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The Newberry herald. (Newberry, S.C.) 1865-1884, February 01, 1883, Image 4

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Persistent link: http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/lccn/sn84026909/1883-02-01/ed-1/seq-4/

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YUEBUARY.
6 7 ( 9110
1 1411.5 16! 17
2 i- 12 -
Sp111i FARM t( COIJTS
, oer to know what crops
ing be it is necessary
:that a farmer should keLp an ac
eeut with each field on his farm.
he were to have a general ac
'oot he could tell at to year's
a whether be had made or lost,
pnt Precisely where the gain or
'oss eame from, he could not know
with say degree of certainty. He
noight lose money on corn, while
- e profit realized from wheat
,_ld be snficient to over balance
ti loss. If he keeps a record
the corn-feld, and another
the wheat feld, he can tell
" " what the loss or gain from
;c;held is.
The keeping of field accounts ne
es' itates the plotting of .the farm,
with a number for each feld This
should be done in advance of the
wrk of spring. The accounts,
s of being kept between the
w, amer and another person, will be
- een himself and fieldNo. 1, or
Sy or 3, etc. Two small blankbooks
mae needed in which to preserve
the record. One, the ordinary day
bhook of the merchant, in which is
,etered the transactins for the
i y. The other, a ledger, has each
.gr ;dor debt and crefit On
- left hand side will -be entered
Sexpenses which the cultivation
21d the eld and the:harvesting and
tof the crop occasions. The
side is. for the receipts
Sthe sa e of the crops. At the
S-ofeach ledger page put the
f- "er of the feld, the record of
ch is kept on that page.
or example, begin with feld
'. This, it may be supposed,
Splanted to corn. If work was
on this field by plowing
< ;l ~h, the day book entry will
42tb.........Fiel No.1, Da. .
.. dai'swat, man and team..2 !50
ch-dir the work done on that
- -wlle charged to it. This
k?acoount shoukd be attend
bevery day; if neglected, these
Srtant items will be forgotten.
the' work done on this
,iwiibe annuring it. If so, tbe
~tyin .the day-book of the first
~ ~swork would stand like this:
..............7wId No.1. Da.
To1O oads of manare, 50c. each..435.0
-Te,ok oftman and team........2.0
-Afte,r that would come plowing,
- rowing, marking, planting, cost
tfeed, etc., and then the items of
msefor cultivating and bar
wiling, as performed throut.e
-maason. Bear in mind that every
an of expense belonging to the
feld must be charged to it
If anything is sold from the held,
-r used by the farmer, it must be
eredited to the field. For instance.
seora may be used for eatting. Make
- n enf,ry in the day-book thus:
Aget 3d......iedNo.1, Ca.
3y green corn.......- .........2
The above will give an idea of
what the day book entries should
be. :It is a sort of diary of~every
Sday's work, and all expenses een
m eted therewith. Keep the diary
meh a way that you know just
what field the work went to, and
what has been received from that
held. Every. thing going to the
g -eld makes it a debtor. Every
tiing celming from the field nmkes
the farmer thbe debtor. Thought
of in this way, the keeping of the
day-book is a very simple thing.
Fanx M.anaermr. -No fixed
rules can be laid down for the
management of farms. The soil of
netownship may be best fited
for growing some kind of grain,
while the adjoining ones can be
most profitably devoted to live
stock. No two farms situated side
- by tide are exactly alike. The dis
tan bce from market, the demand for
spca products and, not the least,
teindividual taste of the farmer,
haeall much 'weight in deter
mining the system of farm mange
ment that is bet to adopt. Those
hehave given the most thought
to this subject, are the slowest
Ien~o dvise any general system to be
applied to-every f.arm. It is like a
garment that is intended to fit all
persons, and suits none. Every
-.erof progress made in agricnl
knowledge teaches more for
previous ones, the truth
mer mnust rely largely
ni intelligence and
king out the best
. Even in
a 'matter as
vine. the
lOT AFRAID OE COLLING.
1 ailaiy Travefler Who Declined to be
SwindeOt oteisieat.
