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Edgefield advertiser. (Edgefield, S.C.) 1836-current, February 25, 1863, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026897/1863-02-25/ed-1/seq-1/

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"WE Will CLIlTe TO THE PILLAB8 OF TH? TEMPLE OF 0?3 LIBEBTIES, AED IF IT MUST FALL, WE WILL PEBISH AMIDST THE 2UI??8.'?
-s
SHIRKS, ???RISOE & CO., Proprietors.
E'DGE'FIELD. S. Ci, KEBI?UARY 20; 1863.
a..:. u..w?cV??. ?Va .if
BY MTSS CLARA'V. DARGAN.
, ~ ~ ~ ?
? T homey Isle.*''
See anotlter sjirig of poesy from ?iogifted
pen of W. H. A.,-en tilled as above- We
e>bort our friend to give himself more fully
to tbe Muses. He is theirs by rights, and,
MARS to tte contrary notwithstanding, he
should be amennLIo to their authority,-at
leastwLener?r and wherever that exceKftot
chef de hataUioft can. afford bim ?be opportu
nity.
-? ? ? -
Enigma for tbe Children.
I am composed of 21 letters.
My 1, t), ll!, ?0, is a river in England.
My 14, VS, 4, 3, 21, 7, was a celebrated Duke of
Kormandy.
My S, 17, 15, 9, is an old-fashioned musical in
etramenr.
-My 2, 5, IR, tris the second son of Noah.
My .?, 20rS, 12. ?^ l*f C. ia ihe emporium of the
lin.'o trotte in Iceland.
My 5, li, li a preposition.
My whole is one of tho most glorious events-in
thc history of the Confederacy. C. V. I>.
A Tfiile of thc-Times.
BY CI-AKA V. DARCAN.
w> ried on ihe. X?t?i Inst., Lieut. Harry
Waikato Ca nit,, only daughter of (he lat?
fjan-renre lemon. Esq."
How vividly this short paragraph re-ailed
to me a scene T bad witnessed scarcely one
short month before. Hut let me begin at the
beginning and tell the whole, and "so grow.
ti? H point*' us our friend l?ottom says.
Perhaps some of yoti remember the day
the Pollville lfragoons wont away to do duty
on tue coast. It was a tine company, people
said, made up of stalwart nen, huntsmen
from the cradle*, inured to hardships, cool
and steady itt the hour of peril, and reckless
nf death ?nd danger. The captain was a man
of noted strength and courage, a line horse
man a id a good ofTioi r. But the young lieu
tenant, Harrv Walton, was the idol of the
corps. A graceful and fearless equestrian, a
skillful marksman-ibrove, handsome, oner
ous and unpretending
Ivoire a.ime?i n'ira "SM! *^.^r^.-."e?m*^ *
I had Knowe his sisters, two pleasant,
kindly girls, for many years-, indeed Mary
anti 1 bad been old class-mates and intimate
friends; so, shortly after the departure of the
Danville Dragoon?, I received tho following
*?r< m ber:
': DEAR A CN ts : Do come to us ! You will
fully appreciate our condition when I tell yon
Harry left with his company last Monday.
You have no iden how very lonely we are.
The dear boy. We could not bear '.ose., him
go, for the cn mp is a dreadful place for one
reared as tenderly as he has been. But then,
you know. Aggie, wc are willing to give bun
to our country ; and Mamma says Got! will
fike care of him es well there as at home.
What a dear, kind boy ho is ! So affection
ate, and thoughtful for us all. The morning
he left we stood on thc Iront steps and watch
ed him gallop away-isn't he a.splendid ri
der, Aggie ?-and he waved his handkerchief,
and kissed his hand lill he was quite out of
sight. Then wo all went into the hou.?e and
cried. I think Mamma bears it remarkably
well, for yon know he is her darling, being
tbe only son ; she always says "It's for thc
best.'' But Harry is changed; he is not near
so lively as he used to be. Don't you re
member what a mischief he was, always
teaming some one, and laughing and sing-tig?
Well : it's all gone now. About a week ago
he went one night to see Carrie Yernon. I
don't know what happened while he was there,
bot he came home early. As I went down
stairs about '.en o'clock to see if Mamma was
comfortable, I observed the door of her room
ajar aud heard Harry's voice speaking exci
tedly.
" I shall never believe in woman ?gain !
I thought ?he was honestand true or I should
never have allowed myself to dream this fa
tal dream. When I said I hoped she would
not forget ms, and every tone and look tobi
as plainly as words bow I loved ber, she rais
ed her clear eyes to my face and answered
quite calmly, ; As a soldier you have my beat
wishes for your safety aud success.' Safety
and success i Would one tear stain her cheek
if I fell pierced with a thousand wouuds?
No, cruel creature, it would not ruffle one
feature of htr beautiful face. But she shall
repent it yet. I will go to the war ; ami when
I am shot down, call ber io look at my dead
hotly, and-*" . .*
Ile sti p /ed suddenly, a'-.d I knew Mamma
had caugnt him in her arms ; 1 b> ard her say
faintly -
" My son ! My son !"'
