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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, September 07, 1882, Image 2

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1882-09-07/ed-1/seq-2/

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Our School Fund and What It I
Accomplishing.
= We publish in another column a
article from our estimable contemp<
lary, the Newberry HERALD, on th
subject of "Our Free Education." W
%now the even tenor and steady pui
pose of our contemporary too well t
suppose for a moment that its timel
reflections are made in a spirit of faul
Finding on for the purpose of antag<
nizing the cause of popular educatio:
Quite to the contrary. We unde
stand our contemporary to desire tb
Use and application of the education
fund for which the people are taxe
so as to give dollars' worth for dollai
n educational advantages afforded tb
public to the last cent of the fun
raised out of the people's pocket
This is right. There is no sort c
sense in wasting a half million of tb
people's ,money for tho mere name
the thing.
And here we can say with emph:
als that there, is nobody who has bee
nore eanertly impressed with thi
very thing than our enthusiastic
diligent, hard-working and able Sc
perintendent of Education, whom tb
people have seen fit to put i
momination for Governor against hi
expressed wish.
Now, we must judge of a tree b
its fruit, it is true. But we mu.
beep in mind at the same time whf
chance the tree has had to bear frui
before we condemn it. Have w
digged around and dunged it" so a
to entitle us to look for a large fruit
age ? If we have set it out ina
eld field and left it to be choked wit
the weeds and dwarfed by neglect w
cannot complain of a poor yield c
fruit.
Let us see what our education
fund is. Our contemporary states 1
at:
Constitutional tas..........--$300,00
Poll tax.................175,00
Common school fund............$475,00
South Carolina University......-50
Citadel Academy............ 15,0{
Total educational fund $502,500.
Our contemporary then observes :
"With this large fund of over
half million has there been that get
eral diffusion of learning and the
advancement among the children the
would rightly be expected ? Wher
are the fruits of this grand system
It is a grand system in theory, but i
practice it has been and still is def
cient. The people should not be sai
isfied with glittering generalities abot
free education." Most true. Be
should they be a whit more satisfie
with "glittering generalities" by wa;
of criticism ? A fund is large c
small, not by the mere figures ei
pressing the amount, but by the dE
inand made upon it by the exigencie
for which it is raised. A half mi
lion is a big sum in private parlanci
but what is it for educating th
masses of a million people?i
But let us examine our contemp<
ray's figures before we go farthei
- We throw off the. $27,500 colleg
fund, whieh all men who contemplat
the necessities and advantages of
higher course of education will recog
nize at once as a bagatelle. We dea
then, with the $475,000 commo
school fund. Are these figures col
rect4? Let us see. The Comptrolle
General's annual report, showingt th
public school fund for the fiscal yes
1879-'80, states it at $415,108 93
This shows $60,000 less than ou
* contemporary claims. Besides thi:
there is at least $40,000 of this fun
per annum which must be paid to th
school debt, which arose under th
Radical administration. And thi:
notwithstanding the earnest entreatie
of the Superintendent, the Legislatur
has persistently refused to lift frot
the .shoulders of the school systet
under its present management, thu
crippling the present performance c
our school department by saddlingi
with past derelictions for whichi
~was in no way responsible.
This, then, reduces our commo
school fund to $375,000 insteadc
$475,000 .as, claimed by our conten
porary. Now, let us see what de
mnand is made on this fund. Ther
are 134 scholars and 3,200 teacher
This fund alb3ws, say $2.80 to eac
pupil per annum, besides constructio
of school houaes and repairs, whic
must be met out of the same func
And measuring it alongside of th~
number of teachers we find it allow
$117 a year to each teacher, beside
meeting the constructions and repair
necesrary. Now what becomes of th
enormons fund of which our conten
porary talks and "the grand systen
in theory,' about which rar conteum
porary thinks the people should uc
be satisfied by "glittering genera.
ities.' We think so too. But doe
not our contemporary now see wher
those glittering generalities lie ? Doe
it not behold them at its own door
We put it to any sensible man wh
has three children of the school age
if upon the payment of $8 40 a yeu
for their "schooling" he would be et
titled to expect -'that general diffusio
of learning and advancement" amon
them which our contemporary think
might be "rightly expected" fro.m on
school system. " -~, what kindc
teachers ean the public expect to ge
at an average of $117 a year, deduel
ing from their meagre salaries, in th
meantime, the necessary cost of th
construction and repairs of the scho<
houses.
