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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, January 10, 1866, Image 1

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MONTIIS, IN ADVANCE.ERMS-$1,50 FORo SIXZ of j - -
VOLUME II. NEWBERRY, S. C., WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1866. NUMBER 2.
THE HERALD!
IS PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY,
It Newberry C. H.,
By THOS. F. & R. H. GRENEMER,
EDITORS AND PRorRIETORS.
ERMS, 1,50 FOR SIX MONTIIS, EITHER
IN CURRENCY OR IN PROVISIONS.
(Payment required invariably in advance.)
Advertisements inserted at -i,5i per sonare. for
rst insertion, .1 for each subsequleIlt i e on
kirr'aae notices, Funer:0 invitations, Obituaries,
and CoMmunicatiois of pe"rsoral interest charged
'is advertisemtuer.
Charleston Advertisements.
'A. GETTY. E. A. SO-LIER. S. T. SOD.
Archibald Getty & Co.,
WHOLESALE DEALERS,
EIPPING, tlUMMISSIUN,
FORWARDING MERCHANTS,
126 AND 12. I -NETNG STR EET.
Charleston, S. C.
WARF.H')USES,
53 ANT) 55 I1AEL ST EET:
REPRESENTEI) BY MR. W. F. NANCE.
dec 2v 32 tf
TO OWNERS AND SHIPPERS
kOF
COTTON, NAVAL STORES,
Y.ARN S, E:Tc
Charles L. Guilleaume,
COMMISSION MERCHANT,
'1ffe 13 Meeting-Street, Directly Oppo
site Itayne-street,
CH.\RI~LE STON, S. c.
ILL M.\KF 1.IPEitAL A)V.\N(E ON
Coniglm's - hfouI his frienis.
Me'ssrs. Bo EK, G vsNA.T.A- E o -Wr.
M..~..s. TXu.r\ L Co.:: . N ew Yo: k
Mes:-ri. 170oos.x\ (I"AVES " \ .o lot,n
-. essrs IASF1.In-RST & SMITH, SVw 'Yort.
Meossrs. T;!.%.rj,, M:i(n. % & Co - 13ow'on.
Messrs. .J. I. & LlT !,.- Iv e'po ol.
31ess rs. IIF-1 1'Y Sto AN S W I', Phi.4elpihi-.
3ssrs. PNAST, V :s -nwitK & Co.,1I.:.l:iinore.
Messrs. C1AnE, FSM rr & o ,
Iis facilities for Insur iee cover Curron, &c.,
all the %av through, by ln(l and se:i, tiomi any
point at lower rates by ai:- policies that enit
be e'ected here.
PRODUCE bou;:ht and solh here to fill or,ler!,
at market raes, giving ownens the oppurunity
of selling 'ere or shipping.
Consignments solicited, to n'hichi I n il give
tu personal1 atteminon, and retutrn,; maet in eur
'rency,.gold or foreign exchange.
Dec 20 .52-1mno.
BAGGING ?- ROPE,
DRY & FANCY GOODS,
MILLINER Y GOODS,
T A NKE E 3NO TIONS kc.,
Full and large assortmenctt now in store, and
constantly receiving.
For sale at L west Market P; ices, at whole
~3,b CH~ AS L GUILLEAUME,
140) Meeting Street, opiposite 1ay nre st.,
dec 20 Imi Charleston, S. C.
John S. Bird, Jr., & Co.,
General Commission 1Yerchants
DEALEFRs IN
GRAIN, HAY AND OTHER PRODUCE,
CoTNE CiILRCHI aND TRADD STS.
CH ARLSTON, S. C.
Country Produce received arnd returns made
in Merchandize or Money.
dec 2cr 3m
C. A. Chisolm. R. G. Chnisolm. H . L. Chisolm
SHlIPP~ING
MER CH ANTS,
ROMPT a.ttenltion given to the Pur
parts of the country; Consignment:
S. C.; G. W. Williams & Co, , Charleston ,S. C.
Dec. 13, 51 3mno.
C. D, CARR & C9.
Dealers in
Carpets, Oil Cloths, MIattings
Window Shades,
PATENT STEP LADDERS, &c.
