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Edgefield advertiser. (Edgefield, S.C.) 1836-current, September 06, 1922, Image 1

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EDGEFIELD, S. C., WEDNESDAY SEPT. 6, 1922.
No. 30.
JOHNSON LETTER.
Women Cast Their Ballots.
Fats and Leans Play Ball
For Fire Department.
Voting at the primary began quite
early on last Tuesday, August 29th.,
and there was much interest manifes
ted to the point of the individual
getting in a vote.
Our women voted for the first
time, and all parties were most cour
teous and there was every indication
that the stamp of approval was on
the woman's vote.
While. some of the women were
voting, one heard a gentleman re
mark: "My, but this looks good to
me to see all these women here to
vote.
Our politics, in a broad sense, is
rotton, certainly not made this way
by a vote of the women, and noth
ing but their vote will cleanse it ail."
The womanhood of South Caroli
na, of Edgefield county, is a force
that can be relied upon to exert its
self to the right side of every moral
and social question.
Beyond the peradventure of a
doubt, the women of this country can
be relied upon, either at the polls,
the jury box, to cast their vote for
law and rigid law enforcement, and
for the candidate that best promotes
this, and stands for only that which
means for good.
As a means for raising funds for
the fire department, a ball game was
had here on last Friday afternoon be
tween the "Fats and leans" of the
town. There was a large crowd out
and the game was truly amusing.
The team was well balanced, and
during the game the recruits from
each side would run in the game.
The leans finally won out, the score
being 15 lo 12.
"The hot day waas kinder against
us," one of the Fats said in a pant
ing voice.
Miss Carrie Fulton, who has been
.Yla??ing- il vs. W.. S-JElraoke, bas re
turned to Connie Maxwell orphan
age, where she holds a position.
Mrs. Taylor Goodwyn has return
ed to Greenwood after a visit in the
home of her father, Mr. A. S. Wertz.
The High School opened on Tues
day of this week, as Monday was
"Labor Day." Some of the pupils
seemed of the opinion that it should
not open at all, as each school day
was "Labor Day."
Mr. George Hardy, now of Atlan
ta, is visiting at his home near town.
Mr. and Mrs. Janie Dunby and
family, of Graniteville, have been
for a visit in the home of Mr. and
Mrs. J. M. Turner.
Mrs. Frank Landrum and Eliza
beth and Marie Lewis, of Florence,
have been guests of relatives here.
Master John Allen, Jr., visited in
the home of his aunt, Mrs. Willie
Tompkins during the past wee*k.
Miss Emmie Wright left on Sun
day to resume her school /duties at
Woodlawn, N. C.
Miss Mallie Waters has been vis
iting her sister, Mrs. David Philips,
at Springfield.
Miss Lizzie Huiet has returned
to her home in Charlotte after a vis
it in the home of her sister, Mrs.
Mary Waters.
Miss Elise Black, of Bamburg, has
been the guest of Mrs. B. L. Boat
wright.
Miss Grace Turner has returned
from a visit to Miss Margaret Mc
Ghee, in Columbia.
Mrs. P. N. Lott has been sick dur
ing the past week, and her friends
will be glad to know that she :s now
much improved.
Miss Mary Waters has returned to
Augusta, where she has a position.
Mr. Edward Parrish returned to
Newberry on Saturday after a visit
in the home of his aunt, Mrs. G.G.
Waters, and other relations.
A surprise marriage was that of
Sunday afternoon, the happy couple
being Miss Janie Rhoden and Mr.
Will Adams.
The marriage took plaace at the
Baptist parsonage, Rev. W. S.
Brooke peforming the caremony, and
was witnessed by two of three
friends.
The bride is the oldest daughter
of Mr. Hansford Rhoden, and is a
young woman of many beautiful
traits of character. .
The best wishes for the young cou
ple.