Let any man of plain commo
sense look at the whole propositio
and see with what our starved fre
school system has had to wrestli
Need we seek for "the fruits of th
grand system " " There is no doud
that a through reform is needed.
Yes, but the first reform requiredi
to remember the quaint adage : "Poo:
RAY, POOR PREACH." This is th
substance of the reform req uirec
This is the beginning and the ent
-of mending the ineflciency complait
ed of. Under all these circumstance
a~nd the miserable sunm doled out4
tese sarelHn- teaher that any on
a -hould be found to talk to us about T
"iaking "the free school system an in
tirmary" and "an asylum for men and TI
women out of a job" looks to us like W
'adding insult to injury.".
But says our contemporary-: "Let ~~
e 'is have fewer or better schools."
e Very well, let us see what that means.
There are 3,200 teachers to 134,000
;,upils, which is some 42 scholars to
y ach teacher. Does it appear that
his is too little work for a teacher
having to teach all classes and ages of
children situated as most of our coun
ry teachers *are ? But suppose the
cheme was arranged for an average of TH
d ,4 scholars to each teacher, so as to _
d allow $234 a year as the average
t..acher's salary. It is difficult now
i our sparsely settled area to get 40 uyt
d scholars sufficiently near a given tae
f school centre to admit of their attend- adv
ance. What if that school area had
to be enlarged to double its present
size ? Do we not see that the chil
dren in very many cases could not
reach the school houses ? This is the
troublesome educatioaal problem in
our agricultural- districts throughout
the South..
Dr. Newell, the Superintendent of
e Education of Maryland, who has
n Leen - in office for sixteen years, and
who gets a salary of $4,000 a year in
cash with a house to live in, fuel and
liehts furnished, with all his travel
ing expenses paid, admits that he has
tiot been able to brix g up the school
e system out of the cities and towns to F
e high state of efficiency. Now,
Maryland had a population in 1880 of
934,943 to an area of 12,210 square
wiles, or over 76 inhabitants to
e the square mile. South Carolina had
in 1880 a population of 995,577 to
an area of 30,570 square miles, or I
something over 32 inhabitants to the citi
square mile. It is thus seen that the and
difficulty of sparseness of population
to area in our problem of free educa
o tion is 9.1 times greater than that of of t
0 Maryland. The only solution of the to 1
o question possible with us is to put the
o more money alongside of the individ- thi&
0 ual pupil in order to secure a better
- grade of instruction than we can now ThE
0 get. How is this to be got ? Only On
in two ways. One by increasing the hav
taxation so as to meet the necessities ing
a of the case. The other to shape the
law so as to require each school dis- pr
t trict or community to supplement apP
t by private contribution a certain per- it
e centage ef the school fund .to which and
? it would be entitled according to the A f
n children .in attendance. Make this Boi
i rule run to suit the necessities of the
case so as not to inflict a starveling tha
t teacher on the helpless children. .for
t Of course objections can be made acc
d against this latter proposition. But stai
7 it seems to us plain that a people who edt
r find resort to a given school ought to
be willing to do something to make it Al
a shift. There are other matters with sta
9 which our contemporary's most sug- of
- gestive article deals, the considera
h tion of which, owing to the length of n
e the present article, we must postpone
for the preser,t, but we will take them anc
>. up to-morrow, for we feel much in- gag
7debted to our contemporary for chal- lan.
e lenging popular attention to this great reft
e school question, which is and must he
a for all time the very corner-stone of 5101
- our well being. ta~
a A Good Story of Stephens and farn
7- Toombs. his
e A doctor named Royston sued
rPeter Bennett for. his bill for attend
Sing the wife of the latter. Alexander rea
rH. Stephens was on the Bennett side, the
and Robert Toombs, then Senator of has
ethe United States, was for Dr. Roy. s 1
estor, The Doctor proved the number fori
of his visits, their value acerding to
~local custom, and his own authority to wel
do medical practice. Mr. Stephens for4
etold his client that the physician had tha
amade out his case, and the only thing not
sleft to do was to pay it. 'No,' said but
SPeter, 'I hired you to speak in my
case, and now speak.' (an
Mr. Stephens told him there was ten
nothing to say ; he had looked on to not
see that it was made out, and it as
nwas.
