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The Washington times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, June 27, 1919, FINAL EDITION, Image 1

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asliiimton (Time
Today
Dante in Sing Sing.
A White Man Working.
Serious British Labor.
Robbing Six Millions.
WEATHER:
Partly cloudy today
arid tomorrow little
rbanRr In temperature.
Temperature at 8 a. m.,
73 decrees; normal tem
perature for June 27 for
last thirty years, 75 de
gree. i
fe
jSTUMBER 11,208.
Published every evening (including Sunday)
Entered as second-class matter, at the
poatofnea at Washington. D. C
WASHINGTON, FRIDAY EVENING, JUNE 27, 1919.
PRICE TWO CENTS.
M
FINAL
EDITION
,f By ARTHUR BRISBANE.
" (Copyright. 1919.)
No mind, not even Dante's, can
imagine anything that is not in
human nature. Dante shows you
enemies that meet in hell. As they
turn in the boiling pitch, suffer
ing for all eternity, one bites and
gnaws at the skull of the other,
and thus biting, they sink from
sight.
That is the world's greatest fic
tion and not unlike todajs reality.
Albert Gerguilo is in Sing Sing
prison, for life. His enemy, John
McGlyn, after some years is sent
to join him there. Both are sen-
antaA t V10 Jvrr. parthlv imifai-
,, wu ...w " -., Ji ,,
tion 01 neu. uerguuo sees aic
Glyn, leaps upon him, stabs him
ferociously, severs his backbone,
kills him. Gerguilo will have his
life sentence made short in the
electric chair. "Where, if anywhere,
will those two men meet next, and
what will Gerguilo do the next
time?
There is rioting in Toledo; cars
ditched and burned when the
street car fare is raised. What
will happen in New York with its
six million people when corpora
tion gentlemen will try to get divi
dends on watered stocks by as
sessing every man, woman, school
child, and working child six cents
a day, eighteen dollars a year?
Proceedings before Federal Judge
Mayer show that a sample street
car line on Eighth avenue, its cost
first well watered, was rented to
the big trust on a basis to pay
over 26 per cent a year.
Eminent statesmen, hired as
lawyers to say anything they are
told to say, declare that the great
trusts, over capitalized at least
four times, cannot pay expenses
unless allowed to put a tax on all
the poor. They mean that the
trust needs the money to pay 26
per cent interest to some one that
did nothing but steal the streets
from the city by bribing aldermen.
Which would be justice, to put a
tax on hard-working poverty or
say to prosperous rascals that
hire ex-Presidents and Presiden
tial candidates to work for them:
"You cannot have your 26 per
cent or any per cent unless you
can earn it bv olivine ud to your
contract with the city calling for
a 5-cent fare."
When blocked in other direc
tions -wily corporations usually
turn to the courts. This New
York case is worth watching.
Those that dread what they call
"unreasoning discontent" would
II da well to putt off a scheme that
Lwrold make the biggest city m
-the land discontented with good
reason. Profiteering in tens of
millions during war and at the
rate of 6 cents a dav rer person
during peace would be thorough,
but would it be wise?
They will not try that nonsense
in Chicago, for they know the tem
per of the population. If New
York puts it through, even that
heaw city may develop "tempera
ment" A colored songster, with a happy
face, used to sing, "I've got a white
man working for me." It would
have made him sad to learn that
his white man was too sick to
work.
The allies could sing "I've got a
German man working for me," and
that explains allied anxiety about
Germany's internal health. Peace is
settled, but German railroads are
tied up with strikes, plots are
formed to kill the leaders that
signed the peace. Such conditions,
prolonged, might interfere with
the collection of billions. It is one
thing to issue bonds Germany
can easily do that another thing
to pay them off. Englishmen who
bought our Southern bonds at bar
gain prices know it.
Information about the formali
ties of peace signing come slowly.