The Johnston High School will
'Or?'.'' >
Official l?eturns
Primary Election, Edgefiejl County, August 29,1922
PRECINCTS :
For Governor
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Total
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283
31
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195
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158
28
34
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26
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17
53
943
56
76
66
147
295
226
233
59
105
48
98
92
120
36
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1821
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39
18
119
34
45
187
48
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21
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785 476 709 |109l| 1814
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195
146
83
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84
82
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293
225
231
59
105
48
98
92
119
36
44
120
56
76
66
147
295
226
232
60
105
48
98
92
120
36
43
120
1820
56
75
66
147
295
226
233
60
104
48
98
92
120
36
43
120
1819
19
22
38
86
190
114
153
26
49
38
55
40
57
16
27
71
1001
37
53
28
59
102
103
74
34
55
10
39
52
62
20
16
47
I
791
soon have a fine foot ball team, and
several of the young gentlemen are
in training and the force will be tak
en from these. Mr. Leightzey, of S.
C. University is coacher, and he has
aroused much enthusiasm in the or
ganization, and from the amount of
interest manifested he could organ
ize several teams.
Athletics is a great thing to arouse
a good school spirit, and is splendid
for the.locaji field, and abroad, as
well, when it i s not a hinderance to :
studies.
Miss Frances Turner entertained
the Bridge club Thursday afternoon
in a very pleasant manner, there be
ing some visitors present as well as
the members.
Miss Maud Sawyer won the top
score prize, an embroidered pillow
top, and Mrs. Julian Bland received
the consolation, a hand made hand
kerchief. The guest prize was cut for
and Mrs. Leland Miller drew this, a .
daintily embroidered handkerchief.
A tempting repast was served.
Miss Antionette Denny has been
for a visi t to friends at Saluda.
Mrs. Alice Cox visited at Bath, .
the first of the, week.
Mrs. Claud Herlong and little son,
are at home from a visit to relatives
at Saluda.
Mrs. W. I. Pinder is now improv
ing and her many friends hops that
she can soon be out among them a
gain.
Dr. Horace Wright has returned
to Georgetown after a visit to rela
tives.
Miss Ella Jacobs has accepted a (
position with one of thc high schools
of Columbia. While in Columbia she ,
will'be domiciled in the home of her
friend, Mrs. Sophie Swearingen
Swindell.
Mr. and Mrs. Gerard Tarrant,' and .
their handsome little son are visiting ,
in the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. M. .
Wright.
Mr. Joe Payne and Mr. Joe Frank |
Logue, of Meeting Street, were wei- (
come visitors during the past week in
the homes of relatives here.
On the first Sunday in November (
a protracted meeting will begin in (
thc Baptist church here, the pastor
to be assisted by Dr. Fuller of the .
Baptist church of Greenwood. (
He has a fine reputation as an ,
evangelist, Rev. Brooke stating that ?
he was one of the best that had gone
out from Louisvillee Semniary. [1
Mr. Burrell Frontis was a visitor -
here on Sunday, and his friends were j
all glad to see him again, after an
absence of two years. j
Veteran Russell Wright had the ?
misfortune to break his collar bone 1
recently, and his friends will be glad
to know that he is doing well and is
now able to be up and about. The ac- j
cident happened at the home of his <
daughter, Mrs. Lonnie Eidson, while <
he was out walking about the farm. <
The body of Mr. Franklin, who
was killed in the train yard near.
Hamburg during the 'past week, was
brought here from Augusta the day
following his death, and the inter
ment was , made at Phillipi church
cemetery.
Mr. Franklin was of this section
and had many relatives residing
there. 9
His unf ortunate death is to be Jt?f-i
plored.
Little Johnnie Hoyt 'wh'o:has been'
so ill with typhoid fever, is now im
proving.
Rev. W. S. Brooke has just closed
a very successful meeting at West
Creek church, and this week is hold
ing a service at Ebenezer of which
church he is pastor.
Miss Maud Waterhouse is at home
from a visit to friends in Augusta.
Misses Ruth and Edith Prescott,
are guests of Mrs. F. L. Parker.
Miss Evelyn Johnson has returned
from a visit to Miss Corrie Johnson,
at Edgefield.
Miss Helen Meyer, of Augusta, has
been the guest of Miss Ethel Lott.
Mr. Tim Thornton, of Georgia, is
visiting his sister Mrs. Tom Millford.
Mrs. M. R. Wright is visiting her
sister, Miss Luelle Norris in Colum
bia.
Do riot fail to vote- next Tues
day.
Miss Ruth Lyon Gives Lovely
Party For B. Y. P. U.