'Peter was obstinate, and at last as
Mr. Stephens told him to make a piC)
speech himself, if he thought one Evt
e could be made. abc
- 'I will,' said Peter Bennett, 'ifkn
h Bobby Toombs will not be too hardkc
h on me.'4
SSenator Toombs promised, and Pe. but
'- ter began:the
e 'Gentlemen of the jury-You and I r
s is plain farmers, and if' we don't stickof
stogether, these 'ere lawyers and doc
stors wilgit the advantage of us. I a p
e ain't no objections to them in their whi
proper place; but thiey ain't farmers, un
' gentlemen of the jury.'gi
[P. S.-The advance agent for the
t circus has just come in with a two- n
column ad., and the Foreman says of 1
s the balance of the story must lie over I
for next week.] pre
- not
A munificent Providence placed in faci
Nature' s storehouse a cure or remedy
for diseases which would first afflict
rthe human family. Skin or blood dis- '11
eases necessarily wai the first to seize uG4
upon mankind. S. S. S. is Nature's c
remedy, taken from her bounteous
r storehouse, and never fails to cure any der
rskin or blood diseases, as thousands tiol
thave joyously testified. Price, $1.00 fou
and $1.75 per bottle. wei
e - dat
e Superintendent of Education. resi
The office to be filled is one of great ~
importance and responsibility, and too der
amuch care cannot be taken in select. ing
eing, as the Democratic candidate, one i
who will be fully eoual to the respon
sibilities and duties' of the oficee, and fl0f
eat the same time in accord with the refi
liberal, just and progressive education- per
al policy of the Democratic party.- mit
Charleston News and Courier-.
e ~~ - 'I
An Impossibility. "n
lDeserving articles are always ap- he 1
preciated. The exceptional cleanli
e ness of Parker's Bair Balsam makes Sta
it popular. Gray hairs are impossi. telli
he Jlerald.
[OS. F. GRENEKER E -Rs.
. H. WALLACE,
NEWBERRY, S. C.
URSi)AY, SEPT. 7, 1882.
A PAPER FOR THE PEOPLE.
e Herald is in the highest respect a Fain
.ews aper, devoted to the material in
its of the people of this County and the
e. It circulates extensively, and as an
ertising medium offers unrivalled ad- t
ages. For Terms, see first page.
The State Ticket.
FOR GOVERNOR
HUGH S. THOMPSON.
FOR LIEUTENANT-GOVERNOR:
JOHNt. SEEPPARD.
FOR SECRETARY OF STATE: C
JAMES N. LIPSCOMB.
FOR ATTORNEY-GENERAL:
CHARLES R[CHARDSON MILES. x
FOR COMPTROLLER-GENERAL:
W. E. STONEY.
FOR STArE TREASURER:
JOHN PETER RICHARDSON.
. ADJUTANT AND INSPECTOR-GENERAL:
A. M. MANIGAU'LT.
R SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION:
ELI'ISON CAYERS.
]
FOR CONGRESS, THIRD DISTRICT:
D. WYATT AIKEN.
A Prediction.
-y far the largest portion of the ]
ens of this State are farmers,
they pay most of the taxes ; yet
venture the prediction that out
he sixty-eight beneficiary cadets
e supported and educated from
taxes of the people not one
d of them will be farmers' sone. t
re are several reasons for this. I
reason is that farmers' boys
e not the same chance in apply
for cadetships. The farmer's
perty is visible and tangible : it
ears upon the Auditor's books ;
is land, and is his sole capital
.the source of his entire income.
irmer might send down to the
ird of Visitors a petition asking
his son be allowed to appear
examination as a beneficiary, j
mpanying the petition with the
;ement that he was unable to f
cate his son from his own means.
ng with this petition and this
:ement might go the certificate
the Auditor that this farmer
is two or three hundred acres of
3, and the certificate-of the Clerk
Sheriff that there are no mort
es or judgments against the
. The Board would, very likely,
ise the petition. But a profes
tal man with little or no visible
able property might be making
eat deal more money than the]
ner and be more able to educate
son. The son of the professional
1 would-find no difficulty in ap
ing to be examined. Another
on is that farmers' sons between
ages of fifteen and nineteen
e not had as many advantages
>oys about town, and are there
not as fully posted and not as
informed. They cannot, there
i, so readily answer the questions<
are asked by the examiners
from any inferiority of intellect;
because, if he is a poor boyt
I that is the kind that it is pre
3ed are to be benefited) he has
had access to as good schools
he town boy has ; has not seen
nch of the world, and has not
red up as much information.
rybody who knows anything
ut hoyvs knows that what a boy
ws at sixteen or seventeen years
e is of very little consequence ; I
everything depends upon what t
-e is in the boy awaiting devel
3ent. The '-smart boy" very
n develops in a few years into
rfect stupe and a no-account,4
le the uncouth, ungainly and1
ophisticated country boy when
en a fair chance almost invariably
s in the world and makes a man
uimself.
ut we only intended to make a
iction. Wait and see if it be
fulfilled. We are only stating
; not complaining about them.
