Eight hundred and ninety-one addi
tional ships of approximately 2.
500,000 deadweight tons are under
control of the shipping board.
Shipyard employes have. Increased
from 00.000 before the war to more
than 400,000 men now. The -payroll
of these men averages more than I10.
500.000 weekly.
Spent Billions.
To meet the giant efforts of Amer
ica, Congress during tne war appro
priated over $50,000,000,0000, included
In which were authorizations for J10.-
j 000.000,000 in loans to the allies.
Of the great appropriations, over
123,000,000,000 were set aside for the
'building, up and maintenance of the
army, including all supplies and forti
fications. Among the other appropriations
were the following: Shipbuilding,
.3.692.000,000; aircraft, $1,584,000,000:
navy. $2,882,000,000; railroads $500,
000,000; War Finance Corporation,
$500,000,000; war insurance, $221,400,
COO; interest on tho public debt. J5SS,
000,000; Food Administration, includ
ing the grain corporation, $1G2,
385,000. and for the Fuel Administra
tion, $3.C1S,000.
And meantime America has poured
out Its gold to aid its associates In
the war. A total of S7.73247C,6fi6
have been loaned to the allies as fol
lows: Great Britain, $3,745,000,000;
France, J2.365.0O0.O00: Italy. 1.0G0.
000.000; Belgium. $183,520,000; Cuba,
15.000,000; Greece, J15.700.000; Serbia,
$12,000,000; Roumanla. $0,CG6.CGG; Li
beria, $5,000,000, and Russia has been
given a credit of $325,000,000, of
which only $187,500,000 was paid be
fore her collapse.
And to meet these loans and other
war bills, the American people have
contributed during the period, $22,
752.091,800. divided as follows: Lib
erty loans, $10,850,471,000; war sav
ings, $720,600,000 and revenues from
taxes, customs, etc, $5,181,975,000.
Expenditures for the war totaled to
November 1. approximately, $2043,471,
000. Great cantonments for training troops
have been erected all over the country.
Kllr mllnltlnn nlanf. m inY. rvn.
! struction. costing scores of millions.
Machine guns are being produced now
I at the rate of 20 a day, and a Scinch
gun at the rate of 45 a day.
Hundreds of new naval vessels of all
I types from the biggest battleships
anoat to iagie Doats are under con
struction or contracted for.
TOUSEFOESHIPS
TOSUPPLYYAIS
PEACE NEWS HERE
Cerman interned ships in neutral
ports may be used for allied and neu
tral trade, with Germany's accept
ance of the allleor armistice, it was
Indicated here today.
Officials admit the ship shortage
still is felt keenly and that there Is
little doubt the German tonnage will
be used to keep America's highway
to General Fershing open and at the
same time to give all possible relief
to peoples In all parts of the world
suffering from the interruption of
commerce.
Argentina and ,ChIle acted almost
simultaneously -in seizing the German
vessels in their harbors. Spain. Hoi
land, and the few other neutrals who
have the custody of interned vessels,
have taken precautions to prevent
their destruction.
Latin-American diplomats are of te
opinion that the eighty four German
vessels interned In Chilean ports and
the dozen on the River Platte would
almost put the South American trade
on a "before the war" basis.
German tonnage sclzqd by the Pern
vlan government and turned over to
the United States now is undergoing
repairs on the Pacific Coast- Vessels
Interned In Brazil. Cuba and Uruguay
were pressed into Entente- service.
A lone vessel Interned in a Colum
bian port was burned by Its crew.
AS SIREN SOUNDS
The Avemxe at Ntnih
CAR STRIKE ENDED
The strike of conductors and mo
tormen of the International Railway
Company, of Buffalo, N". T, has been
settled by an agreement between tho
company and the employes.
a h
n ,y u
: II I He Luxe Salad Oil Ideal shortening j
. IB! i The delicate flavor
HIM ll! Oil will make it yout
II
While the huge siren on the roof of
the Evans' building sounded the dally
prayer of the National Capital for vic
tory, the news was flashed over the
wires to The Times that Germany had
surrendered, and the silent prayer of
the nation's millions answered.