Forgive me, Mamma ! Forgive me, dear
est mother" anti he clasped the frail figure to
his breast. I did uot bear any more but
went up stair*softly. You may know, Agnes,
how very sony I was; fdr I loved Carrie Yer
non; wethoi'ght her haughty at school, but jt
was onlv ber way. and ?he. is jeal ly kind and
loves Wjll wh?n she docs love. I surmised
long ago that Harry .had lost, his heart, for
iho' be treats all girls pretty much aliki be
never appears to think it wotth while to talk
of serious or sensible things-books, and pic
tures, fte., you know -o.\cept tn Can ?e. And
ber brilliant eyes would grow brighter as she
talked, and her tweet smile swie er as she
listened. And.-t$> think she was flirting ! Il
is ahatueful, and I know I shall never forgive
ber, though, of course, I wi I be obliged lo
treat ber as before. I can never liku ber
again.
I don't know if ? ought to be telling ad
this on poor, dear Harry, but it is uppermost
in tny mind ami I can't help telling you,
Aigle. Bt:t to go back where I began, we
ar? 90 lonol}' ; und Mamma iud Lula uni'o
wit* me in earnest entreaties that you take,
pity k.-*'! spend June with us. I ?rill come
Ibr you next Wednesday in the carriage. Xo
excuses tu b* taken.
Yours truly, MAM ns."
Ot course I spent Jone at Danville. I
rouent letters came from Harry and it '
evident from, their mefry, .pleasant tone, t
he had quite, reooverc/l from Carrie Venu
coquetry. Like all toys, I thought, Le
gets her before the -moon changes ; hu
mustr confesa I did , not like to believe
Neither Mamie nor'fever, ni ludid to the ?
j'.'Ct except on one occasion. "We were lo
ing at a fine photograph of the young soli
which hnng over ^he njantel in the sitti
rooui. VOL'' He'verjpntcrcd that room hut j
-AcightsoiKer?ne standing before tbe'Sshrij;
a.* Lula called it, gilsfngTruto tho nv. u.U..
eves which - looked as if they were about
smile, or at the womanly month so' sweet ?
tender.
" How could any one resist him ?" Mat
asked.
I shook my head : I did not understand i
eelf how Carne Vernon bad niauaged to
cape the spell.
"She ?3a heartless creature. I will ne?
j forgive ber for treating Hurry so."
i A thought struck me :
" But, Mamie, suppose she really does h
! bim. You say he did not actually propo
! perhaps she does not like to fall till she
j shaken, aud shaken vigorously. Men do
] care for girls who come before they aie call
j and Carrie is proud, you know. ? can't h
j thinking she loves him."
I Mamie looked up surprised, and then she
; her head: " It might beso, but it is Lan
! probable. Harry is not a boy to be decciv
j He is light and gay on the surface but lin
! is an under carrent of calm thought ar.d
ing affection. No.-strange as it seems, C
. rie Vernon does net love him. or he wot
i have t asily found it cut. She is too cold
j love, cr too uncertain, T don't knov whi
. Ob.- Aggie, I wish it had been youinstei
1 Then all wotdd hav? been right."
! 1 smiled, not knowing what a certain p
' son would think if he had heard Marni
? confident usstvlion. Harry certainly w
: handsome, but I knew somebody 1 thr.ug
I even handsomer. And lhere the Mibjt
; dropped.
I June drew to its close, and July came <
i intensely bi t ; hut still I lingered at Da
j ville. Mamie grew daily more thought!
j and loving ; Lula more kind and winninj
Lui?U^^irAwa^ never was such i
i n-ifcid un earth to m'y-orp?i?iiri?sa "ejes!" "S
? the long summer days we gathered amur
i the invalid's couch where the breeze ble
j coolest and the shade was greenest, to lisii
I to the tules of uer childhood told in low, go
. ile accents, while her transparent lingers we
, CV.T busy with the shining needles and Mroi
yarn, knitting sucks lor " My boy."
j It had been a sultry, sweltering day, ai
i as evening drew on the south wind whit
' lifted the lace curtains and waved the ron
: vines decoyed us into the front poicL. Tbitl
er we wheeled the sufn, and supporting tl
sick mother Let ween us placid her where si
c;iuld watch i be sun-set. It wus not ten mil
tites after, tl.st the gate opened : and wli
should walk up the steps ijniie self-possesse
. but Carrie Vernon. She looked very beauti
; fully. I had not seen ber since we were girl
; at school together and she was much improve!
. Her hair and eyes wee always fine; but he
; ligure had developed superbly, and exquisit
taste in dressing contributed much to be
I beauty, She entered the porch, (iud walkei
directly to Mrs. Wallon. I think if ucthinj
else bad attracted nie the tones of her voici
i and ber manner ou this occasion would havi
i ?
opened my heart to her. 1 saw the painet
; 'ook in Mamie's face Hit away, as thc mot he
took the young girl's hand, and, drawing hp
d-iwn, pressed her pale lips upon the queenly
brow. All restraint vanished that instant.
We were) laughing and t.-.lking merrily
when a servant enten d with the mail. Then
was a strange tremor in bis manner as he
Landed the package to bis mistress, and with
diew to the hall. "Let us have lights my
1 dear,'' Mrs. Walton proposed ; but Lula pro
tested against the innovation of lamps this.
