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Edgefield advertiser. (Edgefield, S.C.) 1836-current, July 14, 1915, Image 6

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026897/1915-07-14/ed-1/seq-6/

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DIFFERENCE IN SITTING HENS
iSome Fowls Are Lacking in Hen Sense
and Do Not Cover Their Eggs
in Proper Manner.
Some hens of course make better
mothers than others, but more than
this, some are much better than oth
ers for sitting itself, according to a
subscriber to Wallace's Farmer. Two
hens were each given an egg to cover
while waiting for the sitting of eggs
to come, and when the eggs arrived
two or three days later the two eggs
in the nests were taken out and bro
ken. The egg from hen No. 1 showed
a third less development than the egg
under hen No. 2. As the first five
;days are ihe most important time in
?thc sitting period, indications were
? that hen No. 2 wculd hatch out more
j chicks than hen No. 1. These results
,were indicated by the behavior of the
! two hens.
; Hen No. 1 seemed to be lacking
j (said the owner) in hen sense. She
j felt the fever of broodiness, but ap
jparently didn't know what was the
?matter with her, only she wanted to
?sit, and she sat. When she was taken
off the nest for food and water, she
?continued to sit, gluing her3elf to the
?floor like a lump of putty, picking up
the corn within her range, but mak
ing no effort to get what lay out of
?reach. .
f Hen No. 2 had work to do, and in
[tended to do it. When take from her
nest she expressed dissatisfaction, but
noting that her breakfast was ready,
she ate and drank, spread her feath
ers, stretched her muscles, and went
'back to her nest. No. 1 had to be
?put back. People sometimes think
that to be hen-hatched means well
?hatched; it doesn't always work out
that way: much depends on the qual
ity of the hen as an incubator.
FOULTRY FARM IS OUTLINED
Illustration Shows How Ten Acres
May Be Laid Out for Best Results
-Ample for One Man.
' A poultry farm of ten acres is am
ble for a one-man establishment and
fe. good living can be made on it. The
Illustration shows how the ten-acre
poultry farm may be laid out for the
Ibest results. Five thousand chickens,
'500 of them breeders, could be com
fortably carried on this farm when it
was running at its full capacity.
There are three breeding houses,
counting the cockerel house, and three
laying houses. Each laying house is
calculated to hold 1.500 laying hens,
writes Chesla C. Sherlock in Farm and
Home.. They may be built on any
scheme acceptable to the owner.
There is also a brooder house which
should accommodate 1,000 chicks at
,one time. The dwelling house and
farm barn complete the outlay of
buildings for the place.
It is planned to have from eighty to
one hundred fruit trees, although
there could be more. There are two
Lay-Out of Poultry Farm.
larg? fields which could be alternated
with the usual farm crops, the larger
one having ten colony houses for the
growing stock.
There is also a garden, a pasture
and a runway for the cockerels. .A
large share of the grain consumed by
the poultry could be raised on such a
place and there should be a good sur
plus revenue from the sale of g'arden
and fruit products. The detailed
scheme of the farm is left to be
worked out according to one's wishes.
1 WATCH FOR DROOPY CHICKS
'White Diarrhea ls Most Destructive
During First Ten Days After Hatch
ing-Remove Ailing Bird.
! Watch the brooder closely for the
. droopy chicks, especially during the
first ten days after hatching, for it is
during this period that white diarrhea
is most destructive. As a rule the
chicks are hatched with it, and it
usually develops in from four to six
days.
Take each droopy chick from the
ibrooder as soon as discovered, and be
careful to scald drinking vessels and
change the scratching litter.
After the first week the chicks are
'toot as susceptible to this diseaise, and
'will not immediately take it from one
(having lt.
| By following this plan the majority
'of the hatch may be saved.
Great Laying Strains.
Not every hen hatched from a great
laying strain will be a great layer. In
the national egg-laying contest, one
hen has been on the job two years
'and never laid an egg.
Fatten Before Marketing.
j Spring chickens, like other poultry
?io? sale, should be fattened before be
jink put on market, and the milk-fed
[Chick makes speedy growth.
HARRY'S INTERVIEW
j_By ADELA ^^^^^^j
(Copyright, 1914, by W. G. Chapman.)
It is not often that a young fellow,
after serving an apprenticeship of two
years on a newspaper, is in a position
to marry. So Harry Rogers accounted
himself a particularly fortunate young'
man.
Laura, to whom he had said good-by
*in the little home town when he start
ed for the metropolis to make his for
tune, had remained true to him. He
had been home three 'times on vaca
tion, and each time their love had
seemed more real to both.