Washington went wild with Joy and
exultation hcn The Times extras an
nouncing the capitulation of the Ger
man empire and the ending of the
Kaiser's dream of Mlttleuropa ap
peared.
Whistles Blow.
Great whistles roaring the cry "Vic
tory! Victory!" in every vibratng note
thrilled the city and excited war work
ers, and staid business folks crowded
out Into the streets and gathered Into
Immense groups discussing the news.
The whistles of the W. H. Dyer Com
pany flrst shrilled out the news to
Washington, and those portions of Vir
ginia and Maryland within hearing
distance. This whistle was followed
by a legion of others which joined in
the Joyful chorus.
Army aeroplanes swept up Into the
sky and looped the loop with ex
cited abandon, flashing over the city
the news of victory.
The big guns at Fort My, Install
ed for purpose of defense, boomed out
in gnttural voices the Joyous news of
Germany's downfall, and soldiers In,
oitve drab and sajiors 'In. navy blue
embraced and laughed and whooped
as they realized the Import of the
news.
Hello Girl. Give News.
Girl telephone operators In the va
rious Government departments, both
civil and military, when informed of
the surrender of the Germans,, drop
ped telephone receivers and shouted
the news to all within hearing and
then temporarily abandoned their
posts to spread the news.
Soon the big boats on the Potomac
caught the contagion which spread
through the air like wildfire and the
droning notes of steamboat whistles
added themselves to the general chaos
of sound.
CLOSING CHAPTERS
OF WAR AS WRITTEN
SINCE SEPT. 16, 1918
September 10 Austria-Hungary
dispatched an appeal for a closed,
non-binding conference to discuss
the possibility of a basis for peace.
September 17 President Wilson
replied that his Ideas on peace were
well known and that such a confer
ence as proposed could not be en
tertained by this country.
October C I'rince Max, as German
chancellor, sent a note to President
Wilson, asking that he bring about
a general armistice and peace on
the basis of his announced principles.
October 7 Austria-Hungary asked
for an armistice and peace based on
the President's announced principles.
Hungary orally that he sent Its plea
for an armistice to the allies.
Austria Surrender.
tfor. 3. Austria signed surrender
terms of allies.
Nov. 4. Versailles conference an
nounced complete unity signed
agreement on terms of armistice for
liermany.
Nov. A. Austria ceased hostilities
at 3 p. m.
Nov. 5. President Wilson notified
Germany she could get the armistice
terms by applying to Foch.
Nov. 0. United States notified Rou
manla her Interests would be respect
ed at the peace table.
?ov. 0. Germany dlsDatched mis-
POLISH
REPUBLIC
IS PROCLAIMED SENAEWBll
ZURICH. Not. 7. Poland has been
proclaimed a republic by the Polish
prime minister. Swlcrclnski, without
consulting the regency or the Polish
council, said a dispatch from Berlin
today.
October 8 President wuson re- .ton to French lin.. ., .,i.i
to Prince Max with threo ln-i.frm, frnm .-.,,
P DENT
FIR
T
NOTIFIED OF TRUCE
Salad Oil Ideal Shortening
af Douglas:
choice for
salads. Douglas mayonnaise
and Douglas French dressing;
are treats for the epicure.
For shortening it equals but
ter and is just as easy to use.
Fine also for seasoning.
Douglas Oil is the healthful
frying fat. It doesn't absorb
odors can be used again and
again.
Made from the heart of corn,
refined by an exclusive process
packed in air-tight cans.
Your grocer has Douglas Oil or
can get it for you. Noriskinatrial
can satisfaction guaranteed.
DOUGLAS COMPANY, Cedar Rapids, Iowa.
Maaafacturm of Com Product!
WALTER LEAMAN,
945 Pennsylvania Ave. N. W., Washington, D.C
First news of the signing of the
armistice, which brings an end to th
world war was conveyed to President
Wilson, both houses of Congress, the
State, War and Navy departments and
all of the embassies and legations
here by the United Press today.
After President Wilson and Secre
tary Tumulty, Secretary nf War Bake--was
the first to hear from the Unites
Press of the signing of the armistice.
He tpok it calmly.
SeaU-d at his desk behind a pile of
work while many visitors waited t
see him. he was banded the announce
rnent
"Is that so." said Raker, with onl
a trace of emotion. He made no fui -ther
comment.