On Tuesday evening September
the fifth, Miss Ruth Lyon entertain
ed the senior- B. Y. P. U. of which
she is the much loved president,
with a lovely party at the home of
Mrs. Arthur T. Allen.
When the guests arrived they
were, by perhaps some witchery on
the part of the hostess, endowed with
smiles planted in, and nurtured by,
merry hearts.
Several games were enjoyed by
early comers, after which a contest
called "A Flower Romance" was en
-raged in. The smiling, merry faces
became more serious and the scene,
changed from one of revelry to one
of pensiveness.
Tally cards were then given out
and, ,after a scramble (on the part
of the young men) for congenial
coupling, progressive conversation
proved a successful diversion.
The hostess then "topped it all"
by serving a generous amount of
vanilla ice cream and' wafers to the
?jroup.
In the wee hours of the night the
guests departed after an unsussessful
attempt to express their past joy to
the ever gracious host
I respectfully announce that I am
a candidate for Warden of the town
Df Edgefield from the 5th. Ward and
solicit the support of the voters in
said ward.
' S. B. Nicholson.
The Governor Cannot Reduce
Taxes.
Did the governor of South Caro
lina have power either to reduce oi
increase taxes there would be som<
justification for interposing the sub
ject of taxation in the gubernatoria
campaign. But The News has point
ed out with tiresome frequency th(
governor hasn't any more to' do witl
^cation than the citizen of anothei
state. He can recommend and he car
veto but he has no AUTHORITY
whatsoever to increase or reduce
taxes.
The LEGISLATURE alone has th?
authority to say how taxes shall be
collected and how they shall bc
spent.
And the next legislature of South
.Carolina has already been elected
with the exception of small number
to be chosen in the second primary.
The question of taxationIS TO BE
DECIDED BY. THE NEXT LEGIS
LATURE.
It is therefore entirely out of
place in the gubernatorial campaign.
As it is being employed it is nothing
more thn a snare to delude and mis
lead ignorant people. And that is the
extent of The News' interest in the
matter. This paper does not intend
that the gross insinuation that the
increase in taxes in South Carolina
has been due to governors shall go
unchallenged, for in spite of all that
this and other newspapers have said
there are some people doubtless who
believe such rot.
The innuendo that the increase of
200 percent in taxes between 1914
and 1921 was due to extravagnt
and wasteful administration is an in
sult to the intelligence of South Car
lina. But to allege that the governors
were responsible for the condition
is positive deception.
As a matter of fact, in behalf of
the legislatures that increased the
appropriations, the figures can easily
be explained. The one item of the de
partment of education shows that in
1914 the appropriation for public
school education was only $10,940,
while in 1921 it was $1,528,930. This
alone represents an increase of a
million and a half dollars, or more
than one-third the total enhancement
during the period. The News does
not believe the people of South Caro
lina consider this a wasteful or use
less increase. The state never had
.such a cry for education as it has to
day, and that is a sure sign it does
not regret paying for it.
This, however, is beside the point.
If Governor Cooper had vetoed the
appropriation for common school ed
ucation last year the people would
have insisted that the legislature pass
the appropriation over his veto. And
that would have been the extent to
which Governor Cooper could have
influenced the defeat of a single i
tem that cost the people $1,500,000
more than it did eight years ago.
Let's get this straight for all time :
THE GOVERNOR CANNOT RE
DUCE TAXES.
It is time that candidates were
quit imposing on the gullibility of
unthinking people by telling them
that governors can reduce taxes.
The News believes that voters are
entitled to the facts and that once
.they know the fa?ts they,-will vote,
right. It makes this statement be
cause they are being fed other than
facts.-Spartanburg Herald.
Do not fail to vote next Tues
day.
Cole L. Blease and the War.
To the Editor of The State:
May I address the ex-service men
of South Carolina through your col
umns? I enlisted in the service of
our country shortly after the war
and feel that I did what thousands
of others have done, served our
country at a time when it needed
service and not criticism. While in
the service I heard of some of the
utterances of Cole L. Blease and af
ter discharge I read some of his
speeches. I do not see how any real
American who feels proud of his rec
ord in the army can vote for a man
who was so narrow as to let himself
become unpatriotic when the causes
of Democracy were at stake.
We enlisted in the service with
out any hope of reward, the only
hope was to make this a safer and
better place to live.
