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Edgefield advertiser. (Edgefield, S.C.) 1836-current, October 20, 1915, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026897/1915-10-20/ed-1/seq-2/

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ETTER MARKETS FOR ASPARAGUS
Association Formed By Growers of Five Towns Will Handle
Section's Output.
Co-operating with the Office of Mar
ket^ at Washington, Clemson College
Is?: working out some practical and ef
ficient marketing; schemes. Some of
tliOi. farming enterprises of South Car
Olma haxe been operating at a loss and
it la up to all c?uceiued io v-QUoiuer
and determine-upon some plan of ac
tion that will solve the problems of
marketing the state's products. Al
though the marketing situation has
not, by any means, been definitely
worked, out, some . very significant
WviV has nevertheless -been decided
upon and begun. One of the market
ing ?ehernes now under way is that
adopted recently by the asparagus
growers in the vicinity of Ridge
p Spring, Trenton, Williston, Elko and
Bladkvaie. - .
On July 19 about twenty of the as
panana growers met in an informal
way at Columbia with W. W. Long,
director of .extension at Clemson. The
me?Jtfas was in the nature ol! a round
tabta discussion, and the growers took
dt.as an opportunity to exchange.their
ideas and experiences. It developed
that, with a very few exceptions, the
. grower* ^ere operating at a loss. The*,
con^eaans was that the growers' sys
tem, ol marketing was wrong. They
were unanimous in the belief that they
ought to get together upon some united
?atuJ aoncerted scheme of sorting, grad
ing, pecking and selling their product
The growers next invited the mar
ket agent at Clemson College and C.
E.,Basset of the Ofliee of Markets and
Rural Organization, ?. S. department
of agriculture, to attend an Informal
meeking of asparagus men at Ridge
Spxb? '.nd another at Trenton. At
?the Ridge Spring meeting'"it soon de
ve"o^"fl *hflt *h? -TOT-eri. bael not sort
ied, graded and packed uniformly,
i Much emphasis was laid on the neces
? sity of adopting standard grades and a
j standard, pack and upon rigid sorting,
: grading, packing and inspection.
Mr. Basset pointed out ?he value of
??rixiing an asparagus Growers' Asso
ciation, adopting rules and methods
i satisfactory to all concerned, and put
I ting the management of the associa- j
noa in the hands of the best avail
able manager. This manager was to
have competent inspectors to see that
all asparagus coming into and going
out of the association quarters was up
to the standard. The Inspectors were
to see that all cars were carefully load
ed and routed in accordance with the
manager's instructions. The manager
was to keep in touch with all markets
and prices, and to sell to the best mar
kets.
With these suggestions in mind, the
'growers formed a temporary organiza
tion. A meeting for further organiza
tion was then held at Trenton and rep-1
resentatives from Ridge Spring,
Trenton, Williston, Elko and Black
ville? were present J. N. Knight was
chosen as chairman and B. R. Tillman,
Jr.* as secretary and by-laws were
adopted. Eight representative direc
tors were selected who will meet in
January to perfect the organization,
draft articles of Incorporation and
definitely decide upon a manager, in
spectors and officers for the associ
ation, j
The success of this association will
depend not only on procuring a capa
ble manager but also upon the con?
certed support of every member.
FRED W. HOFMANN, .
Market Agent
Clemson Agricultural College.
STATE Cl Wt IRE CORN 1
IF FARMERS WILL SELECT SEED
Selection of Seed One of Most Effective Methods of in
creasing Average Yield-Some Points to
Look For in Corn.
In.. 1914 South Carolina planted 1,
?25 ,?051 acres in com, producing 36,
538,000 bushels, or 18.2 bushels par
acrev. Wisconsin, in the same year,
planed. 1,725,000 acree, producing 69,
53S.0?Q: bushels, or 18.2 bushels per
acre: Although South Carolina plant
ed'25?fi00 acres moro than did Wis
consin the latter state made. 33,324,000
busliyde, more corn-almost twice as
muc4 as this state.
This*, is not as it should be. We
sbouWL be able to make as much corn
per acre as any state. The question
is* hgv.' are we to go about it? There
are4 taro principal ways to increase
euri average and under our conditions
both, ire necessary. The f.rat step
lies, ts Improving our land by means
of t?suwigh preparation, increasing
the. "supply of humus, and using com
mer?ai fertilizers intelligently. Th?
seco4f -step is the Improvement of
seed., fej careful field selection. It has
already been demonstrated that our
improved lands are capable of mak
ing ?bom 40 to more than 100 bushels
per; acre. Just how much more can
be- grown on one acre with properly
selected seed is yet to be seen, bot we
ehoutf. certainly by all means give
the-, aeed question more serious
tboug&t
The livestock breeder is far more
particular in selecting breeding stock
than, ls the average corn grower in
selecting seed corn. Yet the laws
governing livestock improvement are
the same as those governing corn im
provement The man who raises, hogs
keeps only the best sows, which give
the . largest and most vigorous litters
of pigs. As some sows give better
litters than other*, so some ears of
corn will produce more corn than
other ears. Therefore, make an ef
fort to select the best ears for seed.