A Washington letter to the Chi
sago Times relates the episode of
lir. Conkling's late trip to the
iational capital: 'As the ex-Sena- ?
or boarded the train at Jersey
Dity he unfortunately took the t
wrong seat in the parlor car. Soon
tfter the train started a young
ellow-a bantam sort of a man
spproached the ex Senator, looked
it the number of the chair, gazed
it the occupant a moment in a cool,
ball impudent sort of a way and
mid:
'It seems to me that you have
got plenty of cheek.'
Mr. Conkling looked at the man
ror a moment with a haughty stare
replied :
'I do not understand your im
pertinence, sir.'
'Oh, rm impertinent, am I' re
sponded the litde man. 'Well Ill
guarantee, if you don't get out of
that chair, you will find that my
impertinence is the least disagree
sble part of me. I've paid my
money for that seat, and I don't
intend to be imposed upon and
forced to give it up by any digni
ed old cock like you. Get ont of
it as soon as you can. Here, hold ~
my overcoat a moment, until I '
fnd my ticket, and I will show you
my number.'
With this the little man tbrew s
his ovexcoat across Mr.3 Conkling's
knees, and proceeded to search for
Sis ticket. He soon found it and
;uickly proved tht the seat was
'Mr. Conkling arose and offered 1
an apology for having made the b
mistake. f
'Oh, you needn't apologize,' said
the little man. 'I've been through
ll this before. I knew if you could
have beaten me out of my seat
you would have done so, but a
[ ve travelled a little myself. Dig
ity and size don't count for much
with 'me.'
The little man, whose name is
Guernsey, and who is from Boston,
gave the details of his little scene
with the ex Senator to a number of
newspaper men at the Capitol this
moning. He says .hat after the
d.fair was over the co.nductor came
to him with the e.xpectation of
parayzing him by telling him who
the gentlemnan was wath whom the
ontroversy had occnrred.
The conductor was surprised r
that Mr. Guernsey wasn't overcomne:
wi' hi remorse because be hadn't t
permitted Mr. Conkling to occupy
the chair unmolested.
THE DtmFrUL So.-A French
boy saw his father hanging, and,
instead of cutting him down, went
and bnnte-d up a polheeman, who,
Dfn entering the room, found the
anw.lmost gone. On reproaching
the youth for not interfering, he
aid he had 'no right to meddle
with his fathers proceedings ; it
was no.t the part of a dutiful son to
neddle.' His father, being re- a
stoed, went to thrashing his son
or letting him hang; but the boy
k-elatd that his father would have I
trashed him jast the same if he a
had eat himn down, and that he t
ad uo right to meddle.C
AN OLD HAD rT rr.-An Austin
~rocr grossly insulted Mrs. Mose
canmburg the other day, without
ntening it. She is an immensely
tout woman, and stepping on the'
eal'.". playfully re.quested the gro
er to we.igha her. As he adjustedt
he wetights, he remarked that she
wei isd 190 pounds, which proved
to be her e-xact weight.
'How did you come to gness it ?' a
she asked.
'1 am used to guessing afgweights,
[ weighed hogs for five years in
Cincinnati.- Texas siftings.
Du. HAWK's APnza.-We do not
know whether the clergyman men -
tioned below succeeded in getting
his pay raised, but he certainly de.
served an increase of salary for his
ready wit!
Dr. Hawks, an eloquent and pop-.
lar New York divine, once asked
the vestrymen of his church to in
rease his salary because of his in
ereased family expenses. - I
'Don't trouble yourself,' said the
vestrymen, 'the Lord has said He Pd
will care for the young ravens
when they cry.'
'I know that,' said the clergyman, y
'but nothing is said about the
yong Hawks.' -
Mark Twain failed to answera
letter written by Sergeant Ballan-I
tine After waiting a reasonable1
time the latter -was so ox- perated
at not receiving an answer that he
mailed Twain a sheet of paper and
tage stamp as a gengpr remin
Clemens wrotrback on
'Pprand stamp re
rv'rr's
~IiETRANT
a comnposed of Herbal and Mueilagnous iod
ets,whtichpermaeate the substasee the
.angs, expectorates the aerad natier
hatcoleetsi the Bronchial Tubes,andformaa
oothing coating, which relieves the ir.
