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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, December 06, 1865, Image 1

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1865-12-06/ed-1/seq-1/

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A ANEJeboflc o 1 i HI i c b1 11o fifo4 it 60 -DO
"5 ,.FOR STXN E W B E R R Y S . W E D N E4DA Y , D E C F, 8 6EUM E R .
I. ~~~~~NEWBERRY, S. C., WEDNESDA',DC ,16.NME 0
ERALD
VERY WEDNESDAY,
C. H.,
Its.
IN CUR XIOS.
(Payttt tIda u nece.)
K 4ili4'istit aare, for
irst insertion, $1 for e sertion.
- -e rbtices, Funeralin, uaries,
4i-d Lcnmunications of persona harged
Charleston A vertisements.
Rl L JEFFE & Coa,
CHARLESTO , S. C.,
;Ge1&ra1AgfttS',Commi 3MVerchants,
AND
LAND AGEMTS,
OFFICE 118 EASY2 BAY,
will give prompt attention t' the sale of
V4ton and other Produce,
WILLNEGOT ATE
-For the shipt of Cott to the most reliable
Houses in Europ and e - North. Awl make
';efat advances on the samle when in hand for
sale or shipment.
WILL UY 4OODS for Merchants and Far
'ers to order. WILL RECEIVE AND FOR
WARD G04)DS. WILL BUY AND SELL Gold
and Silver. WILL NEGOTIATE the Sile of
p'anterions, Lands -ant Tenements, whea placed
in theie care And on this subject we beg leave
,etpecrfultv to say to our friends and the public*,
'that as we were born and raised in the State, and
ned in business for thirty Years, and having
'rave-lled extensively over the State, and well ae
painted with rhe location, soil and climate, and
1eeliug in the closest degree identified with von.
't 42tter ourselves that we can be of great ad
Y.intage to those who wish to sell th.eir !anas or
.plataions. We ar- now in correspondence
'ith friends who are natives of this State, but re
,vently located in New York, %hich wi'1 give us
'additional facilities for finding the most desira
Ile purchasers. We therefore off-r our services
to those who wish to dispose of their lands. etc.
To such we say, send us a plain written dese'rip
tion of your property ; the district in which s
located; whether North, Scth, East or West,
and the distance from the county site ; how wa
tered and the charactey of the streams; number
of acres, and how many cleared and in cultiva
tion; and, as near as you can, the nunber of
acres in bottom and upland ; and your prie pr
acre; with $25 to cover expense of aveti
and we witi vrve you to thi- best of our abily.
IN FACT, give their personal anr1d uinLdi'id1e
attention to every interest committed to 11w-r
care. 11. L. J. ( C-.
I most respectfully beg leave to return my sin
cere thnnk! to ay fnends and the T,;bl'e fur thir
long and liMcral patronage. Ithank tha. An:
as the I.te disastrous and fatal war is over, I
am again established in this city ; and (as ito were)
comnwncing anew ;I therefore assure my f;iends
anid the public that my personal a: tention and
energy shall he faithfully given to every interest
-ommitted to) my care. Ilinte I most respeet
Tully appeal to a~ll my friends and the pul ic, and
solicit a share of patronage. Rorni and reared
among you, and thirty years devoted to business
under voor ownz evec, is m3y refrem-'e.
Nov 8 tf H. L. JEFFEItS
WV. II. CIAFEE,
Xo. 205 E AST BAY ST REE T,
(Opposite New Custom IIouse,)
CHARLESTON, S. C.
AND
CQMMISSION MERCHANT,
UEALER IN
BUTTER,
CHEESE,
LARDP, and
LIQUORS.'
.CONSIGNMENTS RECEIVED BY EVE
NY STI'AMER of Goods selected expressly
ror the Charleston Market.
ORDERS PROMPTLY ATTENDED TO.
Uharleston, S. C., Nov 8 1865. 3m.
KING & GOODRICH,
Wholesale Dealers in
F'oreign &:, Domestio
Dry and Fabcy G4oods,
141 MEETING STREET,
CHARLESTON, S. C.
