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Edgefield advertiser. (Edgefield, S.C.) 1836-current, January 12, 1916, Image 3

Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC

Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026897/1916-01-12/ed-1/seq-3/

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GOOD COW STALL AND FLOOR
Dai-y Building Should Bs Constructed
y/ith Aim to Keep Cows Dry and
Clean as Possible.
While it is more pleasant to work in
fine barns, it is not necessary to have
them in order to get good resulta, but
items under this head are quite nec
essary for getting the best returns.
With the comfort of the animal in
visir, our buildings should be con
structed with the aim to keep the cows
as c ry and clean as possible. Cement
floors built with about the same thick
ness as sidewalks and so construct
ed as to offer good drainage are the
most serviceable, says a writer in West- i
ern Farmer. They should contain a
gutter 18 to 20 inches wide and seven j
Stall and Floor Plan.
to eight inches deep. The gutter
should slope to one edge and also to
on? end, as in Fig. 1, which shows
a cross-section.
The front g?ts should bs adjusta
ble, so as to close to the rear edge of
the platform. Tho manger may be
made of wood or cement, but in all
cases should bs partitioned off so as
to keep each cow's food separate.
Some stockmen object to cement floors
on thc ground that they give the
cows rheumatism and produce sore
feet. If proper bedding is given,
there should be no trouble. Many
think such a floor construction extrav
agant and impractical for the average
dairyman, but it is not. While tho
originel cost may be a little more, it
will be cheaper in the end and far
more serviceable. Such a floor will
outwear many made of wood and will
be far more sanitary in every way.
They are easier to clean and do not
give off odors like a board floor,
which soaks up filth and causes an
ever-present odor in the stable.
The stalls should be separate so
that each animal will be by herself,
and she will soon learn to take her
own place when entering the stable.
Ihis is not saying that good stables
cannot be built of wood, but it is to
remind the man who contemplates
building or wishes to remodel his barn
that it pays to build well.
TO GET BETTER DAIRY COWS
Breeders' Association Keeps One In
Touch With Best and Modern
Ways of Managing Herd.
L Treat cows gently and avoid ex
citement.
' 2. Be regular in time of milking.
1 3. Keep stables clean, well-lighted
and ventilated.
4. Weigh the milk of each cow at
[milking time.
5. Get your neighbor to share with
Jersey Cow With a Fine Record.
i
you in owning a Babcock milk tester,
and test the product of each cow.
6: Discard the animals which have
failed at the end of the year to pay
for their keep.
7. Breed your cows to a purebred,
registered dairy bull from a family
having large and profitable produc
tion of butter fat.
8. Raise well the heifer calves from
cows, which for one or more genera
tions have made large and profitable
-productions of milk and butter fat. j
9. Breed heifers to drop their first
calves at twenty-four to thirty months
of age. Give cows six to eight weeks'
Test between lactation periods.
10. Join a dairy cattle breeders' as
sociation. It will help you keep post
ed and in touch with the best and
most modern ways of managing your
tlairy herd.
For the Silo.
Short, immature corn should be al- j
lowed to stand until nearly dry before
.putting into the silo. That is, the
leaves should be nsarly dry; the stalk
should be pretty well filled with sap.
ilf this corn is put in while too green
ftt may make sour siiage.
Ideal for Keeping Milk Cool.
A springhouso or a refrigerator is
the ideal thing for keeling milk cool,:
but million of pounds of good butter,
<are made every year with no better
lequiprr.ent than a tank for the cans;
ttille? with a pump from a well.
Repair Leaking Teat.
If a cow has a little hole in ftxe
Bide of her teat, through which the
milk squirts, wait till she is dry, then
scrape rli? edges of the hole till lt
bleed? r.nd sew together. Take out
the stitches when lt heals.
VARIETY OF RECIPES
ALL WORTH REMEMBERING BV
CONSCIENTIOUS COOK.
Vegetable Soup as lt Should Be Mad?
for the Best Results-Potato That
Will Be Attractive to the
Invalid.