Laura was to become his wife with
in a mouth! She was to go to New
York to stay with her aunt, whom
Harry had never met, and they were
to be married there. In a week he
would see Laura again.
Symonds,- the city editor, called
Harry over to his desK.
"We're going to publish a series of
funny interviews, and I want you to
handle the first," he said. "It's" with
the world-renowned authoress, Eliza
beth Crow Cavendish. She wrote A
Girl's Safety,' 'The Happy Marriage,'
etc. Shopgirls' slush, you know, and
takes herself very seriously as an up
lifting power among those who read
her twaddle. Think you can do a mock
serious interview to raise a laugh?"
"I think so," said Harry.
At eight o'clock that evening he waB
being shown into Miss Cavendish's
house. The elderly lady who awaited
him at the table apologized for not
rising, and the crutch beside her chair
explained her reason. Harry was con
scious of an impression distinctly
pleasing. He felt a little regretful
about his mission. Still, a newspaper
man is bound in strictest loyalty to
his newspaper.
It was evident that Miss Cavendish
took herself very seriously indeed, and,
becoming confidential, in her simple
way she showed him, under a pledge
of confidence, the manuscript of her
forthcoming work. "Cynthia's Happy
Choice."
I It was only after he reached the
street that Harry realized he must
turn this hospitable kindness into
mockery. However, he knew the duty
of a newspaper man; and perhaps be
cause of his humiliation he wrote the
funniest of all the interviews that ap
peared.
Harry received no letter from Laura
for several days. It had been planned
that he was td meet her at the station
and take her to her aunt's. He was
beginning to grow uneasy when he re
ceived a letter with the New York
postmark. '
"Dearest Harry," she wrote, "I have
arrived in New York, and I thought I
would give you a little surprise bytlet
ting you remain In ignorance until I
had actually come. You. see, my dear,
the train came in so late at night,
and, with your exacting duties, I
couldn't let you come and take me so
far and miss your sleep. I was quite
well cared for by the agent for the
Travelers' society.
"And now I have a little surprise for
you. My aunt is no less a person than
Miss Cavendish, the famous authoress.
What do you think of that?"
Harry read the letter and sat still
as though stunned. Then he per
ceived that another missive, with a ro
mantic pink scented envelope, lay be
side his papers. He opened it. It was
from Miss Cavendish.
"I cannot begin to tell you," it ran,
"how much I liked your delightful in
terview. But, Mr. Rogers, I am afraid
you have overestimated my influence
among working girls. Come and see
me and let us have a nice unprofes
sional chat."
With determination that did not
falter he made his way to Miss Caven
dish's house that evening. What
agonies of spirit he endured during the
day only he knows.
He was shown into the same room
as before. The room was empty. And
while he stood there, desperately gath
ering together the few strands of cour
age that remained to him, the door
opened and Miss Cavendish hobbled in
with her crutch.
She came up to him and held out
both hands.
"Now I knovr who Harry Rogers Is,"
she said, "he ia doubly welcome." And
the little old lady kissed him on the
cheek.
"Miss Cavendish," he began, "that
interview-I must tell you-I must ex
plain-"
"My dear boy, it was simply splen
did," the old lady answered. "It made
me feel prouder of my work than I
ought to feel. Not a word more, be
cause I am too old to blush, Harry."
And the young man realized that the
spiteful, envenomed shaft had passed
her by. She was utterly unconscious
of the hidden satire, of the malignant
sneers. She was too high to be struck
down by the poisoned arrow.
And while Harry stood in perplexity
before her, an awful relief in his heart,
Laura came in. And Miss Cavendish
quietly went out of the room.
If Laura's kisses comforted him,
they also made him feel abashed to
the lowest level of humiliation. '
"I read your beautiful interview,
Harry," she said. "And, do you know,
it 'makes me think you will rise very
high, when you can see so much in
auntie's writings. Many fine writers
have misunderstood her and her simple
aims-but you didn't, dear. And I am
happier than I can tell."
And it was that unconfessed secret
which he knew he must bear alone
thenceforth that made Laura'?
prophecy come tr*?.
A Soliloquy in
Two Paragraphs
'That's the third time this morning. I can't wait
a moment longer on that fellow. Let me see-what is
Smith's number?
"If Jones won't provide sufficient telephone facili.
ties for his customers, he can't blame me for dealing
elsewhere. Operator, give me 437."
How do you know this very occurrence doesn't
happen with your single telephone. Have an auxiliary
line; the cost is tricing. Call the business Office to*
day.