Itation that cau..es the cough. It Seanse.
helungs of all impurues, streagtheas
bc mwhen enfeebled by deae,3go -
:es the circulauon of the bood, and braethe
rvouseystem. Slight colds often end in
onsumptiod. ltis denggaronsto neglect
bhem. Alply the remedy promptly. A
st of twea: y yri=s warrants the assertion that
toremedy has ever been foundthatisas
ir t initfeECTO9.
:Sammation.and its use speily ers theest
bstinate on;h. A pleasant eordial,ehil'
tren take it readily. For Croup it is
avaluable anvl should be in every famly.
In 25e. and $1 Bottes.
TUTT'S
PILLS
LCr DRCCT.Y o
Cuares chlls and Fever. puias
::t :Zradache,Bilious Coifes Pa.
iont, iihtzmatism,Piles, Palpitatiseof
..e Zteart, Dizziness, T 1p Live,and
talI Irregunlarities. If you do not "feel
ry well," a s:na:-e pill stimulates thestomaeh,
:e.rethe a pper, :aparts Tigor to the system.
A NOTED DIVINE SAYS:
Ia. TLerr:-Dear Bir: For ten years I have
,.-.n a martyr to Dyspepsa, Constipation'and
les. Lostapringyourpillswerereoommand
mo; Itsedthem(butwtthlittleffaih. It a
::.w a well man, have good.appetite, dTatlom
r feet, regn:.r s'oola, pi ge and have
:l forty pounds solid Sesh. They are worth
weight in gold.
IiEY.t.L. SIMPSON,Louisv1le, Kr..
firce. 85Mura P. NewYork.
?. TTT'S4 MANUAL o Ve.1
Ts lyta FItEE on application. .
'T,NTS.
fead a rough sker a
WahGi KG E . LEMN
Wshingtetn, D. C., and a Prellmnary
Examination will be made, without
chreofall United Stats ptn of the
une Cm ofiventions and you wlbeadvised
bther or not a potent can be obtained.
sIoaare ad that yorinvention pstentable,
a0, to Government fee.of $0ad Id fe
winp required by the Government. This is
orne's (2) and the dal he
boe . iaining a wll e
at your invention is patentable unien ItreWDy is,
O r s bat judgment can determine; hence,
can aten the aiieen aiters apUnsy
meamt is Sad
ls.faaee.smcud. Caveatsepae - n fled.
aer in e ve
se yoe ownpatenkand hiled,asklliftlhand
at 0 ce my l to me" -ea eua
dulift reest edrNON to bthe ooiluaer of
M,eas that he recognise Gnoms E. Laos, et
tbetititof the invenon and about the dab
ynr,go at ee aanIo and rps
Sa R this oce has been
tlenttl oraI asineels65,andreierenesan.be
T tu~tal cliens nalos evrycmnneq
pplteatjuto Patentsfreprud
3EORGE E. LEMON,
terney at Law and Solicitor or Amerleaa
and Foreign Patents,
1 Fifteenth Street, WASIENGTON, D. C.
mention this paper.
. K. P. GOGQA'S.* D. O. HERBERT.
GOGGANS & HERBERT,
ittorneys-at-Law,
NEWBERRY, S. C.
"Strict Attention to Basiness."
[v. 2,44-ly.
THE_SUN.
NEW YORK, 1883.
liore people have read THE SUnc durilag
is year just niow passin than ever befOre
uce it was first printed. No other ne.e
aper published on this side ot the earth
ts been bought and read in any year by iso
eny men and women.
We are credibly Iiormed that people bt. y,
cad, and like TH E SUN for the following
easons. among others:
Because its news columns present In at.
active form and with the greatest possible
curacy whatever has Interest for hamian
nd; the events, the deeds and misdeeds,
i wisdom. the philosophy, the notable
>lly, the solid sense, the improving non
ense-all the news of the busiest world at
reaue pepehav learned that in its
emarks concerning persons and affairs
uaE SUN makes a practice of telling them
me exact truth to the best of its ability
are'a hundred and sixty-five days In the
er before election as well as a fter, about
so whales as well as about the smatl fish,
2the face of dissent as plainly and fea.r
asly as when supported by general appro
al. THEl SUN has absolutely no purposes
serve, save the information of its readers
nd the turtherance of the common good.