With German statesmen it is a case
of "after you, Alphonse." Every
body says he will resign rather
than sign for Germany. Some in
Lorraine have celebrated the treatv
by committing suicide, others are
expected to do so on the day of
signing, which would be a Japanese
way of registering displeasure.
Nevertheless, It will be a mem
orable signing. Mrs. Wilson and her
secretary, and Miss Margaret Wil
son, will be there, according to As
sociated Press dispatches, and in
one corner there will be three hun
dred newspaper men from all over
the world. They will be the real
.audience, for they will see and lis
ten for as many of the earth's fif
teen hundred million inhabitants
as can read.
The new great crowd of specta
tors, undreamed of in old days, is
the crowd that gathers in the
newspaper columns mornings and
evenings to read all about it. In
this case the reporter's trouble is
too much bigness. The thing is
beyond description. What's the
use of telling how Clemenceau
frowned, or how the German bit
his lip, or what Mrs. Wilson's ec
retarv wore on an occasion like
that? It is like writing a para
graph about the Pacific ocean.
Judge Brandeis, of our Snnreme
Court, is off to Palestine. He de
votes his vacation after a vear of
intense work to the welfare of
Jerusalem, whence his ancestors
came. The man who has reverence
for his fathers, for the land, tra
ditions, and aspirations of his race,
will have the right reverence of
feelinff for his own country.
TRUCE
SUING OF
JUDGE HINGED
IKilENl
ABOUT PISTOL
CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va., June
27. The morning of the fifth day of
the Morris trial, for the slaying of
Judge "Son" Sullivan, in Standards-
ville, witnessed a rapid advance in
the presentation of the prisoner's
side of the case. The feature was
a long line of Green county residents
trouble betwen the dead magistrate
and Morris.
The purport of their testimony
was to show that Sullivan ordered
Morris to be searched at a certain
trial, held before him.
Morris declared then that he had
a right to carry a pistol, and had one
on his person then "which he was
prepared to use."
Bevolver In Evidence.
The coroner placed Sullivan's pis
tol in evidence, stating- at the same
time that it was brought to him after
the Inquest, and her did no know
whether it was 'in the overcoat
pocket, or not. '
Proof of this will probably be
forthcoming and will either strengthen
Morris tale or will further jeopardize
his charces of convincing the jury
that he had a right to draw fire upon
the judge, as he claims he did.
There is a rumor around Char
lottesville today to the effect that
while in the military service Morris
got drunk and held up one of his
officers and forced him to drink with
him. However, Major Opie, who was
at that time a captain and Morris'
commanding officer, denies that the
rumor has the least foundation.
Major Opie will take the stand
this afternoon to tell just why Mor
ris was discharged.
XOGALES. Ariz., June 27. Although
a dozen rounds of ammunition was
fired, no one was wuuneed in a brush
between a border patrol of United
States cavalry and a party of Mexi
cans four miles west of here late yes
terday. The Mexicans fired on the cavalry
men from ambush and th Americans
returned the fire but did not cross
the border in pusuit.
No interest has been paid Finoe No
vember 1917. on loans made by the
United States Government to the
former Russian imperial government.
Under Secretary of State Polk told
the Housp Committee on State De
partment Expenditures today.
Polk also testified interest pay
ments have been defaulted on T.-,-000.000
loaned the late Czar's gov
ernment by private banking interests
in the United States
ROOMS FOR RENT
V ST. N. K., 65 Two room; I. h.
k. . newly papered anil painted.
Phone Lincoln 3739 24
VI could have rented
my rooms thirty times
from m ad in The
Times," said Mrs. Grant,
642 L st. N. E.
Another Jingle Con
test starts tomorrow for
$10. Read announce
ment, first want ad page.