SOUTHERN BELL TELEPHONE J
AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY
Box 42, Columbia, S. C.
'NowServing ?000.000 Homes
LOOK FOR THIS
NEW PERFECTION GIRL
You'll see her in the windows
and on the counters of hardware,
furniture an$ department stores
everywhere.
She stands for the NEW
PERFECTION OIL COOK
STOVE - the simplest, most
efficient Oil Cookstove made.
Already it has made cooking
easier and kitchens cleaner for
over 2,000,000 housewives.
Made in 1, 2, 3 and 4 burner
sizes; ak) NEW PERFECTION
stoves with fireless cooking oven
attached.
Use Aladdin Security Oil
or Diamond White Oil
to obtain the best results in oil
Stoves, Heaters and Lamps.
PER
Ol
ION
ES
STANDARD OIL COMPANY
Washington, D. C.
Norfolk, Va. >
Richmond, Va.
(New Jersey)
(BALTIMORE)
Charlotte* N. C.
Charleston, W. Va.
Charleston, S. C.
FARM LOANS!
Long-Term Loans to Farmers a Specialty.
Your farm land accepted as security WITHOUT ENDORSER or
other COLLATERAL. Unlimited funds immediately available in de-?
nominations of Three Hundred and up. Established 1892. ,
JAS. FRANK & SON, Augusta, Ga.
\
m
NOTICE
m
mo <mN j
?8 Write me and I will explain gg j
m? how I was cured in four days g|v
?55 of a severe case of Pile of 40- |g? !
i*g vears' standing without pain, ???, j
ra knife or detention from busi- ggjj
? ness. No one need suffer from
|? this diseaae when this humane lgB
cure can be had right here in ^
SS South Carolina.
?? R. M. JOSE,
gu Route 4. Lamar, S. C.
GEO. F. M1MS
OPTOMETRIST
Eyes examined and glasses fitted
only when necessary. Optical
work of all kinds. .
EDGEFIELE, S. C.
J. C. LEE, President F. E. Gibson, Sec. and Treas.
FARMERS, MERCHANTS, BUILDERS,
If you are going to build, remodel -or repair,
we invite your inquiries.
COMPLETE HOUSE BILLS A SPECIALTY.
We manufacture and deal in doors, sash, blinds
stairs, interior trim, store fronts and fixtures,
pews, pulpits, etc., rough and dressed lumber,
lath, pine and cypress shingles, flooring, ceiling
and siding. s
Distributing agents for FKntkote roofing
Estimates cheerfully and carefully mane.
Woodard Lumber Co.
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA.
Corner Roberts and Dugas Streets.
Our Motto: tZ
RTRIGHT
METAL SHINGLES
never need repairs, are inexpen
sive, Jbeautiful and stormproof
OJ ^W?Joni have io worry
^about the roof
theyf~wojrtvJeak, burn^. curf\
?j? or raf like wood sAintfes. nor
crack/ike s Me. i
THE STORMPROOF ROOF
Uk
For Sale by
STEWART & KERNAGHAN
EDGEFIELD, S. C. *
ARRINGTON BROS. & CO.
Wholesale Grocers and Dealers in
Corn, Oats, Hay and all
Kinds of Feeds
Corner Cumming and Fenwick Streets
On Georgia R. R. Tracks
Augusta, Ga.
YOUR PATRONAGE SOLICITED
See our representative, C. E. May. .
SWIFTS WAR MESSAGE
Safety First
Fight for Maximum
Crop Yield.
WIN WITH SWIFT'S
TOP DRESSER
"It Pays to Use Them.
Insufficient plant food means to the growing plant just what in
sufficient food means to the human body.
Why buy Nitrate of Soda? SWIFT'S TOP DRESSER produces
better results with less money invested-means ECONOMY, RE
SULTS, SATISFACTION.
Cotton acreage has been reduced and plant food curtailed, there
fore crop conditions require immediate application of SWIFT'S TOP
DRESSER to assure COMPLETE maturity, which means bigger
profits.
SWIFT'S TOP DRESSER is well b?lanced-high in QUICK acting
Ammonia-sufficient Phosphoric Acid and Potash to supplement
needed plant food.
Use SWIFT'S HIGH GRADE TOP DRESSER. Means more crop!
More Quality! More Money!
SWIFT & COMPANY
FERTILIZER WORKS
CHARLOTTE,N. C.'
- CHESTER, S. C.
Factories:
WILMINGTON, N. C.
COLUMBIA, S. C.

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