Because It Is everybody's newspaper. No
ian s so humble that THE SUN is bdliffer
nt to his welfare and his rgts. No man
i so rich that it can allow inustice to be
one him. No man, no assoclain of men,
i powerful enough to be exempt from the
arc apliaton of its principles of right
ud wrong.
ee In politics it a fugt for a
ometimtes almost alone amnon newspa
ers, the fight that has resulted in the re
ent overwhelming mopular verdict against
obesonsm and f3r honest government.
:o matter what prty is in power, Tha Sus
ands and will continue to stand like a
ock or the interests of the people against
he ambition of boses, the encroachments
f monopolists, and the dishonest schemes
t pub;ic robbes.
All this Is what we are tolo almost daily
y our friends. One man holds that TBE
UN is the best religious newspaper ever
ubished. because Its Christianity Is undi
ted with cant. Another holds that it Is
be best RepublIcan newspaper printed,-be
anse IL has already whipped half of the ras
als out or that party, and is p)roceeding
gainst the other hali' with undimninished
igor. A third beIieves it to be the best
mainin or general literature In existence.
'eeaise3 its readers miss nothing wor hsy of
otice that is current In the world of
bonght. so every friendl of THE .$UN die
oers one or it.s knany sides that appeals
ruth paurticular force to his indivjdual lik
i y. -u already know THE SUs, you wIll
berve that In 1883 it. Is a little bet ter than
ver before. It you do not already know
'HE SUN, you will find it to be a mirror of
,11 human activity, a storehouse of
holest products of commi,n sense
ginaton, a mainstay for the
at government, a sentinel for
ersonan Democracy, a scourge I.
Less of every species, and an unco mo y
pod investment for the coming year.
TRS TO MAIL SUBSCRIBERS.
The several editions of TuE SUNi are sent
my mail, pspaid, as foflows:
tALY-t cents a month,$6.50Oayear; with
Sund'- y edition, $7.70.
UNDAY-Eight pages, $1.20 a year.
VEEKLY-41 a year. Eight pages of the
best matter of the daily issues; an A gri
cultural Department of unequalled merit,
narket reports. and literary, scientific,
and domestic intelligence make TaE
W EEKLY SUN the newspaper for the far.
mer's household. To clubs of ten with
$10, an extra copy" free.
tddress L. W. ENGLAND, Publisher,
Nov 23,47-dt I 'HB SUN, N. Y. City.
Wpeople are always on the look
oat for chanoes to increase their
eernings, and in time become
wealthy; thos" who do not im
rove their opportunities remain In pover
y. W offer a greatchance to mmake monej.
V want many men, women, boysandgl
o work for us right in their own localities.
ny one can do the work properly from the
rirst tart. The busineswill pay more than
en times ordinary wages. Expensive out.
it hished free. No one who engages
sils to make oeyrapidly. You can de
-te your whole rieto the work or only
ou oet.Full information and
oX* Co., Portland, Msine. 47-17.
HENRY BAYE~R,
IMPOETER 01
B A NAN A S,
OCO0ANUTS AND ORANGES,
And Wholesale Dealer in
Apples, Potatees, Ouiens, &c.
215 East Bay,
CHARLESTON, S. C. .
, s..........e...n m ma asf.a.
Rail Roads.
Claabia & Greeeville Railroad.
PASSENGER DEPARTMENT.
CoLUmA. S. C., Nov. 4t 1882.
On and afterMonda November 6, the
PASSENGEE TRAIS will ran as herewit in
disated upon this road and Its branches.
Daily, except Sundays.
No. 52. UP PASSENGER.