I beautiful evening, and taking up a paper be
gan straining her eyes in thc gathering twi
! light over the latest news.
Oh, here is something !" she exclaimed,
j Listen !
1 11 Just as icc an- going to press, a gen
' (Untan, atvieed fruin (lie coast, in forms us nj
a raitt viatic hg a detachment of lite Dancillc
' Dragoons, anninutided by Lieut! Walton, a
brace and gallant young ofjicer. Tiny sur
prised a rendezvous nf the t:nutty1 s pickets 'tn
I-I?lund} and captured the whole pvr
, ty, nj ter a brief but short coldest. We regret
\ to state that Lieut. Wallon received a tcouud-"
A quick, balf-suppressel cry broke the si
: lenco thro' which Lula's voice growing fear
! fully lower aud laster, had brought this proud,
.' sad tale to our eura. Carrie Vernon fell
i prone to the Hoer at tlie mother's feet.,
j "Oh, Lula, why did you ?" Mamie cried
! reproachfully, us now, all confusion, we gath
ered around the two who most required our
attention.
He is not dead, Mamma ; it was only a
i fl sh worrmi m:d is not considered at all seri
1 ons. Mamma, darling Mamma, listen to me!
i Harry i? not hurt.''
Mrs. Walton opened her eyes ; she cora
! preheiidtd Lula's confused explanation ; but
Carrie' lay quite still. No sound seemed to
pit ree ber ears. The servants lifted ber up
on the sofa, and pi or Mamie in an ugony of
grief called her by name, and implored her
j lo speak. As we stood thus, chafing the
'? small hands, now cold and paLd as death, the |
gate opened and? Harry Walton bounded up
the steps ! In a moment he seemed to com
prehend all. ? few low words his mother
whispered as he clasped her to his heart, and
he sank down beside the ooncbr and caught
the cold hands in lis. " Carrie, dear Carrie !
open your pyes.. Il is I, Har ry, who calls
you. Speak to me, my own !*'
Tile long lashes lifted themeo'ves ilowly,
and the dark eyes rested upon Ibis lace.
" Not dead, 'thank God P she murmured.
At this-bjot..what's tie use of telling the
.?st? YouVall-know h^W^^^t^fce^
.ali Ivas -bee^.iBadffjrira!ght/ai.-ia all "doubts
and fears removed ; and if you don't know
you needn't. Harry bad hurrhid home to as
sure us of his safety af?er that " dariug fear,"
Tind, as you have seen, arrived most aprop?s.
The wedding, of course, was the consumma
tion of all things, and came dil before.- the !
young lieutenant's furlough expired. lu old ,
limes a girl could not get up a irosscau un
der six months ; but now jshe may be thank- I
ful if she hassix weeks-iaye, nix days' I j
don't know but it's just aspell, seeing theres !
nothing to wear and nowhere, to wear it.
As a veracious story-teller I suppose I {
should give a full account of tho wedding, a? j
well as a key to Miss Vernon's strange he- j
havior. As lo the first yon may exercise
your own imagination ; and as to the second, j
if you are a woman you knovq all about ii. J
Ah, but I suppose thc other sex.'liave just the ?
least bit of curiosity, aud would"like to know '
too. Well: I don't like'to divulge secrets.;
but if you'll promise (not) to lake" advantage j
of it i'll tell you : Harry wa? too tsxdy. und j
Carrie got tired waiting. So you *ee> like all
women, she played a game, and was thv loset
I*-for awhile. But ?lo you blame bet ? 1 !
don't.
.Inst one word more. Girl?, never Hirt :
with a soldier. Suppose he were to get kill- ;
j ed-ah! Try your hands cn the " rons ci ipi*"
and "exempts,"-you may hurt .tbjpm u< |
j badly as your kind hearts will lot y |u, Mt
j sparc Ihr soldiers.
For Ihe Adver'iser.
Thorne)' Isle.
'. The swc.H loneliness of Thorney Isjjo plea? 1
' eth me more now." Those wore ar? ss?r?Wd I? :
j Edward IL, Hie Monk-Kin;.', 1>y Sir 33 lin I wer
Ly lion in bis powerful Kommen nj " Harold (he .
last nf the Saxon Kines." They wera ?ddresJtcd
to William Ihe Conom-ror. us the myiit'Ursia rode, i
. i \ ;,', v
SSfo . " Ti* i ' ' y
William, 1 lovs thc Juillet Town-. . :
And yon ]>u!ath;l pile ;
Vet, o'er inc sways a. sweeter jMiwer,
Tho Bilinga Thorney We.
0 Thorney. Isle, 0 Thorney Ll?,
Thc loneliness sn tweet,
Ot' Thorney Isle, my Thorne}' Lie
Pleaseth me more, I weet !
ll.
1 love Westminster*, my wonna
Shut out from snare and wi.e ;
And u meet bye for royal more,
Is lonely Thorney Isle.