Vegetable Soup-Take one large po
tato or two small ones, one carrot and
one turnip of medium stae, and ont
small onion; wash, pare and slice
them, and let them boil for one hour in
one quart of water, adding parsley 01
toy herb preferred for flavoring, and
more water as it boils away, so thal
there will be a quart when done.
Thicken with a spoonful of flour or
cornstarch, dissolved in a little cold
water; or a spoonful of rice or any
coarse cereal may be added when thu
vegetables are half cooked. Strain ofi
the liquid, season to taste, and add a
few spoonfuls of sweet cream. If n
?tsh a little more substantial ls de
sired, the vegetables may be rubbed
through the strainer also and mixed
with the liquid.
Broad Panada.-Toast slowly several
slices of stale light bread, until they
are a golden brown all through. Pile
them in a bowl sprinkling each ona
with a littles sugar and a pinch of salt;
then cover with boiling water, close
tightly, set tat bowl in a pan of boil
ing water and let simmer gently until
the bread ls Uk? Joily. Serve warra,
with sugar and cream and a grating of,
aoitmeg. j
Potato foran Invalid.-Where potato
is allowed, select such as will boil up ;
dry and mealy. Peel them and boil un
til well done, then mash very thor
oughly with a wire masher until per-1
factly free from lumps. Add rather
more salt than usual a:ad several
spoonfuls of thick, sweet cream; then
beat until perfectly smooth and light,
and serve at once. Potato served in
this way is delicious and much more
easily digested by a weak stomach
then when eaten with butter.
Fruit Toast-Fruit toasts are de
licious and appetizing and may be
made either with fresh or canned j
fruit. Dip the slices of toast in the hot
juice, removing them quickly to a hot j
dish, then thicken the juice slightly i
with cornstarch, adding the pulp, j
rubbed through a sieve or finely
chopped,, and poursall over the toast.
Fruit Whip.-A nourishing way of ,
serving fruit, either fresh or canned, ?
is to press it through a sieve or wire '?
gravy strainer and then stir it into i
whipped cream, regulating the amount
of fruit as desired and sweetening to
taste.
Egg Souffle Toast-Place a slice of
toast on a white enameled plate,
spread with fresh butter or very thick
sweet cream, heap on top the stiffly
whipped white of an egg, hollowing
out the top to form a nesst. In this
place the yolk. Set in the oven to
cook the egg lightly.
Oyster Pate.
One pint oysters, one tablespoonful
each butter and flour, one cupful
cream, cayenne, grated nutmeg, yolk ;
of one egg, chopped parsley. Line a
shallow baking dish with rich crust.
Make sauce of butter, flour, cream,
sauce, and when heated through whip
in the well-beaten egg yolk. At once
pour into the pastry crust (previously
baked) and heat in oven about eight
minutes. The crust can be molded
over inverted muffln cups or made in
the regular baking dish lined with
paste, and even covored with a second
crust is most attractive.
Economical Cake.
The most surprising of cakes can
be produced without eggs or butter.
'To a teaspoonful of bicarbonate of I
soda dissolved in a teaspoonful of
warm water add a cupful of sour milk,
three-quarters of a cupful of brows
sugar and a half a cupful of treacle. :
See that the sugar is well dissolved, 1
and then add two cupfuls of brown
flour, a good pinch of ginger and a ,
teacpoonfui of cinnamon. Beat to ]
smoothness, and pour in while stir- j
ring a quarter of a pound of floured j
raisins-less can be used. Bake in a j
slow oven for a good hour. This cake
is economical, and will keep a long
time, but it is better not to cut it
for a day or two.
Manhattan Pudding.
Mix.together the juice of three or
anges, a lemon and a half cupful of j
sugar; let stand several hours. Whip
a cupful of heavy cream, add a half
cupful of powdered sugar and a cup
ful of chopped nuts or candied fruit.
Rub a mold sparingly with olive oil,
pour in the fruit juices, spread with
the whipped cream mixture and cover
with paraffin paper, put on the lid and
bury in ice and salt for three hours.
Serve garnished with sections of or
ange which have stood over night in
a thick sirup of sugar and water.
Scrambled Eggs With Asparagus Tops.