'he Vews and Courier says :
m. Capers had consented to ac
t the nomination, with the un
tanding that if after the elec- t
and upon investigation he
ad that the duties of the office
e incompatible with his clerical
ies, he should be at liberty to
gn the office to the Legislature."
uch having been the secret un
standing, and the people believ
that Gen. Capers was Tunning
rood faith, his withdrawal came
e too soon. Such an agreement
acts no credit on either Gen. Ca
Sor the State Executive Corn- a
'he Anderson Intelligencer says:
a few years the University will
he equal of any in the United
bes." Upon what does the In- j
Ex Judge Thomas Jefferson Mac
:ey. Republican candidate for Con
;reEs from the Fifth District, has
leclined to meet both Col. E. B. C.
)ash, Independent candidate, and
no. J. Hemphill, Democratic can
lidate. And the ex Judge advises
.epublicans and Independents to
tay away from Democratio meet
ngs.
President Duncan and Secretary
3olloway spent last week in Colum
>ia preparing for enlarged improve
nents and conveniences for the
iext State Fair. The purpose is
,o make it the best in the history
)f the State ; and they can do so if
he people will take a proper inter
)st in the matter.
Isn't it in violation of public
)olic3 and immemorial usage for a
tate officer to reveal the secrets of
is office, as the State Treasurer
id recently in the Whites matter?
We believe that Mr. E. B. Mar
sy, of Anderson, would make a
good Superintendent of Educa
ion. He is young, active, intelli
;ent.and progressive.
State News.
The trial of Capt. Haile for the
:illing of Maj. L. W. R. Blair began
n Camden yesterday.
The following are the Legislative
iominees by the Greenville prima
ies the 2nd: M. F. Ansel, Dr. W.
. Mauldin, J. J. Mackey, W. A.
U cKelvey.
Dr. W. T. Brooker was nomina
,ed for the House of Representa
ives in the late primary in Lexing
on. Edward Kinsler and Carroll
3ookman will run the race again.
The County Democratic Conven
ion of Sumter made the following
ominations the 4th: For the Sen
Lte, Joseph H. Earle ; for the
louse, Rich'd D. Lee, H. E. L.
?eebles, Francis J. Mayes, D. E.
eels. -
The following is the result of the
,dgefield primary election the 31st
iltimo: For Representatives, W. J.
Calbert, Dr. W. H. Timmerman,
linton Ward, Geo. W. Turner,
Jalvin W: Kinard ; for Probate
Fudge, W. F. Roath ; for County
3ommissioners, Joseph Wise, W.
. Dobey, W. L. McDaniel; for
5chool Commissioner, G. W. Scott;
or Treasurer, James Mitchell;- for
Luditor, L. W. Youngblood.
rhe Greenback State Conven
tion.
A Full State Ticket of Nobodies.
Condensed from the News and Courier.
The State Convention of the Green
ack Independent Party met in Col
ibia Tuesday, 5th. Delegates were
>resent as follows: From Aiken 3,
inderson 3, Berkeley 6, Charleston 5,
hester 7, Clarendon 2, Colleton 3,
Jarlington 5, Edgefid 1, Fairfield
3, Georgetown 1, Greenville 2, Ker
haw 19, Lexington 10, Marion 7.
arlboro 3, Newberry 1, Oconee 2,
)rangeburg 4, Richland 16, Sumter
!, Williamsburg 4-120 in all, about
ne-fourth of whom were colored.
[he conspicuous figures in the Con
rention were es-Judge T. JT. Mackey.
f Chester, J- Hlendrix .McLane, of
olumbia, T. Augustus Sanders, Esq ,
f Colleton, T. H. Russell, of Ander'
on, D. R. Elkins, of Alston, and
until he was expelled for being too
lisorderly) Senator Fishbburne, of Col
eton. These men _were conspicuous
n the Convention by the activity they
lisplayed and the prominence they
ook in the proceedings. Ex-Judge
Iackey was the only man in the Con
ention of whom the general public
now anything. Rev. I. D. Durham,
f Aiken, presided. A motion by
x-Judge Mackey to nominate a full
state Ticket was adopted. D. R.
lkins nominated J. B. Campbell, of
Tharleston, for Governor, but upon
eing assured that he would not ac
ept withdrew the nomination. d.