TAILOR'S TRIMMINGS, of every variety,
Which they offer to the Trade at New York Jot
t;ing prices.
CH-ARLESTON, S C;
Cla'leson Adverllsei leits.
AITKEN, NOYES
AV'
JOHNSTON
No. 159 MEETING STREET,
CIARLESTON, S. C,q
IMPORTERS & JOBBERS.
--
D R Y G O O D S,
CLOTHS AND CASSIIERES,
BLANKETS AND FLANNELS,
CLOAKS AND SHAWLS.
DELAINES AND PRINTS,
FBENCII MENIN'S
PLAIN AND PLAID LINSEYS
ENGLIH P RE"', GOODS,
IRISH LINENS.
BR4WN & BLEACHED SHIRTINGS,
OPERA FLANNELS,
-ATINETS AN1 KE1SEYS,
TIC.KS AND STIVES,
% Fo,
A LARG I U .TMENT F
OPElX I1OD0)S,
)ONTAGS AND NUBIAS,
A COMP'LET STOCK OF
FANCY (ODS,
To wih we invi:e the atl: t in of th1 trade.
Nov. 45 St
.11. cGIl1 1"EE,
No. 205 E AST BAY ST REET,
(Opposite New Custom IIouse,)
CHTA%LESTON, S. C.
COMMISSION MERCHANTI
DEALER lN
BEiTTE
Cli KE ,
L.\lPD, and1
IU(iRS.
R Y ST'A: I' f Gons - c t exprcs:.lV
for the Chale:-ton dbirket.
WIZI)ERS PRZOMPTI.N ATTEND)ED TO.
Charleston, S. C., Nov S IS35. m.
LITTLE & MARSHALL,
L Pl liL I,,
173 E. 4TBA IY,
CI[LLESTON, SO. CA.
G IT LI C i A L Implements of all kitds, ol
thIatest and mos(t approved patterns.
* CONSI-TING OF
P!ows, Ha:rrows, I lay ('itters, Corn >hellers, Cul
*MachLies and epar:or5, Saw and Corn Mills,
Plam at ion ('arts, Haundbarrows, w'ithi Plough
Castings of aI kintds.
Imiproved 11land Power Portable ('ottoni
Presses.
For sale for CASH at New York prices.
GRAE8ER & SMITH,
COTTON FACTORS,
Cumwis'Yi & Forwarding MIerchants,
L' ORTII ATLANTIC WIIARF,
CH ARLESTON, S. C.
Solicit Consignments of tot ton, Naval St ores
all kinds of Pruodue', and (General Merchandise
and w ill makte ADV VA NtES on the samett; amn
sell either in this or forcugn markets.
Orders for Gjoods prom ptly e xecuted at lowes
prices. Goods forwa rded to( any pom lt.
Refer to Messrs. G. W. Williams & Co., an<
John Frazer & Co.
dee 6 5o Im
HENRY BISCHOF.)F & CU.,
COMMIYISSION MERCHANTS
And Who!e.sale Dealers in
Groceries, Wine s, Liquors, Segars, &(
No. 1<. Eas! Ilay,
(Cl.X1LESTUN, S. C.
nov 15 Smn
JOHN KING & CO.,
IPORTER~S .ANI W I!oLE:sAl DJE.illI
is
GROCEBIES
PR V ISIONS
FLt'CR
FOR EIGN & DOMiRSTIC LIQUOR:
CROCKERY, HULLo WVARE & GLASS WA R]
Q' ' SACK' LI VEIIPOOL SALT,
nov 8 3mn CH ARLESTON. S. C.
E. B. STODDA \RD & CO.,
WXhiolesale Deale rs in
BOOTS, SHOES AND TRUNKS
AT THEIR OLD STAND,
165 MIEETING STREET,
CH A RLESTON, S. C.
Take pleasure it annuouneintg their restumptio
of busintess, and invite the attention of purcha
sers to their stock, which is now complete.
t'ov 8 cmn
FB ale
MULES and II')JSES for sale at mn
Splantation in Ne.wberty.
SONG OF THlE PREEDMAIN.
BY A. R. WATSON.