King & Goodrich take this medium of in
forming the merchants of the country, that
t.hey have openedi and are constantly receiving
a. stock of goods in the above line, which they
~wifl sell at the lowest cash prices. J. & W.
Enog are to be found with K. & G. and invite
their old friends and customers. [nov 15 1m
JOHN KING & VO,
IIPORTERS AN~D WHOLESALE DEALERS
IN
UROCEBIES
PRO VISIONS
FL,OUR
FOREIGN & DOMESTIC LIQTIORS
SEGARS
CROCKERY, IIOLLOW WARE & GLASSWA RE
ALso,
2000 SACKS LIVERPOOL SALT,
Noe. 88 Hasel-Street,
Charleston Advertisements.
P. EPSTIN & CO.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALERS IN
Bots, Shoes, iats, Caps,'
XND C
N O T IO NS. V
LARGE LOT OF FINE PLAIN and FAN
CY CASSIMERES. Also a variety of
Gent's Furnishing Goods, Trunks, Valises and
Carpet Bags, at
372 King-street,
(Two Doors abore George-street, Eatt-side.)
r
Zf'We beg leave to call the a.ttention of mer- t
chauts to our stock.
The Greenville Mountaineer, Anderson Intelli- r
gencer and Abbeville Press copy three times and t
forward bills to Herald O'ice. Nov. 1 45 3
E. B. STODDARD & CO.,
Wholesale Dealers in
BOOTS, SHOES AND TRUNKS,
AT THEIR OLD STAND, t
165 MEETING STREET,
CHARLESTON, S. C. c
Take pleasure in ai.nouncing their resumption
of businesq, and invite the attention of purcha- C
sers to their stock, which is row compTete.
nov 8 in t
AITKEN, NOYESI
AND
JOH-NSTON,
No. 159 lEETING STREET,
CHARLESTON, S, C.,
IMPORTERS & JOBBERS.
e
-0
D R Y G 0 0 D S,
CLOTIIS AND CASSIMERES, I
BLANKETS AND FLrNNELo 0
CLOAKS AND S1AWLS,
DELAINES AND PRINTS,
FRENCI MERINOSs
PLAIN AND PLAID LINSEYS, i
ENGLTSII DRESS GOODS, t
IRISH LINENS. t
BROWN & BLEAC1ED SHIRTINGS, h
OPER t FLANNELS,h
SATINETS AND KERSEYS,
TICKS AND STRISj
ALSO, S
A LARGE ASStRTMENT OF t
Nt
OPERA HOODS,
SCARES, SIHAWLS,
SONTAGS AND NUBIAS,
It
A COMPLETE STOCK OF |d
FA NCY G OODS,
To whi ch we invite the attention of the trade. e
Nov. 1 43Stt
HENRY BISCHOFF & CO.,, s
COMM~ISSION 1MEROHANTS,
And Wholesale Dealers in C
Croceries, Wines, Liquors, Segars, &c(
No. 197 East Bay,
Opposite Frazer's Wharf, I
CHTARLESTON, S. C. a
HIENRY BISCHo-?F. C. WU'LBERBN.t
nov 15 Gtn
C. GRAVELEY,
direct importer ofC
CUTLERY, FINE GUN~S,
Powder and Shot, Agricul tural Im- ~
plements, Bar Iron and CJast Steele,
NO..5 EAST BAY,
South of the Old Post-oftice,
Charleston, S. C.
>N. B. GRIND STONES and MILL STONES.
Nov 29 49 4
Office G..& C. R.R.M
NEWB1'RRY, S. C., Sep. 4, 1805.
LFREIGHITS will be received at this De-.
-A pt, and shipped without pre-payment, for r
other than Way Stations. Freight to Way Sta- C
tions must be pre-.paid as heretofore.If
The Company cannot collect other than their t
own Freight over the Road, nor be responsible t
for cotton after leaving the ears. a
JOUNY B. LAsSALLAE, E
Sep. 6, 3'i-tt Gcn'l Sup't. J
t
DR1. J. E. DAPRAY,s
Surgeon D entist.