0 Thorney Isle, 0 Thorney Mo, I
The loneliness so ?weet, ,
.Of Thorney Idle, my Thorne; Lie,
Pleaseth me innre, I wet. !
III.
Xormun, I love the l'ulatine.
Keep, where I bode erstwhile:
But denr to me in liTe's decline,
Isellingo Tho'rney Isle.
0 Thorney Isle. 0 Thorney Mc, - !
The loneliness so sweet,
Ol' Thorney Isle, my Thorney Isle.
Pleaseth me more, I weet!
IV.
Sweet Thorney Isle, to thee I dy, j
lu these my days senile;
Have off this crown, 0 let mc die
lu loucly Thorney Isle !
0 Thorney Isle, 0 Thorney Ldc,
The loneliness so sweet,
Ot Thorney Isle, my Thorney Isle,
. Pleaseth me more, 1 weet !
*Thorney Island WHS oueo the scat of Wost- f
minster. W. II. A,
Something Coming.
The Mobile Adotrthtr and lie;/Liter thus j
notices a new English poem and its probable
reproduction by a Mobile publisher':
TAXNUAUSSEU.-We copy from the London
Times a scholarly criticism upon a new poem
which, under the title of " Tanahausser," has
produced a markedsensationin England. Thc
names of thc authors accompanying the pub
lication ure feigned. Its real authors are
known to'be two young Englishmen of tine
genius and distinguished attainments-Young
Bulwer, the son ol' Sir Edward Bulwer Lyt
ton, Secretary to the Eugli-h Embassey at Vi
enna, and Julian Fane, the son of Lord West
moreland.
We believe our enterprising Mobile pub
lisher Mr. Gootzel, is about to reproduce the
poem in book form herc.
lt is not impossible that, when it appears.
Southern readers may discover that it? hint
ia borrowed from " The Temptation of Ve
nus,'' tho most elaborate and elegant of the I
productions of thc Charleston poet, Pani IL I
Hayue.
Making Resolutions.
Never form a resolution that is not a good
one; and when once formed, i cv.r break it.
If you form a resolution, and then break it.
you set yourself a bad example, and you are
very likelv to follow it. A person may get
the habit of breaking his resolutions ; this is
as bad to the character and miad, as an incu
rable disease to the body. No person can be
come treat, but by keeping bis resolutions ;
no person ever escaped contempt, who could
not keep them.-An Extract.
-rr-*- - ..-.y; > . -. - ,
|The following rente*, composed jeiir? nj?o hy I
JrmcE MEEIV??""Al?Wttnn, ?od h?rvmg reference.1
to the womeo.of "74? ?J<9 itf.consqnaiice with the i
feels of thorny in winch we- life. The .Iiiini j
ptanz'ol hns ?Ttnd a speedy and ?1 fient?tiful fulfil!- 1
mentTin evejy ?art of eur gloriuii> sunny South :] :
The Mothers of the "Sonth."
The mothers of thc Somit!
In the judd u?or.n nf unttlr,
When from the cannon's moitli,
Came th e-&nn der's, de.-wily rattle,
Their fair anfr fragile forms '
Shrank no/, in terror fronin?,
But-raihi?ow5onn tbe^oVnu
j StUl .j5p.re n^freado^j^oraise !
=?r^^^?^SE?i*:?'"' a^*ri|^fn?Vi?i Tif^Tir,"
Our-?dblc Soutjiern inotiers i
Who in the ?trffo-iTOnid, mafrdn, wife
Stood by ihejr sons and bmthcrs.
On Camjen V-fsfiil plain,
At Ra aw ?ad, Savannah!
The Btaiof freedom's train!
Was b lanty's woven bannir !
. Through mt thc night of wa?,
Thc fl g wa? still ro?r>lenJenr,
And maya son fell low !
To ke p its folds aseendant !
Then plWge to-n?ght thcir<memorie.? bri?bt
Our nsble Southern laudiere ! >
Who in
he strihV-maid, taatron wife
Stood hy their-sons and brothers!
Oh, ye? we'll keep their names
Etnbi luted in-song.an'u story.
ipu-bearted.dttue.-,
radlcd freedom^ glory:
Those
Who
And ?hiuld the slrife of war
E'er inge again our waters,
We'll md our hcn^Js taehi&cif
Tim* matron* pi their daughter?
Then
On
Who
Sedge to-night their memories bright
obie Southern.obther?!
thc j-trife-maui,, matron, wire
;: ><p ?iv their snr.? and brother? !
-i- . -..-?-- .
tln?rnt??MtUe-.
, blow, thou ijinty"wind,
art not jo t.nkinl
man'? ingratitii.tJ.;
Th
tooth i? not./o kei n,
f t lie tusei then art a?t s< frp;
. lt hough thv ?reithll.e rude.
fr '.zo. freeze. thonSutler .-ky,
Thu do-t nothite.w^&h ".
* benefit.! fuCg-'Q ;.
i Tl ugh thou thf ^iiW.rs wsrp,
I tu rting is no! 3|1:h?rp:
|> friends rc:r.otl-frjr\<?q?t.
j--?- r
Rerutol|on.