A freedman sat on a pile of bricks,
As the rain was pattering down ;
His shoes were worn and his coat was torn,
And his hat without a crown.
IIe viowed the clouds and he Niewed himself,
And shook the wet fron his head.
And a tear dimmed his eye as he saw go by
A boy with a loaf of bread.
And he raised his voice in a dolesome tone,
That sounded like a gong,
While the rain came down on his nappy crown,
And sang to himself this song.
De wind blows cold, but I'se done wid toil,
And lef de cotton patch;
I gness old mlassa tink he count
Do chickens 'fore dey hatch.
I totes no more de beaby load,
Nor drives old Missus round;
wonder who dey's gwinle to get
To work do patch ob ground.
Den fling away de -ake and hoe,
Dis am de jubilee:
De rain may come, de wind may blow,
But bress de Lord I'se free!
But I t1ink last igt, as I tried to sleep
Vpon de4 muddy ground,
Whle de ai n was drippin' on my head,
An de wind w ms wizzin' round,
I'd like to h1h my I ght'ood fire
And m.y cabin back agin,
For de wedder's gettin berry cold
Out here in all dis rain.
I'se got al! ragged 'bout de knees
MY slos is worn out, too
My coat's so old, dat from each siceve
ie elbowN's conmin' fro.
And dere's de chibirei dat once played
lu shirt-tail 'bout -e1.ar
I cannot buy a shirt fo:- dem,
D tiie's o berry hard.
De odder d-av when Pinky died,
I tink it berry good,
Dat de dear Lord should take her off,
Before dis cold wind blowed ;
But den 'twas hard to see her dle
I wish she'd not been born
I'se [raid she perished, for she asked
About de rice and corn.
I dramt last nigh oll Massa come
And took us home wid he
To de log etbin dat we left,
Whvn first dev sst us free
And dre I bu;ll de light'ood fire,
And Dinah ,oked de vain
I)v sav da.t dreams are sometimes true,
I womier if dis one ami.
But den I'se flung away de hoe
To hab a iubilee.
1a rain may coIe, de .md - ay biow,
But, bress de Lord I'se free.
Peistitui\! and Suffering in South Caro
lina.
PENLETON, S. C., December 15.
I doubt if you have the smallest idea of the
poverty of the people of South Carolina. De
siring neither cormmisseration nor alms, they
s vn10thing about it. Indeed the struggle
for the necessaries of life is too pressing to
allow them to brood over losses of any kind
losses compared with which that of property
suens trifling. It is on the reftigee from the
coast that poverty has laid her iron hand
most heviy Th planters of the interior
inthrcapital reduced by emancipation to
abeut one-fifth its former amount, but if the
negro will work tunder the new system, their
inicomnes will not be much diminished. But
the poor refugee has lost everything. Driven
fr om his home and cut off from his resources,
lhe finds it difricult to procure ordinary food
for his household. His plantation on the
coast has probably not a building of any kind
standing, not even aiegro hut, and the recov
ery of the land is, in somne cases, doubtful.
Those on Port Royal are advertised to be
sold to-day, and none but negroes are alllowed
to bid. Even where the land is restored,
where can its ruined owner procure money to
pay taxes, erect buildings and hire freedmen.
Some refugees have returned to Charleston
intehope of procuring business the'-e, but
maystill remain in the interior, being una
ble to bear the expense of removal, and earn
a scanty subsistence by personal efforts. Our
young men have gone to work in earnest.
Our's is a poverty of which no one is
ashamied, and of which very few complain.
We are willing to bear it, a.o its univesality
makes it more tolerable. When I know that
the mtost refined and intelligent women in the
State, deserted by their deluded servants, are
doing all kinds of hodsework--sweeping,
making beds, cooking and washing-it is much
easier fonr me to iron the towels my little son
has wash-:d; w[ile I turn occasionally a laugh
ing eye to the fire-place, where an invalid
gentlcman,(son of a former governor) is en
gaged in churning ! I must confess that his
attempt furnished us with more amnsement
thnan bli'ter. For, believing this state of
thitngs to be only temporary, we make merry
over it, compare notes with our friends, and
boast of our success in these untried fields.