NEW BORDER FIGHT
NO ONE IS INJURED
RUSSIA 19 MONTHS
OVERDUE ON LOANS
Crown Prince Has Not Escaped, Holland
ENDS
THE NEARLY LATE MR. BARLEYCORN
MU)iMfa) &i r' f "" v 1 -v I
glL(-YdOWlLSPEKD ) I .UNV. I f-0HDAY &
Zl5 I5)(gjin YOUR LASTH0UR5 h --i ? ' rlVooAiAStl'Vt
EmJihhmw iiitmJ """" "T" L Ail 4 r - wef 0 ftSttn '
gBzBljj1 " "J gm ARE EXPECTED T i .9 o nTa O M v , L" . gjc '
WET DINNER & BAWJuir & WH&fo W SRTTDCUS 1 ( 1 WIUU P
in honor, fm fSiL f m$ iSKSJ v bvyyo- (kt'm)
l . uke Yova. J mwBw&frW I 1 1 Qc if
15,000,000 IS LEFT
NEW YORK, June 27. The largest
gift ever made to further the art of
music is a bequest set forth in the
will of A. D. Juilliard, New York
merchant, whic?i has been filed with
the surrogate o. " inge county at
Goshen, N". Y.
He left his entire residuary estate
for the establishment of the Juilliard
Musical Foundation, which will help
worthy students to be educated here
or abroad without expense to them,
give entertainments for the education
and diversion of the public, and assiht
the Metropolitan Opera Company in
the production of operas.
There are specific bequests to rela
tives and institutions amounting ti
several million dollars. The extern,
of the residue, which will go to the
Julhard Musical Foundation, can oi.lr.
be gues-sed at now. It may reach
$0,000,000
In any event this benefaction is in
comparably the la-est ever recorded
in the field of must. in fact, so tre
mendous is the bequest and so broad
its terms that there is nothing with
which to attempt a comparison.
Opening the doors of opportuniay to
young men ana women with talent
but without means is only one. al
though a considerable one, of its pur
poses. Executor' Statement.
This is the statement issued in be
half of the executors and trustees:
"The will of the late Augustus D.
Juilliard. who died April 25. has been
filed for probate. Mr. Juilliard, after
making ample provision for his imme
diate relatives and providing terms
for the disposition of his interests in
the firm of A. V Juilliard A: ' to ins
late partners, made the following be
quests: American Museum of Natural
History f 100.000
New York Orthopaedic Dis
pensary and Hospital
Society of New York Hospital
Lincoln Hospital and Home..
Tuxedo Hospital, Tuxedo
Park. N. Y
New York Sonet v for the
Prevention of t'ruelty to
Children
St. John's Guild, City of New
York
100.000
ioo.oou
100.000
100,000
100.000
100,000
PRESIDENT ALONE CAN
SAVE DAYLIGHT SAVING
Repeal of the daylight savings law
the last Sunday in Ostobcr is now cer
tain, unless President Wilson acts.
Both houses of Congress have agreed
to the -onferenre report on the agri
cultural bill, which carries & repeal
ing rider.
TO AID 1 SCANS
Copyrlxfet: 1919: BrJotmT.McCuUAsoaJ
OH, WHAT A SHOCK
TUMULTY GOT
IN THE DARK
Secretary to the President
Tumulty was routed out of bed
early today by the insistent
ringing of his telephone. At the
other end was the White House
attache who handles the cable
messages from the President.
"Cablegram for you from the
President," he said.
"Read it," the Secretary or
dered. "J. P. Tumulty, White House:
"I have decided to lift the ban
on "
"Yes, yes, go on!"
" the export of gold bullion."
NOTE TO GIRL LEO
nosTMN. June :'7.-On the ev of
Dr. Karl Mucks departure for Ger
many it became known that the real
cause of the downfall of the former
conductor of the Boston Symphony
Orchestra was an intercepted letter
sent by him to a Back Ba society
girl. This missive was such that he
was arrested and was told he could
accept detention as an enemy alien
or go to triul on the charge. He chose
the detention camp.
It was not until he visited Provi
dence, where either he or the man
agement of the symphony orchestra
refused to put "The Star-Spangled
Banner" on the program, that Dr.