OFFICE on the North side of Main-street, for- I
kYmerly occupied and known, as the I-aw V
Office of G. G. DeWalt, Esqr.a
Dr. Dapray is now prepared to perform aill ope- d
rations at the OLD PRICES for CA"IH or itsb
equivalent. Chloroform administered when de- r
sired.
Newberr, June 1, '65.
5~,000 S
a ~ - HIDES wanted. To purchase or'
U .tan on shares at headquarters:t
the old Newberry Tannery, by the subscriber. t
n. Oc e ia fI. UJERFELD.
Foregn News..-By the Chhia.
THE ALABAMA CLAIMS.
A supplement to the London Gazctto con.
Lins further additional correspondenc,: be
ween Messrs. Adams and Russell, rel ative to
ie departure of cruisers for the rebels from
ngland. Russell repeats the argument that
2e British Government acted upon precedent,
nd supplies memorandum shown- that steps
,ere taken to pro,.-ent and punish breaches of
eutrality. Every representation of the Ameri
an Minister was considered immediately, ab8
.ferred, wien uecessary, to the law officers
rithout delay,
HE ACrIoN OF THE UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT
FORES1HADOWED.
It i.a impossible for the Ameican Go"-rn
3ent to abandon the claims for the depreda
ions of the Alabama, but it is quite possible
or a Government to yield nothing yet do
othing. We must prepare to be told that
he United States wIl abate no jot of its de
aands, and will reserve the right of enforcing
hem. But, still, when the temper of thepeo
le is calmed, when commerce has had time'to
enew the links which bind the two nations
ogethei, when the memories of war fade into
he past, there will be little disposition to
weil on unfortunate but inevitable casualities.
[London Tiynes, Nov. 11.
DISGRACE TO BOTH COUNTRIES IF WAR SHOULD
RESULT FROM THE DIFFERENCES.
We confidently dismiss the supposition tha
he Alabama claims can become -a direct cause
f war between the two countries, but trust
hat something will yet be done to bring the
ispute to an early practical settlement, for it
one which can in no other way be disposed
f. It would be an eternal disgrace if both
rovernments should confess themselves unable
> find any but a violent solution of their dif
-rences ; but there is a state of nominal peace
rhich has many of the disadvantages of war.
{London Yew, Nov. 11.
THE SHENANDOAH.
The liberation of the captain and crew of
he Shenandoah is said to have been uncondi
ional, the British Government being of opin
mn that there are no legal grounds upoin which
aey could be detained.
IBERATION OF THE CREW-THE MEN PAID OFF.
We are informed that the order for parole
'as received by Captain Paynter, of the Don
gal, early in the afternoon, and that immedi
tely after it was communicated to Captain
Vaddell. Captain Waddell then came ashore,
nd had an interview with someSoutherbgen
emen, aPer which he returned to his ship
nd paid off a-d discharged the crew. At 7
'cluck, the men left the Shenandoah in the
'ock Ferry Company's steamer Bee, and at
o'clock, they were landed upon the George's
anding-stage. But few spectators wero pre
nt to witness the arrival of the crew so re
owned for their exploits, owing doubtless to
ie fact that their parole was not known even
) themselves until a short time before their
tnding. Each of them brought on shore a
trge quantity of luggage, and they appeared
have no lack of money-facts which appear
I to attest that their long cruise has net been
nrewarded. The news of their arrival soon
pread, and crowds of persons collectivg on
ie stage formed themselves into groups around
ae sailors and endeavored to draw them into
onversation. These attempts, however, rare
y succeeded, and when they did, it 'was evi~
at that the men spoke rather to evade curi
sity than to satisfy it. The men, indeed, ap.
eared to be themselves quite in the dark as
>their position, and though under the im
ression that they had done witkh th;e Shenan
oab for good, and all appeared to labor under
fear of committing themselves or their offi
ers by some rash statement. Some of them
agerly questioned the bystanders as to what
be English people though t of the Shenandoah,
nd two or three of them expressed the great.
st surprise that the officers of that vessel
bould even have been suspected of pursuing
bieir work of destruction with a k-nowledge of
be termination of the war. The men, though
xhibiting a marked reticence on matters con
ected with the discipline of the ship, speak
~eely of the circumstances which led the
bhenandoah to terminate her privateering
areer, namely, the meeting with the shr'p
~arracouta, which the crew are unanimousa in
lleging as the first source through which re
able information was received of the termina
ion of the war.