Many refugee ladies feed their families by
enchanging the contents of the!r wardrobes
for articles of food. "IIow are your sisters I"
said I last summer to a young man who had
left home to become a tutor. "Their corm
peions look bajdly," was the reply, "but
that is not surpris!ng when you consider how
long they have been eating old frocks."
'IIave they any lights ?" was my nextquery.
with pcrfect gravity he replied, "No ; when
the moon dloes not shine, they go to bed by
1 'ghtning." IBut ma~tters are mending. In
thlis very family light wood has superseded
lightning in th~e chambers, and in the parlor
a smiall pciroeum lamp (price $1) diffuses
light and happiness around.
But there are cases over which no one can
laugh. I know of a family whose property
wa.s counted by hundreds of thousands, who
havc not tasted meat for months, A gentle
mnan of high scientific attainigents, formerly
a professor in a college, is liter aly .trying to
keep the wolf from the door by teaching a
few scholars, o:Th of whom, a girl of sixteen,
pays a quart of milk per diemp for her tuition ?
Innumerable widows, orphans and single wo
-men, w hose proper ty was in Con federate bonds,
are penniless and seeking employment of
somTe kindl for bread.
nh th2 whole, ouir people are bearing their
tr'als bravery and Theerfully but so wide
spreadI is the ruin that, even if thn new sys
temf works well; it will take at least half a
century tc; put us where ne were. Georgia
a il reovr mtnch sooncr.
ACTS OF Ti GENERAL ASSEN I -
AN ACT TO RUsE SrPPLIES FOR THE YEAR
CoMMENcING IN OCTToIER, ONE THOUSAND
Ev;HT fl x )RED AND SIXTY-FivE.
&. Be it enacted by the Sewte and House ojw|
Representative-*, no. met and sitting in Gen -|
tal Assembly, and by the authority of the eaie,
That a tax for the sums and in the manner
hereinafter mentioned, shall be raised and
paid into the ; iblic Treasury of this State,
for the use and service thereof ; that is tosay:
Fifteeen cents zd raltrern on every hundred
dollars of the value of all the lands granted in
this State, except such lands as during the
year have been in poSession of the Freed
man's Bureau, and on all lots, lands and
buildings within any city, town, village or
borough in this State, except such as during
the year have been in possession of the Freed
man's Bureau ; two dollars per head on all
male res dents of this State between the ages
of twenty-one and sixty years, except such
as shall be clearly proved, to the satisfaction
of the Collectors, to be incapable, from nainis
or otherwise, of proctiring a livelihood ; sixty
cents per hundred dollars on factorage, emi
ploynients, faculties and professions, includ
ing the profession of dentistry(whether in the
profesion of the law,the profits be derived from
the costs of suit,fees,or other sources of profes
sional income,) excepting clergymen ; sixty
cents per hundred dollars on the amount of
comIlissions received by brokers, vendue
masters, and commission merchants ; one dol
lar per head on each and every dog, of every
kind1 and des-ription, in the State on the first
day of January, one thousand eight hundred
and sixty-six, or brought into the State be
tween that time and the (late of the payment
of taxes ; forty cents per hundred dollars on
tile capital stock of all incorporated gas-light
companies now in active operation ; one hun
dred cents per hu.ndred dollars on all prem
lunis taken in this State by insurance coinpa
nes inc-rporated within this State, and two
hundred cents per hundred dollars on all
preiniims taken in this State by the agencies
of insurance cowpanies and underwriters in
corporated without the limits of this State ;
on all express companies doing business with
in this State, one thousand dollars each, to be
paid to the Tax-Collecter of Richland Dis
trict ; twenty cents upon every hundred
dollars of the amount of sales of goods,
wares and merchandize, embracing all the ar
ticles of trade for sale, barter or exchange,
(the products of this State and the unmanu
factured prodicts of any of the United States,
or Territories thereof, excepted,) which any
erson shall ' v'- made from the first day of
ain or mie Q s,om rst cay or
.kl(l U;LI 3 j t,L I va. t U L , G1I-L U3
January, in the year of our Lord one thou
sand dght hundredandsixty-six,eitheron his,
her or their capital, or borrowed capital, oron
account of any person or persons as agent, at
torney or consignee ; one hundred cents upon
everv hundred d.lIars of the amount of sales