Leave Columbia,A - - - 11.42 a i
" Alston, - - - - L0 mpm
iNewherg, - - - - 2.11 p m
" Ninety-Si, - - - - 3.58 p m
" Hodes, - - - .56 p a
Belton, - - - 6.26 p i
Arrive Greenville, - - - - 8.5 p m
No. 53. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Greenville, 18- - - 10.8 a i
" Belton, - - - -. - 12.16 pm
"S Hodges, 111 p
Ninety-Six, - 2.39 pm
" Newberry, - - - 4.88 p m
Alston - - 5.42 p m
Arrive Colinmbia,F - - 7.e0 p m
SP.TR?A'BCL, UNIONai 0OLU3 A nAILROAD.
No. M2 UP PASSENGER.
Leave Alston, - - - - 1.10 p m
" Strother, - -. - - 2.16 p m
" Shelton, - - - - 2.b7 p m
Santuc, - - - 42p
" Union, - - - - 5.iup m
" Jonesville, - " - - 6.26 p m
Arrive Spartanburg, " - 8.15 p m
No.53. DOWN PASSENGER.
Leave Spartanburg, B. lc D. Depot, H 12 50 p m
" Spartanburg, S. U. & C. Depot,G 1.01 p m
Jonesville, - - - 2.09 p m
Union. - - 2.50 p m
Santuc, - - - 8.29 p m
" Shelton, - r - 4.2p m
Strother, 4.58 p m
Arrive at Alston. - - - 6.89 p m
LAURNs RAILWAY.
LeaveNewberry. - - - - 4.47 pm
Arrive Laurens C. H., - - 8.40 p m
Leave Laurens C. H., - - - 8.46 a m
Arrive Newberry, - - * 1241 pim
ABBSYILLS BRAXOS.
Leave Hodges, - . - 5.00 p
Arrive at Abbeville, - - " 6.12 p m
Leave Abbeville, - - - - 12.28 p m
Arrive at Hodges, - - - - 1.36 p m
BLUZ aIDGE RAILROAD AND ANDERsON
BRAOH.
Leave Belton 6.26 p a
" Anderson 7.55 p i
" Pendleton 8.66 p a
Leave Seneca C, 10.68 p m
Arrive Walhalla 11.43 p m
Leave Walhalla, - - 6.40 a a
Leave Seneca C, 7.54 a i
" Pendleton, - - 9.18 a i
" Anderson, - - 11.10 p in
Arrive at Belton. - - 12.09 p i
CONNECTIONS.
A. With South Carolina Railroad from Char.
leston.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Wyilaigton and all
ints North thereof.
Wit Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad from Charlotte and all points
North thereof.
B. With Asheville & Spartanburg Rail Road
for points in Western North Carolina.
C. With A.&C.Div. E.&D..R.,. from all
points South and West.
D. With A.& C. Div., E. & D. . R., from At,
lanta and beyond.
E. With A. & C. Div., R. & D. E. R., from all
ints South and West.
F. Wit South Carolina Railroad for Charles
ton.
With Wilmington, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Wlmington and the North.
With Charlotte, Columbia and Augusta
Railroad for Charlotte and the North.
G. With Asheville & Spartanburg Railroad
from ieudersovilfe.
H. With A. & C. Div., B. & D. B. E., from
Charlotte and beyond.
Standard Time used is Washington, D. C.,
which Is fifteen minutes faster than Columbia.
J. W. FEY, Superintendent.
M SLAUGITSa, General Passenger Agent.
D CaRnwELL. Ass't General Passenger Agt.,
Columbia, S. C.
South Carolina Railway Company.
CHANGE OF SCHEDULE.
On and after Dec. 17th, 1889, Passenger
Trains on this road will run as follows un
til. further notice:
TO AND FROM CHARLESTON.
COING EAST,
Leave Columbia *8.00 a tn 10.58 p m
Arrive Charleston 12.5 p In 1: 30 p in
GOING WEST,
Leave Charleston t.00 a in *5.20 p in
Arrive Columbia 11.28 a m 10.09 p in
fl>aily. *Daily extcpt Sunday.
TO AND FROM CAMDEN.
GOtNG R.AST,
Leave Colu;nbia *8 00 a mn *(.5 p mn
Arrive Camdeln 1l1o a mn 10.10 y mn
GOING wi:ri
Leave Camden *7.00 a mn **, f0Op in
Arrive Columblia 1128 am 'O09 pin
*Daily cxcept tmndavs.