Melt three ounces of butter in a
saucepan, break into it six fresh eggs;
season with a pinch of salt, half a
pinch of pepper and a third of a pinch
of grated nutmeg. Mix thoroughly
without stopping for three minutes,
uaing a spatula and having the pan
om a very hot stove. Add a quarter
of a bunch of freshly boiled asparagus
tops.
Apple Float.
When making apple float, try bak
ing the apples instead of stewing them.
The pulp is removed from the skins
nd mixed with tho whites of the egg,
which makes the float much lighter
:han the old way.
Ru
RUIN WILL BENEFIT TOWNS
Destruction by Armies Will Make
Necessary the Construction of
Whola Communities Anew.
Every town of importance in East
Prussia that has suffered at the de
vastating hand of the Russians has
decided to incorporate a municipal
garden section in its plans for rebuild
ing.
Many of the destroyed towns are so
completely ruined that it is going to
be necessary to razo what little is left
and construct the whole community
anew. This makes it eminently feasi
ble to apportion off a section, that can
be devoted to the desirable city gar
den feature.
Many of the communities also are
planning for a series of municipally
constructed and owned houses for
workmen, single home structures with
two, three and four rooms, which ulti
mately can' be purchased by their oc
cupants cn the familiar easy-payment
plan.
Plans of thia character ar? already
well advanced in Gerdauen, Tapiau.
Orteisburg. Lyck and other communi
ties, and additional municipalities are
preparing to follow suit
HOUSING AN OUTDOOR METER
Unique Davice for Use In Districts
Whers Electricity ls Ussd
for Pumping.
For use in the irrigating districts of
Oregon, where many of the agricultur
ists employ electric energy for pump
ing purposes, a light and power coin
Outdoor Meter.
pany has designed an inexpensive out
door housing for its meters. This con
sists of a wooden box divided into two
parts, the upper of which inclose* the
switchboard and fuses, and the lower,
the meter. A door gives immediate
access to the switches and fuses, while
a cover plate securely screwed in place
over the second compartment protects
the meter, which, however, is visible
for reading. The box is supported on
a substantial framework several feet
from the ground.-Popular Mechanics
Beautifying the Streets.
Palms lining the downtown side
walks comprise a unique feature of
city beautification in Los Angeles, Cal.
The work of installing has just boen
completed, says the National Real Es
tate Journal.
Alo:ag 50 blocks of the heart of the
city have been placed 1,100 splendid
specimens of the Chamerops Excel
sas palms. The work was done by the
county at an expense of some $20,
000, as part of a general beautifica
tion scheme for California expositions
this year. The improvement is de
signed to be permanent.
Delicate trailing vines and nastur
tiums have been planted about the
roots of the trees and give a green
and flower effect against the brown
trunks.
The palms are set in wooden tubs,
which in turn are placed in cement
boxes. The lowest branches are about
eight feet above the sidewalk. The
watering is done at night by the city
street sprinkling department.
Cut the Weeda and Grass.
Whether you aro' a renter or an
owner, you should not permit grass
and weeds to "take" tho sidewalk.
Flies and mosquitoes bred in the tan
gled grass of a home owner are . Just
as annoying and poisonous as theso
that are brought to life on the rented
pr?mices. And the blow to civic boau
ty is as severe in the one instance as
in the other. Don't be a drawback
to comfort, health and civic beauty,
which i3 to say, don't weed and grass
encumber the sidewalk of the place
that you call home.-Corsican (Tex.)
Sun.
Value of Street Trees.
"New Yurk would be a far different
city," says the Evening Mail, "if a mil
lion trees were growing along its 3,500
miles of streets and roads. Manhat
tan highways also would afford room
for 2CO.C0O trees, which would greatly
improve property values and the pub
lie health."