Many of the crew of the Shenandoah arc
iverpool men, and these immediately on be
~g landed drove off to then homes. The men
eclare that they are at perfect liberty to dc
that they choose, and that their discharge is
neonditional. At all events, they have been
aid off in A merican dollars, and many of them
ti, no dloubt, to-day, be on their way to
then parts of the country.
[Lirerpool Courier, Nor. 938
CAPT. wA)DEL.L'5 LETTER TO EARL RUSSELL.
Captain Waddell, in a letter to Earl Rus
ull which is published says:
"In obediedee to orders,*I found myself in
be Arctic and Ochotsk Seas, far removed
-om the ordinary channels of commerce, and
1 consequence of this awkward circumstance
was engaged in acts of war until the 28th ol
une. I was ignorant of the reverses suffered
y the Confederates, and the total obliteration
the Government under which I acted. I
eccived the first intelligence of the downfall
f the Oonfederate cause on the 2d of August,
com the British bark Barracouta, and desis
ed immediately from further acts of war un
iI could communicate with a European port,
nd learn if the intelligence was true. I could
ot have been sensible that the tales told by
Loerican ships were true but merely upon
be statement of a British captain I diligently
onght for a precedent in law-writers for gui
ince in the future control, management, and
.nal disposal of the vessel, but found none.
'inding the authority questionable under
-hich I acted, I immediately ceased cruising
nd shaped her course for the Atlantic. I
id not feel justified in destroying the vessel,
ut, on the contrary, thought the ship should
evert to the American Government. I, there
>re, sought Liverpool to learn the news, and
without foundation, to surrender the ship,
rith the guns, stores and apparel complete,
>the British Government, for such disposi
ion as it should deem proper."
Captain Waddell, the commander of the
henandoah, states that the last vessel he
poke was the Barracouta, from Liverpool for
an Francisco, from which he learned that
nme South was really and truly defeated. On
ais he at once stowed away his guns and am
munition in the hnle, and stem-od for Liver
pool, stopping at no other port. On arriving
near the port he took a pilot on board, and
finding the news of the defeat of the Confed
eracy confirmed beyond all doubt, he desired
him to take the Shenandoah alongside a man
of-war, if there was one in the river. The
ex-cruiser was in consequence placed along
side the Donegal, and a crew from that vessel
placed in charge of her, some customs officers
also being in charge with them. Immediate
ly after the surrender, Captain Wade1, his
officers and crew came on shore. As she
came up the river, the Shenandoah excited
great attention, the sight of the Confederate
ensign she carried being a novelty. As soon
as the necessary fornalities were coucluded,
it was believed she would be handed over to
the United States Government. According
to variou.s reports, Captain Waddell was
more than once told while cruising in the Pa
cific of the termination of the war, but as his
informants were the crews of the Northern
vessels lie destroyed, he refused to give cfed
en,ce to the statement. The crew of the Shen
aTtdoab, it is said, suffered much from hunger
and three are reported to have died from star,
vation.
THE VESSEL SURRENDERED TO THE 'NITED STATES
kUiHORITIs.
The Shenandoah was surrendered (o the
American Consul on the 10th, who took for-t
mal possession, and placed her under Captain
Freeman and a crew of his own selection, tor I
convey. the ship to New York.
T11E NEW MINISTRY-SPEECa OF EARL RUSSELL.