To AND FROII AUGUSTA.
GoiYNo EAsr.
Leave Co'umnbia .*.00 a mn *&.58 p mn
Arrive Augusta 2.00 p mn 7.05 a mf
GOING WE."T,
Leave Augus~ta *7.05 a mn *4 10 p in
Arrive CoTumibla 4.05 p m~ 10 09 p m
*Daily except Sun.iays.
COiNECrioNs.
Connection iza-ie at Columinia with the
Columbia andl (r-enville I:sll Ros.l byitrain
arrivlng at Il.!28 P' .1.. an<.l tlepar' log atl 8.58i
tion with Charlot., Columbia artl :.ugusta
Rail Road by same traint to ant! freom all
points on both rnuads ii :h Ii brough Pulinsan
Sleeper betwv.-en Charla~ton an.l Washing
ton, via Virgi in Mfidlanud ro:ute, withi,aI
change. Coninection ina,I.e at 'h.l-t:on
with Steamers fo'r New York ',,a W--slnesday.'
and Saturdaiys; also. with ~aVavannah andX
Charleston E.uilroa<l to all point3 .,onth.
Connections are made at Augusta with
Georgia Railroad and Central -tilroad to
and from all points South an'! West.
Through tickets can be purchased to all
points South and West by applying to
D. MCQUEHE., Agnt, Columnbia.
LI. C. A L L., G. P. A F. A.
JoiNt B. PzCx, General Manager.
Charlotte, Columbia & Augusta R. R.
OFPicE GENEltAL i'AsqENGEaI AGENT,
. Schedule in ectSeptember 3. 1882:
No.58 DAILY-MAIL AND EEI'IRESS.
Leavo AugStaL. A............... 7.3I5 am
Arrive at Clumbia, B.........,1.45 a mn
Leave Columabia, B... .. . ;.....58 a mn
Arrive at Charlotte, C........... 4.1 p in
Leave Charlotte................ 5.10 p~ m
Arrive at Statesville........... ...7.05 p in
No. 47 I)AiLY-MAIL AND) EnxLRsa.
Leave Augusta, A............... L,0 p in
Arrive at Columnbia. D...........0.25pin
No.19 LOCA L FREIGrr,daily except Sunaays
(With i'assenger C~oach attached.)
Leave Columbia................ 5.00 a in
Arrive at Charlotte.............. 3.15 p in
SOUT H W ARD.
No. 52 DAILY-MAIL. AND ED RlESs.
Leave Stateeville.................. 7.00 a mn
Arrive ait Charlotte.............. 905 a mn
Leave Charlotte. C...............2 200p mn
Arrii7e at Columbia, B............0.30 p in
Leave Columbia, I............... 63 p in
Arrive at Auguneta,A.............10.50 p mn
'o. 48 l)aaLrz-MA L AN ,l E xa'.ass.
Leave Columnbila, D................S I5 a mn
.Arrive at .' u:usta. A............ 10.22 a in
No. 18 LsoCAL YIaEiIIT. tIaily except Nunolays
(With Passenger Coach attached )
Leave Charlotte.................5.00 a in
Arrive at i.olutnbia..............332 p mn
CONNECTIONS.
A-With all lines to and from Savannah,
Flrda and the South and A tlanta, Macon
d the Southwest.
With South Carolina Railroad to and
Charleston.
Wt.h Richmond and Danville Railroad
to and from all ponts North and Carolina
D..-Connect with the W. C. A A. E. E. tor
Wilmin f~n andI all points on the Atlantic
Pullman Sleeping Car's on Trains Nos. 52
and 53 between Augsta and Washington,
D. C.. via Danville, Lburgb and Char
lottesville. Also, on Trains 58 and 53 be
tween Charlotte and Richmond.
Numbers 47 and 48 run solid between Au
gusta and Florence and carry Pullman
Sleepers between Augusta and Wilmnington
and btween Augusta and Wilmington.
Above schedule Washingtn time.
G. E. TA.LOTT, Sprintendent.
x. SLAUGHTsa, General Pasnger Agt.