Wcfhitinft not, t/ wb.-rj rle<diiiies we are
Divine] Provideti?'mi?y h*Hw ana?gsea us-;
bttt ever piavoid?vil and shun reproach are
imperative ,W:e.-! devolving ou all.
A good na.vur * to lje prized !>oth for the
trood. like so nm'-? current coin, it will Iring
?ts possessor. auchlv M an honorable badge,
of that true inerifand iutrinHie excellency, by
which alone, it i to be*.?f-,lair0* Nor is it.
confined to any onditioif J'r rank of men. lt
?elves to mark-ii mental or physical distinc
tion, bul is a bago of that pu rest ndtility,
the nobility of te heurt, which while i>. may
be denied to th proudest, id witin*.' the reach
of the roost hutble. To Young .Vt n UP""
-their iiitrnduetHi t'? tlie untried vicisa :ludcs
of life, ilia a rcommcr.datiou more vaia ?ble?
titan Diplomas Without it the future c*'n
bold out btu lil'e promise. Clouds will, ob
scure thu sun i Hope, aud mists enshroud a
glowing prospct.
To the old iVputation is tho solace of re
membrance: ie crowning glory ol' all pvttox
peiience. It,'ives comfort in declining years,
and profits bfond the grave.
The valu*of a good name is appreciated
by the ?mulos; it is commensurate with their
? hiube.st prefns:ons. Reputation is a treasure,
which if poised by tim humblest peasant
in a Cottagt l>e cannot bo said to lt? truly
poor. Opuence may scorn, but amid all its
vanities, i; the darkest hours of neglect, a
' good natneis rather to be preferred than gold
heaped as uountains, or silver strewed, like
p ebbles iutbe valley. The vile tongue of
sh .nder my select us tis its victims, however
ex emplarywe are, for we often hear the good
dec ded, ard see virtue become a shining mark
for the itvidious assaults of billingsgate;
but .?oonei or later the shaft will recoil upon
the gi'iltyhead, and the voice of vindica! ion
will evtoinally be bear;' rising like dulcet mu
sic, awning above the storm of night.
Repoli ion is the pearl, whose price neith
er proiperit'' nor adversity can deprec?ale, lt
is the talisman of victory over all difficulties,
and u sure plo Ige of faith which gives con
tcnttsent here, ?nd inspires a hope looking
beyond the bourne of life.
" 7oo many persons grow to use their re
ligjoc as a diver doth his bell-to .Venture
dogn into the depths of worldliness with safe
ty, ntd grope for pcarlj with just so much of
heaveuVi air ns will keep them from suffoca
ting and no more ; und some, alas ! as at
time? is the case Milt divers, are suffocated
with the experiment.''
The Raleigh (N. Cr) Standard learns that
when Capt. Garrett was made Colonel of thc
5 th Nonb Carolina State Tioops, on the re
signation of Col. Mcltae, Capt. Hill who was
entitled to the position of Lieutenant Colonel
in the line of promotion, was appointed to
that ollice, and Capt, Lea was appointed Ma
jor.. Hut Capt, Hill, with singular magna
nimity, declined the posilion, and returued
Ids commission to Gov. Vance, with the un
derstanding that Capt. Lea should fill the
place, on the ground that Capt. Lea was bet
ter qualified for, and more entailed to the
ollice of Lieutenant Colonel than he was
Capt. Hill, therefore, becomes Major, :
Capt. Lea Lieutenant Colonel of Ibo Re
ment. Surh instances of unselfishness/1
rartyeven in the arm}'. Capt. Hill is ano!
hearted man, and as brrivp *ri he is unselli
AN ACT TO RAJSE S?Pl'UR? Kim THK \V
COMMKWIST. i.N OCTOBER, OXK Tiiousv*
EimiT Ili'xnREn AND SIXTY-TWO.
lie it enacted, by the Senate ami House
Representatives now met and silting in (li
eral Assembly and bv'-. the authority of
sn me, that a Tax for the sums and .in i
maimer hereTRaftoe- me?lionet-shall bc ti
ed and paid into thc Treasury of this St
fer HIP use and service thereof; that is
say : jDne dollar and thirty cents ad roi n
on every hundred dollars of the value of
lands granted in this State according to I
existing classification toa heretofore establi:
ed ; one dollar ?tul twenty-six cents per he
on all slaves: Provided, that all lands
.?laves in this Slate, now in possession or i
der the control of thc enemy. r?nd such ot!
lands or slaves as may be taken by the et
iny before the return of thc said property
the Tax Collector, and also such other lan
ns shall have been abandoned by thc ownc
in conscqucuce of the action of the Milita
I Authorities, shall be exempt from taxati
1 under this Act : three dollars on each fr
negro, mulatto or mestizo, between the a"
I qf fifteen and fifty years, except such as sbi
clearly bc prove&.lo the satisfaction of t
I Col lector to be incapable fron wounds
! otherwise. 6T procuring a livelihood, and t
cept those whojiow arc, or have at any ti:
1 beeii. in thc service ol the army of tins S:i:
j or ol' the Confederate States, in the existi:
! war: twenty-two cents.fT<7 valorem on eve
I hundred dollars cf the value of all lots, Ian
i and buildings within any city, town, villa
or br-rough in thia- Str.te : Provided, that t
j tax on lands and buildings ?ir the city
; Charleston be assessed C?M ibe value of J
lintis oiily. where the buildings and imprnt
I nvptits on the land have deon destroyed
j tim lat* conflagration. And Proridetlfurth
j Thal no lav .aimil be levied-on lots, lands ai
: buildings in any?*ily, town, village or hmong
! in this State, which have parsed into the pc
: session or under the. control of the enemy,
? which may pass into the possession or mid
I the control of I he enemy, before returns a
j made to the Tax Collectors; one hundred rei:
^iiecjma^ired dollars O?? factorize, en.v.l.