Iendrix McLane was then nominated
y acclamation. McLane in accepting
he nomination, said, "If you will
ive me your unflagging support we
ni have this government. I am
iling to spend all my efforts, and, if
Reed be, die in the attempt to carry
iur movement through. If you stand
>yme and follow me through I will
>e Governor of South Carolina, or, by
be Eternal, we will have a military
~oernent." The other State nomi
ieee are: For Secretary of State,
[ho. Baskins, of Sumter; Comptrol
er General, Simeon Corley, of Lex
ngton; Attorney-General, C. B.
ar mer, of Colleton ; State Treasurer,
W. H. Stanton, of Oconee ; Adjutant
Lnd Inspector-General, J. T. Johns,
f Darlington; Superintendant of
~ducation, Rev. I. D. Durham, of
Liken.
The following Congressional nomi
ations were made: For the 1st Dis
riot, J. B. Campbell, of Charleston ;
id, T. H. Russell, of Anderson ; 4th,
avid R. Elkins, of Fairfield ; 5th,
1. J. Mackey ; 6thb, Dr. - Bowen, of
darion.
How it was Done.
'How do you manage,' said a lady
o her friend, 'to appear so happy and
rood natured all the time ?' 'I al
rays have Parker's Ginger Tonic
Randy,' was the reply, 'and thus easi
y keep nyself and family in good
ealth. When I am well T always
eel good natured.'
POST OFFICE,
NEWBERRY, S. C., Sept. 2, 1882.
List of advertised letters for week ending
ep. 2. 1882:
rasmon, Miss S$Inthingly, J. Henry
arbary, Mrs. A. iJones, Rev. Boston
|aidwll, Mrs. Elvira Moore, Maybin
enny, J. H. IRutherford, Fanny J.
[nter, J. B. ISligh, John
ardy, Mark Sligh, Mary
Paries calling for letters willplease _say
Foa THE HERALD.
A Day of Enjoyment.
During these times of political stii
we have ever and anon a season of mu
tual pleasure in other lines than that o
commotion. One of the most joyou:
occasions of the season was the scboo
picnic at Mr. Adam Hartman's the 31s
of August. - Early in the morning th
people came in from every directioi
till a large number were assembled
At 10 A. M. the pupils were formed 11
line of march for the large and conven
ient piazza which had been selected fo
the exercises. These pupils all blende'
their cheerful voices in appropriat
pieces of music salected for the occa
sion. Their singing would have don
credit to any, choir. The exercises wer
opened with prayer by Rev. Dr. Haw
kins. The exercises consisted of speech
es, dialogues and essays. Each schola
performed his or her part with perfec
ease. The young performers were fa
vored with the very best attention. Al
ter the exercises were concluded an ex
cellent repast was prepared, of whicl
all heartily partook. The dinner was
doubtless, second to none of its orde
or name. In the afternoon the youn;
people enjoyed themselves to the full
est extent in social plays, &c., while th
older persons looked on with delighi
and talked of their young days. Owinl
to the fact that there was a barbecu
elsewhere we bad no candidates pres
ent. Though several promised to pu
in their appearance, they failed to fulfil
their promises. We were very mucl
disappointed in that we had neither c
the Editors of the HERALD present. Ou
young essayists, especially, were almos
inconsolable when they found that th
Editor was not present. They bad pre
pared to present him with some nicel:
arranged bouquets constructed after th<
manner of their lady-like taste. Thougl
we had several disappointments, yet, ii
the main, a more delightful time coulc
not have been expected, neither was i
anticipated. The patrons of the schoo
and friends in general, took great in
terest in the preparation to make thi
day a pleasant one. This was accom
plished, and what more could have beet
desired? Such cccasions have a grea
effect in stimulating the children of an'
school in their studies. Our people an
aware of the fact that anything they cat
do to advance the educational interest
of their children will be richly reward
ed in their future career. For this rea
son they are unanimously iii' favor o
every enterprise that will keep up at
abiding interest in our school. .
M. M. K.
Pyspepsia, beart-burn, nausca, in
digestion, etc., are lways relieved by
Brown's Iron Bitters.
ew aIdtertisements.