of all gaods, wares and merchandize whatev
er, which any tran.sient person,not resident in
this State, shall make in any house, stall or
public place ; one hundred cents on every
hundred dollars of the value of all articles
manufactured in this State for sale, barter or
exchange ; twenty dollais upon every hun
dred dollars of the value of all spirituous li
quor manufactured in this State tor sale, ba
ter or exchange, and upon all spiritvous li
quors brought into this State for sale barter
or exchange ; one hundr-ed cents on every
hundred dollars in value of all cotton on hand
on the first day of October last, excluding the
cr-op of the present year from this taxation;
one dl'ar on every hundred dollars of all
sales of cotton madec since the first day of
May last to the fir-st day of October, one thou
sand, eight hundred and sixty-five :Prori
ded, That the tax shall not be due on any
cotton seized by the United States Govern
ment and not returned, or on any cotton stol
en and not recovered ; one hundred cents on
every hundred dollars in value of all crude
turpentine, spirits of turpentine andl rosin, on
hadon the tirst day o- October last, exclud
ing the production of the year one thousandl
eight hundred and sixty-five ; one hundred
cents on every hundred dollars of all sales of
said artic.es from first of May last to first of
October, one thousand eight hundred and six
ty-five, except sales of production of present
year ; twenty dollars per day for representing
publicly for gain or reward any play, come
dy, tragedy, interlude or frace, or other .n
ployiient of the stage, or any part therein, c'
for exhiibi ting wax figures, or other shows of
any kind whaitsoever, to be paid into the
hands of the Clerks of the Court respectively,
who shall be bound to pay the same into the
public Treasury, excepting in cases where
the same is now required by law to be paid
to corporations or otherwise.
II. That all taxes levied on property, as
pr< scribed in the first section of this Act,
shall be paid to the Tax Collector for the D)is
trict or P'arishi in which said property is loca
ten. .' :d whenever any person, upon whom
a tax is imposed b,y this Act, has nI) visibhle
property upon which an execution can be le
vied, it~shall be the duty of the Tax-Collector
to sue out of the District Court a special at
tachmwent, attaching mnoneys and credits in
the hands of any one whomsoever, and due to
such person, which special attachmen t shall
be conducted in the same way anld be subject
to the sam e regulations as are provided for
speciall attachments jn the Act to establish
District Courts : sMei"'l rFhat any em
ployer may make returns of the namues of
such persons as are employed by' hcn, and
pay the tax of such person, in which case the
tax-receipt shall be a good and valid set-off in
any action for wages by such employee
against such employ-er.
III. In making assessments for taxes on
the value of taxable property used in mann
factur!ng, or for railroad purposes within this
State, the value of the machinery used there
in shall not be included, but only the value
of the lots and buildings as pro perty me2rely.
IV. That the lots and houses on Sullivan's
Island shall hereafter he returned to the Tax
Collector of the tax District in which they
are situated, in the same muanner as other
town lots and houses, and lalH Lbe liable to
the same rates of taxation.
V. That the taxes hiorein -levied Thall be
pid~ only in gold or silver coin, United States
Treasury notes; or rtes declared. to be:a legal
tender hy the (overminut Cf the ( nited
States, tr such hblls receivable as may bie is
sued under the authority of the p)resent Leg
iM.atu - andaL pay vertificates of Jurors
Lnd Constables for attendance on the Court of
olimon Pleas pay-certificates of bearers of
rotes for Governor and Lieutenant-Governor
mnd Members cf Conitnss and pay-certi
:ates of Members of this session of the Legis
ature. The Tax-Collectors of the several
:ollection Districts shall be allowed, on all
mrus of money paid into their hands for taxes,
t commission as follows, that is to say:
rhe Tax-Collector of Iorry and St. James',
ioose Creek, a commission at the rate of ten
er cent. ; the Tax-Collectors of Anderson,
Lhester, Chesterfield, Christ Church, Claren
:on, Darlington, Greenville, Lancaster, Lau
rens, Lexington, Marion, Marlborough, New
berry, Orange, Pickens, Prince 1% illiam's,
Saratanburg, All Saints', St. Andrew's, St.