; inents, faculties arid'prore.*sU?ns; ir.r*rnirng&
j profession of Dentistry, and including lieic
i Clerks of Courts of Common Pleas and Cc
i eral Se pions, Sherifis, Mesiers mid Com mi
-i.ji.ers in Equity, Registers of Mesue Co
. veranee, Ordinaries and Coroners, whetli
i in the profession or employment of Law i
\ Equity ibe profits he derive?! from the cos
! of suit, fees, or other sources of profession
j income, except, clergymen, srhool-mastei
j school mistresses and mechanics ; one bu
? dred cents on every bundled dollars on tl
I amount of com missions received by vend?
mustera and commission merchants ; For'
J cents per hundred dollars on the capital slot
I pnid in on thc first of October, one tbcusar
? ei^ht. 1 r.ndred and sixty-two, of all bani
j which for their preseut charters, haw n
rv rid a bonus to the Stnte, which said bai
tax, ?he Stockholder, when he or she resit!
within" .;,!e State, shall have the right to pi
to th? TY;?,' Collector of the district or paris
where such Stockholder reside by payii
the same on 6*R before ?"? first day of dm
| next, and forwan."''K ? duplicate .receipt
such payment to the r>,R*"l <-'''? of sucb BanI
and in ease any Stockho.v.Vr resides wi,ho
the State, the lax on the stork of sucl1 Sl0c
holder shall be paid to the Tux U '1!,!ctor
? the district or parish where the bank 'H '
cited ; eighty cents per hundred dollars ?
the capital stock of any Bank of issue not. in
eorporated by this State, paid in on the fi?
day of October, one thousand eight bundie
and sixty-two, diing busim ss by hgcnls wit!
; in ihe limits of this Slate ; forty cents j*e
J hundred dollars on thc capital stock of all in
? eorporated Gas-Light Companies: one and
half per ccntum-on all premiums taken ii
this State by incorporated Insurance Com pa
nies, and by the Agencies in this State, act
ing in behalf of Insurance Companies and un
derwriters without the limits of this Slate
twenty-two cents on every hundred dollars o
the amount of sales of go.ds, wares and mer
chan?! ?se, embracing all articles of trade foi
sale, burler or exchange (the produc?s of lLi;
State, and the unmanufactured products o
j any of the States of the Confederate Slates ex
I cepted), which any person shall have mad)
I from the first day of January, in tLe year o
I our Lord one thousand eight hundred ?int
! sixty-two to the li-st day of January, in tht
j year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred
j and sixty three, either on his, her or their cap
I ital, or borrowed capital, or on account of?113
j persou or persons, as agent, attorney or con*
i sign?e; ninety cents upon every hundred do!
^lars ol'thc amount cf sales of all goods, warei
, and merchandise whatever, which any tran
J sient person, not resident iu this State, sha!
, make in any house, stall or public place
j whether thc said sale be made by sample 01
: otherwise ; twenty dollars per day for all cir
eus exhibitions ; live dollars per day for re
presenting publicly for gain and rewaid anv
play, corned}', tragedy, interlude or farce, oi
other employment of thc stage, of any pari
therein, or for exhibiting wax figures or otb
j cr shows, of any kind whatever, to bc paid
; hilo the hauds-pf the Clerks -of the Court
1 ? V
' respect ? vol y. who shill br? bound to pay the
s:irt:?^nto tho Treasuries of the State ofSouth
Carolina, except in c uses where the 'saine ?s |
now required by law to he paid" to corpora- |
tionj orotherwi-C ; one. tenth of one per tent, j
on all monies loandda monies at interest, all j
monies invested iirine^tocks or bonds of any
in.lividnaj, State or eorpbrnttoit other tliau"
Bonds or Stocks of this Stole or of tho Con
federate States, and other than thc Stocks
of tue Banks and Railroad Companies of this
Slate ; one dolhr and filly cents for"-cvciy
hundred dollars of gro.s$ receipts of all Com
[? mert???r;?geuc?ar^
State : thirteen cents on every pack of playing
canis sold in this State; fift?errddlprs upon
every Billiard table within this State, used to
and for Ihe purposed rasing a revenue there
from ; one hundred cents on the hundred dol
?an of all falaries, including public officers,
except officers of thc-Army and Navy, and
on all wage?, from whatever sonnie derived",
except wages of five hundred dollars or les.?
per annum.