&iI FAL OPENJIC
-AT THE
EXCELSIOR
DRY GOODS
E MPORIU1I
We take great pleasure in informing ou:
friends and the public generally, that w<
are prepared this season TO EXBIBIT J
LARGER AND MORE ATTRACTIV]
STOCK OF
DRY COODS
Thin we have dune before.
-Our stock is now about COMPLE|TE, al
though every day we are making new ad
ditions which will be kept up through th~
season..
Prints,
Ginghams,
Linseys,
Plaids and -Stripes,
Camibrics,
Lini-ngs,
S.hirtings,
Tickings,
Bleachings,
Sheetings,
Red Flannels,
White Flannels
Opera Flannels,
Corton Flanuels,
Jeans,
Tweeds,
Kersevs,
C ssimeres,
Surttings,
Sacktings,
Repellants,
Black Cashmieres,
Colored Cashmeres
Alpacas,
Serge,
Black Plreb,
Colored Plush,
Black Velvets,
Colored Velvetsq,
lanck Velveteens,
Colored Velveteens,
Crape Veilings,
Black Dress Silk,
Black Trimming Silk
Colored Trimming Silk,
Black Brocade Silk,
Colored Brocade Silk,
Black Satin,
Colored Satin,
Buttons,
Corsets,
Hosiery,
Gloves,
Ties,
Handkerchiefs, &c
We invite special attention to our
Gents' Furnishing Department
which is now complete.
Polite and courteous attention given t<
every visitor, whether purchaser or not.
When visiting the City don't fail to cal
and see tis.
BENS IIIWN & 00,
Se p. 7, 3i-if
GERMAN GARP,
Scale and Mirror, last Spring hatching~
$1.50) per dozen, delivered about 1st No
vember next. Applicants must furnish
cans. Cash remittances will receive prompi
attention. . D. V. SCURRY,
Chappell's, S. C.
Sep. 7, 36-1m*.
DUE WEST
FEMALE COLLEGE,
ABBEVILLE C0., S. C.
Exercises open Oct.s2nd. Whole expense
Board and regular Tuition, including Latin
$162 for the year. French spoken in clasn
and dining room. Special attention to Mu
sic, Drawing, and Painting. Apply for cat
a..,-.- :r P. KrN!EnY. nrealdent.
Xew e.Idertsernefts.
Dr. .T. 0. Diekert f*or
County Commissioner.
f MESSRS EnIroRs: The friends of Dr J.
(Il)1t'KERT have pte'v:il d unon hint to
allow his name to he presented to the vo
t ters-uf N.+wberry County for the office of
Conr.rv Comnnis'ioner, subject to the rules
of the 'timary system
We feel that our portion of the Ci.unty
is entitled to a member on the Board, and
we select one who is public-spit ited, ener
getic and progressive in thought and ac
r tion, and who will do his duty to the whole
I County. MANY FRIENDS.
Se p. 7, :36-It.
-A CARD.
To MY FRIENDS AND THE VOTERS OF NEw
BERRY CoUaTY : On the account of affliction
in my family I have not been able to can
rvassthe County as I desired to do, but
hope you all will not forget me on the 12th
day of September.
FELIX D. GRAHAM.
Sept 7, 36-1t.*
LOST
On Friday, Aug. 31st, ONE RUSSIAN
LEATHER POCKET BOOK, containing
$10 00 in Money, a number of Notes and
Memoranda, also two Photographs. A
liberal reward will be paid to any one de
liver?hg the same at the HERALD or News
office, or at the store of J. C. Wilson.
J. E BROWN.
Sep. 7, 36- 2t.
News copy 2t.
Attention! Newberry Riles.
L The regular monthly meeting of your
Company will be held Tuesday evening.
. Sept. 12th, at S P. M., in Thespian Hail.
Members will come prepared to pay dues.
Business of importance will be transacted,
and a full a:tendance is earnestly desired.
By order:
JNO. W. TAYLOR,
Sep. 7, 36-1t 1st Sergeant.
NOTICE.
All persons are forewarned nor to hire or
harbor William. Murray, a boy about ten or
twelve years old, who was employed by me
for the year, and who has left :t.e without
sufficient cause. Any one so doing wili be
prosecuted to the full ex'ent of Le i,w
W1M. M WERTS.
Sept. 7, 36-1t.
To the Democracy of
Newberry County.
FELLOW CITIZENS: The 7th day of Sep
tember next has been fixed by the State
Executive Committee of our party for the
candidates on the State Ticket 'co address
the citizens of Newberry on the political
issues of 'h.' day.