Earl Russell attended the Lord Mayor's
banquet on the 5th. In a speech, he paid a
tribute to the memory of P almerst-on. Ad
verting to the last reconstruction of the Cabi
net, he said he had received the fullest sup
port from his colleagues, with the remark on
its policy that he trusted the country would
allo,W time to consider the course they ought
to pursue, and he should abide bytbe princi
ples of his life. The Government deemed it
their duty to consalt the wishes of the people,
and it would be for Parliament to consider
how far those were based on justice. He
thanked God the Am erican war was over, and
he trusted the republic, now freed from the
sin of slavery, would go on and prosper for
centuries to come.
OIN'IONS OF THE PREsS.
The reception of Russell at the banquet was
a practical reply to the detraction which had
lately pursued the government. Russell's
language could only be used by men who feel
the important measures expected of them,
and are willing to encourage the hope.
fLoredon Daily Neix, t h
The effect of the speech was rather an en
couragement to the cause to reform.
[London Star 1Ith.
A Good Precedent.
The published determination of the Clerk,
Mr. McPheison. not to place the names of the
members elect from the Southern States on
the roll of the House of Representatives in
Congress, has brought to light through the
Cincinnat' Commercial a similar incident in
Congressional history. From this incident
in the historical records of the House, we learn
that on the 2d of December, 1889, at the
opening of the 26th Congress, Hugh Garland,
clerk of the 26th Congress, refused to call the
names of the members from New Jersey,
because the seats of all the members of that
State were contested. For three days there
was an excited and wild debate, the House
being bo0th unorganized and disorderly. On
the fourth dlay, the clerk was directed to call
the roll again-, and commencing with Maine,
had proceeded according to the geographical
situation of the States as far as New Jersey,
Iand was about to say that he would not call
the names of members of that State, when
John Quincy Adams, who bad not had any
thing to say about the controversy up to that
moment, suddenly took the floor and said.
"I rise to interrupt the clerk." Instantly
there was profound silence in the ball and Mr.
Adams said:
"We degrade and disgrace our constituents
and the country because the clerk of-the
House the mere clerk whom we employ 'tid
whose existence depends upon our will,
usurps the throne and sets us, the represenm
tatives and vicegere'nts of the whole Ameri
can people, 'at defiinOe and holds them in
contempt. Arnd what is this clerk of yours ?
Is he to suspend by his mere negative the
functions of Government and put an end to
this Congress? lIe refuses to call thme roll.
It is in your power to compel him to call it,
if he will not do it. v.ohntarily. (Here Mr.
Adams was interrupted by a member, who
said he was authorized to say that compulsion
-could not reach the clerk, who had avowed
Jthat he would resign rather than call the State
~Nw Jersey.) Well, sir, let him resign,"
continued Mr. Adams, "and we may possibly
discover some way by which we can get
along without the aid of his all-powerful tal
ents, learnling and genius."
ir. Adams submitted a motion to require
of the clerk to call the roll for the State of
New Jersey, and there was a general out-cry
of "How shall the question be put ?" All
knew the clerk would not put it. Mr. A dams
said "I intend to put the question myself.". T hat
solved the dimculty. Richard flarn weli Rhett,
of South Carolina, sprang upon a desk, and
moved that the HIon. John Qincy Adams, of'
Massachusetts, take the chair, ss presiding~
officer, and officiate until the House be or
ganized by the election of its constitutional
officers. Thc miotion was put and carried.
Mr. Adams was escorted to the chair. New
Jersey was called and the House organized.
We trust that if Mr. McPherson should
prove to be refra'tory, and according to his
avowed purpose endeavor to usurp the throne,
there will be manhood and patriotism enough
found among the conservatives of the [louse
to follow the precedent set by Mr. Adams.
[ Columbia Phoeni..
PROGREss oF CIVIzATION.-We saw the
other day a large dark daughter of Africa
seated in at handsome photon, dir.wn by a
pair of milk white horses. Sh'e lookedi back
with a junior darkie on her lap, whilst a large
colored gemimin was her Jehu. The horses
were very white, and the people Very dark,
and there was an air of comfort, of downright
rejoicing pleasure in it that was irresistable.