II. AU taxes levied on property, as pre
j scribed in thc first eec!lpn of this Act, shall
! be paid to the Tax Collector for the lax dis
i trict in which said property ia located : Pro
j rifled, that where negroes have been removed
i from any Districts or Parishes by reason of j
the.dangers arising from theinvasiou or oc
cupation thereof by "bj enemy, it shall be
lawful to pay thc taxes upon the same to the,j
thc Tax Collector ! <:f tue Districts or P irish
cs from which said negroes were removed.
That all taxes levied cu property in this
Slate durii!1' the continuance of thc war be
tween the Confederate and United States of
America, may be paid in Confederate qotes
I or other current funds, and th? commissions To
j be received by the various Tax Collectors of I
! this State, for thc year commencing on the i
! first dav nf OeU?her. one thousand eight hun j
; dred and ??>ly-two, .?hall he at the rate of
j seventy per centntn td she ptmiuussions now i
? allowed (hem by law, e.vcepj sucli districts
i and Carishe^ as pay* an amount lesa than
; eight hundred dollars tt? the Collector.
! III. The Tax Collectors ttl thai several Dis
! trias and Parishes in this Slate, in their re
? turns hereafter fo b- made, are; hereby rt
; quired and et joined to state the precise,
amounts of laxes collected by th*;m for .sup
'. porting the police of thc said several Districts
j and Parishes aforesaid,, stating the rate3 per
! centum o the. rrnmun^ ot ihe State tax col
' iectefij t?# ?s??ror?n?<^ -polis? pu:""
?! poses; and the ' total aui?'.'?t of conicrmW
? received by euch and every of such Tax Co?
j lectors, ard the rtte per centum of his com
I tiii.-sions, and thc Coiuptru.Ier General shall
i return the same in his report.
Free negroes, mulattoes and mestices
j are hereby lequired to make their returns and
j pay their taxes during the month of April:
I and the Tax Collector of St. Phillip's and
I St. Michael's is allowed until the month ot
June to receive the tuxes of white persons.
! V. The. lots and houses on Sullivan's Ja
i land shall be freed from taxation during ?he
I existing war between the Confed?rate States
. and ihe United Stales of America, the same
: being used by the troops of the Confederate
I Sinu s r-r by lite works for defence.
VI. That the Tax Collectors bc authorized
j to ex I end the lime for the receipt, and also
J for the-payment of taxes, and also for thc
payment thereof imo lite Treasury of this
j State, for a period of thirty days beyond the
' j peri-'ds therefor Hitherto allowed by law.
VII. That the sum- of two hundred and
fifty thousand dollars,, received by Wilmot
G. PeSuiissure, as Agent of the Stale, from
the Confederate. Government, and by him
paid into tho Treasury of this State, under
the resolution of the Confed?rale Congress iv
lative to tho con li ?gration in the city of
i ""harleston OH thc eleventh day of December,
' ousand e.ie.ht hundred and sixty-one,
' one U ,, , ,
; JJ all such other tunis ot money as
j an a ?.0, ^ ^ ^ ^ Confederate GoV
! mat be reed. ?ti
I . >e present vear amt placeo
I cr?ment during i. , . ' ,
.. , _ , bject to such appropria
i in tin! 1 reasury, i.e . ., , .
the ?lencial ASMIII
lions as may oe made hy
bly ol' (his Stale.
- ? - . .
Noble Sentiments.
<! Ol
' >. >t long since some ol' the Physician
j thu li mrisliiug pity nf Macon, published theu
\ fee bill, stating that, "lite Physicians of Ma
j con arc unwilling further to attend gratuit
j ously the poor am) destitute of the city.'' They
j exercised but their proper und just right in
? doing so. Four noble and generous hearicd
men. however, whono names ough. to be
known and their virtues appreciated by cve
j ry one : Dra. M. S. Thomson, John T. CeX,
j A. L. Llinkscale*, ?nd M. H. Freeman, pub
J lish a card protesting against the action in the
! name of humaniiy and justice, and S3y ;
M These parties have a perfect right to speak
j for. themselves, and :l that is their determi
? nation, bc it so, but wc object to bc included
j by the general term used, and deem it prop
j er to say that so far from endorsing that
j declaration, we are ready, in view of our
j present surroundings, to do more, if possible
for that class of our fellow creatures, many
! of whom are made " |>oorand destitute'' in
j part for our sakes, through whose sufferings
by reason of tho absence of their supporters
wc who remain at horneare enjoying our lives
and liberties ir. comparative security. .Should
tho City .Council still see proper to pay for
the Medicines used, so as to relieve ut from
pecuniary outlay in that behalf, we Khali b?
p cased, hut their not doing so shall lie no
bur to our tirona usc tuen u?u?ui?Mu-.uistH
most extent of our ability."* .
Nobler and mur.- patriotic wtimeots ha?
not been uttered during the war. . The hies
jugs of heaven will rene upon them.