A few moments later more complet
details were taken to him and li
smiled, but commented only: "Good
The general staff at thht time i
hearing of It through the cable ce:.
tor's office
Shortly after Raker learned tli
news Secretary of State Lansing r
reived the United Pre cablegran
He too. was reserved, but tin bpir
everywhere was one of relief fron
tension.
nlled
qulrlcs to test the good faith of thi
German offer and announced he could
not make any armistice proposals to
the allies so long as Germany oc
cupied allied territory. w
Max Accepts 14 Principle.
October 14 Prince Max forwarded
a note to President Wilson accept
ing without reservation his four
teen peace principles, agreed to evac-l
uate occupied territories, proposed a1
commission to arrange details and,
declared be spoke for a new gov-j
ernment approved by the German,
people. I
October 14 President Wilson re-i
piled that there could be no armls-1
tlce arrangements so long as Ger-,
many continued her U-boat attacks
on passenger ships and countenanced
the ruthless destruction of territory
being evacuated. He also called at
tention to the fact that his peace
terms provided for the destruction
the German autocracy.
October 14 Turkey's peace appeal,1
based on the President's announced
principles, received by Wilson.
October 18 P resident Wilson
answered the latest Austrian appeal
by saying he could not accept "mere
autonomy" grants to the peoples of
the dual monarchy as peace pro
visions but that those peoples them
selves must decide what the wanted.
October 22 Prince Max sent a note
to President Wilson saying Inhumane
welfare had been ordered stopped oni
land and sea, ana that constitutional,
changes were being made by the new
government so that more power!
would be In the bands of the
people, and equal franchise granted
all Germans. -
Allies Receive Appeal.
October 23 President Wilson an
swered Prince Max by saying he bad
communicated the German appeal for
an armistice and peace to the allied!
governments: but added that If Ger-
many persisted in retaining her mlll-l
tarlsts in power, nothing but but-;
render would be acceptable to the.
United States Government. I
October 27 Germany acknowledged
receipt of the President's last note
and said it was awaiting the armls-1
tlce terms. I
October 29 Colonel House and al-
Ued diplomats and .military chiefs
gather at Vervallles to formulate
armlstle, terms.
October 20 Austria sned President
Wilson for a separate peace, agreeing
to his demands for subject nations.
October 30 Austria asked Lansing
personally to hasten the President In
gaining a separate peace.
October 31 Turkey surrendered ' to
the British in the field.
October 31 Austria asked Italians
for armistice In the Held.
October 31 President In note to
Turkey said he passed on Its armis
tice plea to the allies.
October 31 President asked Swed
ish authorities to notify Austrla-
I terms from Foch.
today Germany signed armistice.
TAKE 0ATI10F ORFICE
PARIS. No. 7 In the cathedral at
Agram the new government of Jugo
slars took the oath of office, according
to Vienna advices. Josef Pegaenfic.
former vice president of the Austrian
lower house. Is the new president. The
Slovenian national assembly has taken
charge of the government of Laibach.
CaraIoh v
FALL RE-ELECTED:
Republican control of the Senate, by
at least 40 to 47 probably Is assured
as the result of the election-of Senator
Fall, Republican, of New -Mexico.
His election Is Indicated' by press
dispatches and by advices which Sena
tor Smoot- of the Republican- Sena
torlal committee received todj Sen
ator Smoot Is advised -Fall Is re
elected" by about 1400.
Based -on the suppcJtucoCtKaXJrsw.
berry has been elected In Michigan
tills gives the- Republicans .16 '-Sen
ate by a majority of two, conceoiss
Nugent, Uemocrat, Is-, ra-elsctea; In
Idaho. . . .. i
in statement today ny me m.
publican committee headquarters
the
Thrift Stamps bought fer yourself I ,- i. claimed by CO to 40- The
or Tour children cultivate the right statement claims victories In New
spirit. 'Mexico. Idaho, ana Aiicnisan-
gffiEfgffifflag
f
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OF WASHINGTON, D. C.
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Tablets remove the cause. There
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Capital $1,000,000
Surplus $2000,000.
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