HOW TO CURE COLDS
Avoid exposure and drafts. Eat
right. Take Dr. King's New Dis
covery. It is prepared from Pine
I Tar, healing halms and mild laxa
tives. Dr. King's New Discovery
kill?? and expels the cold germs,
soothes the irritated throat and al
lays inflammation. lt h^als the
mni'ons membrane Search as you
will,you cannot find a better cough
and cold remedy. Its use 45 years
is a guarantee of satisfaction. At
all Druiitriflt*:. 2
f
A Few Hours Real
easure in the
Evening
rip HE bright
light of the
Rayo lamp
makes reading and
sewing real pleas
ures these evenings.
The Rayo gives a
steady light that
can't hurt the eyes.
It requires almost
no attention. Its
simplicity of design
makes it easy to
keep clean. You
don't have to re
move the shade to
light it-just'lift the
gallery and touch a
match. Most con
venient - most
efficient - most
economical.
Use Aladdin Security
Oil or Diamond White
. Oil to obtain best reJuits
in Oil Stoves, Lamps and
Heaters.
The Rayo is only one
of our many products
especially suitable for
use on the farm.
Standard Household
Lubricant
Standard Hand Separator
Oil
Parowax
Mica Axle Grease
Eureka Harness Oil
Matchless Liquid Gloss
If your dealer does not
carry them, write to
our nearest station.
STANDARD OIL COMPANY
(New Jersey) '
BALTIMORE
Washington. D. C. Charlotte. N. C
Norfolit. Va. Charlton. W Vi
Richmond. Va. Charleston, S. C
HEMSTREET
&
ALEXANDER
Guxs
REVOLVERS
CARTRIDGES, ETC.
JUST BELOW
Ga. R. R. Bank
64-7 BROAD STREET
AUGUSTA, GA.
B. F. JONES
Graduate Veterinarian
EDGEF?ELD, S. C.
Trespass Notice.
All persons are warned not iff
hunt on land owned or controlled
by me. This means everybody, so
please stay off.
G. T. SWEARINGEN.
Trenton, S. C.
?3^-aimil i---a
v . . . ?. ? >w
I J. C. LEE, President F. E. Gibson, Sec. and Treas.
FARMERS. MERHANTS, BUILDERS,
If you are going to build, remodel or repair,
we invite your inquiries.
COMPLETE HOUSE BILLS A SPECIALTY.
We manufacture and deal in doors, sash, blinds
stairs, interior trim, store fronts and fixtures,
pews, pulpits, etc., rough and dressed lumber,
lath, pine and cypress shingles, flooring, ceiling'
and siding.
Distributing agents for Flintkote roofing
Estimates cheerfully and carefully mane.
V/oodard Lumber Co
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA.
Corner Roberts and Dugas Streets.
Our Motto: S
Our Edgefield Friends
Are invited to make our store their headquarters
when in Augusta.
W ; are better prepared than ever before to supply
their.rieeds. Eyery department of our large stock is
fiiledvwith stylish fall merchandise.
?n Dry Goods we were never better stocked. Our
Shoes were bought from the leading ir anufacturers.
Our stock of Men's and Boys' Clothing was never
more complete.
We invite the ladies to see our tailored suits frc m
the largest makers of women's ready-to-wear factory in
the country.
Our Millinery Department is also filled with the
most Stylish Hats and Trimmings ever brought to Au
gusta. Do not fail to call in to see us whether you
buy or not.
Augusta Bee Hive
816-918 Broad Street Augusta, Georgia
A.J.R
J & R
E E
WEI
^We have the largest assortment of pres
ents in every department that we have ever
shown. We have ordered largely of Clocks.
Watches, Gold and Silver Jewelry, Sterling
Silverware, Cut Glass and China. Every de
partment is filled.
It matters not what you want we have it or
will order it out at once.
Come in to see us. We have our entire stock
marked very low, much lower than you find the
same class of goods elsewhere.
706 Broad Street, Augusta, Georgia .
I
EEADQUAKTEKS FOE
We announce to our Edgefield friends that we carry
'the largest stock of Fresh Fruits, Candies and miscella
neous Table Delacacies in Augusta. Come in to see
us when in the city
California . Fruit. Store
Corner Jackson and Ellis Sts.
Augusta, Georgia
VOTAN
The wondefully different coffee in
the
Hermetically Sealed ?an
SOLD BY
Penn & Holstein

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