The white horses did not seem to mind 'it, and
the white people on foot rather liked it-it
was refreshing and hilai ious, if not grand,
. Fr, the Abberille Banner.
AT Ho3m, November 25, 186>.
Mr. Editor: Never before in the history of
our State has the plar.ting mind of the coun
tyy been so exercised as at the present. 'Fach
neighbor is inquiring of his still further offi
neighbor, "How do you propose regulating
labor on your plantation rext year?" This
one propotes to interest the labo~rer by giving
him a proportion of the crop ; that one thinks
as "money made the mare go," it wil! be the
only effectual stimulus to the freed-men, and
hence propdses to pay iihonthly.
I advocate neither of these plans, but prefer
a mixture of the two, which simply means to
pay in money for the'quantity harvested.
For instance, for each bale of cottom (400
pounds), each bushel of corn,- peas, or small
grain, for each gallon of syrup, and pounI or
hundred pounds of fodder, I propose prying
so much, the aggregate bt.g divided pro rata
amongz the hands, who will in the contract
be rated -is full, three-quarters, or half hands.
Medical attendance and all other plantation
expenses to be furnished by the master, but
deductions to be made at the expence 'of the
laborer, such as loss of time from any other
cause than that created by the master, fines
imposed and boarding of children. IEvic
tion" and discharges to be within the power
of the iaster at all times for disobedience,
idleness, or impude'nce.
.Stock will be raised by a servant not coun
ted.a field hand, whose pay will depend upon
the flock or herd, and the number of'
polnds of pork butchered. In a similar way
is poultry to be grrwn. No employee wiH be
allowed to raise chickens or cuftiva-te a patch
for himself, and by no means to own a dog.
With these explanatory iterns, Mr. Editor,
I give you below my contract fo a plantation
or farm working seven hands. Of course the
same would answer in form and primeple fo -
any number of hnrfds:
FORM OF CoNTRAcT. -
This agreement, made and entered into
this the first day of January, 1866, between
John Snith-6nthe 6o part and sundry' freed
mein on the othe- Vatt, %itnesseth :
That've (freedmen), whose names are here
unto attached, do agree and bind ourselves to
labor faithfully for one year for the aforesaid
John Smith, obeying all his orders, consuiting
defending and protnoting all the interests of
his plantation, and rendering-it, by our indus
try, as productive and the ensuing crop as
abundant as possible. That we will be obe
dient, humble,. civil and-ofte to hirtself, his
family, or agent; and for violation of these1
pledges render ourselves liable-to the punish
ments, or eit-her of them, mentionedbefow.
In consideration of the service above speci
fied, I, John Smith, do agree to house com
fortably, feed liberally, and furnish medical
attendance for the aforesaid freedmen, deduc
ting, however, from their wages 50 cents per
day for each day lost by one of the laborers
from sickness, or any other cause, except
that created by me.
I further agree to board and lodge the chil
dren (non-workers) of the aforesaid freedmen
at a monthly expense of $2 each, and at'the
end of the year to'pay the field hands, stock
rinder and pultry woman as follows : The
feld hands, for each bale of cotton (400-i
pounds), $10 ; for each bushel of corn or peas,
20 cents; for each -hundred pounds of' fodder,,
20 cents ; for each gallo.n of syrup, 10 cents;
for harvesting sr.all grain, 5 cents per bushel;
these amounts to be aggregated and divided
amongst the freedmen as rated below, each!
full hand receiving one seventh ~6f the wtiole
net amnount.
The stock-minder will receive for each lamb
or calf added to the flock or herd . during the
year, 25 cents, and 1 cent per pound.for earli
and every pound of pork btitchered in the
fall of 1866.
The pQuItry woman will be paid 5 cents
for each. head of poultry grow'n.