Muck received any attention from the
authorities. This incident created a
great storm all over the country, and
resulted in Washington being flooded
with demands that something be done
about it.
The Attorney General then took a
hand and sent a peremptory order to
the local authorities of the Depart
ment of Justice asking them why
they had not done something. Then
the investigation of Dr. Muck was
taken up in earnest.
In this investigation, in which the
authorities were assisted by patriotic
members of the symphony orchestra,
it developed that the name of a young
woman in the Back Bay district was
closely connected with that of Dr.
Muck.
TO IK'S UNDOING
HAMBURC REBELLION
. i
Fmzw
D. C. FISCAL PLAN
The fifty-fifty fiscal relation be
tween the District of Columbia gov
ernment and the Federal Government
should be abolished, in the opinion of
members of the House, and the best
that advocates of tha forty-year-old
plan are asking for today Is that it be
continued for one more year that no
delay may be had in making appro
priations available for the District
govrenment next month.
Majority Leader Mondell, who for
years has supported the plan, yester
day voted against it. holding that it
has outworn its usefulness.
Several other House leaders who
have supported the plan in the past,
on the groumd that it was merely to
avoid delay in making District ap
propriations available, are now deter
mined that the final disposition of the
natter should be taken up without
more ado.
Should a deadlock result following
thr refusal of the House to recede
and agree to the Senate amendment
which puts the fifty-fifty plan back
in the District appropriation bill, it is
problematical what will happen
Were the President in Washington
a concurrent resolution could be
passed which would continue District
appropriations Of two years ago, but
the President is not here, and a reso
lution of that kind cannot be signed
by wireless.
The conferees of the House and
Senate will meet late today, and an
effort will be made to report out some
measure that will offer a .volution
Later. Senator King, after a con
ference with Senator Curtis, agreed
to withdraw his objections to the
consideration of the conference re
port. Senator Curtis, who ha charge
of the District bill, hopes later in
the day to have the Senate adopt the
report and agree to the request of
the Hous.e for a further conference.
Ho expressed confidence that the
half-and-half plan will remain in the
bill at the insistence of the Senate.
SENATE DEMANDS
SIBERIAN POLICY
The Senate today passed Senator
Hiram Johnsons resolution request
ing the President to inform the Sen
ate regarding the Government's mili
tary policy in Siberia.
TAKE BELL-ANS BKFOKE MEAI.S and
Me how fine cood digestion makes you feeL
Advt.
NOW A NG DOOM
DOUBLE BILL
TO ENFORCE
DRY LAW NOW
UP-TO HOUSE
Enforcement legislation for both
wartime and constitutipnal prohibi
tion was formally reported to the
House in a bill of two sections by
the House Judiciary Committee to
day. The vote on reporting the legisla
tion was 17 to 2. As the bill now
stands rather lenient laws are pro
vided in one section for wartime
prohibition and drastic provisions
for constitutional prohibition in the
other.
Lenient Enforcement.
Should Congress approve the House
plan, enforcement of the war-time
act will be more lenient than pre
viously planned by the House Ju
diciary Committee. Only the manu
facture and sale of Intoxicating liquor
are prohibited, but the House bill
clearly defines intoxicating . liquor
under the war-time act as any bever
age that contains more than one-half
of 1 per cent of alcohol.
Although enforcement legislation
almost certainly cannot be passed be
fore July. J, drys in Congress believe
the wartime act In itself provides ade
quate enforcement provisions. While
it does not define "intoxicating liq
uor," the manufacture and sale of
liquor Is prohbited, with penalties of
Imprisonment from thirty to ninety
days and .fines of from $100 to $1,000.
Enforcement in clearly lodged with
the Internal Revenue Commissioner
and the Department of Justice, and
powers are given to issue permanent
injunction against any place that
tries to manufacture or sell liquor.