George's, Dorchester, St. James', Santee, St.
John's, Berkeley, St. Luke's, St. Paul's, St.
Peter's, St. Thomas' and St. Dennis', Union,
York, Williamsburg and Barnwell, at the.
rate of seven per cent ; the Tax-Collector o1
St. Philip's and St Michael's, at the rate of
four per cent., until the commission amounts
to three thousand dollars, and atter that
amount, on all remaining sums, at one per
cent.; all the other Tax-Collectors, a commis
sion at the rate of five per cent. Tax-Collec
tors shall make their returns at the Treasury,
in Columbia, on or before the first of August.
VI. That before the collection of the taxes
herein levied, an asessment shall be made of
the actual value of the property taxed, ahd
for that purpose the Tax-Collectors of the
several Districts or Parishes, except the Par
ishes of St, Philip and St. Michael, are here
by constituted Assessors, for which additional
labor they shall receive as compensation a sum
equivalent to forty per cent, of their tax com
missio,s as allowed by this Act. That each
rax- Collector, before entering.u pon his du
ties as Assessor, shall take and substribe be
fore the Clerk of the Court of the District the
following oath, which shall be endorsed on
his commission viz: "I, A. B., do promise
and swear that I will, to the best of my abili
ty, execute the duties of Assessor for my col
lection District and will without favor or par
tiality, ascertain and assess the actual value
of the property, real and personal, upon which
an ad ralorem tax is laid before, and for the
purpose of laying such tax."
VII. It shall be the duty of the Assessor in
each District to require from each tax-payer,
or person subject to taxation under this Act,
a full return, on oath, of all cotton, crude tur
pentine, suirits of turpentine and resin in his
or her hands on the first day of October last,
subject to taxation under this Act; and in
case any tax-payer, or person subject to sucli
tax, shall neglect or refuse to make such re
turn, on oath, as aforesaid, it nhall be the de
tv of such Asse.or forEthwith to assess thi
probable value of such cotton, crude turpen
tine, sp!rits of turpentine and resin subject t<
such tax in the hands o! sabh,person as afore
s.d, which said assessment shall be held ,tc
be true, and the tax be estimated thereon
unless such tax-payer or person liable to suci
tax shall, v ithin ten days after notice thereof
make return, on oath, to such Assessor of al
his cotton, crude turpentine, spirits of turpen
tine and resin so liable to tax as afaresaid.
VIII. That it shall be the duty of the Trea
surer to cause the official bonds of the several
Tax-Collectors of this State 16 be* 'eaminec
by the Crmrnissioners appointed in their re
spective tax Districts to approve public secu
rities, andl if the said bonds are found to be
sufficient andl satisfactory, they shall re-affirir
their original approval thereof; but if insuffi
cient and unsatisfactory, they shall reqmir4
the same to be re-executed and renewed witi
good and suflicient sureties.
IX. The treasurer of the State is hereby
authorized to borrow, on the failth and credit
of the State, a sum not exceeding one hon
dred thousand dollars, payable not more than
twelve months after date, and to deposit sucl
collateral securities as muy be recek;ed anc
transferred to the State by the President o!
the B3ank of the State for the same purpose:
Porided, hower'er, If die said loan has al
ready' been negotiaited in accoydance with a
joint~resolution of both HIouses of the Genera
Assembly, then the authority granted t'd the
Treasurer shall not be exercised, unless t<
substitute for the note of the president of th<
Bank of the State the note oi' obligation o
the Treasury of the State: Proided, fur
themiore, That the Treasurer shall executi
an obligation to the President of the Bank fu
all collateral securities he may obtain froni
said Bank in behalf of the State;
X. The taxes prescribed to be levied ant
collected by this Act, as well as the sum Q
one hundred thousand dollars authorized t<
be borrowed by this Act, and also all bills re
ce~ivh which. may be hereafter issued bi
virtue of any Act that triay be passed at thi
present session of the Geperyl Assembly, shal
be paid out by the Treasurer only in obedi
ence to an Act of the General Assembly at it:
pres:nt or some future session.