In accordance with that ar;angement we
cordially invite all our citizens to be ptes
eint. Let there be a rousing reception giv
eu the candidates on that day.
The speakers will be
Hon. Hugh S. Thompson, candidate for
Governor.
Hon. 'John C. Sheppard, candidate for
Lieutenant-Governor.
Hon. James N. Lipscomb, candidat.e for
Secretary of State.
Hon. Charles R. Miles, candidate for At
torney-Ceneral.
Gen. El|ison Capers, candidate for Super
intendent of Education.
Hon. John P. Richardson, candidate for
Treksurer.
Hon. D. Wyatt Aiken, candidate for Con
gress.
Hon. M. C. Butler, U S. Senator.
And others distinguished for their eloquence
and pitriotismn
The soeeche-s n ill be delivered in Cline's
Gro're, tind will begin at 11 o'clock A. Mf.
The procession will be under the control
o,f Capt. Wallace W. Riser, as Chief Mar
shal, to whom all mounted clubs will report
on reaching Town.
By order of the County Executive Comn
mittee. Y. J. POPE,
Aua.34) 882 County Chairman.
Notice to the Democracy
of Newberry County.
At a meeting of the Executive Committee
this day hold'en, the followi.ng Managers
were appointed for the Primarv Election
September 12, 1882:
EJWBERRY-'L. MI. Speers, Jno. B. Jones,
H. H. Evans.
Giasos's STORE-A. J. Gibson, J- H.
Smitb, W. F. Ewart.
MAYBINTON-WII. B. 01xter, Wmn. Whit
ney, Reuben Aughtry.
CRoMEa's SToR E-ClaytLon Abrams, J. C.
Hargrove, James D. Johnson.
JAtA?A-J. E. Schugnpert, Thompson
Conner, N. F. Johnson.
LoNGSRoRE's SToR--W. G. Peterson, J.
H. Auli, B. F. Goggans.
WroLLAMs' STORE-J. R. Irwin, A. J.
Teagtue, W. W. Wallace.
DEA&D FA.L--L. W. Long, Jno. C. Gog
gans, Frank Schumpert.
PROSPERITY-P. E. Wise, A. H. Kohn, S.
C. Batrre.
JOLLrY STREET-D. H. Werts, G. A. Mills,
L. W. Bowers.
GI,YxPHIvt.LE-A. W. Glymph, J. B.
Helier, (. P. Dickert.
PoMARIA-J. B. O'N. Holloway, J. B.
Suber, E. R. Hipp.
By order of the Executive Committee.
Y. J. POPE, Ghairman.
Aug. 31, 35-2t.
NEWBERRY
FEMALE ACADEMY..
A. .P. PIFER, Principal.
~iass ELLA MOTTE, Assistant.
Mrs. BAILEY, Music Department.
Next Session will begin
13th SEPT., 1882.
For particutlar... apply to S. P. Boozer,
Esq., See'y Board, or to the
PRINCIPAL.
Aug. 31, 35-St.
FURMAN' UIVERSITY,
GhiEENVILLE, S. C.
The next Session will begin SEPTEMBER
20th, 1882.
ExPENsES.
Academic Department.......$20 to $25
Coll-giate " .. ...,.. $30 to $40
IPer Term.
For fuil informiation, apply for Circular
to C. MANLY, President.
Or to PRoF. H. T. COOK, Secretary.
Aug. 31, 35-im.
Election is Over.
Now go and iWar the votee counted at
CLARK'S GA LLERY, where the finest Art
Works that have ever been exhibited int
Newb-rry, .tre on exhibition And while
there sit for y.mur picture, and take to your
homes some of tneir superior photographs.
We warn you that delays are dangerous:
go ere it is too late.
Mr. W. H. Clark feels confident, after an
experience of fifteen years, that he can
produce a class of work that will please
and give perfect satisfaction.
Copying old pictures-and enlarging to
any- desired side, also reducing to the4
smallest, a specialty.
For style and quality of work, refers to
the editor of this paper. CAKBO
j aov 10. 46-tE.