Any or all the freedmen parties to this con
tract may be fined a sum not ordeeding $1
for- each offence, for idierness, -inpudence, dis
obedience, or for maltreating the stock or the J.
plantation, and for -repeated offences .may -be
discharged at my. discretion, apjeal being
granted in case of a discharge to a Magistrate
or: thre District Judge-oss of time occisioned
by the appeal chargeable to the offender.
All expenses incurred by :reason of law
regulating labor, approval of contracts, taxes
of freedmen, and boarding the (non-workers)~
chldi'eh, will, be deducted fr<jna the wages oft
each freedmen as he may be severally liable.
This contract to continue for- oi6 year only.
- JORN SMITHU, Employer.
Witness: PETER SN'JOKs,
RoBrs HOOP,
l~sFREEDMEN".
Simpson, fr full hand.
mark.
her
Hannah, his wife, a three-fourths hand.
mark.
his
A dam, o full hand.
mark.
her
Charity, his wife, - ha!f hand.
mark.
their .
Sam, Lewis, Eli, J - each a full hand.
1~r marks.
Molly, - -- three-fourths hand.
mark.
Mr. Editor, as the subject of contracts and
labor is one of vital importance to the whole
:ountry, I hope your readers will publish]
Lheir views cn this subject, that the planters
may be able to deduce therefrom a completet
orm of a contract.
Should not the State and each District for
itself call a pilanters' Convention anyhow ?
Truly, SALUDA.
SPEAKER CoLFAX.-Washington, November
22.-The speech of ex-Speaker (3olfax here,1
-equiring new tests from the South, does not
meet with President Johnson's approval. The "
atter remains firm to his own policy. Most1
f the pardon business is suspended for the
>resent at the Attorney-General's office by
>rder of the President.
Workmen in 'the lake tunnel at Chicago,
'orty feet below the bottonm of the lake, can
car the engines and padd!c wheeles <f thet
tamers passing ovcrhead.
The following are extracts from a letter
written by a distinguished gentleman :
First-Brazil is, in my opinion, a most suit
able and desirable country for Southern raised
people. Its Government is a tild monarchy,
well and evenly administered. The rights of
persons and property are sacredly respected,
and when invaded, as speedily vindicated as
any%rhere'Tn the world.
Second-Tbe climate of many portions of
the empire is very fine-the thermomet,r
ranging from 30 to 59. Mu"h of the country
is mountainous, and the supply of water is
very fine, fresh freesto'ne.
Third-There are large tracts of nim
proved lands, much of which is vastly rich.,
and penetrated by good, and in many cases,
ravigable rivers.
Fourth-:The country produces sugI&, cot
on, rice, tobacco, coffee, hides, horns, talow,
medicinal plants, and fine rosewood. The
province or Pernamb ico raises cotton, sugar,
rice. Bahia"produces sugar and coffee. R o
Janerio the woods, coffee and medicinal pignts.
The Rio Grande is the great district for hidtS,
horns, tallow, etc., Many of the minerals arc
found in the St. Paul's province, where are
ituate,I the diamond, gold and silver rnines.
A railroad has been constructed, penetrating
the country froithe great city of Rio Janeire
to the city of St. Paul's, a distance of 150 t(
170 miles. ~The city of Rio Janeiro in 185,
had a population of 500,000. St. Paul's 80,
000. The latter has greatly inareased in the
last five years.
Fifth-I would prefer a settlement on tho.
St. Francisco River, orin the province of St.
Paul's. Both are rich and healthy countriep.
and accessible. The one is in the interior,
the other from seventy to bi4hty tallis froe.
the coast. There 'are other very desirabli
districts wfich hold out strong inducement.
for settlement. There are large tractau f ver --
fine lands in Rio Janeiro, suitable for cottoi
and especially far coffee, which is the great
staple of the country, the empire having ex
ported as much as 3,500,000 bags in a year.
Qoffee-is very easily raised. The third year
after it is plted it produces a fair yield, ar.
then progresses, increasing in proportion
from year to year. There are fair producing
trees fifty years old. . The nett revenue from1
each hand was, *heni left Rio Janeiro, couI;
ted it from four to six dollars.