After selecting them, test them to see
which yield best Seed selection must
begin In the field, in order to know
what kinds of stalks the ears come
from and what kind of chance they
'" "j;. -, } ' . .
Making Field Selections.
! Before making selections, fix on the
type of stalk and ear desired and stick
to this type. Keep it always in mind
so that the selection will be alike.
Selections should always be made, un
der uniform and normal cinditJons.
Do not select from the best land.
Always take an average spot in the
field.
The stalk must be the first consid
eration. A large* ear taken from a
pile, of corn will not necessarily be a
producer of large ears, since H might
have had a better chance than some
others in the field, the stalk might
have been too tall and slender, snd
the ear mighi: have been too high en
the stalk. It is, therefore, necessary
to know the stalk from which an ear
eomes.
Select from stalks which are strong
should be just long enough to permit
the ear to turn down at maturity. If
earliness Is desired, such stalks can
be kept separata. Db sot gather the
corn until it is well matured. Mark
each desirable stalk with a tag or by
some other method and leave it stand
ing in the field. If the corn ls to be
cut and shocked, the marked corn can
be left and shocked separately.
After the Field Selection.
Field selection is of large import
ance, but tnese is work still to be done
after the corn has been shocked and
taken to the barn. Experiments have
8npwn that an ear which is cylindri
cal, gently tapering, and has straight
rows of deep, plump kernels will prro
duce the highest percentage of grain.
The accompanying: photograph shows
an ear of the desired type. The cob
should be medium to small, rather
than large. Large cobs mean a small
er percentage of grain, as well as a
possibility of causing the grain to
mold on account of the cob's not dry
ing out. The grains should be long
and full. A gently wedge-shaped and
A GOOD AMD A BAD EAR
A-Shows poor ear with too much
space between kernels: a-shows
pointed kernels of same.
B-shows good ear with no space
between kernels, b-shows plump
kernels of same.
plump kernel will leave very little
space between the TOWB. Sharply
pointed grains are usually loos? on
the cob.
The spacing and shape of the ker
nels will vary with the variety, but
care should always be taken to select ]
only those ears that have well de
veloped kernels that are not loose on
the cob. The careful study and selec
tion of the individual ears must be
done after the corn has been brought
to the barn and the farmer can do it
in his apare time. ' As soon as the
corn has been carefully selected lt
should be stored in a well ventilated
room out of reach of rats and mice.
It should be inspected, at intervals
and, stocky, and gently tapering from j throughout winter to see that it is Ih \
the ground wp. The ear should not good condition.
ba growing h.gher thsn cuss shoulder,
as ttiis has un important boaii^s on!
the labor of aa'Lterin*. The shank!
F. G. TARBOX, JR.,
Extension Corn Breeding Expert,
Clemson Agricultural College.
A CLOGGED SYSTEM NEEDS ATTEN
TION.
Are you bilious, dizzy and list-j
.e*8? Dr. Kind's life Pills"1
'.aken "at once seizes upon cons ti pa
ion and starts the bowels moving
naturally and easily. Moreover it
! acts without triping. Neglect of a
cloeraed s.\ stein often leads to most
serious complications-^ Poisonous
matters and a. body poorly function
ing need immediate attention. If
you wjsh to wake up to-morrow
morning happy in mind and entire
ly satisfied, start ye ur treatment to
night. ?Sjb. a battle.'--2
Light >5aw, Lathe and Shin
gle Mills, Engines, Boilers,
Supplies and repairs, Porta
ble, Steam and Gasoline En
gines, Saw Teeth;-, Files, Belts
and Pipes. 'WOOD SAWS
and SPLITTERS
Gins and Press Repairs. .
Try LOMBARD,
AUGUSTA. OA.
Southern, Railway
Premier Carrier of the South
. Schedule effective April 18, 1915.
Trains arrive from ,
No. y; Time
208 Augusta, Trenton 8:20 am
230 Colnmbia, Trenton 10:55 a m
232 Charleston, Aiken 5:05 pm
206 Columbia, Tienton 8:85 p m
Trains depart to
;No. Time
1209 Trenton, Columbia 7:20 am
231 Trenton. Augusta 10:10 am
; 229 Aiken, Charleston 11:20 p m
290 Trenton, Augusta 7:40pm
Schedules published only as in
formation and are not guaranteed.
For further information apply
to
J. A. To^iVNSEND,*
Edgefield, S. C.
Ticket Agent.
I To Farmers and Stock Raisers:
Owing to improved business con
ditions and high price cotton, farm
stock will be high for *ears to come..
Now is the time io ir^ist in a good
brood mare with size and raise
some good stock for home use. All
: stock dealers agree that horses and
. mules will be high. A good brood
( mare will be a very profitable ani
; mal to keep. I will have on hand
here next season my splendid com
bination Stallion and two of the
best bred Jacks.
JAS. H GARRETT.
Clark's Hill, -3. C., Oct. 14.