D. CA1LDWELL. Ass't General Passenger
Agent, Columbia, S. C,
Asheville and Spartanburg Railroad.
SPARTANBUYRG. S C., September!1, 1881.
On and after Thursday, September 1, 1881,
passenger trains will be run daily (Sundays
excepted) between Spartanburg and Hen
dersonvllle, as follows:
UP TRAIN.
LeaveRE. AD. Depot atSpartaniburg.4.20 p m
Arrive at Hendersonville.........7.80 p m
DOWN TRALI *
Leave Hendersonville............. 8.30 a in
Arrive E. A D. Depot,Spartanburg.12.00 m
Both trains make connections for Colum
bia andI Charleston via Spartanburg. Union
and Columbia and Atlantaad Charlotte by
Air Lie. JAMES ANDEIzwO'J,
T mNlrg NO PATENT. NO P \TY
PMIIEJIIII1W Is our motto. We have
IIII1~h3 ad 14 years eprec
in procuring Patents,
Caveats. Trado-Ma.rks. Copyigt.etc., in
this and other countries. Grand Books
giving full instructioxis in Patents free.
A ddressRE.S.A&A.P. LACEY, Patent Att'vs,
606 F St., Washingttn, D. C. Jan. 11, 2-tf.
NSfor Soldiers on any dis
DDNI1tfl ease, wound or ry.
Fees, $10. Bounty;
Pa,Dlehargee for De
sorters, etc., prerd jearsexperkm33ee
A .SITES A .,6SI Vet., Waik
Hotel
The Crotwell Hotol,
A LARGE THREE STORY BRICK BUILDING.
Only Hotel with Electric Bells in Newberry.
Only Hotel with Cistern Water.
CENTRAL OFFICE OF TELEPHONE EXCHANGE.
MRS. EMMA F. BLEASE,
PROPRIETRESS,
NEWBERRY, S. C.
This commodious and spacious Hotel is now open and fully prepared to entertain all
comers.
The Furniture of every description is New, and no effort will be spared to make all
persons patronizing the esttablishiment at home.
The Rooms in this Hotel are spacious, well lighted, and the best ventilated of any
Hotel in the up country.
One .1 the Best Sample Booms in the State.
All horses entrusted to our care will be wel cared for at Christian & Smith's Stables.
TERMS.
BOARD BY THE MONTH, 830,00; WEEK, $10,00; DAY, $2.00.
LOWER RATES BY THE YEAR.
The Table shall be furnished with the very best. Nov. 2, 44-ly.
aet,inMg.
MV LE KINARD'S
CLITHINI8 EIUSE.
C I take pleasure in informing my friends and the public generally, that I have pur
chased the largest stock of
FALL AND WINTER CLOTHINGI
For Men, Youths and Boys, that has ever been in the City, and the GOODS HAVE
BEEN MARKED DOWN, BELIEVING IN SMALL PROFITS AND QUIICK SALM.
Fine line of
GENTS' FURNISHING GOODS AND NECK WEAR,
OF ALL THE LATEST STYLES.
GENTS' FINE SHOES.
Men's Suits and Overcoats.
Youths' Suits' and Overcoats.
. Boys' Suits and Overcoats.
U' Gall and examine my stock when in the Gity.
" All orders addressed to Box 84 will receive prompt attention.
Opposite Grand Central, - COLUMBIA, S. C.
Sept. 21, 88-tf.
*% I gsXP-a.;.So,,V
. . ...-. | 1 4 II
g .2
a
Le 0
Engnes #c
PE &r BR
AGETS FO T FMOUS
THSEM8800 IPR 8MRTO
SA, dL,C0TN IS
-ALSO,
TH, AMERICA FRUT RY.R
Pats isin te boe,aes ,
SPEAHE&BR. K&ar' .TEO.N8,C
AWGYO T IOR TEFMU
Hnb u uleiomd Trbho &theaIe ten
ari whn the Fabve adrejssu
877. Broaway,Netork
Eveyboy s dligte wih telaste A S oo lar eough to js itw
war, wo hs zvz YALKl t plas he L atsi aoo Pano, Organ and Guitr
Send fr it.Fancy Work.