XI. That the President and Directors o
the Bank of the State of South Carolina be
and they are, hereby authorized and required
to close the branc~hes and agencies of soi(
Bank, andl that the principal Bank in Char
leston shall cease to be a Bank of issue. biu
shali continue ta ?et as a flhii ofdposIt unti
further action of the Legislature, and the s:i
Preident and' Directors are hereby author
izd and required to collect the assets and
property of tihe Bank, and hold the so me spe
cliny appropr iated, first, to the payment o1
the principail and interest of the bonds knowr
as the Fire Loan Bonds, payable in Europe;
secondl, to the payment of the principal and
interest of the Fire Loan Bonds, payable ir
the United States ; and third, to the redemnp
tion of out-slanding notes hitherto issued by
said Blank. That the Bank aforesaid is here
by required to receive on special deposit, and
t pay out on checks fuundecl on~ sugh depos
its such bills receivable or othet- evidences ol
indbtedness as the State may order to be is'
'ud in paymrent of amount due. That thc
said Bank :lBaIl as agent of the State, con
twue to receive and hold on deposit, as nowi
provided by law, the funds of the State ; anc
tle President and Directors are hereby au
thoized and required to make arrangements,
by an agencev for the reception, safe-keep
ing and pavi~ng out of said funds in Columia,a
on the dra~ft "ir order of the Ti'easuirer ; e
they shail .also provide offices for the Comp
trller and Treasurer, and for these purpose
ter are hereby authorized to use any part o
the new State Capitol, or any other builinr
belonging to the State which may not he ir
In the Snate louse, tie t%vntY-nr.t any
of December, in the year of our Lord Ono
thousand eight hiindrcd and -ixty-five.
.W. D). PORTE IR,
President of the Senate.
C. II. SI.IINTON,
Speaker of the House of Reprcsentatives.
Approved : JAMES L. OR11R.
LIST OF THE ACTS RATIFIED AT TIE
SESSION OF TILE GENERAL ASSEMBLY,
ENDING DECEMBER 1, l85.
An Act to incorporate the Elr:.;e M i I
surance Company. An Act to ainon I the Crinii
nal Law. An Act preliminary to the legisla-ion
induced by the emancipation of slaves. An Act
to establi:h District Conrts. An Act to amend
and renew the charter of the Calhoun Insirance
Company of Charleston. An Ate to alter the law
in relation to lost W%ills aid Tet;a:ents. An
.1ct to provide for the drawin.: oi jrit- in ccr
-ain cases. An Act to incorporato Sh hiler Lodge,
I. U. 0. F., No. 3(-. An Act to provide for the
reorgani'ation of the Militia. An Act to provile
f6r the appointment by the people of t;is State
of Electors of Preold.ent and Vice Prcsident of
the United States. An Act to incorporate the
Rose Mill Manufacturing ConipmY. A!n Act to
inerprate the Palmetto Saviiie llan. An Act
to incorporate the Charleston Savings Bank. Au
Act to incorporete the Ireland Creek TImber
Cutter's Company. An Act to de,cla:e certain
streams not navigalle. An Act to anend tho
:harterof the Edisto and Ashley River Canal
Compa.ny. An Act to amend the charter of the
Charle Compny. An Act to nake
appropriatinis for the year comnincitg 0,tober,
186-5. An Act to anl)d an Act en:.i:lol "An
Act in relation to the Southern Exprer,s Compa
ny and to provide addlitional remedies for de
faults of common carriers." An Act to incorpo
rate the Charleston Dred-ing and Wh:irf-huilding
Company. An Act to extend to the Camden
Bridge Company the time within which to re
'ijld.their bridges. An Act to establi,h regula
tions for the purpose of preventing the spread of
Asiatie cholera in this State.
An Act to amend the charter of the Gicenville
and Columbia Railroad Company. An Act to
authorize fariers and planters to give their
books in evidence in certain eases. An Act for
the relief of the Spartanburg and V'nion Railroad
Company. An Act to incorporate the village of
Kirkwood. An Act to renew the charter of the
Mount Pleasant Ferry Cotnpany.
An Act to establish certain road,, bridge- anid
ferries. An Act for the relief of the Charleston
and Savannah Railroad Company. An Act to or
ganize the Executive Department of tbis State.