Export of the liquor on hand is al
lowed. NEWPORT. June 27. The Iron
hand of Secretary Daniels In enforcing
prohibition has been on Newport too
long, thinks Mayor Mahoney. who
sent to the navy chief a fiery telegram
demanding that the -naval dry
zone law be modified to permit New
porters to bring in liquors irom sur
rounding cities before July 1. Secre
tary Daniels recently refused the
pleas of both Congressman Burdlck
and the mayor, and citizens, feeling
the rapid approach of wartime pro
hibition, prevailed upon the mayor to
send the telegram wnich stoutly up
holds home rule and resents outside
Interference.
"War being over, Newport Intends
to be ruled in home affairs by New
porters and no one else,' said Mayor
Mahoney in his telegram. "Newport
ers consider continued refusal to modi
fy unjust and unreasonable interfer
ence with local rights a violation of
the sacred New England institution
of home rule."
FEAnS INSANITY j DRINKS POISON'.
TOPEKA. Kan.. June 27. Fearing
insanity. Miss Anna Hays Holt, daugh
ter of the late Judge Noel Holt, drank
poison on the Bteps of the house of
Judge W. A. Johnson, of the Kansas
supreme court, a long-time friend of
her father, and died in a' few minutes
Miss Holt left a note iaying she
feared insanity.
ST. HELENA EAGER
TO HAVE KAISER
AS PRISONER
JAMESTOWN. St. Helena
Island, June 27. The St. Helena
Observer, the only newspaper
published on this island where
Napoleon ended his days, wants
the former Kaiser sent here to
spend the remainder of his life
in exile. The Observer says the
entire population of the little
island is excited over the pos
sibility that it may have another
imperial hostage.
NEWPORT PROTESTS
NAVY'S LIQUOR BAN
Announces
FOE PRINCE STILL
AT WIERINGEN,
SAYS HAGUE
LONDON, June 27. It
is officially announced at
The Hague that the for
mer German Crown Prince
is still at the island of
Wieringen, said a Beuter
dispatch from The Hague
today.
The former Crown Prince
was reported yesterday to
have escaped from his
place of internment and
to have entered Germany.
Advices received in Paris
were that he was accom
panied by a staff officer.
RESIDENT IS
WILL RATIFY
By JOHN EDWIN NEVIN,
International Tferrs 'Service.
PARIS. June 27. President Wilson
has the utmost confidence that the
United States Senate will ratify the
peace treaty shortly after it Is pre
sented in its final form.
The President plans to sail imme
diately after the signing, probably
Sunday noon, landing in New York
a week later. It is expected that he
will request a joint session of the
Senate and House on Monday, when
he will address the members and at
the same time deliver the treaty to
the Senate Committee on Foreign Re
lations. Latest advices reaching the Presi
dent indicate that sufficient votes
can be mustered to secure ratifica
tion, although the Administration ex
pects a bitter fight in the final stages.
Telia of HI Confidence.
The President has informed his
colleagues that he is entirely con
vinced that public opinion will de
mand the ratification and that it will
be unwilling to consent to a separa-
(Contlnued on Page 8, Column 1.)
JACKSON'. Mich.. June 27. To spend
thirty-five years in JacKson peniten
tiary for murder and then come face
to face with the man he was sup
posed to have killed waa the experi
ence of James Halsted, paroled con
vict, he declared today.
Halsted said he met by appoint
ment on the streets of Chicago the
man whom he was convicted of killr
ing lir Jackson thirty-five years ago.
His story is being investigated.
NEW BEDFORD. Mass.. June 27.
Mij-s Olive Grace, a twenty-two-year
old stenographer, shot John S. Noves
during a lovers' quarrel early today,
while they were automobile riding.
2he then shot herself. She may die.
N'evej.. who is twenty-five and a
garage manager, bandaged his wound
and drove the car to the police sta
tion. He i.aid the shooting had ended
their romance, and he will prefer
charges against his sweetheart if she
recovers.