THE MIGHTY MA]tVI
AND GIGANTI<
Of all Ainsem4,ent I )rg,anir:
S. H. BARRE
- NEW UNITED
U A I-LR OJ. 1
ORIENTAL CRCUS, EGYPTIAN C,
EXPOSITION - OF LI)
Positively Coming, and will exhib
NEWBERRY, SEPT
7 ENORNOUS METROPOLITAN
50 Fifty Blazoned Cage
Positively the largest collection of extremely Ra
this continent. The LA
WHITE NILE HI
Ever imported-a Huge Shambling River Hors
many Theologians and Znograpuers to be ide
A PAIR OF MAJES
Broken to Harness and drav
D100,0O0 Invested In moret
A MON:TER ALL-REPRES
PERFO RvMIN G
ncluding TWICE the largest anirmal known to e:
~XER2
>everal inches taller and the heaviest animal evt
Years of Age. Also the MIDGET. "LIT
full-grown Elephan
11590l THE GREATEST OF
The first and on
"LION SL
The only animal of its kind ever on exhib
ABYSSINIAN .
n animal never before exhibited in America.
Exhibited on this Continent
HORNED
YOU WILL
WHE SLMIAM COLOSSUS, CYNOCEPHA.
THE FIVE-TON PERFORMIN(
- AN -ARCTIC AQ1
You will see features never before witnessed
Elks driven Tandem In the Streets. Performing 1
Perform Incredible Feats, Lapland Hurdle I
Cynocephalus, Performing Dens of Hy
Performing I
TIGERS, LIONS A
A PAIR OF AFRIC
A CAVALCA
14 Fourteen Performing Ken
The hugest number of the most beautiful ai
and. more than a- whol
THIRTY ARABL
A COMPLETE AND EXUTAUS
Livin.g Zoologi4
rou will see WILLIS COBB'S c
Circus of Dogs, Goat
i COMPLETE CIBCUS CO19
00 EMPLOYING
[00 ONE HUNDRED FAMC
20Double Somersa
Lcd by the acknowledged champ
JAMES QUICLEY AND W
$10,000 challenge their equa
1CHAMFIONl BARE-:
BEADED
Wiss Viola Rivers. Miss Jenni
and Charles
-The champion two. four and six Horse]1
The World-Famned BENO AND DUNBAE, ths
- The only and in
IDALETTA ANI
terial Bicyclists of the Nineteenth Century, who:
ble Wire 6W feet in the air, holds thousa
.0 OCLO M
HIeaded by the KING LAUG]
AYMAR BR
The Low Comedy Bear, "BRUNO.' Steam Air-St:
Sheik's Return from Conquest, A Quar-ter of a
Martial Musical Brigades. The New Leviat
Chorus, always EXHIBITING JUSE
Cheap Excursion Rates os
G-reat " WorkdFs.
7NE TICKET ADMITS TO At
Children Under Nine 1
wo grnd EhibiiaRsDail1
MOTH MONARCH I
COLOSSUS
tions, Panopliel in
TT & CO.'
MONSTER
SIHOWSZ
kRAVAN AND UNIVERSAL
vING WONDERSr
It in all its vast entirety at
MENAGERIES UNITEDIa-f*{
of Wild Beasts 5
re Wild Animals with any exhibitlofl RGSTLI-N
PPOPOTAMLUS _.. "
e the terror of all Saurians-eTaimed
atical with the43ehemoth of the Bible.
TIC GIRAFFES,
,ing, Roman Chariots.
an EICHTY TONS of Educated 'fesh ,
ENTING HERD OF
ELEPH-AN.T
cib5t, the famous old India War Eeha,' w
r on th is Continent; said to be over' 20'
TLE DOT." thrice the smnallest
t ever seen.
ALL FEATURES, . =
y ge"nuine
ition in this or any ot,her country.
ABIROU1SSA,
Che first and only HOCIPOTIMUS
.The only genuime_"
HO10 RSE.
U,
BLACK BINOCEROS. =,:
TARIUM OF POLAR MA
wit any other .&hibition on eari.:.
rabian bromedaries, Zebras trl-d o
lacing Reindeer, a Gigantic Eiding,=.
enas, a School of Learned Seals.
>enof- -
ND LEOPARDS..J
AN ELANDS.
DE OF
eucey Thoroughbreds -
ud best trained .orseo in the Worlde
AN CAMELS !Ci .
EIE COLECTIO OF
EaLEWoneS;
riginalh fandu oly ia iaturIepha,
ut eapers,
ALLA FEATCHLO,
iio isn tior abe found. ou~y
Ewe frs an n7HGPORISe'
Te onl thednneword
NT AC ,HNOEOS 1
Oii aTy oH E RS.blno
Lrabin oeaiosdebr free neto t&..
b:c.ng Rteimnd, a20-Vganicding
antrols Tillos, baceds 14iB
rd e aned aras t in onerd,o-o
e>w lte.

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