An Act to postpone the lien of the State on the
Greenv Ile and Columbia Railroal Company. Au
Act to raise supplies for the .or conitencin
October, 1865. An Act to incorrorate the Ger
man Immigration, Land and Trading Company
qf Ciarl3e1ch. An Act to regulate the distill
t!.n oftspirituols riquors. An Act to, -provide
for the isue of Bills receivable in -y.tmenz cf the
indebtedness of this State to the a:nount of five
hundred thousand dollars. An Act to provide a
mode by which to perpetuate testimnony in.rela
lion to deeds, wills, c!.oses in action, and other
papers e'd.reerds lost or destroved during tile
war. An Act ib establish and -(e:!ate the (Ic
mestic relations of persons of cilor, and to
amend the law in relation to paupers and vagran
Vt. An Act ,t incorporate the Charleston Ilook
and Ladt?er company, No. 1. An Act to incor
porate the Ashley River Saw ."121, Ti:nber and
L1m1ber company. An Act to inco:porate the
Deep Water and Western Railway Con pany. An
Act to authorize the sale of the Columbia canal.
*An Act to amiend the law known ats the Stav
Law. An Act to provide for the election ot Tai
Collectors for the Districts of Darlington and
Chesterfield. An Act to anond tIhe License
Laws. An Act to lend the credit of the State to
secure certaip b,onds to be issn:el by the South
Carolina Railroad Company, and for other pur
poses. An Act to change the tme for holding
the election of Shneritf of Wifliamshum I)District.
An Act to incorporate the So;nhi Carl:ina Laud
and Emigraticn Company.
A GREAT CouNrIr.-Sonre years ago an
Alabama ppr got off the followmng "burst of
Tho;erie :"t the least shadow of a doubt of
the matter-ours is emphatically, un.deniably,
incontrovertably, positively, comparatively
and superlatively a great and WIuous couIr
try. The innals of time furrnish nothing to
compire with,,it; Greece wasn't a circum
stance; Roriie was no where; Venice couldn't
Khold us a cande, while aill modern nations
sink into insignificance before our country.
*It ltids longer rivets, and more of them rpmc
dier, deeper and run faster, and go Iarthe;
Iand make more noise, and rise htgher ted fali
lower, and do more damage th:m~ anybody
else's rivers. It has more lakes, and they are
bigger and deeper and clearer than those of
any other nation. It has more cataracts, and
they fall farther and faster and harder, and
* oar louder, and look gratnder than all other
cataracts. It has more mountains, and higher
Iones, and more s:.cw rn 'eta, and harder to
get up, and easier to fall down, than all other
mountains. It has more gol, and it is boa vier*
and brighter, anid is worth more than the
gold of other nations. Our rai! ears are bigger
and run faster, and pitch off the track cftener,
and kill more people than all other cars.Ou
steamboats are longer, and carry Ligger loads,
and bile their h'usters oftener, and the captains
swear harder than in any other countries.
Our men nrc b!gger, and higher and thicker,
and can fight harder and faster, andl can drink
more whiskey, chew more tobacco, s'it more
and further, kick up their heels higher, and
do anything else more, and better and oftener
than men in all other countttries combined.
Our ladies arc prettier, dress !iuer, spendV :;'orC
montej, break more hearts, wear Li:zer hoops
wear shorter dresses, kick tip the devil gene
rally to a greater extent than all other ladies.
Our politicians can spout louder, lie harder,
make gas faster, dodge gnicker and turn often
er, make more noise, and do le-s work than
everybody else's politicnns. (Kir tiagers are
blacker, work harder, h:ave thi:kr skulls,
srhell louder, and need thrashing oftener than
other niggers. Our children squall lou der;
grow faster, and get too him' for their trowser:t
-uce than all other children.
The Methodi ~t Episopa I rches in Newv
York arc mnaking con i r repaatot1n to
ceerate the first Sn y in .En;y, which
was the ainn;iver-rt \ i me'" .1'dt
year of the' e : :nati: in
A MRa Fp.r - t ta a '.=y cf ffy
famr'~ t ni I h,i to emn
bark fr I n at pro

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