Addres MRS.ELLEN AMAR. For furth'er inform ain inure i
Nov. IA. 48-tf. Brept.y NeSYok. A39-OF[C.
OU R
TIME SW ~qtm.~ .~i
Friends~ a.d Dl-htors, No oEXT us! A~ a
rt.i-ling twet. Yet we congratulate you on .aa.t9uwn bmn' twiby5
b. ing Al ' n,a i *be State Fair, so call- iinkgttaaltetm,w4~1o
edI Yo h4' pi yourI Ban,k notes and ~Ii OH iLUT~(~,Prjad
Taxr-, an:d apar' if -..ot all ot your Liens. ____________________
We .ve werd patientlv and have said AU.L3ZTJUK5M3AT
nothing; we now chink it our time next,
and be assured we need our money, andCURAT&MECAT
begi s e ta It I about ti e w had.
andNo jut te uptotheCatan'sofic Atoney q t Law,a
adsettle at once. We think and believe Atres-t-Lw
ouwil come uik en and arelZbe us NE ERY ..
eFr1AL L SATTERWHITZ. Will practice in the Sa4 an ed
Dry God aid MMese* :
Bay wbat you need in Dry Goods
and Millinery of
W. .T.Yo
132 Main St" Clwm S. C.,=
and save money.
NG0;
Jan. 25.4-6m
Hardwa-e #c.
HART & COMPNT
HARDWARE MERO
SOLE ACENTS FOR
LADOW DIC PUL1RRZT WG - ARROt. -r
THOMAB ,SJOOTHING, THOMAS -PULV PRMY, A '
LANE ?RBROW,
THE AMERICAN BARBED FENCE WI.
BUFFALO BTA DAIA
-AGNTS !'O
Genuine Farmers' Friend and AVer
--FOR SAI3S
STEEL BULL TONGUE, SCOOTR8
BOLT&, GBRAW BODS, SINGL&TREE, TIN WAR WOOINKI
HOUSE&TEEPING GOODS, OABPEN(EA', COOPER' ,A .: >
ISTW' an.d BL ACKMIrTHS T'oOIg
uiessau ixureau ouaam
MUZZLE ANTIBREECH LOA1IK
-83TT LGB T' FOR
KEMP'S MANURE ANT COTTO
a. . m .
HART & CO.,F- - h s
* m', xem . -
svateke~cs, e ery
WATIH18 AND J IM NO
At the New Stere en belLot. I STA f
I have now on hand alarge and elegant 4
asortment ofj
WACHE, CLOCKS, JEELY1 H
Silver and Plated Ware,
VILIN1iND GUITAR STRIIGS,
WEDDINS AND BIRThDA. PRESENTS.
rx sunr.ma vAarvr
All orders by mail promptly attended to.
Watchmaking aid Repairing uMa
Done Cheaply and with Dispatch. s.n
Call and eamnine my stock -and pric.'
EDUARD) SCH4OLTZ.
A GreatCause f HumaeEuzer
110w Lst,.H. Re...re:
'Just ublishd, ane editnd oEl). .U
weakness. anvluneasy.Seminl Losses. IX
Nov.21y, 47ef.lan hyia
EFIreat an ofmnduiery
setndlen rsexa mextoravgne ~Z P'ot ~Ii
yeas' subclh el, h ew editi m fh. CUtI a
rdcaeueneofieEfaTOsagA z%fbrediulwot
ekn;s poluntoyt moeia nataIe
rosmpl, ceta and Phycl Iynsnaaiy
whimevent sutoerriage.at.: wat CO
ofevryouEtI.s and er.a indthelad uk,ad byr6uskm~o
cuer al ahin thli ele opore,pb1hd 'Sca~
say, dars don raes fioma ohr toy ps ymi, 0cna od
euepoi tamps.t Adde rea once?
sipe, erin an1efUaL, byDCA COan, ofI3k opbl
which ever sfferer, nmewha his.Y
ostOfic*ecBota."soren a. ;andsy
ofevrnyuh. n every man inoeman.
Sen, unde Mea, n t pain ep, to
NailstrO ee ox, 40. Ja. 4-ly
B. . . N DM

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