Sixth-Emigrants should take with them a
plain, strong, light clothing, including boots,
hats and shoes, to last thew a year, also son:c
furnittre.
Seventh-The Government grants four
hundred acres of land to actual settlers. Som
wheat and Indian cornis r.i[ed in the cour.
try. But the arrow-root, banana and orang?
yield so abundantly that they furnishi larg
supplies for food. The arrow-root is a a
mirable article *for use. The price ofA'eci
riages from five to'seven cents per pound.
Eighth-The entire population in 1 56 wa
about seven millions and a half; of 'thes.
four millions, were free whites, three million,;
were slaves, and five hundred thousand were
free uegroes.
Ninth-The writ of habeas corpus-trial by.
jury, ieligious freeeom of speech and tl
press, are all guaraiteed by the ConstitutioP.
ani-practically prevail.. Many of the peoplh
ae highly educated, and in the province Mf
Rio Janeiro they have in full operations a pure
system of free schools.
FROM WASHISgToN. -Washinigton, 'oveii:
ber 13.-It~is stated tiat Mir. Colfax will l2l
on the ground until Congress meets. He wVi
thus have great advantage in manipulatire:
members as they come, in advance, to his.i;
trest As candidate for Speaker, and -.s chati
pion of severe measures argainst the South..
The Bostonr Post has it that General Banks.
the "litne'iron~man," will be a candidate fa
Speaker, and.the Chiago Times calls upo :
Mr. Ray mond to run on justemilieu positi&
advocated by him~ and carried in . the Repub
lican Convention of New York.
In cinens of Republic~an members it mtay
bo fouii ncessary-to harmonize views befo;
there will be unity of action for .the Hiou:,e
officers.
It is~ rumored bere -that Dr. Powell, Star
agent4f North 'Carolina, has -gone to5 ih:
tate'with a view to prepare the way formV.
inauguration of Mr. Worth as Governor. '.I! -
is invariably spoken of, here- by all Nora~
Caroliniana&as an excellenit man, and'one little
identifiedt ith..original secession,
General Butler is ex pected here soon.- Ihi.
will probably platrathier a large part 'in p(dl
tics next winter fassqchusetts being otia
high horse. -
It is said that Mr. Colfax is'not in the usu.
confidential relations at the. White .House.
I hear that radical n..en.bers of the Hou
are moving in concert to prevent the appoiro
ment of Mr. Davis, of Massachusetts, as Chai,
man of the Committee on Elections.
The Confederate ram Stonewall was forcV
by the gale to put Into -Beaufort harbor e.
Sunday.
The Stonewall will arrive here in time
be examined by the court martial now tryi:
Comrodore Craven for not attacking her,
'errol, irn March last.
MnIssISPPI.-CoRREsPoNDENcE BETwEEN TI
RESIDENT AND) GoVERNOa HUMPRsrEYs-MISco
)CT oF COL.ORED TRooPs.-JaCkson, MisS.,N
erember 21, 186i5.-A Bill conferring certain ci
-ights upon the freedmen passed the House i
lay. The freedmen are allowed to testify
vinesses when party to the record, but not
~ases exclusively between white men.,
Governor Hum phre'ys has telegra phed to t'
~resident that the colored troopa recently
acked and: took possession of the paIssen.:
rain at Lauderdale Springs. insu;lting ladies, a
>therwise miscondu~cting themselves. The ?
ers were unable to control them.
He says the Legislature has been memoriali:
or the removal of the troops, and are willing
~xtend to freedmen the right to testify in Cow'
f the troops are withdrawn.
The President replied that the troops wot
>e withdrawn when peace and order could
naintained without themi. Measures should
idopted giving protection to all freedmen in th
ossession of property, -whbich will entitle th
o assume their constitutionlal rights. There
o dispotition on the part of the Goverune
ritrarily to dictate, but siniply to advise a po
y that is beneficial.
Anna Farrell was thrown from a wage
vhile riding in Columbus, Ind., and dragg t
o death by her hoop skirt catching the bw~

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