Yes, buddies, we were in France
for the glory pf the proudest state in
the Union, South Carolina. And we
are going to have a reunion at the
polls September 12. This meeting al
so for the glory of the proud and
grand old Palmetto state.
Let's get together and mark par- 1
tisanism and Bleaseism from the an
nals of South Carolina history. Let's
show the former governor that we
want law and order, that we want
the decisions of juries to stand, that
we want the criminals to'be punish
ed, that we want Democracy nad a
Democratic governor and that we
must have a real American, one who
can say: "Our country, may she al- 1
ways be right, but right or wrong,
our country."
An Ex-Service Man.
Florence, S. C.
Tax Extension.
The Comptroller General has no
tified me that he, with the approval
of the governor has extended the
time for the payment of taxes with- ?
out further penalty until thc 15th. 1
of September. Therefore my office i
will be open to receive taxes with- i
out further penalty until the night of ;
September 15th.
J. L. Prince,
County Treasurer.
Miss Florence Mims Sends
Message from Charlotts
ville, Virginia
Sunday Morning..
Dear Advertiser:
I have been searching through my
grips vainly for a large sheet of pa
per upon which to write you as
though I had great pictures to draw
of this hill country of Virginia, with
its apple trees bending down with,
ruby colored fruit,destined for pos
sible cider presses to make an inno
cent and cheering drink for the Vir
ginia farmers on long winter even
ings.
But I have found only a letter to
write upon, and since it isn't dear to
my heart with fond words on the
other side, I write ruthlessly upon ita
back.
Lincoln wrote his Gettysburg ad
dres on a scrap of paper while riding,
on the train. That comparison is o
dious, but he believed in charity to
ward all and malice toward none and.
would forgive me for my seeming
presumption.
As I am inspired by the landscape
outside, my heart is filled with
poems that other people have made.
I could not write a line of rhythm
myself, but these words of Carruth's
come to" me as seeming so eminent
ly appropriate to the season and this
farming country through which I am.
passing. . ,
"A mist on the far horizon
The infinite tender sky
The ripe, rich tint of the cornfield,
And the wild geese sailing by;.
And all over upland and lowland,.
The charm of the golden rod,
Some of us call it Autumn
And others call it God."
Every day brings to mind its par
ticular association of ideas, and the
name, Virginia, is a very connota
tive word. I think of '"Old forgotten,,
far off things and battles long ago."
One half expects to see the smoke
of battle rise from a trench or, breast
work;and long" lines of "blue ?n?r'gray,
and hear the air pierced with rebel
yells, but such things have been re
placed by "Sweet smelling fields and
peaceful homes."
Reality is a tame thing and he who
would re-live the glories of a past,
must sit and dream at home, and a
wake to reality with a startled, re
bellious feeling, or haunt museums .
like a trhost and see the must
of the ages on flags that were
once bright red and blue and gold
One can help make history today,,
but the present is too intim?tely
near us to enjoy the triumphs hard
won and the past too far away. So
does joyous fulfilment of anything
elude us.
Later: I have arrived in Washing
ton, for the strikes have struck hard
enough to make us four hours late,
but not quite hard enough to stop
us altogether.
Two years ago, I was sitting in
the Atlanta station, waiting for the
Dixie Flyer that was four hours
late, and both times you were af
flicted with a letter.
Then I was going among a strange
people in the freedom of the west,
and now I am returning to the con
servatism of the East. Between the
two, my Southland is the happiest of
mediums.
Florence Mims.
Do not fail to vote next Tues
day.
Notice to Managers of the
Second Primary Elec
tion.
You will please comply strictly
with the rules of the Democratic
Party in the second primary election
to be held next Tuesday, Sept. 12th.
1922. Act in all matters exactly as
said rules provide. Copy of said rules
was heretofore sent to Secretary of
each club with enrollment book.
J. H. Cantelou,
County Chairman.
Edgefield, S. C.
Sept. 5th, 1922; J
Rent or Sell.
I desire to rent or sell (prefer to
sell) my farm one mile from the
bown of Johnston, within the school
district. Fine pasture, good farra for
stock raising and dairying. For
terms, etc., write to or see me.
Mrs. W. B. Cogburn.
Edgefield, S. C.
9_6-2t. . ,

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