WILL STRIKE IN SEATTLE
AS M00NEY CASE PROTEST
N'KW YORK. June 27. A -general
protest strike to demand the immedi
ate retrial or release of Thomas
Moonrv will b" held in Seattle July
4. James Duncan, president of the
Seattle Central Trades Union, stated
today.
i
MET. 'VICT1' AFTER
TERM FOR KILLING
SHOOTS HER FIANCE
DURING AUTO RIDE
STREET RIOTS
AT END, BUT
REDS MENACE
U. S. VESSELS
BERNE, June 27. A truce has
been effected between government
troops asd Spartacan forces in Ham
burg, ajdispatch from that city re-
ported
tilities
y. The cessation of hos-
e after hours of street
fighting.
egotiations were still in
progress
en the dispatch was filed.
Spartacans occupied the railway
stations and tore up the tracks for
.miles in all directions to prevent
arrival of more government troops.
LONDON, June 27. It is believed
here that the Spartacist mob which
has taken possession of Hamburg
will attempt to capture the supplies
aboard American food ships which
.recently arrived here.
The American vessels are armed
and should be able to repel the at
tempt. MACHINE GUN BATTLE
IN ALEXANDER PLATZ;
CASUALTIES CONCEALED
BERLIN. June 27. A machine gun
battle took place in the Alexander
Platz. It could not be ascertained
whether there were any casualties.,
185 REPORTED KILLED
IN HAMBURG RIOTING;
BOURSE IS DAMAGED
LONDON. June 27. The killed In
the rioting at Hamburg number 1S5,
according to an Exchange Telegraph
dispatch from Copenhagen. Other
dispatches declare order has been, re
stored in the city, which is belnff
governed by a council of twelve,
whose numbers include communists
and independent socialists.
Newspaper advices from Berlin ay
General Von Lettow-Vorbeck has
been ordered to Hamburg with strong
forces to restore order.
The stock exchange at Hamburg, it
is added, was damaged seriously in
the fighting for possession of the.
town hall.
Disorders are increasing In Berlin .
the Exchange Telegraph correspond
ent at Amsterdam reports. Manv
streets there are barricaded, and
there have been serious engagements
between government troops and mobsr
In military circles In Berlin, tha
dispatch adds, it is asserted th.t a
counter revolution will begin as soon
as a communist revolt against th
government is started.
Up until 4 o'clock Wednesday aft
ernoon the strike of railroad workers
failed to show signs of spreading in
Berlin. The Federation of Rail
Workers, the membership of which,
is 400,000. is opposing the strike and
has called upon the workers not to
permit themselves to be "misled by
political agitators or guilty of plung-'
mg the country into economic
chaos."
Field Marshal von Hindenburg. In
reply to a request from Minister of
Defense Noske concerning the allied
rejection of German reservations in
the peace treaty, said that in th
event of a resumption of hostilities
according to a Berlin dispatch, tha
Germans would be able to reconquer
Posen and maintain the frontiers to
the east, but hardly would be able to
reckon on success in the west. Tha
field marshal is said to have added:
"A favorable issue to our opera
tions is. therefore, very doubtful, but
as a soldier 1 must prefer an honor
able fall to an ignominious peace."
General Groener. who succeeded
Field Marshal von Hindenburg as
German chief of staff, has tendered
his resignation to President Ebert.
but has agreed to remain at his post
until the situation in the eastern
provinces becomes stabilized, say
Berlin advices, which also deela.ro
that th Prussian National Assembly
has passed a resolution expressing;
confidence in the government, this
action following a discussion of tha
peace situation by the assembly.
PEACE SIGNERS LEAVE
BERLIN; DUE IN PARIS
TOMORROW MORNING
VERSAILLES. June 27 The Ger
man delegation which will sign tha
peacp treaty left Berlin at midnight
(Continued on Page S, Column 5.)
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