NOTICE
Write rae and I will explain
how I was cured in four days
of a severe case of Pile of 40
?ears' standing without pain,
nife or detention from busi
ness.- No one need suffer from
this disease when this humane
cure can be had right here in
South Carolina.
R. M. JOSE,
Route 4. Lamar, S. C.
FIRE
INSURANCE
Go to see
Harting
&
Byrd
Before insuring elsewhere. We
represent the best old line com
panies
Harting & Byrd
At the Farmers Bank, Edgefield
VW%AA^WV/VNA/WWWWWWWV\
DR-J. S. BYRD,
Dental Surgeon
OFFICE OVER POJJTOFFICE.
Residence Thone 17-R. Office 3.
CENUINE
, Miss Myrtle Cothrura,
o! Russe? ville, Ala., says:
"For nearly a year, I suf
fered with terrible back-,
i acne, pains in my limbs,
and my head ached nearly
all the time. Our family
doctor treated me, but
only gave me temporary
relief. I was certainly in
bad health. My . school
teacher advised me to
TAKE
Tlte Woman's Tonic
I took two bottles, in all,
and was cured. 1 shall
always praise Cardui to
sick and suffering wo
men." If you suffer from
pains peculiar to weak
women, such as head
ache, backache, or other
symptoms of womanly
trouble, or if you merely
seed a tonic for that tired,
nervous, worn-out feel
ing, try Cardui E-ff
Iii
Make the Old Suits
Look N?w
We are belter prepared
than ever, to do first-class
work in cleaning and press
ing of all kinds. Make your
old pants or suit new by let
ing ns'olean and press them*.
' Ladies skirts and suits al
so cleaned and pressed. Sat
isfaction guaranteed.
; Special attention giv^n to La
dies' Silk Waists and Skirts.
IEdge field Pressing Club
WALLACE" HARRIS, PROP.
SHEPPARD BUILDING
?CHESTER S PILLS
DIAMOND ?5?lSk BRAND
LADIES !
JUk/MF Bran** fot CHI-CHHS-TER'S A
DIAMOND BRAND PILLS in RBI? and/U.
GOLD metallic boret, sealed with B4ue< Q}
Ribbon. TASS MO OTHER. Dny oFyonr V/
Druggist ttl Ilk ftr cnr.CEKS-T?H'S V
BiAMOND BUA ND PILLS, for twenty-five
years regarded aa-Best, Safest, Always Reliable.
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS
SS EVERYWHERE SS
Woo
See our big
Wood Heaters
Coal Heaters
COAL HODS
COAL VASES
BRASS FIRE
SHOVEL AND
!' BRASS AND)
We Install all
Stewar
"MONEY"
The mint makes it and under the terms
of the CONTINENTAL MORTGAGE,
COMPANY you can secure it at 6 per |
cent for any legal purpose on approved
real estate. Terms easy, tell us your j
wants and we will co-operate with yon.
908-9 MUNSEY BLDG.,
Baltimore, Maryland.
duros Old Sot?;, . ...v . v ..indies Won't Cure
ri>e worst canes, no matter cf how lon?; arandin K
are cured by Uv* aouderiul, old reliable Dr
Fbrter'B Antiseptic Healing OIL Itre?evei
.-sin aad Heals at thc sam.* risas. 2Sc5Gc,?U/
fresh Shipment by Express
Almost Daily
_i_'._:_j
For cale by the quart or served any style in our
. restaurant. Take your dinner with us when in town.
Alfi of the Fresh Fruits in
Season
ames Ve lix
Next Door to Post-Office
IT MAKES flo
OfflSoDiiw
To lave A
BANK
ACCO
Qwnight 1909, by C. E. Zimmerman Co-No. 44
OF all the unhappy homes,
not one in a hundred has a bank
account and not one home in a hundred who has a
bank account is unhappy. It seems almost foolish to
put it off any longer, when it is such a simple, easy
matter to start a bank account.
BANj: OF EDGEFIEtB
OFFICERS : J. C. Sheppard, President; B. E. Nicholson, vice-President;
E. J. Miros, Cashier; J. H. Allen, Assistant Oashier.
DIRECTORS : J. C. Sheppard, Geo. W. Adams, Thoa. H. Rainsford, John
Rainsford, B. JE. Nicholson, A. S. Tompkins, C. C. Fuller, E. J. Mims, J. H.
Allen. V
and Coal
Heaters
line of Coal and Wood Heaters
-, - - - $2.00 to $10.00
-? - W?k $3.50 to $16.00
STOVE PIPE
; . ELBOWS
SETS STOVE MATS
TONGS ENAMEL WARE
RONS TIN WARE
of Our Stoves FREE of Charge
t&Kernaghan
FARM LOANS!
Long-Term Loans to Farmers a Specialty.
Your farm land accepted as security WITHOUT ENDORSER or
other COLLATERAL. TTrtlim?tecf funds rntmediate'y available in de
nominations of Three Hundred and up. Established 1892.
JAS. PRANK ?Sk SON, Augusta, Ga.

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