Severe bat Just,
Referring to the re*?arjr..i of ^Y. Conrad. <
Louisiana, wlio spoke in the lower house '. <
ane Confedera'e Congress the other. day,' i
relation to the exemption of newspaper mei
the Mobile Tribune is only justly severe. ?VT
C. declared that the newspapers, b? ihougl
it probable, are " doing-more barm than good
.irrW-as-fur^bln^^ be declared that b
believed they could be better iTmpluyecT1
thc army " than in preaching to empty meet
ing bouses, or to old maids and grannies,
Tn reply to the ?ttack upon the press, th
Tribune tuyn :
If the exemption of printers gives no equii
aient for their service? in the anny, let then
be placed there withoutdelay. .'"But that-mat
is a fool, or has some especial personal griev
'ance against the craft, who cannot see tha
?hey are of almost indispensable rise--tba
is, when they are lionestly performing tin
duties of their vocation ; and we are glad b
say that we know of few exceptions to thii
high virtue within the Cotifedy*.lt? States. .
We venture also to asserf i t even tbi
least of them may be considerer >f ?s ?ucl
value to the general cause as auy of bal
the members of the Confederate Contr?es
Their enemies are those who lack the abilitj
to achieve the importance which their smbL
tion craves : those who are envious of th?
me:it which has ks due applause throogb
j tbeir-coinmos ; those whose mercenary pur
: po*es are exposed and thus checked. Th?3
o'Vicer who h:i* crawled to a pince by servili
! ty or fraud mid whose value is tested in bat
j tip, detests a newspaper, and would also, il
i his power were eiiual to bis de*ires, " hmrk'1
or hang all (hose who have mastered the re
' cundite arts of reading arid writing. The
I han ?i rs on of t?rese officers-the pickers up
I o'' the crumbs which fall from official tables,
("and there are many of them everywhere, they
are indignant when their masters are men
tioned in print, unless it be in disgusting hy
perbole, politicians who have girded on their
swotd ar.d fire usi: g it as an .instrument to
exhume and recreate their dead reputations ;
these and scores of others believe that a free
j pro.-i isa great evil, and ought to be snhjcC
[ i.-fi to military P""T'??."". Th,t py"^! ^
^beXOTtitM^^el? in ?bH^ne^^pcrJan, Jnjjt^?;
j inenV wl??ct:"ltlilies thy dt^Piiot^csrtsi^jj^ij
i country in a brotherhood of sympathy ; sees
? in ic a means of appealing to, and arousing
j sud encouraging the general patriotism ; sees
how it keeps the charitable feelings of our
people alive ; sees how it gives heart to de
sert ^ sees how. it pricks reputation which,
without it, might.be blown up to so great pro.
portions as to bring ruin on the country ; sees
j how it is constantly on hand to intercede for
1 the wronged and t.o sustain t he right ; sees
I how welcoinp it in to the thousands of house.
; bolds that, would he.in the suspense <.f igno
j raucc without i*. Its good uses are manifold and
I could only be properly appreciated if it were
j stricken ont of existence. But the^e char
I icteristics are obvious and p^ed no display,
j They who deny them may very justly be sua
I peeled of holding positions which they are
not fit (or-The sooner such men find their
level-are reduced to the ranks of military
or civil life-the better it will be for all of as
who are working in dead earnest to achieve
the ?mancipai' m. of our cauntry from the
sordid toils of Yankee despotism.
Mr. Boyce and the North-west.
The Richmond correspondent of the Char
leston Mercury has the following rumor on
! the position-of Mr. Boyce on the North-west,
i The rend?, i: -will bear in mind it is only ru -
I mor :
lt. is rumored that Mr. Boyce has been "mak
l ing a 'peech in secret session advocating eon
! eiliation towards the Northwest. Yesteiday,
I the House, in its anxiety to dispose of tho
question of impressments, refused to go into
secret session in order that Mr. Boyce might
conclude hi-* speech. What the temper of
the House is in regard fli the Northwest, I
I cannot suv. The tone of the Enquirer ind.'
eates the indisposition of the Administration^
*o rely on anything but hard blows-the riaht
Our poliey is the executionof the Con
view. w
script Lu correspondent says :
The sam?. ig forden the exchange of
Joe Hooker b. jjf jjfrjn dtJ
J newspapers, and *? K ^ f ^ on *
papers for getting . J. Wm ???
! shingle every week ar* taSfc r t?tm' w? w
?Ofconjcciural mpvcoont?O. Gt* ***
i need not bi sfloken about*
I *A H A ttl:' Ca8?.?-?Tbe Pfovisiooaj Coili
! millee"' of Botetcmrt county, Va., b?te given
I notice, by sJvcrtUctttetlt in the l''itid?stle jKir
' prcas, tbnt they will hut hereafter apport
: thc families ol soliiiors (rum that bollUty "io
j thc cveuCof their marrying."
Coot..-Thc Acte South, the Yankee paper
published at Hilton Head, contains, among
' other villainies, an advertisement of six
columns of laud sales " for unpaid direct
! tax?e in insurrectionary districts," which
sutes that thc lands there offer*! have been
j forfeited to the United States. Several hui
: drcd tracts of laud on St, Helena Island, La- '
. dy's Island, aud Pori Royal Island, are eou
! nitrated. The notice is signed A. D. Smith,
\V. E. Wording, anl Wm. Henry Brisbane,
Direct Tax Commissioners,
* ' ... **.

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